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Eritreans In Sweden Demonstrate Against Tyranny

Eritreans in many parts of the world are demonstrating against the government sponsored festivals.

Every summer, the Eritrean embassies hold festivals to empower their ever dwindling Dispora support base. Usually, such festivals are attended by senior government officials, but in previous years many of them have been arrested or exiled. Abdella Jabir, one of the last officials who attended such festivals has been jailed with scores of others since January 2013. He was not formally accused or tried and his situation is unknown.

Over the weekend, Eritreans in Sweden flocked to Stockholm to demonstrate against the government festival in the outskirts of Stockholm.

Diaspora Eritreans who have so far been polarized along religious and regional lines have broken the walls of fragmentation and in an unusual show of unity, all sectors of the society were represented in the demonstration.

One of the organizers explained to Gedab News, “our people fell prey to the subtle mechanization of the Eritrean regime that divided our people.” He added, “we are not divided anymore and we exhibited that in Stockholm.”

Meanwhile, Eritreans in Eritrea are becoming very apprehensive of the Diaspora elements who support the regime. A frozen government official from Asmara told Gedab News, “people are expressing their anger every time they see reports of the festivals in support of the regime on television.” In a language common among opposition elements, he said, “all they care about is to have parties where they live, or to come [to Eritrea] as tourists; they do not care about our situation.”

Further reading:

Awate.com interview with Arhe Hamednaka
Donald Borström’s interview with Isaias Afwerki (Video)

Sweden Might Arrest Eritrean Officials On Arrival (Gedab News, Aug.6, 2014)
Swedish Policy On Eritrea: The Carrot Or The Stick? (Gedab News, Aug. 4, 2014)

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  • Nitricc

    “I am sorry to say this but human right takes second”

    http://www.tubechop.com/watch/6557420

  • Nitricc

    tera watedr of Ethiopia talking about tera wetder of the USA. you must be a friend of Tes. just go bed, you sounded that you are expired. toothless.

  • Nitricc

    Hye Papi; i read your post and love you too.
    now, did know that Hayat was dating Kiros Alemayo; the dead singer. now, that not the news, Did you know any one a Tigryan man who dates a Muslim woman. my point? either do your home work or shush-it

  • Peace!

    Dear all,

    Sorry, I feel I have to clarify myself because I see some twisting here. I probably went a bit far to calling the Ethiopian government a sectarian government, but my concern is valid, and has nothing to do with religion as some dishonestly trying to imply or use it as an excuse to avoid the subject. My focus was on future Eritrea, and I can’t be as clear as I was that my intention was not to compare the two countries or to arouse some sort of resentment, but rather I was simply saying, given Ethiopia is our neighbor, its injustice on Muslims should not be ignored.

    regards

    • tes

      Dear Peace!

      I hope you have considered your approach by now. Everybody reads anybody carefully here. Consistency matters. But one thing to clarify: I didn’t react because you raised the concern of those who you consider faced injustice but your approach. You might be a justice seeker but what I see always in your lines is opposing any move. Ok, now it is clear for me and I won’t be surprised. However, upto this day, you are not helpful rather a discouraging man. What amazes me most is your call for “REFORM”. How can you advocate for reform if what we can read now clearly is your political line of thinking. If I have a brotherly advice for you, please go with your cause and I will help you fully.

      At last, ideas always make collisions. And hopefully from this collision, we will have some new energy.
      @Bayan Nagash is not sure whether such topic will be on our advantage or not. I assure (Bayan), this topic can only be discussed here at Awate University. Unless we go deep into and discuss the matter honestly, we won’t have solution for future Eritrea.

      If I am happy in today’s Eritrean political movement is the rise of ELL, lowlanders. if this organization is for the right cause and according to Sheik Ibrahim Sultan, Abona Woldeab Weldemariam and Hamid Idris Awate’s, for sure Eritrea will raise again very sooner. In a short time I can see the progress. It is because of the ELL stand in Genava that we see our voice heard.

      Eritrea is a diverse country and everybody should come and voice the cause.

      saying that again I call you to drop your OTTO and be an advocate for what ever you want.
      @hayatadem:disqus has a strong counter argument against you. I understand why she did but I’m not that much surprised for here high temperature. If she is an honest justice seeker, she must be in the Eritrean mindset. Till then, all what she says is just a flaw and I don’t buy a single line of her argument. She is barking just for nothing.
      Therefore, mu friend, now lets be in Peace and your nicknames is implying.
      tes

      • Ted

        Hi, tes.
        How are you going to help Peace if you are not sure if ELL have the right cause , apparently, they made your voice heard in Geneva. You made it your mission to hop on the waggon of whoever utters “PFDJ is bad”. You have no clue where UN?,TPLF? or ELL are taking you. First pause and think before volunteering to help people. Reform is for the strong,and for the determined those able to see PFDJ on the eyes and say- we don’t like the way things are going or else. You and your likes are a gift keep giving for PFDJ.

      • Nitricc

        Hi Tes, as usual you are on your medication. ELL needs millions of Ali Salim. let me Ask you honesty test question. do you believe that Hayat ELL? be careful with your replay i will smoke you like cuban cigar.

    • betri_weyn

      Dear Peacee
      Are you chief executive of HRW,AI,or what. The root cause of your country problem is interfering in another country affair like your master it takes several decades to eliminate these kind of mentality from each diehard regime supporters just simple question @Where is -abdela Jaber,mustepha Hussein and all EPLF legend tegadelties… I refer you this link
      AreJailed opponents of Egyptian regime continue to die due to alleged medical negligence by prison authorities…

    • betri_weyn

      Another Islamist leader dies in Egyptian prison

  • Mahmud Saleh

    Dear HaileTG; dear all

    In this Situations, I am not good. I usually like to stay out of it, or if I am discussing it, I just want to put the item in consideration within a context. I’m still a revolutionary; still unrepentant secular, I tend to appreciate religions for their unique beauties, colors and textures. I grew up in an atmosphere where Muslims and Christians were killed in the same dug-out, and were they were buried in the same final resting hole. Most of my mentors happened to be Christians, and I am proud to tell you that most of my trusted friends (friendships that endured decades) are still Christians. I see them as my blood brothers and sisters. I’m not terribly informed on issues regarding religion and religiosity. On matters of public administration, I do believe in the separation of politics and religion. I care for injustices happened to Muslims as much as I care for injustices befalling Christians. Injustice is injustice. Having said the above:

    Here we have a miscarriage of justice that the whole world is talking about, including American State Department whose President slapped the Ethiopian PM behind the door, in his visit to Ethiopia, on issues related to the notorious terrorism law and the Ethiopian government’s heavy handedness on the Muslim leaders’ and similar other civil liberty cases (bloggers, journalists, politicians…etc.). As I said in my last reply to Peace, this is not an issue of sectarian nature or an act of a Christian government declaring war on Muslims. This is an issue of a government that has no credible and formidable opposition; a result of a process that culminated to the erection of a government which has no appetite to second-guess in jailing and sentencing presumed opponents in whatever color and taste they may present themselves (religious or otherwise). It’s a good example of one party dictatorship. Now, there are other factors playing in its favor: the recent resurgence of extreme Islamic currents. Egypt’s Alsisi government, a Muslim country, is known for sentencing suspected opponents of terrorism and radicalism, en masse, some times hundreds together, to death. So this has nothing to do with a case of a crusading government. In my last, same piece of installment, I explained, in a concise form due to the need to conserve space (because this is a discussion forum), what I thought should be done in handling these types of situations in multicultural, multi-religious states like Ethiopia in order to keep the harmony that has bound them for centuries. The sentencing and the “due process” availed to those defendants vis-avis the reason why they had been imprisoned in the first place should have been the focus of every justice seeker. I criticized Peace for making assertions without supporting those assertions. I hope he will tell us why he thought it was a sectarian act, and why he thought the government declared war on Muslims. My take is different. This is a manifestation of a situation when, for whatever reasons, the scale tips to the favor of the executive branch. That happened in the USA (presumably the model of democracies) after September 11 when the Patriotic Act was rushed through the Congress. You know the abuses that followed from Abugraib, to interrogation barbarity, to bombings of civilians in target countries, to breaking laws by overreaching to civil liberties through phone monitoring, and physical surveillances of innocent citizens and residents of the USA. It included a no-fly list, a haphazardly compiled list and which included underage children and established innocent Americans, save the humiliations that suspected citizens face in airports, etc.

    Again, the primary front line should be the communities themselves, otherwise, Muslims will continue suffering the consequences of zealots whose primary victims have so far been these Muslim communities and societies on whose name the said zealots keep beating drums.

    Your excellency (to borrow from shabait which, in turn, had borrowed it from dictators of the region),the focus of the discussion should be on whether we think the current approach of governments in the region, who are copying everything bad the USA has done, is in fact just. What Hayat did is profiling Peace as a person who hates the TPLF/Tigreans…etc. No big of a finding. We know that. She would not comment on the core issue that the world is talking about. As I said, as tasteless as Peace’s comment was, the news is that 18 Ethiopians who tried to negotiate a peaceful settlement for the grievances raised by the Muslim community in Addis were finally rounded up, and now sentenced to years ranging up to 22. Their lawyers are saying the court threw out/disregarded evidences that would establish their innocence and it did not tell them why it did so. And the world, including Ethiopians, are saying it was an outrageously unjust; they are saying those defendants have been mistreated under the guise of fighting terrorism. So, are treated that way other non-Muslim Ethiopians who have been victimized under this law.

    Here, we talk about this because of its moral significance. As I said before, for Eritreans, it’s either to ignore what’s happening in Addis and focus on our domestic issue; or, if we are talking about it, we be strong over our conviction that justice has no boundaries. At least we have to put things within their proper context. HTG’s last paragraph, in my opinion, was unnecessary. It read, “When I read Hayat’s documented feedback on Dejen vs the Ethiopian Muslims, I was indeed saddened to note that after all the blood shed to make Eritrea independent, some people are that far behind to want nothing more than religious caliphate.”
    Your Honor (again borrowed from some legalese guy, SAAY), If you feel your observation is based on facts, please elaborate on those people who want to establish an Islamic Caliphate (dear HTG, I’m talking about awatistas, and I am confident you don’t mistake this as if I am saying it to defend myself). I’m taking this further, to clear out things, so that we don’t discuss in an atmosphere filled with suspicions. The views of BuluQbash Niticc (a Christian from Himberti)and Peace’s views on TPLF/Tigray is well known. What Hayat did was deflecting the discussion from the real news to a known profile of Peace. Do Peace’s tasteless comments about TPLF/Tigray amount to the zealotry of establishing an Islamic Caliphate? Come on HTG!

    My love and admiration to the state and the people of Ethiopia is the pillars of my hope that these two peace loving countries will embark on a new Horizon of cooperation. I see it in the relations I have with my Ethiopian friends, and neighbors, in family to family interactions and community to community outreach programs, including churches and mosques. The hope that I find in this front pales the disappointments I get from the politicians, cadres and governments of both countries.

    On separate but related note: Thanks to the people of Ethiopia for allowing our young people to attend higher education in your land. Thanks to the people of Adigrat for allowing the likes of Rahwa and Bilal attending your higher institutions. The future belongs to these conciliatory stories. The future belongs to the likes of Rahwa, Bilal and their Ethiopian counterparts. Let the spirits of boot camps of Dedebit, Rubda and Emahmimet (Sahel) be replaced by the spirit of campus discussions and researches. Let the voices of emotions be replaced by the voices of reason.
    Regards.

    • haileTG

      Selamat Mahmuday,

      I have no doubt that such kind of fanatical tendencies are nothing to describe you by. You are far from it. I can’t deny my ears, eyes and mind for the fact that there are such people however, from awatistas here extending all the way to the Eritrean Islamic Jihad Movement offices. I am also aware of similar tendencies from the other side against their Muslim counterparts too, about I will keep to the topic. I insist on answering a direct question directly as a first order of business, hence the awatista by the name Ali is one such person who openly considers our problem along those lines. There are several others and we need to live with it and challenge them at every junction, but also remind ourselves it is very much a real issue and a real divide. I can actually make a very extended and compelling case, but I don’t see the case being resolved anytime within mine and my children’s life time. It will linger for generation so long as we break the barriers.

      The deaths and tragedies that you recounted happened between Ethiopians and Eritreans. That happened in your life time, it is so fresh in your memories and all of us too. In those conflicts of recent past, many Ethiopian lives were lost at the hands of Eritreans and vice versa. That is regardless of why. That was huge blood that was spilled between the two peoples, in the recent past and so fresh in our memories. No Ethiopian would take that lightly as much as no Eritrean would do either. We can’t possibly be standing on each other’s relatives bones and try to lecture each other on justice, democracy…. No Ethiopian would buy that from us and nor do we expect them to do so on our case. Unfortunately, despite their disagreements, I don’t see Ethiopians going against the core of each other to weave and saw seeds doubt about basic integrity as Ethiopians. I only see that kind of brutalization of Eritreans and denigrating their birth right as Eritreans because they didn’t swim over the rivers of blood to cross to the other side and lecture them on internal matters. What we need is to focus on our issue or at least talk about Kenya and Uganda for the time being and exchange good will and people to people confidence restorative gestures. Those Eritreans making a fool of themselves on the Ethiopia card, can take their senseless highs to any heights to the point instigating total mayhem for Eritrea’s future, but I am firm that Islamic fundamentalist sentiments and Gehdli scratching wounds will be the ultimate folly that would lead to the demise of Eritrea.. We don’t talk Ethiopia not because we are any less patriotic than the next person but we are cognizant of the real injuries we caused one another that still hasn’t got full closure. A person who would go to the length of justifying the monstrosity meted out on Dejen and would go to the extent of telling us Ethiopia is sectarian, says something definite about that person’r valuing of Eritrean christian’s life vs Ethiopian Muslim’s life. That is just obvious and Hayat had done spectacular job for helping to present what we knew silently dismissed all along.

      Eritrean problems are complex. Some can wait and others can’t. Eritreans would do well to spared from confusion, as they are very confused as is. Taking the moral and mature stand on Ethiopia isn’t reason to doubt anyone’s patriotism. We have a sea of tragedies we need to overcome and move on before arriving there. I understand some selfish and some desperate parties use it to quickly turn it into character assassination, but time will judge in the end.

      So, Mahmuday, take the above with a little understanding. The two issues are highly volatile and let’s help it rest:-)

      • Bayan Nagash

        Gentlemen, Good Early Morning To You & All

        This is an area of a subject that tears my heart like nothing else. It was with heavy heart that I wrote what I did and it is still weighing heavily on me. And this is the topic that cannot lead to any amicable understanding for a host of reasons: From the venue to a language devoid of gestures, human interactions, face expressions, that accompany it, which is not there to give it meaning; to the fact that having no baseline, parameters, if you will, from which the conversation ought to begin to where the ending should be; to having no knowledge of who is who in a sense that, all that one can do to derail it is use one wrong term or phrase, the whole thing will come undone in a split of a second, descending on us like a ton of brick, and it is downward spiral from there. I share the genuine concerns you raise, and they are in the right place.

        Context is everything in this kind of environment, there just isn’t the right ambiance to have meaningful conversation on a subject as highly intricate and absolutely and positively so sensitive that it will go nowhere. There are layers and layers that need to be untangled, what this will amount, at the end of the day, is to nothing more than skin deep. And, it would be a colossal waste of time, not to mention the energy that such a topic would exact in our person is too monumental to even attempt it here.

        I am in complete agreement in putting it to rest for now until we find a mechanism and a venue for it. Having, for example, a convention of reconciliation in which scholars could come with their presentations, where panel discussions could be conducted, our efforts here in this regard will prove to be an exercise in futility. I am even regretting what I had written, as such I will go ahead and remove it as a gesture of ending the conversation related to this. I should’ve stayed mum, but it is not too late to go the Tes route. In fact I should just do that now come back to this to see if I can edit it out. Let’s see how accommodating Disqus is – wouldn’t you know it, as simple as ABC. Done! 9 hours was 9 hours of pain too long. What a relief. The burden rests on Peace to do the right thing. My conscience is clear now.

        Respectfully,
        BN

        • haileTG

          Dear Bayan,

          You are in deed right that such an issue isn’t one for casual discussions and opinions but ought to be raised at the right venue by the right people. That is especially true for societies like ours that is balancing its thread on a knife edge. We have wasted the entire post independence era and did not manage to create a sense of nation out of the disparate groups, ethnicity and religions. Political development had been stifled and raw emotions had gained value as a political currency. As we traditionally say, Eritrea is 50% one or the other. So any of her problems can be apportioned like that. The religious considerations become partly the problem of each side. Each side is doing little to reach and accommodate the other. Muslim Eritreans are as much to be questioned about their contribution to unify the nation as are their Christian counterparts. They are as much to utilize barriers as the other, they are as much responsible to enabling and supporting the dictatorship as the other, they are as much responsible to carrying out the injustice as the other. Hence, our problem becomes complex, one that requires power sharing and equitable access to rights and responsibilities. That is a tall order that can only develop over time and enabling environment. Due to the unique situation of Eritrea, there can’t be an entity called Eritrea if one side try to get ahead of the other and at their expense too. This makes our problems shared and fit for sober analysis only. I also predict that the regime will play that card in its last legs. The Eritrean people will need to be careful as to what is coming from whom and only deffer the issue to be discussed under circumstances as you aptly put at your intro.

          Regards

    • said

      Salamat Mahmud
      For some secular or believer, faith must be individual before becoming collective. God is real and doesn’t exist merely in
      creeds, holy books and philosophies. He truly responds to the cries and
      yearnings of the faithful; the believing quest of a heart. Finally, one doesn’t have to dig God out of the recesses of the mind; He is all – present and loves a humble request from a simple believer. I didn’t mention 1 thing about religion yet. In the case of Hindus Religious heritage is man-made. As such its a source pride,which may even exclude God or at least marginalize Him and give glory primarily
      to the created. It embodies a feeble and futile human attempt to reach God.Faith is empowerment from above. The first (religion) is destructible; thus they need to protect it, the second is everlasting and totally God-unborn, God-sustained and produces real peace. Defiantly in some quarter of society
      there is ignorance and stereotyping of Islamic faith.

      A Documentary aired on PBS TV in two parts on two occasions that was entitled: “Islam an Empire of Faith” highlighting the exceptional achievements and contributions of Islamic Civilization to World Civilizations. The Scholars giving rather elaborate testimonials appearing in the Report were ALL respected authorities often heads of the relevant departments of the subject study at major leading Western Universities. Realizing the significance of such an important documentary to be
      afforded access to the widest audience possible – foremost Western Audience susceptible to the craze of Islamophobia –

      • Mahmud Saleh

        Dear Said
        I’m a bit busy, thank you for the reply. My comment is to stress the need of looking into the problem from its political implications. The diversity of our society doesn’t bear the existence of theocracies. Either we will have to cease to exist as the country we know, or religion should be separated from politics. Even in homogenously, muslim countries, we will still have to see a modern Islamic State. What’s happening today is the rise of determined zealots who are bent to wipe the planet of reasonable human souls (you are witnessing their barbaric ideology in Syria, Iraq…Do they represent Muslims? No. But I am saying that the muslim scholars and the societies should do a better job at alienating and finally defeating them. I understand that there are biases against Muslims. Well, that’s the sad reality when 1.4 billion get outshouted by few radicals. How can I blame a Christian American when he confides in me that he is really scared of me? The reality is there are groups who are speaking on our behalf and who are able to hijack the message. They are ravaging the planet. The non-Muslims, for obvious reason will not be able to see the toll these groups inflicted in the Muslim population. The mayhem they created in the Muslim societies is statistically more significant than what they have inflicted the non-Muslim communities. But Muslims will continue generalized as long as we don’t say “enough.” The trend is encouraging, I know Muslims have been battling these groups all along but the media coverage is biased.

        • Abraham Hanibal

          Dear Mahmuday,

          Very well said and to quote you, “The mayhem they created in the Muslim societies is statistically more significant than what they have inflicted the non-Muslim communities”. Indeed, how could someone claim to be muslims, while at the same time they detonate themselves inside mosques, where other fellow muslims pray?

          • Mahmud Saleh

            Dear Abraham
            Believe me, if I were condemned to be living in a territory they control I have my head chopped off long before I say good night to my kids. These are agents of darkness. Look what they did to all those communities they subjugated and to the historic treasures they put hands on. A wide spread of massacres have been reported against Muslims simply because they thought those Muslims were not good-Muslims enough. We know what they did to the Eritreans and Ethiopians in Libya. These are factions who believe in self-created prophecies. What’s interesting is that we sometimes get so depressed that we don’t recognize that there are many reasonable folks from among those communities that if approached and dialogued in a respectful manner, we will see that we have allies in fighting these groups. That was my main thrust in the comment I gave in regard to the Ethiopian G-18 defendants. The governments should not panic and resort to tactics that may in the long run alienate moderate Muslims.

          • Abraham Hanibal

            Selam Mahmuday;

            I fully agree with your opinion regarding the handling of the issue of muslim defendants lately. As Hayat Adem has explained to you, and as you’ve noticed it; there was a misunderstanding between you and her on the issue that Peace raised. You were discussing on the actual subject-matter of the verdict on the defendants, while many of those who criticised Peace were focussing on whether he has the moral high ground to speak of justice when what he said previously stands to the contrary.
            Regards

    • Hayat Adem

      Dear Mahmuday,
      You made very good points and all are carefully contextualized.
      First corrections: I never said anything on Peace’s hate towards TPLF nor do I believe hating a political organization, justified or unjustified, is a sin. Hating people is a senseless sin. I know Ted said the same thing like you but spinning is a force of habit with him. Stay away from his influence:)
      In the quotes I reproduced, Peace clearly showed his hate and mockery towards Tigreans and Ethiopians (not TPLF/EPRDF). This is should not be tolerated by sane minds. It is a bad omen in any discourse. “Yes, said things but…”, please, let’s not trivilize such a vulgar loathing for sake of ourselves and our people.
      He also accused the entire opposition in a blanket as “sellouts”, so he should be held accountable and quoted on that as well. But most of all he showed us his inverse sense of justice when he spoke of Degen. That comment of his on Degen, when he said there must have been a crime of collateral nature committed by Degen and since the government is not telling us, Degen himself should take that responsibly of telling us what his crime is mind-boggling. And it tells you that if you hate other people, you hate your people, too. It is almost automatic. If you love your people, you cannot NOT love others.
      Mahmuday, I was not writing on the issue of the convicted group of 18. I was on Peace. As you know Peace has been panicking his bell on this issue insistently. Let’s assume injustice is done. Then a person can just report it, a person can report or make a call of redress, or both. I believe people who can make calls of redress are the ones that exercise some standard of moral and principles with zero or minimum hypocrisy. People like Peace can only report acts of injustices as they witness it. The quality of their report is determined by the quality of facts supporting the report. Calls of redress, on the other hand are like advance checks reserved for higher personalities where, integrity, consistency, sanity, normal standard of rules and behaviors are critical parts of the person.
      Peace asserted the following:
      1) EPRDF is sectarian.
      2) Muslims in today’s Ethiopia are being faith-oppressed.
      3) Injustice is done on a group of Muslims.
      4) The Eritrea opposition failed to extend support to the victims.
      5) Therefore, the Eritrea justice-seekers’ stand for justice is questionable.
      And he didn’t say anything to support all those grand assertions and he kept on repeating them. The best contribution he could have done was focused on assertion 3 and tell us what happened, meaning fact-based reporting and let us conclude from that report. Or else, we are supposed to share our opinions from what we know and based on our respective perspectives.
      I think assertion number 1 and number 2 are bull shit. One is no ruling party in Ethiopia can ever be sectarian and politically exist. The entire heterogonous structure, diverse fabrics and social system would never allow that to happen. Besides, EPRDF is a revolutionary front and all its principles and activities stem out from that ideology. Ethiopia’s constitution speaks to the nature of the political system. Also, Ethiopia’s Muslim freedom has been expanding not shrinking from the fall of the monarchy system, more equality (not necessarily more freedom) during the Derg, but more equality and more freedom now than in the Derg. Assertion number 4 and 5 are also, bull-shit. First, if the Ethiopian system is asserted to be sectarian, what are Eritreans being called to do: to declare Jihad on Ethiopia?
      The only valid argument and Pease has failed to show us is point number 3. What is the disagreement with government, what were the charges, what is the evidence to support the charges, what was the defense and the countering evidence, how were they argued in the courts, why is the court verdict being questioned, is there clear evidence that injustice is done and the convicted are innocent victims, what can be done to improve it, is there a chance for improvement in the appeal process etc??? But for Eritreans, there are more pressing and bigger problems at home including religions, all religions.

      Regards,
      Gual Adem

      • Mahmud Saleh

        Salamat Hayat
        I understand your points and thank you for clarifying them. As I understand it, your purpose was to bring Peace to the spot light, not necessarily to comment on the issue he raised. Taken within this caveat, I can see your original reply was on topic. I was addressing the whole issue from a different angle. Let us be fairly critical here. I think the government is overdoing it. I don’t know why it’s on a panic mode. As I understand it, and this is contrary to BuluQbash Nitricc’s prediction that EPRDF will fall before PFDJ; EPRDF has become a force to reckon with. The fact is soon or later EPRDF will lose an election but it will not fall. But PFDJ’s fate is one: it will fall, unless it changes course and allows conditions that are equivalent to or better than those EPRDF created in Ethiopia. EPRDF has vertically built a relatively sustaining structure, and spread its influence and presence horizontally, that’s at grass roots level. I don’t understand why the government gets so nervous by political and/or other social critics. In my humble observation, the opposition in Ethiopia has not shown Ethiopians that they could be more trusted than EPRDF in running the country. As the Prime Minister told a reporter on the day the voting took place, the opposition, instead of laying out their programs and working hard in challenging the government using the tools available to them under the constitution, they had spent their time on critiquing EPRDF. Instead of building a broad alliance, they tried to compete EPRDF individually…etc. I’m not saying EPRDF is an angel, but using the constitutional tools available to them is more expedient for the opposition to come to power than resorting to the denial of EPRDF as a national force and resorting to violence, or even going to a length in challenging the existence of the constitution itself. I know Ethiopia of today through the eyes of Ethiopians in diaspora. Sure, there are big chunks still riling and revving against the government. Their concern primarily stems from existing social (ethnic-region based), and religious critiques. Again, this is an observation based on second hand observation; I have not come across works that elucidate the problems. However, there is a consensus among the world press, Ethiopia-friendly leaders and international human right organizations that the government is overusing and abusing the terror law (citizens should stand guard for their rights; no government on this earth is angelic). That was my focus. I find what I see the government is doing to be a bad strategy, because I care for the peace and stability of my close neighbors. Stability in Ethiopia means uplifting the region from poverty. The country has the potential of changing the face of the region to the better. I see no reason why the government should be so anxious. I doubt it will lose the next election if it plays it moderately. My friends who said all the ugly staff about wayane are now talking about an Ethiopian government. They are reluctantly admitting that this is in fact a new era. The government will be more respected if it opens more space; it will continue to dominate the political sphere of the country for future rounds of elections to come. That’s just the reality. And that reality will hold true if it plays social and political issues carefully.
        I have been uncomfortable for a quite long time that there are Eritreans who draw their patriotic zeal from the hate of a people, particularly the people of Tigray. I don’t understand this sickness. I objected it when it was displayed in videos and literature (my friends know me). I don’t read comments that depict nations and peoples as “bad.” I know governments could be bad, and that’s why in my comments/criticism I try to distinguish between the people of Ethiopia and the government of Ethiopia. Between the cooperation of yesterday and the confrontation of today, etc. I criticize the government of Ethiopia, but I don’t hate nor indulge myself with stereotypical and biased ideas, opinions, writings…etc. targeting a people.
        Therefore, the issue should be narrowed to human right issues, nothing more nothing less.
        Sorry, I am in a hurry, I’m not sure if my thoughtsd are connected.

        • Hayat Adem

          Mahmuday,
          Thanks for the reply. Indeed, you were an up-headed tegadalai then and you are an up-headed family man now. No one should dare to take you as hating anyone, any people, let alone the people of Tigray. If the call of redress comes from you, I have no problem, considering the issue in good faith. But I want you to use your moral leverage of correcting when others make hate-driven colossal error. I nearly agree with everything else you said above.

          Hayat

        • Amanuel Hidrat

          Mahmuday,

          Let me quote you brother:

          Your entire comment could be encapsulated in this quotation: “I don’t read comments that depict nations and peoples as “bad.” I know governments could be bad.” Very true brother. I hope this will convince the haters of Tigray people in particular and the Ethiopian people in general. I also hope them understand the difference of a confrontational government of today and the cooperational governments of near future. A cool head will neither falter nor stumble by empty patriotic zeal. You have showed that.

          regards,
          Amanuel Hidrat

          • Peace!

            Dear Emma,

            I don’t believe anyone in this room hates Ethiopians. We have Ethiopian families and friends. Stop acting as if there is no difference between TPLF government and Ethiopian people. It is politics, and as you know, politics is dirty.

            Regards

          • Amanuel Hidrat

            Selam Peace,

            Let me quote what Hayat quoted you, if you don’t dispute them so far (a) “I think you missed the point. It is not about the current Ethiopia that is ruled by the despised minority dictatorship; it is about the genuine Republic of Ethiopia where Asmara is more welcome than Mekele” (b) “I am a US taxpayer, and that means, I am feeding some of your people. please be thankful.” Do you need to say “despised minorities”? Do you need to wage a war between Tigrayans and the rest of Ethiopians ? Are you really feeding the Ethiopian people? And I think you stand corrected for going to far to say them. For being stood corrected, I salute you.

            Regards,
            Amanuel Hidrat

          • Peace!

            Dear Emma,

            Again I was referring to the TPLF government, and yes, sometimes I over react. I can’t believe you are in a digging business to find minor things to justify your indecisiveness.

            I know you are a frequent visitor at assenna.com, and please tell me when is the last time you denounced the hateful preaching against Eritrean Muslims by Fitsum Solemun? I am not talking about simple comment.I am talking about a series of articles, and despite that you even have a nerve to try to promote the website right here; may be no “solicitation” should be added to the posting guidelines. Emma, Your silence is clear and consistent; did you say something when YG insulted Hamid Idris Awate right here in this very forum? Not to my knowledge.

            Respectfully

          • Amanuel Hidrat

            Dear Peace,

            This the first time to be accused of “indecisiveness”. In fact I am frequently accused as a stubborn on my position and I am sure they are laughing at you, on your characterization now. Anyway show me where I have shown my indecisiveness in my debate or in my writing – you could visit my archive “Tebeges.” I am consistent to the issue I am interested to. Second, I don’t visit regularly Assenna and if I visit there I never comment on that website. I just visit it if I could find something that interest me. Amanuel Sahle is the best writer there that I enjoy his writing and never comment to him, but may be two or three times I quoted him and surely linked in order awatistas to read it. Is there a problem to do that? Are you telling me by the way not to visit other Eritrean website? Rediclous! Let me give you more pain; I also visit PFDJ websites to get first hand information from the regime I hate. Did you notice our own Saay bringing info from every website to make us aware what is going other that awate website? I have defended our struggle from its inception to its conclusion. I have written four parts in series to argue against YG ( Saay and SGJ Beyan or others who read it will tell you). Defending our armed struggle is defending awate and the rest who followed his mission. You said not to my knowledge. Am I responsible of not reading it? Wey Antum Sebat. You want to bring religious argument, hey I will not delve in to it. I think you have a religious disease my friend.

            regards,
            Amanuel Hidrat

          • Peace!

            Dear Emma,

            No Emma, you and your friends have deflection disease. I simply asked you if you denounced the hateful preaching, and your answer was indirectly No. As simple as that!

            Regards

          • Amanuel Hidrat

            Dear Peace,
            I don’t comment on Assena writers even to the one (Amanuel Sahle) I admire. Period. Read your accusation one by one and read my answers one by one. The more you write and accuse, the more you are wrong. You don’t know me, period. What is the deflected one? You accused me about Assenna and the writers there, I gave my answer. You accused me of not debating against YG’s position I referred you to my writings. What else you want? First answer where was my indecisiveness?

            Regards,
            Amanuel Hidrat

          • Nitricc

            Hi Aman; don’t twist things for your own scoring point. no one on this forum, i mean one ever said I hate the The Tigryans. if you know one, name it. true, few of us, including me, said i dislike TPLF; i never even use the word, hate. and it is unalienable right of mine to like and to dislike. however; i expect you to be honest. now, why don’t you identify who ever said, i hate Tigryans?

        • Fnote Selam

          Mahmuday,

          I am confused, why are you not The President of The State of Eritrea?

          Best,

          FS

          • Mahmud Saleh

            Ahlan Fnote Selam
            Wey goode!!!!! keytewedaderkayom ‘qua tenfasna aHxirom alewu! Just hope they are napping away and your comment will pass through unnoticed. Thanks though.

          • Abi

            Hi Mahmud
            I missed the Tigrigna part.
            Who is napping ?
            I read one of your comments and I said is this guy running to be prime minister of ethiopia? The position is taken by Hayat . Too late.
            Honestly, yours and Hayat’s comment takes this sight to a higher level.
            Thank you .

          • Fanti Ghana

            Hello Abi,

            You know there is no position too big for Hayat anywhere, but regardless of their qualifications the country would be better served as follows (the order means nothing):

            1. Mahmud: Prime minister (diplomat, historian, witty, and a fighter)
            2. Haile TG: Foreign Minister (diplomat, quick thinker, compassionate, and all knowing)
            3. Hayat Adem: Finance minister (meticulous, extremely disciplined, logical, and dependable, and Eritrea needs evry penny it can get)
            4. Saay: Interior minister (I couldn’t think of a better punishment than that)
            5. Mr. Amanuel Hidrat: Defense minister (steadfast, mature, direct, and a patriot)
            6. Ali Salim: ambassador to Mongolia (there are too few Mongols per square mile to divide)
            7. Saleh GJ: Education minister (anyone who disagrees will go to jail)
            8. Semere Andom: minister of Fish and wildlife (Abisha, I love him, but either the storm will take him away or a lion will eat him. Who Knows?)
            9. Saba: Minister of Justice (witty, inquisitive, and yet, reserved, but because of her age she serves as an assistant for one 5 years term)
            10. Papillon: Health Minister (decisive, intelligent, and I always think of her as a doctor. Don’t ask)
            11. Prof. tes: Agriculture minister (the French know more about food than the Italians)
            12. Professor Beyan Negash (Vice prime minister; we don’t want Mahmud to have a plane crush ‘accident.’ Do we?)
            13. Tzigereda: Chair Woman of Eritrean Women’s Association (Just agree. I am smarter than you think)
            14. The one I forgot: Minister of Information (ask Saay)

            Many more to least, but this is a good start.

          • Bayan Nagash

            Selam Abi,

            I enjoyed your message to the wardya of AT earlier when the scolding was broaching to a teacher who seems to possess authoritarian tendencies. No, actually, I am being facetious here, it was done with class.

            This one was a joy read and an apt observation on your part, heck, if you continue to do this every Saturday around this time, who needs SNL, eh. You forgot one name, how about the Cartoonist Minister of Vice & Virtue, using not sticks and bones, mind you, just the sheer power of humor that you seem to have disposition for. Abi, The Cartoonist Minster of Vice and Virtue. Now, that’s a mouthful title to have. the acronym ATCMV will have to do.

            Thank you, Abi – that was fun read.

            BN

          • Abi

            Fantisha
            I care less who assumed what position either in ethiopia or eritrea.
            I care only for Hayat . Her position is in my heart.

            SGJ– justice
            HaileTG– finance
            Saay- culture
            Mahmud– defense
            Pappilon- health
            Amanuel – education
            Tes- city morgue administrator
            Kokobe- assistant to Amanuel
            Bayan- ambassador to ethiopia

          • Bayan Nagash

            Selam Abi,

            Did I already get demoted, what gives? Or is this just the vetting process between the Selection Committee members. If that is so, then we are seeing transparency at work.

            BN

          • Abi

            Bayan
            Those we love the most , we keep them closer. You stay in addis where you belong. You belong in the capital city of Africa. That is where the action is. That is where eritrea needs a diplomat with brain. Actually, that position was saved for Hayat . She is promoted.
            Good luck !

          • Bayan Nagash

            Alrighty then, Abi. losing to HA is actually an honor. I will take that like a man! Way to go Hayat. I conceded.

          • saay7

            Hey Abi:

            Its confirmed: fara neh. Didn’t you see The Godfather? “Keep your friends close; and your enemies closer.”

            https://youtu.be/YscgEcd_s-s

            saay

          • Abi

            Saay
            I love it . You are winning 1-0. There will be revenge for this embarrassing defeat.
            ” revenge is delicious when served cold.”
            The Godfather/ Goodfellas?
            You are the culture minister. Help me here.

          • saay7

            Hey Abi:

            You missed your chance to quote one of Mickey Spillanes books (I confess it; I was a huge fan): Vengeance is Mine. His character, Hammer, was an Old Testament fan:)

            That thing about “revenge is a dish best served cold” is very old. First time I heard it was in Star Trek. Khaaaaaaaaaannnnnn!

            saay

          • Abi

            Saay
            Honestly, I never watched Star Trek. I’m sure I heard it in one of those movies. It’s been a while. Besides, that was a good shot. No amount of defense will help.
            Saay you are not like those people I gently guide to their demise. I have done it before. With you the reverse is true.
            You are too smart , too quick for me.
            If you insist the ambassador position is given to Sem. At least he will drink a much better coffee. We are watching him closely.

          • Fanti Ghana

            Hello Abi,
            God where are you? Lema Sebektani?????
            I think I am cursed. You see, I have a secret, only known to me, that I evaluate a person with three things before I accept them as a life time friend:

            1) they must not be allergic to and must like peanut butter
            2) Their 50% reason for going to the movies is the pop corn
            3) Under no circumstance should they be ignorant to Star Trek

            Anything else, no matter how Temama, I can navigate around, but these three are my ultimate measuring rods of ‘goodness.’ A lot of scientific thought has gone to this, so don’t even try to argue. Please tell me that you at least score two out of three.

          • saay7

            His Fantiness:

            Abi.net is just messing with you. Of course he remembers this scene from Start Trek where Khaaaaaaaan is trying to give credit to the Klingons for a very earthly proverb. Also, I think Abi is right: the “revenge is a dish best served cold” was also in Godfather. I think.

            https://youtu.be/5vwHLMs04XA

            saay

          • Fanti Ghana

            Hello Abi,
            Oh! I am having a hard time remembering Kokhob Selam is indeed an Eritrean. Mr. Amanuel can just fit anywhere. So, fine, but I am glad to know that there is a position worst than interior ministry for Saay. Thank you for that.

          • Saleh Johar

            Hi Abi,
            Dej Tnat yelle minamin? You throw away big portfolios like a home made mercato candy?

            Be careful, such gestures might inflate our heads. Including you, kingmaker 🙂

            I will settle for your tea in Massawa. Our poet Kiros Yohannes says, ngus nebsey eyye

          • Abi

            Ato Saleh
            Tea in Masawa?
            Begude weTahu !
            Where is justice?
            No way ! You can have that hot water with some mint, I will have a cold meloti .

            Wardyaw abedu beqa leyelachew
            Masawa teqemTew shay new yeTemachew
            Anjetachew yiras birra amTulachew

          • Ted

            Dear SJ, if i were you i take the position for a chance to ban Sax from anything Eritrea and beyond, (we are going to be one anyways). The cabinet is all about compromise, if you play along, you will get your wish to have a nice cup of tea on the beach without Sax ruining your mood. it is worth it;-)

          • haileTG

            Dear Fanti,

            The appointments seem reasonable (except my friend Bayan who would have most definitely deserved a real job (VP? what a joke) …haha. Seriously though, would it work for you if we promote Amanuel H to chief of Police, move Tzigereda to defense, restructure the National Women’s Association into ministry of Gender equality and appoint Minister Bayan? Seems workable to me:-) (do you see the strategic narrowing of the gap between saay and emma?) Also, we shoud assume the rest of awatistas are “opposition” party under chairman Nitricc and deputy Selam:)

            For your urgent considerations

          • Fanti Ghana

            Hello Haile TG,

            Why Bayan in that ‘no-position’ was I needed someone I can trust who is not power hungry. So, on my over zealousness to protect Mahmud I had to sacrifice Bayan. At the same time should nature calls Mahmud to join his ancestors, I needed someone who can handle the burden of being a prime minister. Tzigereda as defense minster is brilliant, but I don’t think all the dragon tattooed ladies will go for a man as their chair-woman, but if you manage it I am flexible.

            Hailat, I am trying to get something done here, and you are bringing Saay and Mr. Amanuel closer. Can you imagine how many “I am sorry” and “you can do more” that is? besime-ab bel.
            I have a few more brilliant ideas for the youngsters Selam and Nitricc in the Eritrean Development Association Department, but it is still under construction in my mind. I will continue to consider any persuasive argument except shipping Ali-Salim to Mongolia.

          • haileTG

            Dear Fanti,

            I hope you don’t mind me fiddling with your appointment list (in fairness, sir, you are responsible for it for appointing a restless soul like me to the FM of Eritrea! Gosh what do one do as FM of Eritrea nowadays? Water the plants on IGAD HQ front yard or something?…haha). So, I can double with any other duties too (seriously, I have a lot of time in my hand…FM of Eritrea my foot haha..). This is why I created a role for my self to help stabilize your candidates. I measure everything by heart remember, not lungs (this ain’t a shouting match-:) To form a stable post holder, you need to check where their heart is, so when they say “I love my job” it is really from the heart:) Aman H the chief of police, telling you “I love policing that is what I do” would definitely come with an inspiring sincerity, and Tzigereda’s communique’s graced with short and defensive qualities will speak for itself for the ministry of defense “short on words, but don’t push our mettle” motto. Since Ministry of interior (hagerawi dihnet) is digitized nowadays and it is all about Photoshop of futuristic city master-plans to say “ab sirah ena zelona” (or “sorry I am busy on my computer!”) saay’s quality assurance mind (photoshop doesn’t need heart – the real thing) will be handy. Ministry of Gender Equality (or equalizer – if it is pay back time..haha) will be a real stick for brother Bayan to wield and ensure that he is the only clear majority holder in the cabinet surrounded by 4 ladies who will undoubtedly be trapped in conflict of interest every time he pushes a motion.

            Now, if you had enough of this talkative FM, well what you gonna do? fire me? haha…

          • Fanti Ghana

            Hello Hailat,
            This is exactly why you must be the FM. You have a way of making someone say what you wanted them to say and make them feel they came up with it on their own at same time. like right now, I am totally confused where my ideas end and yours start. If I was a gentleman, I would have been honest and tell you that as long as you don’t change #6, I like your suggestions better, but what can I say, it is just a weird week!

          • saay7

            Hailat:

            Sometimes, one sentence is such a classic, everything before it and after it is mere decoration which is why I won’t address your photoshop, lung, heart, kidney talk:

            “Gosh what do one do as FM of Eritrea nowadays? Water the plants on IGAD HQ front yard or something?…haha).”

            Epic. Slow slow clap followed by standing O. IGAD is basically Ethiopia. I think it has been chaired by Ethiopia for a gazillion consecutive years. From that perch, it dictates Horn of Africa’s policy on Somalia, it decides Eritrea’s membership (suspended kinda maybe who knows check back on Monday) and it refuses to release the report of the Commission of Inquiry on South Sudan because that report shows that Salva Kiir and Machar are war criminals whose black asses should be hauled to prison but, Ethiopia likes Machar (national interest blah blah yadi yadi yada). I am not supporting your FM candidacy: you would be watching Ethio-Eritrea Tigrinya tewahdo videos and go all soft and all “heart” on us. Clearly that job must be filled by Ted or Nitricc or Peace.

            saay

          • haileTG

            Haha,,saay, wait till I solve the age old highland/lowland problem with Bayan later today. You will see I have more to offer than the good old tikur sew lyrics:-)

          • saay7

            Ha! Hailat, if you are going to solve the “age old highland/lowland problem”, shouldn’t at least one of you be from the lowland? Just saying 🙂

            saay

          • haileTG

            saay, say what! weda’Etey’ke, anta nsu’wn highland dyu?? I thought all Christians were from highland and all Muslims from lowland. You’ve pretty much thrown a spanner in my works now:) T’Egsti tray, zeyftah shigr yelon saay arkey:-)

          • Bayan Nagash

            Say what now, Sal? Though funny one liner, I couldn’t help but be reminded of these young freshmen kids at college signing up for Chicano Studies, you should the visible murmur and puzzlement at seeing a Caucasian professor. Say what now?

            Similarly, in Black Studies, the young African Americans couldn’t believe their eyes, you guessed it, it is a graying white dude teaching the subject.

            Both are just visibly perturbed how outsiders from the dominant culture could actually teach a subject that these professors were from the oppressive mold.

            On a different note, to my respected brother HTG, I never said I was going to solve the highland/lowland dichotomy nor did you – Sal – say I said that. (Now, this is probably making you wanna say, say what?). I know I am catching the Nitricc disease here, you know it is infectious.

            Of course, some solutions could conceivably come from an unlikely source. No need to be chagrined like the kids above in seeing two highlanders of different religious persuasion speaking their mind on Eritrean issues -:)

          • saay7

            Professor Bayan:

            Man, you are a little behind, considering your expertise you should feel bad. Here it is: just like people now say they are trans-gender, the sociologists are saying that in the next generation there will be trans-racial kids. Just like someone can say “I am a woman trapped in a mans body”, in the next generation u can have people saying “I am a black woman trapped in white body” and they will see the white woman who was leading the Afeican American group by pretending to be black as their civil rights leader. It will be even more mind blowing if it someone is transgender and transracial. This is why identity politics is doomed because it assumes identity is static and it is vested in making something dynamic very static. One more reason why the TPLF are so backward. Oops I did it again:)

            saay

          • Bayan Nagash

            Dear Sal,

            You have effectively shown your qualification that I hope Fanti & Abi are paying close attention to. We Eritreans can barely manage the traditional gender roles, the transgender curveball you just threw way in the left field is something that I cannot wrap my head around let alone to inculcate it in the gender rights category? This in my estimate, at least in Eritrean context belongs in the Human Rights category, wouldn’t you say?

            That aside for now though, Sal, shouldn’t there be a distinction between “identity politics” and “ethnic politics”. Or are you seeing a confluence between the two and a such you categorically detest the two equally?

            I can just see in my mind’s eye our HTG going darn it, Sal, I have to rewrite again what I had written because it is preemptively being discredited. if anyone is qualified to untangling these issues it is you. So, while your are hard at work at resolving the old age project of highland/lowland dichotomy, I say add Sal’s notion of “identity versus ethnicity” politcs. Go HTG!!! (One exclamation for each letter in your initials here)

            Cheers,
            BN

          • saay7

            Hi Professor Bayan:

            Your question is so simple I am assuming you are trying to set a trap for me:) when you ask me to make a distinction between identity politics and ethnic politics, well, ethnic politics is a subset of identity politics. The others being “racial politics”, “regional politics”, “heritage politics”, “gender politics”, “religious politics”: basically a grievance based not on individual liberties but group rights. This is identified as vertical polarization as opposed to good old Marxs interpretation of history where the U.S. Vs them is the haves and have nots (horizontal polarization.). The difference between vertical polarization and horizontal polarization: the former is static and the latter is fluid and dynamic. Marx believed in “economic determinism”, ie, a rich wedi mataHet has more in common with a rich wedi Kebessa than his fellow poor MetahtTay 🙂 This, said Marx, is economic determinism. Now, u are saying, why is a libertarian quoting Marx? Because Marx gave us the definitive interpretation of history and we use all his vocab.

            Ok, now give it to me: tell me what I missed:)

            Saay

          • Amanuel Hidrat

            Oh Saay,

            Can you go more into it? Slowly you will relate it to our issue. Kab-Atekayo continue to tackle it.

            regards,
            Amanuel Hidrat

          • saay7

            Sure Emma:

            Step 1, we create a political class made up of the haves (people with means.) People without means (the have nots) should focus on making a living and supporting their families.
            Step 2: We take these people of means and ask them, (a) “is anyone in your immediate family intermarried with other ethnic groups?”(b) “Are you, or anyone in your immediate family, raised in a region of Eritrea different from that of your ancestors?” Those who answer no to both questions are disqualified as people with inadequate perspective: we tell them go home; we will call you when we need you.
            Step 3: Are you multi-lingual? Can you speak at least two of Eritrea’s languages? If no, disqualified.

            Step 4: Write a 100-word essay as to why you love Eritrea. If they can’t, they are disqualified.

            What do you think?

            saay

          • Amanuel Hidrat

            Dear Saay,

            When you go to joke talking as an exit door from topics of national concern, you make me cringe. Why do you do this to me? Instead, you could tell me I don’t want to deal with this subject, even without reason as to why you don’t.

            Regards,
            Amanuel Hidrat

          • Bayan Nagash

            Ya Sal ya Habib al shaEb,

            I am sincerely simple man and my questions reflect such simplicity. Honest to
            goodness Sal, I seldom enter into a conversation thinking I am going to set a
            trap so that by the second or third rejoinder and counter rejoinder I would
            effectively emerge out-shining or out-gunning the person with whom I am having discourse or dialogue with – Nothing like that at all, Sal. You are like a
            lawyer in a court of law meticulously thinking through issues with the intent
            of winning at the end, good for the court of law but not so cool at all in the
            court of discourse and dialogue, if you will. That’s what must be established
            first.

            So, my friend, intent and effect rest at the core of any conversation. For example, in the last piece that I wrote to HTG, I presented what I know to be rationally and factually based effect I conceived of srAt PFDJ’s folly heedless of its intent. Now, in its grand design of socially engineering whether it was
            intently done becomes less important than the effect with which we will
            ostensibly deal with in the aftermath of the demise of this srAt. It is in that
            effort that I thought of engaging you and HTG based on what both of you wrote.

            Issues of ethnicity, in your case, and issues of polity and domination and where the blame should be centered vis-à-vis Eritreans as viewed from the main religious groups in that process of counterpoise is that of HTG’s topic.

            Let us promptly return to the former, that of ethnicity and gender, and the
            question I posed at the outset is so we both have a baseline from which we both can collaboratively march forward in finding the countervailing that will help us in the future of Eritrea. I am not dogmatic in any of my views, there is
            plasticity and malleability of great proportions that I would have no problems
            conceding to alternative explanations, which is precisely why I was elated when I heard HTG saying that he was going to resume the discourse. This
            fundamentally has been preoccupying me since the 3rd of October 2013
            Lampedussa tragedy, simply because it was a signal that Eritrea’s predicament has reached a point of no return when young men and women are willing to resort to such extreme measures knowing their own life could come to an abrupt end, yet, choosing that over staying in Eritrea; it is precisely when it dawned on me that it was time for me to write less and do more.

            That said, from having a little exposure as student of anthropology, I know exactly how the notion of ethnicity evolved to become a marker for minorities in general and Africans in particular. During the colonial era anthropologist used the term “tribes”, but that was too derogatory for the African elites who came to power in the post-colonial Africa. So, anthropologists thought it best to use ethnicity instead of tribes as the former was deemed more neutral while the latter had quite a bit of retrogression to it. Right around the same time, on this side of the Atlantic African Americans and other minority groups began to assert and demand their rights, which coincided with the liberation of African countries from the yoke of colonialism; here, too, anthropologists began to use the terms uniformly on both sides of the continent, including Asian countries. The interdependence of gender and ethnicity as you have explained is fluid and there are influential relations and confluence between the two.

            For our Eritrea, however, we must come to terms with the facts as they exist today. Let us focus in Diaspora, because we really do not have an accurate picture to make sensible illustrations inside Eritrea. Therefore, in diaspora, at least we know there are pockets of ethnic groups, in particular within Eritrean Muslim groups. Here, too, let us focus on this latter group. Since each ethnic group staying fenced within their respective ethnic groupings, what harm is it in bringing these groups together along their interests. For example, finding
            minimal areas of agreements that each subscribes to, such as the official
            language issues, such as the land issue, such as the constitutional issue,
            essentially, bringing very few pointers for starters from the document that is
            already publicly available for them: The Covenant (aka Majlis al-Mukhtar) as the basis for coming together for an ostensible discourse on many other issues with the highland groups in diaspora.

            So, I see no harm in this two pronged approach. In fact, it would make for a far more effective discourse between and among the many competing groups. At the root of it all rests the acknowledgment, the validation, and the respect that each ethnic group deserves to maintain its identity of choice. Once this is crossed, I firmly believe the unity in purpose will not be something that we would strive for any longer; it will be the only motto that will emerge by this process of social osmosis.

            This is something that srAt PFDJ will never want to see, because we all know its modus operandi has been and continues to be one marginalizing and disenfranchising each groups with the intent of complete subjugation; not only that but making sure that each fosters enmity toward one another, thereby keeping its power intact. Of course, all hell began to break loose when srAt PFDJ began to use this anachronistic tool on its own base, I mean that was the dumbest move on its part, because the base began to vote with its legs, if you will, by leaving the country empty and bereft of its vibrant and the most productive part of its society: The Youth.

            These are some of the notions that I really want to bring into the marketplace of ideas, the venue for which I see nothing more suitable than this space right
            here. That’s really all what my intention was and remains to be when I asked
            the question. Having the theoretical framework for these ideas is well and
            good, however, our Eritrean reality has its own trajectories and dynamics that
            attempting to make it fit into those frameworks may just not be what the doctor ordered. We can use the concepts that you laid out in using, for example, the economic means, which is really at the center of it all.

            No ethnic group will buy into alliances with any other group or groups if it does not see its economic interest in the matter. That is crucial formulation that must be taken into consideration. It is why srAt PFDJ’s sociopolitical engineering in the end backfired where it is now having difficult time trying to locate where its tail is, never mind the messed up head which is metaphorically illustrative in the picture that we see adorning SGJ’s piece – there is no there, there when it comes to that head, it is an empty skull or shell, if you like.

            Sincerely,
            BN

            P.S.
            Brother HTG, Beyan or Bayan is just as good, I appreciate the courtesy
            though.

          • saay7

            Selamat Bayan:

            I am trying to follow the thread and I may have lost it. I talked about identity politics. You asked me if ethnic politics is identity politics. I said yes ethnic politics is a subset of identity politics. I just thought that since this was so obvious, you were going some place with it. And now you are:)

            In the absence of an organizing ideology (or once people are disoriented by the failure of ideology), they revert back to familiar organizing principles. This is the case with ELF cadres after 1982 in Sudan or the Russians after the collapse of the Soviet Union. And the Diaspora Eritreans are in that exact comfort zone now. I find this neither surprising nor shocking.

            Now the question is: is the way to jolt them out of it by creating an inspiring and transcendent ideology or to accept the status quo and use ethnicity/religion as an organizing principle? The first is hard (what ideology?) but the payoff would be great. The second is easier but, once the taboo of that is gone (there is a self-consciousness, a level of guilt and secrecy associated with ethnic affiliations, no?) then there is no incentive for people to transcend their groupings: the most you can hope is a united front. And all you have done, I fear, is neti dictator teshrfo alekha: instead of 1 mega-dictator you end up with a dozen mini-dictators.

            Let’s take the Islamists as an example. Now, to my knowledge, no serious political organization (with the exception of PFDJ) has said “in a multi cultural multi faith country, there should be no room for an Islamist organization.” So now let’s pursue this free for all we are creating where people are negotiating on behalf of an ethnic groups or a religious group. Isn’t that what happened in Awassa: where people were incentivized to created dozens of fiefdoms and civilian warlords? Do u think the Islamists will come to me and you or ask for our advice or will they take us as “wsudat” and negotiate on our behalf although we never once chose them to speak on our behalf?

            To be continued….

            saay

          • Bayan Nagash

            Dear Sal,
            My reading in the tradition of virtual communication is that when I see “To be continued….”, the writer is telling me to not respond so as he may not lose his train of though and that he has some more stuff to add on the topic. Therefore, the virtual etiquette is that I respect that and back of until I get a signal of completion of thought. Up-voting this will suffice if I got it right.

          • saay7

            Hey Bayan:

            While I appreciate your courtesy, I think the “to be continued” is a freno mano after I read what I wrote and asked myself “what is this? Where is it going? What zeytehatete Hto is it answering? “. Please feel free to jump in and redirect the convo.

            Saay

          • Bayan Nagash

            Dear brother Sal,

            I appreciate your well thought out rejoinder. So far, we both established and agree on the “revert[ing]…to familiar organizing principles.” This is our diaspora reality on the ground after the demise of ELF in 1982, which has been about a little over three decades. Otherwise, it will be decontextualized language, which will get us nowhere. It is in that context I understood the reason why you brought ELF’s demise.

            Therefore, heeding your approach let me also furnish a little context in that let us take the historical context back to 1942, 1952, 1962, and 1972. I am only using this numbers following the demarcation date of 1982. Let me truncate the first three decades into this simple trajectory and dynamics in that the Eritrean Muslims overwhelmingly let it be known that Arabic was their language and that it should be the co-official language to Tigrinya. This was accepted by the Highlanders, which gave a resounding
            force its due legitimacy to Eritrea’s case. Now, add to this the 1970s ghedli history we know what happened when nHnan Elamanan became the driving principle of EPLF in the fight for independence as it convinced the Afar and the Saho block into its fold which led to the culmination of 1982 that you referenced.

            The Afars and the Sahos today are the staunchest archenemy to srAt Hgdef as are the other Muslim groups and so are the Tigrinya population increasingly becoming the enemy of srAt Hgdef. I only brought the first two because they believed in the EPLF as ghedli, but srAt Hgdef went back to its nHnan Elamanan principle even after the country’s dream of independence was realized.

            Where I want to take you with this, my dear friend Sal, is that the Tigrinya hegemony that began in the field never wavered when independence was realized and until now. That being the case, the Eritreans in diaspora overwhelmingly who supported the EPLF in the past and who remain to be loyal to srAt PFDJ now are the Tigrinya speaking crowd. Hope you
            took note of what HTG availed earlier today Hgdef’s Canada festival in which the overwhelming presence in the audience was from Tigrinya speaking Eritreans. I doubt anyone would refute that, but it is worth putting it out there for the sake of other readers.

            And here is where the clear distinction that needs to be made when you in passing remarked that that is why you hate TPLF ethnic project is this: TPLF srAt that is in Ethiopia and our own are two different cases. The former is only 10 percent of the population; as such it had to come up with a formula that will ensure its influence, which is completely under-standable.Over the long haul how sustainable is such an arrangement to
            governing remains to be seen. My interest is not Ethiopia at this junction; my focus is our predicament. I am only bringing it for contrast.

            The srAt we have in place is run by the majority from one ethnic group, namely, the Tigrinya. The way I see us rectifying past mistakes is the way it was done as aforementioned when Eritrean Muslims gathered together with their counterparts and each brought what it thought was the pressing issues that needed redressing and collectively they came up with the solution.

            So, you rightly asserted in your piece in that “the way to jolt them [Eritrean Muslim groups]… by creating an inspiring and transcendent ideology or to accept the status quo and use ethnicity/religion as an organizing principle.” For me, there is absolutely nothing wrong with doing what was done in the past, it worked then, it will work now. Remember, srAt PFDJ did not change its guiding principles to date, and the Eritrean Muslims
            overwhelmingly are reluctant to come to the opposition force because they have been burned by Tigrinya hegemony. It is the case of fool me once, shame on you; fool me twice shame on me. The best way to bring Eritrean Muslims is as through very few common principles that binds them together. When that is established, it would make it a whole lot easier for negotiations, sociopolitical contracts, temporary governing methods, such as constitutional mandates, and the like can be discussed with broader support from all sides coming readily and willingly.

            The advantage to this approach is this: The preemption of regional influences would be at its bare minimum. The discourse with Tigrinya speaking Eritreans will be far more transparent. That’s my take.

            Finally, I will leave you with the link to the report of the then UN Secretary General (Kofi Annan), report, which I firmly believe is applicable today as when it was written in 1998. Here is just one part which shows the internal factors that are the folly of many African nations. The following might as well be describing Eritrea:

            “More than three decades after African countries gained their independence, there is a growing recognition among Africans
            themselves that the continent must look beyond its colonial past for the causes of current conflicts. Today more than ever, Africa must look at itself. The nature of political power in many African States, together with the real and perceived consequences of capturing and maintaining power, is a key source of conflict across the continent. It is frequently the case that political victory assumes a “winner takes-all” form with respect to wealth and resources, patronage, and the prestige and prerogatives of office. A communal sense of advantage or disadvantage is often closely linked to this phenomenon, which is heightened in many cases by reliance on centralized and highly personalized forms of governance. Where there is insufficient accountability of leaders, lack of transparency in regimes, inadequate checks and balances, non adherence to the rule of law, absence of peaceful means to change or replace leadership, or lack of respect for human rights, political control becomes excessively important, and the stakes become dangerously high. This situation is
            exacerbated when, as is often the case in Africa, the State is the major
            provider of employment and political parties are largely either regionally or
            ethnically based. In such circumstances, the multi-ethnic character of most African States makes conflict even more likely, leading to an often violent politicization of ethnicity. In extreme cases, rival communities may perceive that their security, perhaps their very survival, can be ensured only through control of State power. Conflict in such cases becomes virtually inevitable.” (p. 5).

            https://www.issafrica.org/uploads/CAUSECONFLICT.PDF

          • Amanuel Hidrat

            Hey Saay,

            When you say ” This is the case with ELF cadres after 1982 in Sudan (who showed up at
            Friday prayers much to the shock of the civilians) or the Russians after
            the collapse of the Soviet Union (who renewed their love affair with
            their church.)” Is this Saay’s assumption or you are told by the conservative group within rank and files of ELF?

            I don’t think the people you are referring are from the regular ELF’s cadres who were teaching Marxism/Leninism philosophy. You see my friend, though Jebha Abay was dominated by the socialist philosophy orientation (mostly by the highlanders), there was all types of grouping with their own world view. There was an open ideological debate within the rank and files. I don’t think the blanket characterization to the ELF’s cadres is correct.

            regards,
            Amanuel Hidrat

          • saay7

            Hi Emma:

            I think the people I am referring to were from the irregular ELF cadres:)

            I like it how poor Field Marshall Mahmuday is harangued whenever he defends his EPLF but the mildest cricisim of ELF (an organization that splintered 33 years ago) and you are all over it.

            The larger point is: in the absence of a unifying -ism (an ideology), people revert back to traditional organizing principles: ethnicity, religion, region. Our choice then is to create an inspiring -ism or to accept people’s natural tendency to organize on the basis of ethnicity, religion, region.

            saay

          • Amanuel Hidrat

            Kubur Saay,

            EPLF was almost a homogenous organization (you know what I mean by that), and ELF was a hetrogenous organization with all the stripes of the Eritrean rainbow. Therefore, the contradiction that existed in the ELF organization and EPLF organization was different in nature. Take this as a fact as is. Then, when ELF pushed out from the field, the conspiracy of the Sudanese government was heavy hand on its integration to the extent of disarming them. Of course the rainbow of the organization was lost, and every social group went their way to organize and advocate for their representation in the state of Eritrea. Nothing wrong with that.

            Fast forward, the problem of Eritrean politics is not only authoritarian regime, but also the issue of representation of our diversity in governing the state of Eritrea. The issue is – “bigulbab liberalism” our social groups (the minorities) are marginalized. The debate between me and you, and hopefully others will join it, is how our social groups get fair sharing in governing the state of Eritrea. And what kind of governmental structure is conducive to address their issues. My argument is ( as depicted in the constitution you advocate) “centralized unitary government” will not do the job, or address their grievances. I will maintain this argument until we come to some resolution as a nation collectively.

            Regards,
            Amanuel Hidrat

          • Bayan Nagash

            Great counseling from my friend HTG. Friends in need are friends indeed. No worries about some Eritrean women throwing a fit about the appointment. In fact,

            Ato Fanti, you’re seeing this particular appointment through the West’s notions of feminism. The Eritrean feminists would have no problem accepting a man to such a position – they were there during the struggling years, at a whopping 33% (No 100% yet) but enough to make them feel comfy seeing a man representing their cause. Viewed from cultural and traditional standpoint, it would be a brilliant move on the women’s part, because it would accomplish two tasks at once:

            Making major statement about men could be partners on women’s cause a 100% (couldn’t resist this insertion) of the time. While the men will go bunkers on me almost like Donald Trump did on a Fox News reporter was it who was moderating…what is it with these Republicans and women’s private parts, anyway, gash Sal? At any rate, I could just see vicious attacks from macho Eritrean men calling me unflattering names, but it comes with the territory, I would just shrug it and move on, but you see to HTG’s genius on this, don’t you? (Gash Fanti, this is off the record. Let me clue you in on this secret: Have I shown my desperation in how badly I wanted the post but making it sound more beneficial to the larger cause of women rights and the betterment of society at large).

            Good Sunday morning to ya’all
            BN

          • Fanti Ghana

            Hello Prof. Bayan,
            I have been so slow this week that Saay has termed my condition as ‘self hanging mode.’ I didn’t even see the chance my best friend Haile TG created for me to redeem myself after giving you that un-position position of VP. I stand corrected, and I here by offer you that beautiful position, the beautiful that you are, and please remember me!

            PS
            Hey Bayan, I have some fantastic stories about my entanglement with ‘ማሕበር ደቂ’ንስትዮ ትግራይ’ which I can only tell when the sun comes out for all of us, and we are in a ‘men only’ coffee shop. Please remind me. I guarantee you hours of laughter.

          • Bayan Nagash

            Dear Fanti,

            When all is said and done I want to see nothing more than “the sun com[ing[ out for all of us” where we all as human being relish life, smell the coffee, appreciate the sun rise and sun set that we all take for granted.

            For such a beautiful wish – Ato Fanti – of good will to our region, I am dedicating the following beautifully rendered music between a living legend artists who seems to recognize he is off toward the sun set of his life; and is making sure that the young man Gossaye is ready to absorb it all continue the art legacy and Gossaye seems to be more than ready to enjoy his turn of artistic endeavors to which he is well suited for. What a beautiful rendition. I just love everything about this song.

            https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oetcpLWzyF0

            Cheers,
            BN.

            P.S. I will make sure to remember for you to tell me the story, drink will be on me all night. May we live to see the day of promise and an era of peace and tranquility in our region.

          • Fanti Ghana

            Hello Ustaz Bayan,
            This is Karma! I have an exclusive picture of me, one of my cousins, and Mahmud ahmed taken at a wedding about 4 years ago which I treasure. I love Gossaye. He spreads more positive energy more than any Ethiopian artist I know. The combination of Mahmud and Gossaye is a jewel. Thank you for that.
            Why Karma? The story I promised to tell you has Mahmud Ahmed’s

            ኣታውሩብኝ ሌላ ከሷ ዜና በቀር
            ኣሰራኝ ትብትብ ኣርጋኝ ሂዳለች ከሃገር

            in its center. That happened to me at that exact month this song came out, and how I self distracted afterward is hilarious. Just to wet your appetite, Yemane Barya was mysteriously involved; in person.

          • Bayan Nagash

            Kbur Fanti,

            Now, you’re really peaking my interest with the story as contextualized above. There appears to be a love story in which you fell head over heels at a rapid speed but the gesture was not reciprocated in kind. You see how you are getting my imagination to fecund in all directions. Heck, you even managed to include the late Yemane who would’ve been long dead – Do we have the Day of the Dead in our part of the world like they do in Mexico or what? But, I get it in how you are spicing the story through the use of the word “mysteriously” involving Yemane Barya (my all time favorite Tigrinya singer) “in person.” Hmm?

            So, two purpose with this Tigrinya song that I am about to share with you: it has what the Arabs call Haja wa Hujja, you will approximate its meaning gathering from the context below, if you don’t know Arabic that is.

            1. Let’s see what the song will conjure up? There is a level of subversion in the song that I like, which leads to the hujja part. The hujja part, again, is between you and me…I cannot let women know about my hidden agenda, now that you’ve made a politician out of me, which I will share with you, the king maker, knowing full well that you will keep the cord very short, maximum confidentiality is an absolute must – a mouthful sentence for you.

            2. You see how correct Haile TG was to advocate for my post related to gender equality. I am on it already sending subliminal message to my constituents that a woman can desire a man and even sing about it in such beautifully expressed language – so there, I stand for women’s rights in more ways than they and you think, showing intimate desires toward a man through art and public is no exception. I tell you, Fanti, this a post that you will grow to appreciate just like wine.

            https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CEz0SndbVZY

            BN

          • Kim Hanna

            Selam Fanti,
            .
            SAAY, interior minister. That is a cruel and unusual punishment. Give him a little break, just because he is winning his debates with you without being present does not justify this.
            .
            I know a position that will fit him perfectly. It is “Auditor General of All Ministerial Portfolios” to review and report the result of his audits to the nation on a regular basis.
            .
            Can you imagine when he goes to the Defense Dept. and Defense Minister Amanuel Hidrat posing for the press pictures with him. What a picture that says a thousand words.
            .
            The next Audit and picture in front of the Agriculture Department, the only one smiling is SAAY.
            .
            What a strange picture in front of the Finance Ministry, there was just a little smirk from both parties, another 1000 words worth.
            .
            In all cases, the darling of the press, “Auditor General SAAY” declares that he loves his job. The rest of us do too, so much so that the result of his audits has a 60 minutes segments in the U.S when it comes out.
            .
            Good night Fanti,
            .
            K.H

          • saay7

            His Fantiness:

            I was trying to figure out how do I pay back Abi for nominating me as Minister of Culture (isn’t that what the winning party gives the tiny party to keep it quiet in the coalition government? That or Sports) and then, since you are in a self-hanging mode this week, you not only nominated Tzigereda for Chairwoman of Eritrean Women’s Association but boasted that you are smart for doing it. Let the fireworks begin.

            I hope she unloads a long feminist rant on you:) It would make my Sunday if she did. Come on Tzigereda, give it to him.

            That’s the biggest flaw in a flaw-filled list. Amanuel for Defense Minister? He would make us the Lebanon to your Syria. We might as well rename ourselves DjEritrea. Semere Andom would be spending all his time talking to the fish and the wildlife on how Shaebia exterminated all their kin and kith: we would be exporting nothing! And Saba…did you say because of her age? Wow, do you always carry a shovel with you?

            Of course, no country should have a Minister of Information. I (naievely) applauded Ethiopia when it did away with that ministry before I realized it had absorbed it into its National Security apparatus. When you say Minister of Interior, do you mean the US kind of Secretary of Interior (land, water) or the Third World type of Minister of Interior (spying on your own citizens)? I am trying to see what level of hell you are wishing for me as all government jobs are hellish to a libertarian.

            I strongly object to the lack of representation from my school of chauvinism (Peace, Ted, Nitricc who will be Minister of Horses, checking their teeth.) This reminded me that KH once genuinely asked if there are horses in Eritrea. At a website. Whose logo is a man riding a horse.

            His Fantiness: May you be stuck in a broken elevator that pipes in non-stop Teddy Afro.

            saay

          • Abi

            Saay
            I wanted to say culture and sport but since the only sport in eritrea is cycling and you don’t have a clue about it , it remains ministry of culture. I like to see you running from one festival to the other.
            Your foreign minister will be the one and only Fanti Ghana.

          • Nitricc

            Hi SAAY; you are asking too much. lol it is all about the 100% epidemic. the Ethiopians will never be happy unless something is 100%. SAAY what is funny to observe is that even on this toothless selection; they selected the people who are easy to bend for them. it is amazing. one thing the Ethiopians have to understand is that, in order to have a normalization within the two countries; one country must be weaker and that country is not going to be Eritrea. they can take it or leave it.

          • saay7

            Ah Nitricc:

            You are not a big fan of win-win are you? Why must one country be weaker for the other to be stronger? Have you heard of “a rising tide lifts all boats”? Check it out. Get me? Cause I get you. I saw you in a movie once; not u personally, but a generic Nitricc:

            Coach trying to build team work: there is no “I” in “TEAM”!
            Nitricc: But there is an “I” in “WIN”

            Take easy, Corporal:)

            saay

          • Nitricc

            SAAY Corporal? oh well, try something. it is not Eritrean way to show off so, have it your way.

          • Mahmud Saleh

            Dear Nit
            Relax. This is a real people to people chit-chatting, nothing of an actionable plan. IA is still in bietemengsti until you lead your generation to make Eritrea a better place. You said bending. Well, nitrickay the world is navigated with a bit of a bending. You see PMHD bent president Obama a little bit; and sister Susan Rice did her bending message through the laughter she broke at the mention of the 100% EPRDF victory…it’s called diplomacy, or a diplomatic way of causing someone to bend. If you don’t do bending the rotter blade chops you off, and you become way shorter for the world to see you. Look what happened to our country. A nation that was promising, a nation that was riding high got reduced to a short sump, thanks to IA unbending. So, dear Nit, bending is not bad when done for the right purpose and at the right angle.
            NB: SAAY called you a corporal? No, that’s not mine. I’m hopeful that you will regain your title. We will have a serious talk, but good night for now.

          • Abi

            Hi Mahmud
            Before you go to bed I have to translate this comment into Amharic.
            ” lega senbleT leT wede meret.”
            SenbleT is a kind of tall grass when the wind blows it bends, when the wind pass it goes back to its original position. In short it is flexible.

          • Yoty Topy

            Hi Nitiricc,
            I implore you to look into the most successful Union in the African continent.i.e Tanzania/Zanzibar.

          • Amanuel Hidrat

            Hey Yoty Topy,
            Correction for you: The union of Zanzibar and Tanganyika brought the the birth of “Tanzania”.

            regards,
            Amanuel Hidrat

          • Yoty Topy

            Hi Amanuel Hidrat,
            Thank you. I stand corrected.

          • Fanti Ghana

            Hello Dearest Saay,

            1st the last person I talked to last night was you before I went to bed sofa. I had an appointment in Oakland this morning, and the traffic was worst than Monday morning, and then I opened my cell phone when I saw KH’s reply to me asking whether I was your attorney against myself. It was then down hill from there. losing a fight while your opponent is still in bed is not an easy trauma.

            Unless I am completely gone, I thought I was being clever with Tzigereda. She cares about gender equality, and she can stand her ground against any man when necessary. Please Tzigereda go back to bed.
            However I am correct about Saba. I see that I was not clear about the age, but I meant she is too young now and she should stay as assistant for 5 years before she assumes the full responsibility. I wrote it in English and your twisted mind had to read it in Arabic.

            Peace is quarantined for a month or he brings a release paper from Hayat whichever is sooner, but I actually had a plan for Ted until he blew it with one sentence recently, which I am not telling until he adds to it and confirms my suspicion or he redeems himself by clarifying it. Sssss! I don’t think he is Eritrean or Ethiopian.

            Oh! Saay, you won’t believe this but your curse of me stuck with Teddy already happened before. A friend of mine borrowed my car (bigger) and he had a Teddy CD stuck which refused to come out. The friend told me to keep it thinking that he was doing me a favor. That CD remained there for three month or so, and every time I forget and press ‘cd’ selection here comes Teddy and I press eject for several times before I remember. The music always started at the exact position as before, so it was pure torture.
            Selam.

          • Mahmud Saleh

            Dear FG
            What a break from a weak of serious talks. I think I have had enough of a laugh, ready to hit the bed. All of you, just hilarious. God bless you.

          • saay7

            His Fantiness

            If it makes u feel any better, your opponent was not asleep: he was on the same freeway heading to Berkeley. I actually have proof because I was driving 5 mph: ( one of 3 reasons why I am ditching this state:).

            As for stuff men consider ordinary language and women consider offensive, you won’t learn it from your mom, you won’t learn it from your girlfriend/wife. You will only learn it from your daughter.

            Ah, stuck CDs. Not as bad as jammed tapes though. Remember with those u need a surgery knife to untangle, a Philips screwdriver to open the case, cut the tape, align it, scotch tape and the revel in your craftsmanship as the part u taped was the wrong side. Never happened to me either.

            saay

          • Fanti Ghana

            Hello Saay,
            It helps big time. I was more irritated imagining your smirk than my own downfall. Bay area is getting worst by the day. It is getting to me too. I think there is some conspiracy by those who want to build another bridge to East bay or by those who seem to benefit from the current quagmire.

          • Tzigereda

            Hi Fituw Fanti,
            You are lucky, I dont rant sundays.

          • Fanti Ghana

            Hello Embeytey Tzigereda,
            If you only knew how far down I have reached this week!

          • Ted

            Hi Fanti, very funny. If the Prime Minister’s plane lifts off with interior minister in it, the ‘the unfortunate plane accident” is bound to happen. We are not calling names but when it happens your Financial Minister is well equipped more than others to be “Minister for Shredding Ghedli archive” . The Cabinet definitely approve the position without a vote.

          • saay7

            Hey Ted:

            I thought the “unfortunate plane accident” happened only in the Great Lakes (South Sudan, Rwanda) and we were safe in the Horn…until wikileaks told us Isaias Afwerki was furious at Meles Zenawi because he almost had an “unfortunate plane accident.”

            In 1996, while returning from a vacation in Kenya, Isaias, his family, and his inner
            entourage stopped in Addis, where Meles offered to fly them back to Asmara in one of his aircraft. Isaias accepted the offer; en route the aircraft caught fire, but managed to turn
            back and land safely in Addis. According to someone who was on the aircraft, an infuriated Isaias accused Meles to his face of trying to kill him and his family. Isaias has not
            trusted Meles since, according to this source.

            In all the analysis of the cause of the Eritrea-Ethiopia war, this is never mentioned because (a) we didn’t know about it until wikileaks and (b) Isaias never goes on vacations but “working visits”.

            saay

          • Fanti Ghana

            Hello Brother Ted,

            You gave me a very important suggestion with your “Minister for Shredding Ghedli archive,” except that I am not going to be as obvious as you are, so I will rename it “Minister of Ghedli Archives Preservation” instead and scrap ‘librarian’ from our vocabulary for good. No sane person will accept that assignment, and that was the reason I did not list it above.
            Thank you.

          • Ted

            Hi Fanti, you are dealing with inherently naive northern neighbours, as you very well know they don’t get subliminal messages “Preservations”. “No sane person will accept…. “, It doesn’t seem sanity is on your criteria selecting the officials. ዪዕብድ ገላጋይ ድንጋይ ያቀብላል except you are not crazy.
            It is all good.
            Please pass this link to Abi. Him, especially us need him to use GeeZ font. It is self explanatory, what about Tigrigna commentary to for a curve ball -:)

            https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O5oq23PmULY

          • Mahmud Saleh

            Hey abi
            Because you are my favorite Ethiopian, I will do it.
            1. Tig part: something like ” alas! even without running against them[ for presidency], they have already crushed/safocated us.”
            2. Who is napping? The guys in Asmara. Have you heard of kifli hagerawi deHnenet? Oh, I forget the tigrigna problem. Rather, the Dept of the National Security.
            3. Gual Adem, for Ethiopian premiership? Goode fela abi!! She is an Eritrean. It’s official.
            4. Hayat/Mahmud discussion taking the site to a higher level?
            Naturally, I’m anti-establishment. I don’t like to echo what others say if I fill is bull-shitish, to use Gual Adem’s words. She used them twice today. Frankly, I do have disaggreements with her, but she is a good debater. I respect her for that.

          • Abi

            Hi Mahmud
            I’m honored to be your favorite ethiopian. you are an honorable person.

            Yes, Hayat for prime minister! We don’t check birth certificate. If we like the color of your eyes, you are ours.
            I don’t expect you to agree with Hayat all the time. It is not human.
            “If two people agree all the time , one is not thinking.”
            Hagerawi dehninet is hizb dehninet in Amharic or dehninet in short. The people are called ” joro” like joro Tebi.
            Your debate with Hayat is a model for everyone to copy.
            Thanks.

          • Fnote Selam

            Dear Mahmud and Fanti,

            You are so deserving and capable Mahmud, on many levels….

            But on the bigger picture, I am lamenting the fact that we, Eritreans, repeatedly failed to give opportunity to (and stand by) so many capable Eritreans (Mahmud being one of them) to lead our institutions and our nation….

            anyway, late than never….

            Best,

            FS

          • Fanti Ghana

            Hello Fnote,
            Good confusion! But
            በጃኹምንዶ ሓንቲ ገድሊ መስርቱ ኢልናዮም ኣብዮምናስ ንስኻ ድማ መራሕቲ ኹኑ ትብሎም? ከይተህድመልና በጃኻ፤፤

      • Peace!

        Dear Hayat,

        I did not intentionally accuse the entire opposition members. If I did, I stand corrected.

        Regards

    • Ted

      Hi Dear, the greatest, field marshal, MS. Well said.
      Urgent request to reinstate the General. The troops are in disarray.

      • Mahmud Saleh

        Hello the great
        Well, the supreme command is still considering Nitrickay’s case; until then he is “frozen” because of insubbordination. mKri/teezaz slezeysemEe deskilu alo. As you know, discipline and cohesion are very important in today’s army. Run-away Generals will cause us another 1998, albeit on the cyber territory.

        • Ted

          Hi, The Greatest MS
          As you know our missile defence system(Gualka, selam) is on forced leave, the two soldiers (Nitricc and Peace) are being attacked by “Friendly” fire on their Ethiopian reconnaissance mission called operation Justice for all, Muslim and christian .We never had Run-away Generals before and we are not going to start now. We kindly request your reconsideration. Tes is already smelling blood:-)

          • Mahmud Saleh

            The great Ted
            Don’t worry, our front is formidable. There is a transition of systems underway, from damb weapon system to smart one. Keep on monitoring the situation. The rest, I will give a detailed explanation when I get time. Please let tes have a good night. You just want a fight! No advances without an order. It’s strict.

  • Dear all,

    Please note that a while ago, we suggested that limiting music and arts to weekends only (that will be Saturday and Sunday,only). Lately, we are observing that some of you are overdoing the video sharing activity, sometimes three or four clips on a single comment. The serious violators know themselves, and we kindly ask them to slow down and stop posting unrelated clips repeatedly. Please limit arts and music to Saturday and Sunday because you are contributing to the discouragement from discussing the content of the article under which the distracting clips are being posted.

    • Abi

      Kbur Wardya
      Yezarew wardya ber lay quch yalut
      Shimaglew nachew tolo yemiqoTut
      Yene aya Gadi ebakwo ayiqoTu
      Man yisemawotal wedetach biwerdu, wedelay biweTu
      Arfew yiqemeTu
      Muziqa eyadameTu

      With respect.

  • T..T.

    Hi Nitricc,

    Like any Isayasist, your hatred is driven by fear. Nice to see you engaging those you fear. The process of engaging your enemies will help you to self-examine and free yourself from hatred.

    I hope one day you will come to know that hatred is contagious. You started with your neighbors and IGAD, then the whole Africa, followed by the US and the whole world including the UN. No one is free from your hatred so long every one envies your freedom. What freedom!!! Do you have enviable freedom? WayGoooood! Even those Eritrean babies, mothers, elderly and youth who are drowning in the high seas are not safe from your hatred. See, how hatred is contagious.

  • Peace!

    Dear Mahmuday,

    Fair enough, thank you. I wish I was challenged with those questions you eloquently put in your comment, but unfortunately the response was ridiculous and unsurprisingly unbelievable. What’s more disappointing was the response of our prominent veteran opposition member (leader) Amanuel Hidrat and the silence of professor Bayan Nagash: Amanuel Hidrat’s response was pretty much straight forward—so what PDFJ is doing it too; where were you when 120 Muslim Eritreans killed and his personal attack was beyond disrespectful, and Bayan Nagash; not only he was silent and uncomfortable, but also he even tried to change the subject as if the issue goes away by just ignoring it (yes I am talking about our professor Bayan Nagash). As for our Ethiopian friends, as you may sense, pretty much all are pro government and are more interested in lecturing us on how and why we should fight against injustice as if the justice in Ethiopia is solid and sound, but at least they were smart enough to keep their mouth shut perhaps because the unfolding injustice at home is a result of the government they support. On a bright side, my two big thumbs up to Fhanti Ghana, he shares the tragic pain; I have enormous respect for him; he is honest and valuable asset to our awate university, and of course Saay came up big and made great points.

    Now, I was simply trying to share what was a headline news on almost all major news media, but here, it turned into a powerful mercury and accentuated the genuinely of some of the pro justice, and not surprisingly, the result was disappointing. It is safe to say the vocabulary of JUSTICE in the opposition or justice camp is regrettably LIMITED; so far, it fails to extend its hand as far as to Ethiopian Muslims, and it is only a matter of time before we find out how far it goes within Eritrea.

    Reagrds

    • Abi

      Peace!
      Your friends from ethiopia will never tell you there is justice and democracy in ethiopia.
      I was following the debate quietly. Honestly, I didn’t like your approach. You made it sound like the injustice is only on the muslim brothers. No, injustice is everywhere, on everybody.

      • Peace!

        Dear Abiye,

        Ebakeh, Abiye! I understand, but the topic was very specific; it was a headline everywhere including on almost all social media. You had a chance to impress your tour guide guy, but you failed big time.

        Now I am imagining… you saying REALLY…REALLY ….PEACE … In the middle of Massawa-;)

        Regards

    • saay7

      Hi Peace!

      This can’t be a bad thing because this is the longest posting this forum has seen from you:) You know, Peace, when you go to department stores like Nordstrom and you use the main entrance it is always the fragrance department. And there is so much over-fragrancing you want to make a bee-line to anywhere? This forum is like that when Ethiopia is raised–the cosmetics department shows up to perfume her:)

      Now. I think your approach of calling the TPLF sectarian is, um, makes people defensive. And your expectation that some SERIOUS OPPOSITION would jump to criticize Ethiopia is unrealistic. I will give you an example: I think the entire time Omar Al Bashir was ethnic cleansing the Darfurians the Eritrean opposition was in Sudan. Do you think for one nano-second they crticized Omar Al Bashir? Do you think the Eritrea-hosted Ethiopian opposition will criticize Isaias Afwerki? Such is the life of the exiled opposition: he has to advocate for justice in his country while turning a blind eye to injustice in his host country.

      What is puzzling is why individuals and civil society are quiet. I mean the whole reason people remain unaffiliated to political organizations and the whole reason civil society exists is so it can fill the vaccum left by political organizations. I don’t think there is any malice intended–give people the benefit of doubt–they actually think every ticking second that goes towards discussing Ethiopia is a ticking second that could have been used to discuss injustice in Eritrea.

      As for our Ethiopian brothers (don’t tell Sudan, guys, but you are our favorite Southern neighbor), what the EPRDF has done is something disastrous. The Dimtsachn Yisemma guys should win some award for resisting the provocation of the EPRDF to change their organization from a peaceful to an armed group. Man, did they try. And the DY guys persisted in remaining peaceful. So now the Anti-Terrorist Proclamation has found them guilty of trying to create an “Islamic State” inside Ethiopia. You know what that means? If a group of Muslims say we want to choose our own Imam, we want to oversee our own financial affairs, then they calling for the creation of an Islamic State within Ethiopia. Do you think the next generation of DY will be peaceful?

      When you close off paths to peaceful resistance, you better win and win decisively or you will create paths to armed resistance. Of course the EPRDF knows this well which is why they used a sledgehammer on DY. But if they are wrong, the next DY won’t be peaceful. By the same token, if one wants to understand why Dr. Berhanu Nega moved to Eritrea to wage an armed struggle from the United States…well, if you sentence someone to death in absentia AND pressure the host country to name his organization a terrorist org, then haven’t you closed off all possible paths for peaceful engagement?

      Anyway, do carry on, PEACE. And once in a while, insert the Sunnah when you are posting, or add an asterisk at the end that says, “nothing in what I wrote above is meant to imply I support the PFDJ which is a terrible organization.”

      saay

      • Peace!

        Dear Saay,

        I totally agree! I honestly was not trying to arouse some sort of resentment or condemnation; I was simply sharing the stunningly unfair justice. Nevertheless, some how I have to overcome my skepticism and lack of confidence on opposition groups. That’s my biggest problem. Thank you again!

        Regards

      • Amanuel Hidrat

        Saay Arkucha,

        You lamented on every organization be it political or civic. Can I lament on you for not becoming an alternative to them? Is that fair to lament on you? For me it is fair and square. When some one start to lament about others, he must be able to fill the vacuum that exist from the failure of the civic and political organizations.

        Regards,
        Amanuel Hidrat

        • saay7

          Hey Emma:

          Well, you know, at this fine University, we have done the Song of Songs, Ecclesiastes so why not the Book of Lamentations.

          In this particular case, I am explaining and rationalizing why Eritrea’s political organizations (those in EDA, those in Bayto/Majlis) are hamstrung from criticizing Ethiopia and it is bad politics to do so. (Remember when the ELF, in a stunning case of “men kebdkhum regixkum” criticized Egypt for the Camp of David accords, haha.) But individuals like you and me, civil society which is concerned with justice should have no hesitation to criticize injustice anywhere including in Ethiopia. The question, Emma, is when you are creating an independent, self-sustaining Eritrean civil society, who are your Ethiopian allies: the EPRDF or those organizations opposed to the heavy-handedness of the EPRDF?

          My last article was called “The Churning” and I feel that a Mega Civil Society is being created and its membership will be made up of both Eritreans who have either no affiliation with existing political orgs and Eritreans who have an affiliation with existing political orgs. It is diverse, it is action-oriented, it is self-sustaining and it is serious. My role is not to lead it but to hope that from every 1,000 words I write, it will find 10 that are actionable:)

          saay

          • Amanuel Hidrat

            Merhaba Saay,

            I doubt we have a “Mega civic society” and I don’t think the “civic sphere” is created in the Eritrean political landscape. Not yet my friend. The effort is to create the civic sphere – the third pillar of future “Eritrean state” along with the other pillars – the private sector and the democratic government. The nascent civic organizations are not yet organized on their specialties – and will undergo a lot of metamorphosis. Second the current priorities, the struggle against the regime make it difficult to evolve and create the civic sphere as it should be.Slowly but surely we are building the infra-structure that are needed for civic societies. You question is we don’t have any civic alliances with Ethiopian civic societies, and that if they have them anyway.

            Second with the caliber you have, political punditry is not enough for the Eritrean political conundrum. More input is demanded from you and like you to change the discourse of our politics.

            Regards,
            Amanuel Hidrat

          • saay7

            Ah, Emma:

            This is a familiar territory for us. You invite me, I say no. Then you say what I am doing is not enough. Then I say, “I am sorry.” Then you say don’t be sorry do more. Then I say “Eich embley”. Then you say that’s rude. Then I say I am sorry. Then you say don’t be sorry, do more then…I go all Shermanesque on you and:

            “If drafted, I will not run; if nominated, I will not accept; if elected, I will not serve.”

            saay

          • Ted

            Hi, saay, i can understand why you don’t want to be a group member who would accept you as one. if it is any conciliation we absorb more 10 actionable things. Plug away, we, from both side of the isle, are learning. Educated foe is better than the damn one.

          • saay7

            Hi Ted:

            Aren’t you a Detroit Lions fan? This is for you, Nitricc, Mahmuday and awates NFL correspondent Haqi who has a perfect record so far. So does Nitricc: perfectly wrong:)

            saay

          • Nitricc

            Hi SAAY lol

            “”If drafted, I will not run; if nominated, I will not accept; if elected, I will not serve.”

            what if i sentenced you to 20 years in prison for attemptening to create ISIS; what will you do?
            lol

          • saay7

            Nitriccay:

            That’s not my line: it’s by Sherman. And whenever journalist ask a person if s/he is running for office, they always compare the answer with Sherman’s and say “it’s not Shermanesque.”

            If you SENTENCE me to 20 years then you will already be ahead of PFDJ because these words don’t mean anything to them: self-defense, evidence, sentence, term, good behavior, family visitation, appeal, overturn, conviction.

            By the way, when you were discussing the Ethiopian education system, I was going to share something with you because you had accidentally swerved into the truth 🙂 But I didn’t want the cosmetics department to be hurt so I let it go.

            saay

          • Amanuel Hidrat

            Merhaba Saay,

            The easiest job is critiquing for those who are trying to bring changes proactively either in civic activity or political activity. Unfortunately, that is what we are doing here any way.

            regards,
            Amanuel Hidrat

          • saay7

            Hey Emma:

            Nah, I can think of at least three others: (a) saying nothing and (b) praising everything (c) self-flagellation. Now those are easy jobs. Critiquing while giving suggestions for improvement is actually not an easy job.

            Not everyone is wired for politics. While we are at it, I didn’t say we have a mega civil society (you really need to read slowly Emma), I said we have the makings of one. An effective umbrella of civil society will come sooner than an umbrella of political organizations. That should please you: aren’t u a member of a civil society?

            saay

    • Hayat Adem

      Dearest Peace,
      I always find your brief inputs interesting and thought provoking. But you are not the kind of guy (assuming) I could trust have a confidence on. What I know is you are smart and you are not boring. And now you are saying things and blaming names, so I’ll not go easy on you. You need to have a recognized ground or reason to point fingers at others. If you are asking to be taken seriously on that issue of justice and your concerns honest, fine but there are two things that discourage me. One, you are not telling me what really happened with these guys (saay did a bit, that was informative); two, (in the absence of such fact-based inventory) your past reputation doesn’t encourage me to take you at face value.

      Did you, at one point in this forum say “Dear all Ethiopians, without Eritrea being on your side, you will never win any battle against anyone?” Too much ego there and zero truth! Did you also accuse the entire opposition of being a sellout by saying, “When it comes to the unjust severe sanction our country is facing, no one should declare victory other than shameful hungry of power ” sellouts.”? Why are accusing these what you once called power-hungry sellouts for not defending justice in Ethiopia?

      Did perhaps your statements about scaring and separating the Tigriyans tell the Ethiopians you are not probably concerned about the convicted Muslims but trying to advance something else? Here is what your words at one time conveyed that:”Tigray, not Ethiopia, needs Eritrea because Eritrea is a backdoor for our Tigryan cousins, in case the oppressed Oromos and Amharas manage to drive the current minority dictator out”. How is that you are so worried now about 18 Muslim defendants and their days in court? Well, you could but try to package it for us fact-based message. Then, we can look in to the credibility of the facts and the implications on justice. Then, we may find you valid or not valid.

      You are accusing justice seekers for their limitations of the sense of justice promotion because they are quite on the issue and you named few names on that. You are accusing them because they didn’t echo your call. But you didn’t seem to have any love and respect for Ethiopians some monthes ago when mocked on Ethiopians receiving aid and begging from the haves. When someone reacted angry of your privy and interference, you said this: “I am a US taxpayer, and that means, I am feeding some of your people. please be thankful.”. Would this guy take you seriously when you come around and ask him to see the plight of injustice-victims in Ethiopia?

      Your bad taste about Tigriyans specifically acted out of your inside heart in one of your comments to one Meqeletay when you drove a point of your vision of Ethiopia whereby there will be a day Ethiopia favors Asmara than Meqele. Your exact words: “I think you missed the point. It is not about the current Ethiopia that is ruled by the despised minority dictatorship; it is about the genuine Republic of Ethiopia where Asmara is more welcome than Mekele”.

      I am always puzzled why Eritreans who had some kind of experience living Ethiopia in the past and now supporting the regime or not-yet in the opposition have a bad wish for the entire Ethiopia but more acutely for Tigriyans. The ones that don’t have Ethiopian experience are so sympathetic to Tigryans first and to the whole Ethiopia next. I’m not sure about the last assertion except the refugee flow is more to Tigray than to Afar, for example. And you have seen the beautiful Rahwa and Bilal how so typically they feel at home in that community. But people like you, Peace, visit Ethiopia every while and all they talk is hate. Look at to what you had to say to Abi a year ago: “I thought you are an Ethiopian, right? How about some research on Ethiopian refugees, terrorist Ethiopian journalists, disenfranchised Oromos, imprisoned innocent religious leaders? you seem to worry too much about Eritrea, I don’t know why. Nevertheless, Eritreans are now more worried about social tensions in Ethiopia than where Eritrea is heading. I came back from Addis recently, I was surprised to find out that speaking tigriyna in down town of Addis can get you killed. Please share it with your friends and families.” And you have the nerve to talk about justice and accuse the Eritrean opposition camp as power hungry sellouts on the one hand and this :” [The opposition] fails to extend its hand as far as to Ethiopian Muslims, and it is only a matter of time before we find out how far it goes within Eritrea”

      Here is my favorite line from you, Peace. You were talking about the hero fighter jet pilot Degen. “While there is no excuse for imprisoning any citizen without charge, why pilot hasnt said anything he may have done wrong? You cant throw someone in prison for 15 years for no reason, unless for collateral. I mean just because he was not charged, it doesnt mean he is innocent.” Soooooo funnnny! “Just because he is not charged, doesn’t mean he is innocent”. Please help! How do you express your laughter using a keyboard? Peace, I mean you Peace: Have you ever heard of a legal concept called “presumption of innocence”? It means, you are innocent until proven guilty. Not until you are charged, until proven guilty!!! Even if Degen was charged, it doesn’t mean he would lose innocent status. But he was not charged as you know. He was not event told of his crime, let alone to the court. So, what kind of justice promoter are you?

      Remember this: you are still welcome to discuss and participate on issues of justice. Only based on enumerated facts and events not on grounds of moral and principles. Those options are for people who built their reputation on consistency and good faith.
      Hayat

      • Peace!

        Dear Hayat,

        Wow! I will reply when time permits.

        Regards

        • Hayat Adem

          Dear Peace,
          You don’t have to. You have already wowed me. I wish don’t have anything to add to this.
          Hayat

      • Amanuel Hidrat

        Dear Hayat,

        I can’t believe that you have profiled all what Peace had said in the past. Wonderful, and that is why you are a great Debater and never lost, even one. You are a great asset to this wonderful forum.

        regards,
        Amanuel Hidrat

        • Nitricc

          Hi Aman that is exactly what her job is. Now; who will sacrifices his/her precious time to profile such nameless and faceless person? Here you have it all the proof that what I have been saying about this woman.

          • Amanuel Hidrat

            Nitrickay,

            Hayat is a well read with analytical mind. Even if we have different take on issues, I love her approach, basically on fact finding argument, to assess reality, in order to give an educated judgement. She is sober and collected on what she want to say. No matter we could have divergent view, we always learn something from her. You don’t have to agree on everything with her, if you have something to agree with, that is enough with me or with anyone for that matter. You might be surprised, but let me tell you something, I agree with you on something, and that is the love to our country. With Hayat we have many we agree on, that includes ideological view and philosophical approach to issues. So she has many virtue to contribute to this forum as many does. Start to love her on her contribution to our political debate.

            Regards,
            Amanuel Hidrat

        • Ted

          Hi, Amanuel H. You present yourself as crusader of TRUST among people struggling for justice. I wish it is true to your identity who works building bridges among Eritreans(we badly need it) but you are justice seeker of another kind who spends much of his time trying to shove TPLF’s agenda in to our throat with unsolicited advice and showing up like a valet to complement every time the TPLF agent come to spew her venom. What “Peace” posted has its own context and ‘she” as usual try make it about her defending Ethiopia but in truth she is nothing but TPLF agent under Muslim woman skirt. If you fail to see her nature, i don’t know what to make of you.

          • Nitricc

            Hi Ted, there is a kicker to it. the first muslim woman to defend and celebrate because Muslims unjustly sentenced to prison. Ted, let me make a prediction and you can pass along to our Muslim woman. get this, EPDRF and Weyane will collapse before PFDJ does. so, the innocent Muslims who are subjected to unjust imprisonment; will be freed by the victories fighters.

          • Ted

            Hi, Nitricc, the news Ethiopian muslim were charged on boggess charges is all over the media. The Muslim lady who knows the prosecution of Muslims all over the world, let alone Ethiopians who have the history of peaceful coexistence, to accuse and shoot the messenger is ironic. Her argument , “peace” had said insulting things about Ethiopia. I don’t think he did in the context. irregardless, how civil do we need to be towards our Ethiopian neighbours. Do they expect us to forget that they were willing to be the minesweepers of TPLF(the organization they despise ) so once again they control us, see us defeated and humiliated. Do you think TPLF would have opposition or difficulty governing Ethiopia today if they had succeeded in the Bademe war. No, they would been hailed as the vanguard of Ethiopia to rule forever. The saddest part; Eritrean opposition in Ethiopia live in the dark to see the reality.

          • haileTG

            Hi Nitricc,

            Let is assume as you say Hayat Adem is EPRDF/TPLF [which I don’t share], from your point that she is “…the first muslim woman to defend and celebrate because Muslims unjustly sentenced to prison.” Are you implying EPRDF/TPLF is ENTIRELY Christian and ALL Muslims should be asumed to rise up against the “Christians”???

            NB: When I read Hayat’s documented feedback on Dejen vs the Ethiopian Muslims, I was indeed saddened to note that after all the blood shed to make Eritrea independent, some people are that far behind to want nothing more than religious caliphate.

          • Nitricc

            Hi Haile; on your first paragraph; you missed my point in its entirety. from my observation of this world, Muslims have the most tight kinship and they tend to lean at each other more than any thing, be it race, Christians and other compartments of societies. If Hayat was a Muslim, there is no way she would jumping in joy because the corrupted EPRDF sentenced innocent muslims. my point was just to point out her fak-nness. From what i see in Ethiopia; i don’t think there will be any Muslim Christians problem. Ethiopian Muslims are not too fanatic to cause any problem. Although, if the Ethiopian Muslims are dealt with injustice, like this one, it is a matter of time to be a problem.
            Dejen stroy is something what PIA must be answer.

          • Saleh Johar

            Hi Nitricc,
            The what you wrote,”Muslims have the most tight kinship and they tend to lean at each other more than any thing, be it race, Christians and other compartments of societies.”

            You sound like a clueless person for one who is from Eritrea. You think Muslims would mow each othe mercilessly all over the world if that was the case? Many people, including you, do not realize that most of the world’s victims are Muslims of Muslim fanatic groups. And all of us are cluelessly lambasted wth the crazy in a sad wholesale condemnation by the clueless of the world. Go to Any war torn region and prove the strong kinship among Muslims, you can’t. Please don’t add insult to injury.

          • Nitricc

            HI SJ. i was speaking regionally. what you have in Ethiopia is, very liberal muslims. even their names half and half. for example, you hear a Muslim Ethiopian calling himself, Kebede Ali. some even consume alcohol, so, what you have none fanatic Muslim incapable radicalizing it self to the level of fanatic Muslims. I can say the same think about Eritrean’s Muslims. However, this is my observation. And i believe you will correct me if i have the wrong observation.

          • Saleh Johar

            Hi Nitricc,
            Again, you are wrong.

            1. For instance, how would you explain an American, white named, Tom, joining ISIS? Fanaticism and liberalism have nothing to do with names–that is called stereotyping, dear Nitric. It is just like any person named Mohammed is a suspect and should be put on the no-fly list. Remember that?
            2. Names are governed by the culture of a region, they have nothing to do with ideologies–after all, parents give names, babies do not choose their names.
            3. You also need to know the history behind names. Historically, Muslims always used names from the Quraan, Arabic names while Christians use Biblical Hebrew names–some are adopted as it, like Daniel and Mohammed, others are corupted a little: Isaias for Isaiah, Ismaaeel for Ishmiail, etc.
            4. Many Abyssinians with names that give away the religion of the person were sidelined during the “Abyssinian inquisition”, mainly Atse Yohannes. Many Muslims adopted Christian sounding names to hide their faith–and that is how names like Mebrat, Lemlem, etc seeped into the Muslim populace.
            5. Consuming alcohol is not a sign of anything–the guys who hit the twin towers were drinking all night before they boarded the planes.
            6. Having non Arabic names is not a sign of a liberal view–that is lame Nitricc. Then is someone is Mohammed he should be a fanatic, right? Does it mean an Eritrean Muslim named Hagos Berhanu (just a pick) could not be a radical person, same as a person named Tesfai Girmay (just a pick) can never be a fanatic? Drop that Nitricc
            7. There are fanatics and moderates in any society–you can’t say “incapable” of being radicalized. Check what Afghanistan used to be before the Soviet Union invaded and in rejection to communism, we see the radicalization we see now. Read “The Kite Runner” to have a glimpse of what the country looked like, You wouldn’t believe the transformation.

          • Nitricc

            Hi SJ, well, let me take a shoot at point number of yours.

            you said, ” For instance, how would you explain an American, white named, Tom, joining ISIS?”

            I don’t know if you know this but 18% American youth is unemployed. if you think about it that is very high for highly developed country. Adding that with the youth in prison and the youth that is hooked up with drugs and pain killers; it is troubling to comprehend the magnitude of the problem the US government chose to ignore it . i.e. adding it all together; it is not too hard to think and to believe why a white American person will join the ISIS, simply put, in their mind ISIS gives them a purpose for their purpose-less lives.
            next i will address point number 2.

          • Amanuel Hidrat

            Hi Ted,

            I have almost stopped engaging you. But since you accused me of shoving TPLF agenda to your throats, can you mention some of the agenda I have tried so far? Bring them up please? Don’t try to bring some nasty blackmailing from the PFDJ manual book. If you believe Hayat is an agent under Muslim woman skirt, then how do I know whether Ted is not an agent of PFDJ – a Christian with a man’s pant? Why don’t argue on ideas rather than dancing on the suspicion world? The problem with you is that you don’t know that you are suspected person. But why are you engaging in such filthy behavior? Can’t you learn from the humble people in the forum?

      • Peace!

        Dear Hayat,

        Usually your sugarcoated replies are impressive and to the point although I don’t share your false hope for “Greater Tigray”. But on this one you miserably failed to impress me perhaps because your intention was to pay back your friend for the unconditional up-votes.

        With due all respect your excuse to justify whatever in your mind is nothing but a plain silly; this is what you said ”One,you are not telling me what really happened with these guys (saay did a bit,that was informative); two, (in the absence of such fact-based inventory) your past reputation doesn’t encourage me to take you at face value.” Fine. But why didn’t you ask for clarification then if you were really interested to learn? Not that I believe you didn’t know, but at least you simply could pretend as if Google doesn’t exist. Fast forward:“Did you, at one point in this forum say “Dear all Ethiopians, without Eritrea being on your side, you will never win any battle against anyone?” Yes I did said that and I will said it again and again…How many times do I have to tell you Eritrea is a back door for minority TPLF government? Why do you think TPLF is dragging our toothless opposition groups from conference to conference? Please don’t hate me for being honest. You kept on going and said, “Did you also accuse the entire opposition of being a sellout” Not all of them. If I did, I stand corrected. Otherwise, yes there are a bunch of sellouts working for TPLF including those who wish to see TPLF invaded Eritrea. As for, “Why are you accusing these what you once called power-hungry sellouts of not defending justice in Ethiopia?” I didn’t accuse them please re-read my comment; it just won’t make any sense for a sellout to stand against his boss. The rest, all were logical questions, not statements.

        peace!

    • tes

      Dear Peace!

      I am refraining myself from indulging myself further after I got your line of thinking. It took me a long time to taste your politics. Hayat Adem has said some strong points that I could have addressed. I was reading you but I couldn’t make an exact converging point where we can have head-to-collision. Honestly, I am an all rounded justice seeking advocate. But when I see people opposing one and supporting the other, I can’t help myself accepting it.

      saay7 may support your tag but I am afraid he is changing himself into an end-receiver rather than the way he used to be. If he was concerned about the our Muslim brothers in Ethiopia, he could drop a single article two years before (remember the case was since 2013) and stand on behalf, at least sharing what he feels about. Instead, he preferred to be silent observer. Then what happened to raise from the ashes so late and seem concerned. If TesfaNews (Aka Turning News) brought it as a headline, they have a reason to do so. We are following what they are inferring based hate and enmity.

      Another point is: you are accusing TPLF to be a sectarian governor. Well, what is your point here? If you are opposing everything Eritrea has at this time (PFDJ, Opposition and so on), what is your take then? Are you looking for a country lead by religious clergies?

      Well, this is my last converse in this topic. I didn’t write you to give me a response (I am happy that you will ignore it as usual) and hence just read it if you are interested if not, it is a self talk.

      For now, I have chosen to be a silent reader.

      tes

      • Kim Hanna

        Selam tes,
        .
        Well tes, this is also my last converse with this guy.
        .
        You must read what Hayat has written below. She turned the flood light on this guy “peace” and all his maneuverings. He is a piece of work. He posted his ooh oohta the day of the verdict with such concern for justice for a neighbor. It turns out his concern was the Eritrean Muslim opposition cozying with Ethiopia or TPLF as he refers to us still. That was his political angle.
        .
        I don’t think he even read anything other than the headline from a friendly web sight. That was enough to spit his venom far and wide. That is also why I prefer people like Ali Salim than this “peace” guy. Ali Salim tells you up front that he prefers to see Ethiopia disintegrate because he believes Eritrea would fair better. From then on you read his articles and posts with that caveats to his thinking. “peace” on the other hand comes all concerned and hurt, wondering why the world is not concerned that such injustice befell on his neighbors. That is a character flow. I don’t like Ali Salim but there are others that are worse.
        .
        K.H

        • Fanti Ghana

          Hello KH,
          This is off subject. I meant to tell you something since yesterday I almost forgot. Our ‘tezeweri mekina…’ song is being mentioned on the theme song on the Adigrat University students video Hayat posted. In fact the entire song sounds a revision of our song. He mentions it in several places but here is one almost at the end at 32:02. It is slightly off (like singing the same music on a sharp verses a flat key), but it is close enough for nostalgia.

          Hey, better than nothing!

          • Kim Hanna

            Selam Fanti,
            .
            I almost missed the whole thing. I think it is at 25.02 when the folks are dancing the same music has that tantalizing melody. As you said it has a resemblance, my memory still has that lengthy almost Sudanese sound with kirar accompanying it. The voice is similar to this Russom too.
            .
            This guy is great. I tried Amazon with his name, no match, but you tube has this song.
            It is much better than better than nothing.
            My guy who thought he can get it, is still YEABESHA keTero neger. Thanks again, I will keep trying.
            .
            K.H

          • Bayan Nagash

            Selam KH & Fanti,

            I think it was you Fanti who said that you didn’t much care for Teddy because of lack of originality in his music or was it Abi, I genuinely forgot and this was just last week, this, too, I am forgetting already – was it last week or one before. So, now that I have effectively discredited my ability to judge how are you going to believe my judgment on what I am about to say.

            K.H’s’ comment above promptly reminded of something that the new Teddy’s song reminded me of when I listened to it few days ago. Hey, it has been a long day. It is TGIF, right, why not some diversion.

            I am not trusting my musicality here but right at about 24 seconds into Teddy’s refrain of the word “maleda”, I am now in a quick succession remembering about lack of originality and the word maleda itself conjured memory of Wubshet’s maleda song that I have but erased from my memory, I thought. And right about the same time the refrain and the melody seemed to be the modern version of Wubshet’s maleda. So, I am juxtaposing the two to see whether my musical acumen is showing some fallibility equally to that of my memory. I will let y’all be the judge of that.

            Any musicologist here -:) Teddy’s music is just too soothing to not enjoy and too emotionally engaging to not want to get up of one’s chair and begin to move them shoulders and tab them feet rhythmically.

            https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8Ac2MlI8oNk

            https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YQpAJcHyciw&list=RDYQpAJcHyciw#t=82

            And here is one just for the heck of enjoying a great eclectic dances, all are made to dance to Teddy Afro’s song. Am I hard at work trying to convince Fanti here to begin to appreciate Teddy Afro or what?

            https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wnw5i2FuuCU

            Y’all have a great weekend.

          • saay7

            Selamat Bayan:

            Fanti (His Fantiness) is always spot on… except on Teddy Afro. You can accuse Teddy of many things but being a copycat is not one of them. Now, when Fanti said what he said about Teddy, it rang so untrue to me…I had to solve the riddle. Do you remember Teddy’s yastesrayal? In it, he sings as follows:

            በ አስራ ሰባት መርፌ በጠቀመው ቁርጣ… አዲስ ንጉስ* እንጂ ለውጥ መቸ መጣ? (the guys with the raggedy, patched up shorts showed up: we have a new king, but no change.) If one is a life-long supporter of the TPLF, I can understand how these lyrics would be offensive. If one is a life-long hater of the TPLF, I can understand how they would cheer it. So I get how His Fantiness would be repulsed by this, I really do.

            But from that, to deny the obvious that Teddy Afro is the biggest thing that happened to Ethiopian music? Bigger than Aster, Mahmoud and Tilahun Gesese combined (from an international impact)? Come on.

            Anyway, if you want to hear why this guy is absolutely original and clever–essentially embracing Jamaica’s embrace of Ethiopia and giving the love back, with a little Geez bonus–listen to this: Musica Hiwete which I like to think is autobiographical. Fast forward to the 1:45 minute mark…

            https://youtu.be/NVTevqYNxuQ

            saay

            * I ain’t doing “se negus” because Eritreans retired that alphabet:)

          • አዲስ

            Hi Saay,

            I disagree with Fanti’s notion that Teddy Afro isn’t original in his music. I also disagree with your statement “Teddy Afro is the biggest thing that happened to Ethiopian music? Bigger than Aster, Mahmoud and Tilahun Gesese combined (from an international impact standpoint)” What qualifies an international impact standpoint for you saay? For me if international impact is defined as impact on non-amharic speaking foreigners, then there’s no match to Mahmoud’s music(helped largely by the Ethiopiques series).

            Thanks,
            Addis

          • saay7

            Hey Addis:

            I knew I liked you, and people I like make me work hard. And “ere mela mela” to you too.

            http://diretube.com/mobile/articles/read-teddy-afro-chosen-for-world-cup-2014-official-singer_3642.html

            Over to you, as U.S. Bubble head bleach blond TV news folk like to say 🙂 Hey, that phrase is not mine: it’s from one angry Don Henley( The Eagles);

            “the bubble-head bleached blond, she comes on at five,
            she can tell you about a plane crash with a gleam in her eyes;
            it’s interesting when people die,
            give us dirty laundry!”

            Saay

          • አዲስ

            Hi Saay,

            haha right back at you. Trump has a thing or two to say about one of those Tv personality tonight. There’s no end to his vulgar but he keeps me entertained. I remember that coca cola production for the world cup was controversial as many things surrounding Teddy these days. The dire tube article makes it look like he was the only one chosen to represent Africa. But if i remember correctly he was part of the central & East african group. Besides, if you intend to have somebody represent Ethiopia in a collaboration at this time, he’s the most popular one, so an obvious choice. Credit to him nonetheless.
            In the international music scene, I still believe the likes of Mahmoud Ahmed, Alemayehu Eshete are more visible. In fact Mahmoud was also one of the headliners on Womad 2015 last month.
            Speaking of K’naan, you can notice how Ethio-Jazz influenced his music. And I was around here as a silent observer back then during his wavin’ flag days.

            Thanks,
            Addis

          • saay7

            Hey Addis:

            I made a deal with a friend: in exchange for her never mentioning Trump for the next 12 months, I will stop doing something that annoys her. I am willing to negotiate acceptable terms with you. You can even read his Art of the Deal before you approach me with your request.

            Saay

          • Ted

            Hi Saay, I forgot. Republican? ouch!!! I have request too. I need you to detox from Sax till the time the clown dissociate himself from your party. If you have the urge to cheat, this heavily sax flavoured clip wil help
            https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WHdbhFK00WM#t=16

          • Ted

            Hi saay, I forgote you’r Repeblican.Ouch!!!! i have request too. I need you to detox from Sax till the time he disassociate himself from your party. If you get the urge to cheat, this heavily sax flavoured clip will definitely help.
            https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WHdbhFK00WM

          • saay7

            Hi Ted:

            Correction: I am a libertarian. Don’t make me whip out old articles where I declare myself as one by way of explaining why I am indifferent to the socio-economic agenda of the Eritrean opposition. In free and fair elections in Eritrea, all the political parties would be Socialist I, socialist II, socialist III…

            Saay

          • Ted

            Hi, Saay, Socialist Libertarian for Eritrea is all good, Inshallah. This one is all different, who is good for you and family for coming 4 yrs. if you don’t like Hillary, you are for the other. You need to learn to live with the clown till Noam Chomsky takes the stage in about 100 yrs.

          • አዲስ

            Hi Saay,

            haha sure I won’t mention the Donald in conversation with you.

          • Fanti Ghana

            Hello Saay, Addis

            Professor Beyan,
            That was me with that Teddy staff, and please don’t listen to Saay except when he complements me.

            Saay,
            if the above comment wasn’t sophisticated enough to fit you I would have suspected a forger! “…his total originality?” Presentation: yes. He is a good entertainer, but originality is where he blows it completely. Not necessarily the lyrics mind you, but his ‘music,’ every single one of them, are a modified version of Senegalese, Mali, Niger, The Sudan, Afro-Hispanic, and many Ethiopian classics. I listen to an international music from Mangolia’s throat singing to West Africa’s drum only beats, and I recognize music when I hear revised version of it very quickly.

            You also indirectly supported my assertion of him being crowd pleaser when you mentioned ‘QumTa suri’ followed by ‘tarequ.’ I wonder if he was wearing Atse Minilik’s t-shirt when he said that! Having said that, I did not dislike him for his ‘bad music’ at all. In fact I like his music very much. As recent as his Mohammed Wordi’s ‘sita Asher sena,’ which was excellent, I don’t deny his talent and gift at all. My only grievance is his immature and unfocused political take he throws willy nilly to please the crowd. Quite the opposite of what we need right now. By tradition, our musicians had always been our ambassadors of all the people. Teddy is a different ball game, and for that I am inconsolable. For the first time ever you wounded me badly by mentioning The Goddess of Goddesses Aster Awake and the still suckling Teddy in the same sentence.

            Addis,
            Why Saay said ‘Bigger than Aster, Mahmoud and Tilahun Gesese combined’ is because he somehow knew these three are my favorites, and that is how he calls his friends whenever he craves a good fight. So, don’t take it personally.

          • Kim Hanna

            Selam Fanti,
            .
            Ha ..Ha, sorry to tell you this Fanti, your response to SAAY confirms his suspicion. You were his attorney against you and provided all the evidence. You lost the fight before it began. I was all ears…….I better stop here. You and me have a hunting expedition for that song, I don’t want to jeopardize it.
            .
            K.H

          • Fanti Ghana

            Hello KH,
            Haha. I started with ‘I don’t like his music’ to eventually end up with ‘I don’t like his politics.’
            I didn’t plan this one carefully. Thinking about Saay smiling ear to ear right now is unbearable. I was meaning to say his political immaturity made it hard for me to overlook his copied mater and enjoy the music. I am on my mobile, but I f Saay glots about this let me know, and I will come back later to salvage some dignity.

          • Bayan Nagash

            Sal bud,

            If Fanti is guilty of his distaste for Teddy due to the latter’s ‘unoriginality’, then you are equally guilty of transgression, my friend, as you brought three individual artists who are a league on their own right and in their respective artistic endeavors. Your sweeping generalization demands an explanation as to what parameters or the spectrum by which you are making such a judgment call, as Addis asserted: How does one judge global branding? Ayfalkan Sal, abzeas tegagikha.

            I am sending a virtual toast to aster’s song on peace, love, nafQot, what else, here trademark, sle fiQr new enji mn alle bleh neh yenye wendim. We need more of love in Eritrea. I never tire from listening to this song. Enjoy!

            https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zWwxjHDqn40

          • saay7

            Hey Bayan:

            Hmmmm. First, I think Teddy holds the Ethiopian record for best-selling artist. Second, his concerts consistently draw large crowds. I once drove 70 miles to his concert and didn’t attend because they don’t have a VIP section and I would have to sit with the masses. No that was not the real reason. Third, Mahmouds music is a niche music (jazz) and within that, Ethiopian jazz, is a niche of a niche. His music was discovered in 1984 when….I was going to mention Famine brought Ethiopia to the attention of the world but I don’t want to be accused of “hating Ethiopia” which I think is the new bullying technique to end debates here. (To accuse a government of mistreating Muslim Ethiopians is anti Ethiopian only if one equates Ethiopia with Christianity and, consciously or unconsciously, some awatistas from the cosmetics department do.) Fourth, the classic Ethiopian book Oromay has something to say to you about you liking Aster Aweke.

            Now, the riddle: what are two transformative things that Haile Selasse I and Teddy Afro did. Your answer must include Pan Africanism and reggae.

            saay

          • Kim Hanna

            Selam Bayan Nagash,
            .
            There is no musicologist here, trust me.
            A good number of these songs they come up with have old traditional song roots. They pick it up dust it off and present it by making it their own.
            .
            Teddy’s “Abebayehosh” single hit song was what young girls got together to sing in the neighborhoods in September, new year celebrations. It was interesting to see foreigners dancing to that tune now.
            .
            Regardless Mr. Bayan Nagash, Teddy has a gift of voice that is unparalleled. He is a showman too. I hope you listen to his Tezeta song. I wished he did it by himself but his portion of the song was breath taking to me. So many people have sang that song. He is that gifted.
            .
            BTW, Speaking of music.
            There was an assignment given to me by Fanti, Haile TG, SAAY and others to teach myself to listen and enjoy classical music a couple of months ago. I want to report to them that I am in the middle of it. It is not as painful as I thought it would be. In fact when the mood and the environment is right it is quite habit forming.
            At home, never good in the car for me, I listen now to Beethoven Collection Symphonies Nos, 1–9 CDs that I acquired.
            .
            I don’t think there will be “soul” connection or bring tears to my eyes but on some occasions it is quite enjoyable. Thank you, I will continue to explore. (The opera portion, I am afraid has to wait)
            .
            That is all to report at this time.
            .
            K.H

          • Bayan Nagash

            Selam Kim Hanna,

            I don’t envy you on the assignment at all. I don’t mean to discourage you, but I have been pushing myself to listen to classical music for years now, albeit sporadically and in no systematic order either – it just never seems to speak to me. It is encouraging somewhat to hear of such headway in only a couple of months. Whereas for me, I need verses to the music. I can only listen so much of classic and had not been able to appreciate it at the level others that others do. I suppose verses and lyrics in music speak to me more than the instrumentation that makes music a music, if that makes sense. At heart, I am blues man and alternative music speak to me more than the commercialized versions, if you will. For that I am availing below for music lovers, “Me & Mr. Rodriguez,” where there is great story behind the song that Raylan Baxter tells, which you can easily find on Youtube. The next song to listen to, if you liked “Mr. Rodriguez” is “rugged lovers.” The verses in this song are deep and emanate from RB’s own life experience. Interestingly, there is a contrast between the title and the lyrics to the song and the music…at least for me.

            https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6ec8hZuQa9M

            About Teddy, I concur with you and Sal than with Fanti Ghana in that FG you need to remember that even children are not our children, they come through us but they are not us. One of the oft quoted poems that speaks to this is that of Khalil Gibran, the Sweet Honey In The Rock’s version I really like. See, even poetry does not belong to the poet they come through, not from him/her. So, by extension, it can be said then Teddy and his songs are not his but they come beautifully through him for us to enjoy.

            K.H, your suggestions on Teddy are duly noted, barring the classics for now. Ok, ok, I am heeding AT’s observation in that I have been inundating the forum with several in one comment. So, I will reduce it one decibel, two songs this time instead of the three that had been my average and will eventually go down to one as I become more refined & finessed on my selections and sensibilities to music.

            BN

            https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ti0rzHq_0xU

          • Fanti Ghana

            Hello Beyan,

            Even on this one do you see the t-shirt he is wearing? It is meant ‘ምዓ አንበሳ ዘእምነገደ ይሁዳ.’ Do you see what I mean about his immaturity? The main reason the lion was removed from our flag was because of its insensitivity to Ethiopian Muslims. I am sure Teddy wears it to please those who crave for the old royal family rule, but either he doesn’t know ‘ምዓ አንበሳ’ is offensive to Ethiopian Muslims, or he doesn’t know that the people who believe in that slogan don’t believe there are native Ethiopian Muslims but refugees who overstayed their visas. I am sure he doesn’t have anything against Muslims per se, but his immaturity combined with his crowd pleaser-ness makes him a terrible public figure.
            PS:
            I am still fuming for losing an argument to Saay that never took place. KH will explain.

          • Saleh Johar

            Hi Fanti,
            That lion is why I hate reggae. I thought Moa is Geez and I thought it meant something like Hail as in Hail Hitler 🙂 now I will not rest unt I find out conclusively.

          • Fanti Ghana

            Hello Memhir,
            I am very sure about ‘ምዓ.’

            In the old Ethiopic texts there was what you would call ‘scientific’ reason about when to use the two ‘A’s the two ‘Ts’s and the three ‘H’s which has been lost from our scholars over time. So, ‘ምዓ አንበሳ ዘእምነገደ ይሁዳ,’ simply means ‘ምስ ኣንበሳ ካብ ይሁዳ ዝመፀ’ which was the necessary linkage to King David/Solomon for anyone to become a King. The number of words we have in common between Geez and Arabic is a lot more than the commonly known few.

            Just for the sake of surprise derived pleasure, I hope to God you don’t know where the word ‘ሰንጠረዥ’ came from. In our Tig/Amh languages it is a group of equally sized and spaced squares with alternating colors. The word came from the Arabic ‘ሻጥራን’ (witty, clever, smart) depending on the context. The interesting part is that the word ‘ሻጥራን’ or ‘ሻጥር’ is inherited from Persia, but the Persians didn’t pronounce it right, but they meant to say ‘shaturanga’ which is a Hindu word meaning ‘Chess.’ Nice!

        • Peace!

          Dear Kim Hanna,

          YeErgo Zienb Sibal Semtehal ?? I don’t mind translating for you just in case Abiye or Rahwa are not around. Nobody asked you to comment on anything– so chill out!

          regards

    • Bayan Nagash

      Selamat Peace,

      First and foremost, this is one of those moments when one wishes one was using a penname; a pseudonym liberates one to say anything he/she wishes because if and when the going gets tough and rough all that one has to do is recede into oblivion come back few days later in another attractive and well thought out name, resurrection without any compunction. I do not have a problem with the idea of penname; it just dawned on me when I addressed you with such a beautiful and tranquil inducing name: May Peace Reign in Eritrea sooner than later. But, I don’t have the luxury to do that. I must be dragged into a topic that sure as heck I do not want to be dragged into. The discomfort is not the topic, the discomfort rests in how due diligently can it be handled? The discomfort rests in the fact that we do not know each other.

      There is no personal stakes involved here. It is all about Eritreans coming together in a platform willingly and on their own volition and just as equally they could disperse in the midst of it all as willingly as they came. So, allow me to bring your attention from earlier last month when Awate posted this: “How Eritrea Hopes To Get USA To Lift Sanctions” July 4, 2015 Written by: Gedab News

      There was riveting conversation among many Awatawyan, if you haven’t followed the conversation, you will find it equally mesmerizing. It was about “Islamophobia”. It was very tempting just as was equally what you had posted. Let me assure you Peace, I refrained, not because the topic was uncomfortable, but because the whole point for me was the incompatibility of the venue for some such sensitive talk. And then, Sal, as though he heard my thought he captured what I was feeling and here is what he said in a rejoinder to Amanuel Hidrat

      “Selamat Emma:

      “Your efforts are appreciated and
      your record is clear. Speaking for myself, the most important thing is
      discussing the issue responsibly. I will go beyond your proposal and argue,
      since we are talking about identity, for some Eritreans their religious
      identity is far more important than their ethnic or geographic identity and it,
      and their fears, hopes, grievances should be discussed. But I would rather not
      discuss it than discuss it irresponsibly. And as much as I love Awate and the
      forum (we go to great lengths to maintain civil discourse), we would have to
      triple our moderators and be on red alert to monitor the deterioration of the
      subject into the irresponsible zone. And right now we are not equipped for it.
      I think this is something that requires face to face discussions in a civil
      environment by people of goodwill only.” saay

      Very interesting that you took me to task based on presumptions and using that erroneous presumption, it is obvious that you would arrive at erroneous conclusion. Now, instead of discussing what you obviously are pushing compassionately to have conversation over, I am going to have to explain and re-explain to make you see how you have it all wrong.
      Not only that, I would have to thoroughly read what was said by others so as to avoid repetition. You see Peace how difficult it is, to honestly, due diligently, and respectfully discuss such sensitive issues as what you raised. For me personally, it is a case of XimbilaliE si… you know the rest, can someone like our residence poet, KS, I need a helping hand give us this missale in its original form because the word that comes right after XimbailaliE si is not something that one feels comfortable to use in this forum.

      At any rate, brother Peace, we need to clean our own house on this before we begin discussing it in Ethiopia’s context. One thing I completely agree with you on is that injustice anywhere is injustice everywhere (MLK) and as such I sympathize with our Ethiopian brothers and sisters. After all, this affects us all. They are our brothers and sisters, in many cases, literally, not just euphemistically.

      So, let us bring it back to our side of the border brother Peace. As coincidence would have it, just two days ago, I wrote the following in Dr. Daniel Rezene’s FB as the demonstration coordinating committee of Geneva’s 26 June 2015 put out a report in Tigrinya. So, here is a problem that is worth tackling because status quo bias in Eritrean highland is so entrenched that they do not see its ramifications on the rest of Eritreans. If they are the “head”
      on a coin they forget that the other half, the “tail,” amounts to the 50 percent. So, it is with that in mind I wrote the following thought to the good doctor that I know succinctly fits in our conversation here.

      Dear Dottore, I hope the “symbolic personalities” was badly phrased statement, to which Dessale & Ibarhim have expressed their disappointment, and wouldn’t dwell on it here. I will, however, dwell on another phrase, almost on a second thought, was nestled in a parenthesis making it seem less important. Here is how you put it: “…we need to work hard in mobilizing our diaspora communities effectively…the detailed report (unfortunately is in
      Tigrinya).

      Now, from what little I know about Zurich & Geneva and environs, there are thousands of young Eritreans who are highly educated, whose education, to borrow your phrase, “unfortunately,” is in Arabic and many of whom speak Tigre language. Now, how is it possible in “mobilizing our diaspora communities effectively” if we are dismissing them
      inadvertently or not by the very tool of communication we are utilizing.

      So, Dr. Daniel, this is not to take away of what you (in its plural sense) were able to accomplish in the 26 June 2015 and in the UN’s CoIE report. I am on the record appreciating what was accomplished here. It is now high time the coordinating committee thinks hard and fast that this momentum becomes a collective one and the way you make it collective is certainly not by excluding others through barrier of language. Oh, by the way,
      my first language is Tigrinya, as such this is not about me but about Eritrea and about how best to move forward and the well-deserved hard work bearing fruits of its labor via effective coordination, mobilization, and above all else, through a vision of having unity in purpose.

      Hope you take this to heart and go outside the Tigrinya circle and reach out to your fellow Eritreans from all walks of life. This is not a challenge to you but for you to think about and review who is who in the coordinating committee that produced the Tigrinya report, there lies the answer in how diverse the movement is and will end up becoming. Broaden your horizon is all what I am saying and in there lies the richness and the strength of the
      mosaic nature and culture of Eritrea.

      Dr. Daniel, by default you have emerged as the voice, if not the voice of this movement. Seize the moment and relish it, but become the leader that Eritrea is lacking today. This is your moment. To borrow Obama’s phrase, you “have come so far.” You “have seen so much. But there is so much more to do.” The question facing us is not only about today’s Eritrea but about its future in that whether decades from now Dr. Daniel will be remembered as the Nelson Mandela of Eritrea or just of a movement that started in Geneva and died in Geneva.

      This momentum must transcend all conceivable barriers: from religion to region and from ethnicity to gender. Go on my brother, shine the light and I will be sure to follow your lead and help move the torch the way the Olympic is moved from one country to another while the fire on its tip end stays burning. So, you have moved the passion of Eritreans in diaspora the world over like fire, [the challenge is to] keep it there. I certainly wouldn’t
      want to waste your valuable time and those who are following your work, not necessarily to lambaste you, but to genuinely serve as your mirror and give you not the distorted version of it, but the hard truth and the accurate feedback emanating from the heart so you become a better leader.

      If you’ve come to read my message this far, bless you. I thought I was going to write, at best, one paragraph, but ended up writing an article size. Hope it was worth your while.

      Respectfully, B.N

      Finally, Peace, since you bestowed on me the honor of professorship, let me close my thoughts with the following audio file of no more than three-minutes-and-a-half in which I try to articulate in how the process of addressing the issues that you have in mind can best be approached if it is going to have some semblance of success. The date stamp on the threaded voice shows 22 February 2014.

      https://voicethread.com/myvoice/#thread/5470999/27815410/29641448

      http://www.google.com/imgres?imgurl=http://i.imgur.com/5QZ1MrT.gif&imgrefurl=http://imgarcade.com/1/screw-this-im-outta-here-gif/&h=300&w=400&tbnid=2Se81b2BHoDH8M:&docid=Jxc5JQKOfHdhyM&ei=mWLFVbGAFIHogwSX1pqIAQ&tbm=isch&ved=0CCIQMygGMAZqFQoTCPGwgN6xmMcCFQH0gAodF6sGEQ

      Peace!!!
      I’m outta here

  • Kim Hanna

    Selam AMAN,
    .
    What are you talking about?
    Are you talking to yourself, or do you have someone specific in mind?
    .
    K.H.

  • Hayat Adem

    Dear Awate Community,
    We are hearing bad news of Eritrean victims now more often than ever. But, all is not bad, there are some spots of excellence of Eritrean youth even under unstable conditions and hardships. Bilal YiHdego and Rahwa Mehari are two recent examples, who graduated with 4 and 3.92 GPA in an Ethiopian university. Thank you and congratulations to Bilal and Rahwa, and thank you, Ethiopia and Adigrat University.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IFjQtCib9XY

    • Abi

      Dearest Hayat
      That is really a good news. As Hailachin once said , all the good things about eritreans comes from ethiopia.

    • Bayan Nagash

      Thank you Hayat for sharing. There are 26 more Eritreans who who are also mentioned in the piece. I love the talk the young lady, Rahwa gave, something to the effect that “the two people I see them through the same lens…and that what Ethiopia is doing out of bad situation creating by doing good is a good thing. In similar vein, Bilal also conveys his message on this to the Eritrean and Ethiopian people that the people are one and both can live in peace… And Radia also said…what we could not receive it from our country we are getting it from our neighboring country. This was something I never thought possible, but I am the happiest for it. I have never thought I was going to get this kind of a chance…so on and so forth.

      I am writing this note as I am listening to the clip – very moving, indeed. What Ethiopia is doing will have great dividend in the long haul as it will forge long lasting peace minded young men and women who would choose peace over and need not be fooled by errant and misguided leaders who seem too quick to get to skirmishes rather than solving their issues in round-table discussions. We lost 12 young men when Eritrea decided to get in skirmishes with Yemen over the Hanish Islands; unfortunately, the devastation over the war with Ethiopia has been incalculable, 15 years later we have yet to recuperate from it.

    • Nitricc

      What an embarrassment moment to the Ethiopian school system. the Eritreans who flee to Ethiopia are the once who can not cut it academically in Eritrea; meaning they flank accadmically and i.e. they have to leave Eritrea flee to Ethiopia and yet, they go to Ethiopian schools; they are the best.! this shows you how Ethiopian schools are a joke.

      • Abi

        Nitricc
        For some people the glass is always half empty.

        • Nitricc

          Hi Abi, instead of using outadted half this half that. why don’t you ask the real qeustion? you can’t even educate your own citizen why are you educating the enemy?

          • Amde

            Nitricc

            Why do you think they are the enemy to us? Can they be just young people going to college and being celebrated for making best use of the opportunity available to them? Is every Ethiopian an enemy to you?

          • Nitricc

            Hi Amde, enemy or not, any responsible government has a duty to educate its citizens before its neighbors. for me every Ethiopian is not enemy but i will tell to your face i will not educate, even the fake one like you have, before my own citizens. now, answer me, why are you educating your neighbors while millions of your own lacked access to education? Amde, one for a while take a shot and answer me. why?

          • Fanti Ghana

            Hello Nitricc,
            This is not a good argument. Usually you are a lot more sophisticated than this. Never mind the let’s share whatever however small we have part, I know you will not buy that, but let me try logic. There are millions of Americans who cannot read or write, there are even more who did not finish high school, even more who did not graduate from college, and yet, most of your friends at AT are college graduates. Why is that?

          • Nitricc

            Hi Fantiiiiiiiii. lol; don’t even go there. lol anyway; what do you thin the percentage of Eritreans who go to collage in Ethiopia? 50%? 10%? 0.0001%? Fanti; you are finest person on this forum that i know; you morality exceptional time and agin and you know what i am talking about here.

          • Fanti Ghana

            Hello Nitricc,

            It is very small percentage to be sure, but we need to keep in mind that regardless of how ‘close’ we are Eritreans are still refugees in Ethiopia. Getting to university in Ethiopia is not that easy even for Ethiopians. High school GPA is a major factor for getting acceptance into university. So, as you said, either this is an elaborate strategy by the government to drain Eritrea of its youth or it is equally possible that some cool headed folks in Adigrat decided to give a few brilliant hopefuls a chance to earn a degree. Why I thought your position is hard to defend is that you cannot show evil intent by the government because even if it is being done for the reasons you suspect it is still ‘good.’ Like thousands of households, didn’t your parents fight tooth and nail to come to the US to create a better opportunity for you? Can we then claim the US accepted their plea for evil intent?

            Haile TG, and I am sure many others too, understand the point you wanted to make. However, as Haile almost said, you may have started this one from the wrong end. So, to sum up, this is the dilemma you are getting into:

            1) Ethiopia is playing politics by enticing Eritreans with good opportunity -> end result -> educated young Eritrean: GOOD.

            2) There are some good people in Ethiopia who would like to share from their meager resource -> end result -> educated young Eritrean: GOOD.

            Brother Nitricc, may God give you the wisdom to bit them all!

          • Amde

            Nitricc,

            You know why?

            I have to put it in terms you understand….

            Because they got teeth 🙂 Perfect dentures. Nice pearlies. Fine molars to grind the kitfo we feed them. I know – shocking right?

            Just like the millions of foreign students like me that come to the US to study on the American taxpayers dime. I bet you there are millions of Americans who are outraged there are foreigners getting scholarships when they have none. It’s called generating good will and investing in the future.

            Plus, if you don’t want them, I am sure they can stay and contribute to the Ethiopian economy.

            Are you really scraping the bottom of the barrel on your fake outrage fishing expeditions? Yesterday it was the inhumanity of a cartoon depiction. Today it is the squandered educational opportunities of the Ethiopian masses.

          • Nitricc

            Hi Amde; i was hoping one of you will get but since no one is having a clue; let spell it for you. the reason this was posted; and the reason contains some Eritreans is; it is not because Eritreans are better than the others academically. it is not because Ethiopians nice people want to give Eritreans a free eduction. it is out of pure humanity and a gesture of a good will. But is about the tactic and strategy to draw and attract Eritrean youth from their own country. it is well planed and well coordinated action to strip Eritrea her man power and to weaken the country in general. if the Ethiopians care about the Eritrean youth; all they had to do is, cooperate and accept the border ruling. that way, the Eritrean leaders would have nothing to stand for. i can not believe all you fall for this cheap TPLF’s poly. So, ato Amde, because you failed to get the bottom line, you can’t acuse me for scraping a bottom of the barrel.

          • haileTG

            Selam Nitricc,

            I think you have a point but I don’t think you are making good sense of thinking it through properly. If Ethiopia improves economically and extends such opportunities, then that will indeed drain Eritrea. For example, an 18 year old Eritreans will think the odds are better to cross to Ethiopia than to stay in Eritrea and be left wandering in national service. Opportunity is not a cheap ploy, actually it is a powerful magnet. That is the very reason many young people are leaving Eritrea because they see no hope for their future. So, Ethiopia can’t stop creating opportunities for itself for stupid reason as say the border or something like that. As it creates opportunities for its people, those opportunities become a pull factor for other peoples in the region. If Ethiopia starts to create surplus employment then that also becomes another pull factor. It can’t avoid attracting outsiders unless it decides to stop growth and development. The only way Eritrea can counter that is by creating similar environment for its own people.

          • Hayat Adem

            Hi HaileTG,
            “The only way Eritrea can counter that is by creating similar environment for its own people.”

            Well, PFDJ is doing just that but in a unique way. Ethiopia is only sharing a small portion of the opportunities it is offering to its people. Eritrea is doing exactly the same. The opportunities abundantly available for the Eritrean youth and elders right now is in the military industry. Well, Eritrea is sharing a small portion of that to Ethiopians and Somalis. That is how we ended up with dhaher aweys and birhanu nega…

          • haileTG

            Hi Hayat

            I take it as a sarcasm born out of the current irony in Eritrean case. In reality, I hope that we both agree that the opportunities that are abundantly available to Eritrean youth in Eritrea are those made a no go by the regime. There is no military industry per se in Eritrea. It is rather militaristic infatuations. The people are trapped in that illusive enterprise hatched in the mind of a paranoid dictator. Ethiopia has a military industry that has been servicing UN and African peace keeping operations and other internal and external security needs. In real sense of what Nitricc got closer to being right was the fact that economic imbalances tilt the ground and gravitate those in less well off side towards the better off side. It can be safely assumed most people commenting here from the diaspora have experienced that for them to be here in this time and place. At the root of Eritrean deprivation of economic rights is of course, political repression.

            Regards

          • Nitricc

            Hi Haile TG; the saddest part is the Ethiopians think we are stupid because we have a stupid government. can ask you what the the percentage of Eritreans are going to the so-called Ethiopian universities? it is nothing but stupid propaganda to attract more Eritreans drop-outs.

          • haileTG

            Hi Nitricc, let’s correct the perspective you have there too. Can we ask what percentage of Eritrean youth go to university in Eritrea??? I know PFDJ (and their closet lookalikes … haha) feel more Ethiopians than Ethiopians themselves:) Following that logic, I guess it is normal for them to ask for their Educational rights from the Ethiopian govt. Unfortunately, I feel and think like Eritrean and am secure enough to thank the Ethiopians for their gesture. I usually feel like losing 10lb and cringe in embarrassment whenever I read the PFDJ (and their closet lookalike:-) crying and complaining about Ethiopia with bare naked out of basic dignity. It offends bruises my pride deeply. How shameful that 25 years after hard won independence, those class of of Eritreans remain deeply insecure themselves to the point of the Ethiopian govt, becoming master of their destiny!!!

          • Kokhob Selam

            Dear Nitricc,
            Let us assume Ethiopians are playing it for political purpose, let us agree they are attracting the youth and are giving chance of education. what is wrong with that? become a politician and play it. do the same by giving free education to Ethiopians. but, can you? the question is do you have those universities? will you find Ethiopians crossing the boarder to Eritrea, even where there is no shoot to kill policy from the other side?

            the solution is to not let your young generation hate there hardly earned nation, which is not done by PFDJ. the solution is to work in developing your nation and have a system, system that allows live trusting their government etc. so, at least if you are loyal to your “government” you should give your opinion to them instead of blaming others.

          • Abi

            General
            It is easier to celebrate their achievements than belittling ethiopian education system.
            We are educating the enemy to make them
            friends and brothers and sisters. They are your future ambassadors. Easy as that.

          • Nitricc

            Abi lol now you are sounding like your friend; Tes. cut that bull crap and answer it straight for me. besides; i don’t have to belittling your toothless educational system., it shoot.

      • ዋዕሮ

        You are wrong

      • Amanuel Hidrat

        Nitrickay,

        If you can’t learn from the matured people in this forum, please listen and learn from the young Eritrean kids, Rahawa and others, who appreciated the Ethiopian people and Ethiopian government, for extending this educational opportunities for them. These young Eritreans will be the ambassadors of good will and peace between the two people. Keep in mind, that these “educational opportunities” is not different from the opportunities you get it from outside of Eritrea. When you can’t get it in Eritrea you got it in USA. When they can’t get it in Eritrea, they got it in Ethiopia. If there is an educational magnet that attract them in Ethiopia, it means there is a magnet that repel them from Eritrea. So Nitrickay, ask yourself why there is not a magnet for education in Eritrea for them, for you, and other young Eritreans for that matter? Instead of expressing gratitude for giving them this opportunities, you are despising them for extending these opportunities to our young. This is not the thinking of a right mind to say the least.

        regards,
        Amanuel Hidrat

        • Nitricc

          Dear Aman-H. I truly believe you are missing my point. again let me tell you what I told Haile TG; because we have a stupid government, we, the Erireans are not stupid. if the stupid TPLF going play games with us, then, they have no idea what they are dealing with. saying that i hear you; Sir!

          • Amanuel Hidrat

            Hi Nitrickay

            There is no bad game from educating our kids. From this goodwill of Ethiopian leadership, our children are the only beneficiary.

            Since you saw their act purely of humanity and goodwill, you shouldn ‘t have Politicize it. In any case whether you try to politicize it or not, the net benefit from the act of the Ethiopian Government goes to our children . And God bless them to be the bridge of the two brotherly people while Our gratitude goes the Ethiopian people and their leadership.

            Regards
            Amanuel Hidrat

      • Papillon

        Hey Nitricc,

        Perhaps the two greatest crimes of Isaias Afwerki among other things are rendering Eritrean men losing their virility as they are engaged in a gossip spree (read what is being said at Meskerem net about Daniel Rezene) and screwing heads where you’re a prototype to that effect to the extent of being afflicted with a convoluted line of thinking. If I could send you back in history, it is said that Emperor Hailesellassie lavished Eritrean highlanders with perks in a bid to have them enclaved within Ethiopia-proper and it certainly worked albeit not for long and one could get tempted to think in those terms if we are condemned to repeat history but the striking contrast is that the present rulers of Ethiopia are asking nothing in return as they extend good gesture to the bright young Eritrean minds as they were at the mercy of a man who cultivated an intense aversion towards intellect. Richard Nixon once said, people may hate you and if you hate them back you destroy yourself. The bright young girl a graduate in Psychology echoed just that and if the ultimate purpose of higher learning is cultivating reason and critical thinking, all the props goes to the higher institution which created a new Rahwa when you are rusted in hate and grudges. I say, let it go for your own good!

      • Ted

        Hi, Nitricc. it was not long a go Weyane yanked teachers and students from school to ship them across. How strange the mind of the toothless think Eritreans forget that, AyeesAnu deA.

    • Malkai

      Dear Hayat,

      The only hope we have to save our identity is to re-unite with our Ethiopian brothers and sisters. Italian or Arab identity has made us fall on our face.

    • Semere Andom

      Hi Hayat:
      This is good news in deeded, but are you sure that this is the university of Adigrat and not the university at Dedebt?:-)
      any h
      My connection is slow and cannot see the video, but any human must rejoice when a university by the name Adigrat came to existence in the last 25 years

      • Hayat Adem

        Hi Semere,
        The great wediTiKul said it all in his lyrics: ab dedebit ziweliAa shiimAa tarted Selmat kitgelih TerabiHa. It started at Dedebit and the light multipying itself to others. So, we are now talking about Adigrat University.
        Where have you been? I haven’t authorized such a long leave.
        Thanks for getting back.
        Hayat

        • Semere Andom

          Hi Hayat:
          Thanks for your reply, Sal has adeskilluni nerru:-)
          But I did warn you that I will be taking a break, check your email

  • Peace!

    Dear tes,

    Excuse me! When did I oppose Geneva 26? Can you quote me? I always pick a topic first before I comment.

    You know! I have been ignoring you because I know where your heart is. So please be respectful and stop your nonsense provocation.

    Peace!

    • tes

      Dear Peace!

      Do not take that much serious for ignoring me. I know I will not ignore you at anytime. Therefore, I don’t shout to be considered. I consider the considered. And sure you are one that need to be considered. If not, who else?

      Concerning the Geneva 26, check your lines. I have taken notes for what I should and revising them for you is just a wastage of time for both of us.

      Therefore my friend, I know how to engage you when needed. Don’t worry about yourself being engaging me.

      tes

      • Peace!

        Dear tes,

        If you can’t qout me, then you should appologize. I was off that month from politics to observe Ramadan.

        Peace!

        • tes

          Dear Peace!

          Since you brought Ramadan, to be sane, I have this for you:

          Two months ago :

          Hey Abye, in
          response to Abi

          Wow! Could that be a reason why they call themselves justice seekers, or for joining the oposition groups?I hope not. If so, barking at others whom they believe are better off under PFDJ makes them complete hypocrites.

          In response to
          Ted

          As immaculate as aay put it “…as long as [Isaias] is the president of Eritrea, the ountry will, like a pin-ball, be bouncing from one disaster to another. But it wll be making happy clown music the whole way down the precipice.]

          Now, what if a buncing pin-ball loses its air down the stretch? Who do you think we should
          trust? UN? smh….I think this what Nitric talking about.

          http://awate.com/sovereignty-international-law-and-the-commission-of-inquiry-eritrea/
          one or two more posts were also present, one is against Semere Andom and other is in assurance to saay7.
          these two responses given to Abi and Ted speak a lot about your political stand. You are nothing but an OTTO.
          I did this because you wanted to be clean from accusation but you are not. If you happen to be in the justice camp, I can now clearly see your line of thinking. And what you have as an intention seems very dangerous to Eritrea in particular and the horn of Africa in general. You care not for what the people in general face but what a particular society is subjected too.
          As a justice seeker and an advocate for all types of justice, I could support your way but you are not supporting either. You are much more interested on your own agenda.
          Here I am making a serious step into your line of thinking but it is time to expose you. You have such a headache to the all rounded justice seeking camp. It is time to expose you so that you can know your limit.
          tes

          • Peace!

            Dear tes,

            If that’s your proof? I rather leave it to readers.

            Thank you!

          • SA

            Tes,
            Why is it hard for you to say that you were wrong to say that Peace! was against Geneva26 because based on the proof you provided Peace! did not even come close to saying that?
            SA

  • T..T.

    Hi all,

    The fight between Nitricc and tes signaled deeper irregularities indicating that the Isayasists camp mindset is deeply entrenched in narrow mindedness.

    Nitricc, after a very long long struggle has lost to tes. Nitricc lost everything including Weni.

    At first, when Nitricc hasn’t seen Weni all day he thought she would be back the next day. But what Nitricc didn’t know is that Weni had left him when she became convinced that he had no respect for his people.

    Finally, when Nitricc was walking down town he saw with his own eyes Weni being picked up by tes in his tes-tagged car that rushed across the street disappearing into the traffic.

    Ntricc, not believing his wide opened eyes, chose to go delusional.

    For the rest of the story the SONG narrates Nitricc’s failure to catch up and failure to stay abreast of political developments in Eritrea and the world.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l9fqvAQQGFE

    .

    • Semere Andom

      Hi T.T:
      And Nitric sings the following in his ever improving Tigriniya to out do Tes
      Eway “tyme” khasm
      zegem endable arkibley
      tes hingid btey gni
      kem zi meas mesiluni
      neti fiqrey eti “tyme” zerkbelu
      hats elle ktefie ngojjame
      gobo gobo gere ndedebit geltam
      Gojjam yhsheni kenadi netta gize zwessed figrey
      emnetey khida mofto guannot kab geberetni
      keydella, kab qedmu wun entay effelta
      dey ellome elle zfetkuwa
      yhsheni ab zelkuwo ndroney enna aqebaterku
      drrarey maererku

      • T..T.

        Hi Semere and all,

        No doubt Nitricc is articulate in denials and not facing the truth. It is not a surprise to see Nitricc taking pleasure in shooting words of denial, saying: “kab qedmu wun entay effelta”

        Nitricc’s words are statements of the arrogant and secretive tyrant. The common hatred of Isayas and Nitricc towards the Eritrean people is out of their delusion that the Eritrean people are not their equals and, therefore, should be treated as slaves. Yes as slaves with no rights that are subjected to military drills and discipline – irrespective of age, even those under age and over age.

        Indeed, Nitricc’s obsession with the tyrant is a reflection of his persistence in delusions. He is seen to defend Isayas’s empty and broken promises despite the everyday tragedies and pains our people are facing.

  • saay7

    Hi Tes:

    I will probably regret this but what the heck.

    Why are you getting yourself so worked up over this? People are free to pick and choose what topics interest them and what topics do not. In the case of Peace, the issue of Ethiopia’s sentencing of Muslim Ethiopians for being guilty of trying to create an Islamic State interested him. If it doesn’t interest you, just skip it. But this conditionality people create–you must be this high to play in this amusement park–is a non-starter.

    I don’t even know where you got “his political motive is to divide people”: what does that even mean? The totality of Peace messages are: the Eritrean opposition is weak and it gets weaker by its association with the Ethiopian government. To make that argument stick he has to show why associating with the Ethio gov is bad and he gave this case as an example.

    If u want a subject to die, ignore it or show its demerits. But this trying to shame people into jumping hoops to show they are sufficiently oppo (you should have condemned X, you should have supported y) is an argument you can make; just don’t expect this writer to join u in that witch-hunt.

    Saay

    • Abi

      Saay
      I also may regret this but i care less.

      I just noticed for the first time that your nick is all lower case. I and almost all people are addressing you as Saay7 not saay 7. I found this kind of things interesting. You think it is weird? Am I chasing a wild geese ?
      Are we playing Richard Gere and Julia Roberts?

      abi

      • saay7

        Hey Abi:

        Uh-oh: Is Sherlock Holmes now going to put on his fishing hat and checkered trench coat? 🙂
        If you have done it for so long and I didn’t protest then it is kosher. “ሀጢያት ሲደጋገም ጽድቅ ይመስላል” ይላል ያገርህ ሰው 🙂

        saay, Saay, SAAY, its all good. I am not case-sensitive, or school-sensitive. By the way, I just realized why Professor Tes has such a hard time understanding why some awatistas can be in two or three different schools: which is why his mind cannot consider that Peace! can oppose PFDJ and criticize the Opposition and Arbegnaw Weyane. Because, unlike the conventional schools of a university, over at Eritrea, the Schools are miles apart: one is in Hamelmalo, one is in Mai Nefhi, one is in Halhal…it is physically impossible to be at two schools at the same time:)

        saay

        • tes

          Dear saay7,

          Let me then ask you further by extension. If Peace! can oppose all three at a time and that is his right to do so, can’t I also have a right to oppose Peace! What is wrong with this. He is opposing, I am opposing. Very simple logic. The same I did to your lines. I am not in the “Truth- Tellers”. What I do is of my own opinion and point of view. What I try to say is at a face -value.

          What is wrong then? I have been in that track since my landing to this lovely room. I think you can’t forget the reaction I had against you. The same goes to Peace!. And when I call you to refrain from supporting Peace!’s move, it is indeed for higher purpose. Don’t try to conspire the higher purpose. It is simple as it is: building social harmony and consistency of what we advocate.

          tes

        • Abi

          Saay
          Do you know how good you are? You make a lousy sarcasm great.
          Coffee on me whenever we meet.

    • Bayan Nagash

      Hellow Virtual Gentlemen,

      Interesting subject matter, but sometimes it is best to just read and learn, but while I am at it, there are two short clips from which we Eritreans can learn that you will find below; something constructive on the subject of engaging the public, the fact that Ethiopian ambassador seems to be more dignified and more respectful of his interlocutors than ours were when Sal challenged the two via Twitter. At any rate, the second one deal directly about Muslim Ethiopians.

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HALBgCPIjYY

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bVeq76GiU94

  • Mahmud Saleh

    Dear all
    I’m a bit pissed off because this beloved forum wasted precious time on really inconsequential differences.
    Peace wrote:
    “The TPLF led government has officially declared war against Muslims by sentencing innocent Ethiopian Muslim scholars to die in prison despite a mounting evidence that the deliberate and malicious accusations against them are proven nothing but a plain charade. In the last twenty years Muslims have been experiencing discrimination and systematic displacement under pretexts of terrorism and social developments respectively”

    Some or most awatistas who were interested by his input jumped onto defensive mode. That’s except SAAY, as far as I could gather it at a fast glance. What is sickening is for many justice seekers to avoid the uncomfortable reality, which is avoiding criticizing the Ethiopian government. If those defenders defend the government based on its record, I would not care. However, most of them seem to be defending it with the rationale that Peace brought this news:

    a/ in order to deflect the focus from the abuses PFDJ commits on its people

    b/ From an enduring and endearing position of love of the Ethiopian government. EPRDF is better than the Derg, HS, and even PFDJ, across the border to the north. “Show us Peace your bragging justification/reason/accomplishment…” they ask.

    The problem:

    Peace: While you are within your right to be concerned about the news, I’m concerned too, because I believe justice is just justice ኣይትሽርመምን ኣይትቑርመምን። If you care about the injustice befalling a far away lands, if you care about the injustice befalling your own fellowmen/women, why shouldn’t you be concerned about news that’s happening next door, obviously criticized by far away established journals(http://www.ibtimes.com/ethiopian-muslims-accused-terrorism-jailed-22-years-after-obamas-visit-2038177); And why should you be accused of uncalled for name callings when Ethiopians in Addis, are criticizing the government’s heavy handed treatment of the case (http://addisstandard.com/an-ethiopian-court-jailed-muslim-leaders-activists-to-lengthy-terms/)?
    Your problem:
    When you state that the government “declared war on Muslims…” you expect to be asked. You should have said a bit more as to why you think the government has declared war on Muslims. From the above links, you can understand, Ethiopian Muslims are facing the same challenges that Muslims in the USA…UK…Eritrea…are facing. And that is paranoid governments up in arms to quash any protests to ensure law and order pressing the communities from outside (many countries passed copycat terrorism laws which originated from the corridors of American anti-terror agencies and which was pushed through an ill-informed, ill-prepared and an already biased congress. The communities are also menaced from within by determined Muslim zealots. In between, the Muslim communities will suffer as long as they do not own their internal agendas. There is no question that schools and mosques…medrassas are being populated by heavily politicized and radicalized sheiKs/Emams. The phenomenon of ISIS and similar organizations could aggravate/complicate the situation. In countries like Ethiopia, there are three concerns that need to be addressed.
    1. The right of the faithful to exercise their faith freely, to conduct their community affairs according to Islamic Jurisprudence…etc.
    2. The concern of governments to ensure the security of citizens; that communities and their resources are not hijacked.
    3. That in doing number three above, governments don’t abuse rights of their citizens; that they do not alienate the peace loving members of the community.
    In a country where more than a third of its population are Muslims, a careful approach is needed. The concerns of security could only be addressed when the community puts trust on the government.
    The problem of your opponents:
    They could simply ask you to elaborate on the terse statement. That there is an abuse of the terror law is not a secret. Ethiopian government is using that law to frustrate any legitimate dissention. It has been criticized from all corners. What’s the fuss of an Eritrean gentle man criticizing it? If you truly care for the injustice in Eritrea, you should also care for an obviously exploited laws in Ethiopia because injustice is injustice wherever it may happen. Why would one jump to comparison? If PFDJ Eritrea is under brutal unjust rule, does that mean Eritreans have no say on what happens in Ethiopia? Why should not we discuss Ethiopian news independently, on its merit? I think it’s a bad culture. I don’t trust folks who come here talking all that’s obvious, yet have no toleration to hear news that puts Ethiopian politics/justice on the spotlight.
    The sentencing was news, but the fact that the government is one of the worst human right abusers is not news. To their credit, even the officials don’t hide this fact, although they try to rationalize it out.The targets have been bloggers, politicians, and religious leaders alike. For the sake of Ethiopian prosperity and harmony, good citizens of Ethiopia need to watch any encroachment of the tentacles of the governments on the liberties of citizens. This is a constant struggle between citizens and governments, be it in Africa or Europe.
    C

    • tes

      Dear Mahmuday,
      Let me ask you this again: “why Peace! opposes any move that is done against PFDJ?” You are missing this important point. No matter how you explain, everything will be referenced through the eyes of Eritrean justice seekers.

      I know that justice is justice and it must be every where. Can’t we make justice in our hope while we wish others to have too? What moral standard does Peace! has to raise such questions when he is basically against it for Eritreans? Aren’t we fighting so that what you said above is true for Eritreans?

      What concerns Peace! above everything? Can he be a fire extinguisher in someone’s house while his house is burning. When I write this I have in my imagination the five pillars of Islam. Therefore, don’t go that much further. All I am asking is from on due justice point of view.

      The paradox we have is:

      We call for observance of law without looking into the law by itself.

      Let me ask saay7, the one who debates and supports the legitimacy of PFDJ as a governing body. PFDJ has ratified a constitution in 1997 though not materialized. If that constitution was approved and is basically a non-sectarian that has no room for religious leaders to lead their community according to their observances and guidelines, what his take could be if incidences occurred like that of Ethiopia? Could he boycott the verdict and call it “Government has declared war to…?” I think we are not rational people. What we advocate is most of the time what it interests us and I can see it here camouflaged in the name of justice seeking camp. Let’s be clean first before we take a move to look into other’s eye.

      For me, any society can not be non-sectarian but the way the governing body should handle issues should be non partisan. There must be a system boundary that clusters the system f administration and the way society lives. if not, there won’t be justice.

      When there is justice, there is no discrimination.

      tes

      • Mahmud Saleh

        Hello tes
        I’m not aware of any attempts made by peace that opposed moves made against PFDJ. Please share your findings in regards to this assertion. I hold the belief that people have every rights to conduct their opposing views in ways they see appropriate. There are tens of ways of communicating one’s opinions. Just because one seems out of tune of what you consider appropriate does not mean that that person is supporting PFDJ. Just as you said to saay that you have the right to oppose everything you feel should be opposed, he does also have that same right to enjoy that latitude of a platform.
        Regards.

    • Peace!

      Dear Mahmuday,

      Just posted a reply on top!

      regards

  • Kim Hanna

    Selam tes,
    .
    In this kind of vintage SAAY analysis, I automatically assume he is up to no good. I kinda knew he will rehabilitate the convicts and smear and tar Ethiopia.
    .
    I know this because of years and years of experience.
    .
    He brought out the Saudis, the Wahhabis and Gulf Arabs and dismissed it as a giant conspiracy theory, as always.
    .
    His understanding of these “conservative Muslims” almost republican conservative types are convicted for wanting their own religious leaders. That is SAAY for you. I am not even sure what the benefit of it is for him or Eritrea. I am at least glad that some Eritreans are calling him on it.
    .
    K.H

  • Semere Andom

    If Romadan Mohammed Nur(RMN) was President: uninviged intrution between Sal and Emma
    Try to imagine this unimaginable notion that this veteran Eritrean helmed Eritrea instead if IA. Would Eritrea be a normal African country or would it be just like what it is now, NK of Africa.
    Before your try to imagine this unprovable and unknowable notion, please heed my advice do not, it is mere waste of brain cells. Dreaming is good but when the dream is not realized you have to go to facts to find out why has your dream not materilazed and the facts as will free you from the dream that changed to nightmare. RMN could not have been the president, alt hough Petros Solomon told Dan Connel that RMN would have been the president with a little push.
    First EPLf’s emergence was ironic and unnecessary given it came immediately after the congress of 1970 of ELF after IA and RMN returned from China after a military training. The 1970 congress was a turning point I ELF as it was visionary and raised bold questions to remedy the problems in the nascent revolution for freedom as ELF refined and worked to remedy its ways IA after playing a leading role in the congress sceceded and the hodge-podge amalgam of the red sea region Muslims also separated and united with IA’s group. SInce then EPLF has only seen one leader and that is IA. RMN had no chance to president both for demobraphy reason, a society dominated by beliefe in the “hyena of our village”. RMN was technically frozen in 1987 as he was sent to the Siberia of EPLF, the then founded “Justice” department. And in 1994 IA prevented RMN’s name from the ballot. His comrades pleaded with IA and he agreed to give him a semi honorable exit in guise of retirement.
    There seeds of the conoration of IA were sown long time ago in Sahel and all the G-15 nd RMN has no chance to be leaders, so the question if RMN and Haile D were presidents is a silly questions and I am guilty of asking that question before too. But asking that question appeals to our anguished need to justify the madness that went in our name in Sahel, the place where the current seeds germinated.
    The tendency to dampen the accomplishement of TPLF also miss the point that for whatever reason the Dedebit guys made the conscious decision to take their current path, maybe they understood that they will fail duet to the powerful minority in Ethiopai and I do not suggest that they did it from the goodness of their heart but maybe from the sharpness of their minds to tame their victor pride. In our case maybe it was because of our weak minority as Eritera has ethic groups on the verge of extinction except the Tigriniya and Tigre and both are using their majority to wreck havoc. T

  • haileTG

    Selamat Awatista,

    Do you know that in the minds of Eritreans in Eritrea, pro regime are considered opposition and justice seekers are considered supporters? Here is part II of the interview with Kiros Asfaha and other artists.

    https://www.facebook.com/wegihu.teame/videos/1183974758302434/?fref=nf

  • haileTG

    cool thing; ወዮልህ’በል፡ ጉድ ሲፈላ እንዲህ ኣይደል… ጓድ መንግስቱ ምን ነው የሚሆኑት ኣሁን፡ ያ ሁሉ ኢምፔርያሊስትና፡ የትግሬ ቅጥረኛ ወንበዴ፡ ቤተ-መንግስት ውስጥ ላሎይ ላሎይ ሲይስነኩት…..haha. Seriously, nice clip. thanks for sharing.

  • Bayan Nagash

    Hello cool thing,

    One can only envy Ethiopia for pulling the biggest diplomatic showdown by any standards. But, one also is hopeful that Ethiopian leaders do not squander this diplomatic milestone that must be cemented and made to endure much as the Jews State does in the Middle East.

    The squandering is being raised because Eritreans had their chance. Here is a little snippet from the memory lane, way back in 1997 when the first lady, Hillary Clinton was so influential in the White House when she was trying to institute the bodged Universal Health Care, using that influence she went to Eritrea with her daughter Chelsea, among other things, she attended a ceremony of health care clinic in the outskirt of Asmara. Word has it, the first lady even danced with the then President Isaias now turned tyrant, but only references of it, no video clip that I could locate. So, the hope is that Ethiopian leaders heed lessons from our own blunder in Eritrea, from one who believes in bulldozing diplomacy, incapable of harnessing diplomatic ties – that’s the African malady.

    Excerpt from “Living History”, by Hillary R. Cltinon, p. 405
    “ The president of Eritrea, Isaias Afwerki, and his wife, Saba Haile, a former freedom fighter, lived in their own small house, but they recived me at the Presidential Palace. As we watched folk dancers perform in a courtyard built by the Italians during their colonial
    occupation, I asked President Afwerki, who had given up his university studies to fight in the resistance, if he had ever found time to dance during their long war. “Of course,” he replied.
    “We had to dance to remind ourselves of a world without war.”

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OJSxrVCPj34

    http://www.deseretnews.com/article/551587/First-lady-does-a-dance-for-democracy-in-Eritrea.html?pg=all

    https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/8fd618ed4f08b28c7e782af934d3660578b257deea135670cead38995e4f06ce.jpg

  • betri_weyn

    Dear cool things. please don’t upset the north ha*asenai nitric,sara & anti–selam… However Thx and who knows tomorrow they Wii dance in ha*asenai palaso

    • Nitricc

      Beri_Hasot
      so you are proud some white people danced with you at the same time calling you “charity project”; you see that is why Eritrea will never be like you. how is the begging going anyways? ” i can’t believe she called you ” charity project” lol and you are happy. what is wrong with you people?

      • betri_weyn

        Dear nitric
        iam happy and proud whites,blacks and red people from any background when they dance our traditional dance.by the way there’s some unconfirmed rumours those our dear guests they were asking to see and meet him the 1990-92 trenches converters General…

        • Nitricc

          Betri-ewyn; i know there is major network, water and electric problems in Meqele but here in the USA, blacks are being killed for nothing by the police. what is even intriguing is, no one in awate university is addressing this tragedy. at least, some one have to acknowledge it. after all, black life matters as well as your masters. that is the reason i care more blacks than your privileged white masters. you are happy they danced on your music while calling you a ” charity project” and i am sad my black brothers are being killed for nothing.

          • betri_weyn

            Dear nitric
            I completely agree with u yes there’s water and electric shortage b/s of the development… I was amazed you just jump in water and electric but forget our own big problem investors(ayte-dawit) problem. The good thing Soon Gibelll start and the problem will solve…

          • betri_weyn

            Dear nitric
            do you know how many Mr john and Mrs Johnns, Mr sui, sung and sheikhs &… visiting the no electric and water city… We have a master plan on GTP-2 in the next 5 years from the tourism industry 1-2 billions dollars to earn.so every night tens of thousands of people from all background of skins are dancing our nation and nationalities dance In our night clubs and( mesheta-bet)

          • Nitricc

            Hi Betri_weyn; you said ” so every night tens of thousands of people from all background of skins are dancing our nation and nationalities dance In our night clubs and( mesheta-bet)”
            well, here is the difference between you and me. you look at the dancing and i am looking at the people. at their life standard, at their well bing and at their way of life. no wonder why you are dubbed ” Charity Project” let the people have a clean drinking water first and you can tell us about your masters dancing in your country.

            http://i.unu.edu/media/ourworld.unu.edu-en/article/15840/unsafe-water-source.jpg

          • tes

            Dear Nitricc,

            I know you don’t have any clue about the water source and flows of Eritrea in general and the water flow from the capital city of Asmara towards River Anseba. But the whole garbage and wastes (some contain toxic chemicals) flow without any treatment to river Anseba. people who live alone the sides of this longest river drink water from open dug wells directly. And those who live near Asmara (Anseba Laelay, upto Halibmentel, even do down to keren and Hamelmalo are victims of this untreated water.

            According to many researches (including my best friend who did his MSc study on water source along Anseba and its effect on human health, especially the visible teeth problem) has recommended an immediate action to be taken so that any water that flows from capital can not flow freely without treatment. Many civil engineering students did their design project on water treatment centers in Mai-Bela but none has been approved.

            Worse, the capital is supplied with vegetables that grown from water irrigated from this water source.

            Another serious problem also exists far from the capital, around Keren, in College Hamelmalo (where I worked for 6 yrs). the water consumed by the students (more than 1500 per year) drink water that is extracted from river Anseba. The water has very high sediment residues, very black and fine soil particles. if you live 1&1/2 litre bottle filled with this water, the next day, you will see a dark plastic.

            After observing such serious problems, which also has created water loggings because of sediment settlements, the college called engineers to design a new water supply system. A civil engineer from Segen Construction campany, who is my friend too, came in to study and propose designs. I was assigned by the college administration to assist him and supply needed information. We did that and my friend came out with a complete design. I was closely following. Then, Segen promised to start the construction phase. This was in 2008-2009. We were so optimistic but non was materialized till August 2012 where I left for good the college.
            Even now (? not 100% sure) the students are consuming the same water from the same river without treatment.

            When we investigate the source of the fine sediment, we found that it is the sediment carried from Asmara all along the river coarse. Around Hamelmalo college, the depth of the sand is deep and the river cross-section is wide. When the river flow reaches there, it gets enough time to down load its sediment and get leached deep to the river bed. from there, whenever there is water pumping, the sediments are carried with.

            Therefore, why are you much concerned about Ethiopia (I think they have to thank you for increasing their awareness -for sure tomorrow there will be a project in this site you shared, please provide full address) instead of your country if you really care. We have much more worse problems to be brought to the public view.

            Dear Ethiopians, I think you need to thank Nitricc for being an awareness raising campaigner. he is sometimes brining serious matters that you need to work. I am sure you will have a project in this area soon.

            tes

          • Kokhob Selam

            Dear tes,
            nice explanation, thank you. But our friend Nitricc seems he care more about Ethiopia. they should hire him to work for them in finding all those faults and wrong management of EPRDF.

          • Abi

            Tes
            Thank you.

          • Nitricc

            Hi Tes, what you are saying is not new or unheard of. let alone in Eritrea; even the USA there are multiple cases of water contamination. few months ago i read city wide water contamination a city called Telido. the contamination was so severe; the water plant was shut down completely and no one was allowed to drink water. in the same manner; i read some where in Cali the water was found to contain high percentage of Cr+6 which very cancer causing agents in the drinking water system of the Cali city. i don’t remember the name of the city. the point is, yes it does happen. my point was when some one is bragging about dancing and night clubs while the poor people are drinking the poison water; i was expecting you to stand with me in support of those people. now, did you how i make a joke about your fake cry for justice? when it matters you dished the poor and little people and you stood with rich and who are dancing the night away. where is your morales?
            once again, your hypocrites are exposed. he told you they are earning billion of dollars from dancing and i showed him how the poor people are dying from a poison water and you stood with him. Tes, you better not mention justice one more time and i am coming after you. i will grow like a fungus on you. hypocrite.

          • tes

            Dear Nitircc,
            I know you have a very hard heart and I what I said is falling on nothing.
            Let me remind you: Whe more than 360 people died in Lampedusa, you didn’t understand why they first left Eritrea (by implication, you were saying those who leave, drowning is a reward). and when people went to Geneva to support COI findings, a finding that proved for systematic torture and crimes, you labelled those who air their voice as losers and woyane agents.
            Then, by what standards are you talking about dancing bla bla?
            I know your eyes are open and get mad when you see people laughing. But when thousands of people mourn and shout simply because they lost their beloved family member, your eyes are closed and your heart dances.
            You feel much happier when you see diehard PFDJites dance in Bologna, Sweden, UK, Canada, by the name of festival, while they are there to express their absolute loyalty to the dictator. And now, you look much concerned about this music.
            Why your eyes ear are closed while your is full of happiness when you heard about the death tragedy and now, your eyes are open, your heart getting mad when you get this event rejoicing clip and manifest it as it is done at the cost of innocent and poor people?
            At least you can be consistent. After seeing this video, if you had said that EPRDF organized such events to please their bosses from USA and to get money, well you have said it many times and no one could care. but now, you just into a dirty business just the same as Peace!
            tes

          • Abi

            General Nitric
            The future is brighter for these poor ladies.
            For the time being enjoy the picture. Take more pictures now. Soon you won’t be able to take this kind of picture.

          • Nitricc

            Hi Abi, be fair! as long as anyone is fair; i have no problem if you take me to the task and trash me.
            again betri_weyn was bragging about the white people dancing in his country and how the country gaining on tourism in billions of dollars. and all i did was remind him what is important; the people; the little people; the poor. now, what exactly did you find offense about my post? if anything you should take it with your Tigryan brother. be fair. i did not dig it up out of nowhere.

          • Abi

            General
            I’m the first one to tell you or anyone interested that ethiopia is poor. Nothing new there. What is new is we are seeing a light at the end of 3000 miles long tunnel. Looking into someone’s poverty doesn’t make you any richer or a better person.
            Take it easy.

          • Nitricc

            Hi Abi; if that is the case; be humble and work hard. you don’t need to tell me how your night clubs are generating billions of dollars from the visiting white people. i don’t care. that is all. how about giving clean drinking water for the villagers? here is an idea for you.i am cool, though.

          • Kokhob Selam

            Dear Abi,

            in fact you should invite him and go with him to see. that is nice appearance that none of us will see in the future.

            ኣንተ ድህነትም ቆንጆ ነው ልበል!

          • Fanti Ghana

            Hello Abi,
            Nitricc missed the most important part of this picture; they are all smiling!

            PS:
            NItricc, Abi
            This ladies are from my home district. I can tell by their hairdo and a little bit by the land scape.

          • Nitricc

            Dear Fanti; i trust Your judgment. i am wrong? for responding when someone is bragging making billions of dollars from dancing while the little people and the poor people are drinking a poisoned water and ultimately westing their life from it. you will be the judge and if you think i am wrong; I have no problem apologizing. that much i trust your take.

          • Fanti Ghana

            Hello Nitricc,

            I am sure betri_weyn was playing tit-for-tat with you, but you definitely are right. Let’s buy a few generators before we dance. I get it.

          • tes

            Dear Nitricc,
            To your surprise, I grew up drinking from the same water source. It is because of my own experience that I oppose you when you mock on such things. If you to Eritrea, you could have cried. I know what life in the village is and how we lived.
            And don’t just copy what has been said. This water source we see in the picture is just a small pond where rainwater was harvested; And as I can see there is no algae or any kind of grass around. this implies it is a fresh rainy water. Hence from quality point of view, there is no harm to drink this water unless you have severe internal physiological problem that can be affected easily by fine sediments.
            Working for 6 years in Hamelmalo and drinking highly sediment water has not brought noticeable problem to me. Some student show stayed even less that a year had problems with the waterand those who were able to buy 10 littres of purified water, they use it almost for a week. 10 litres per 7 days, almost 1.4 litres per day. Imagine now?
            tes

          • Nitricc

            Dear Tes; i don’t think you are feeling me. i am not saying Eritrea is better than Ethiopia or Kenya is better than Sudan. I don’t care where your are from; the minute you tell me you are well off and making billions because of forginers visit your night clubs; while your people are living under that kind of living condition; all i am saying is i reject it with all my bones. do you understand what i am saying?
            what happen to humanity??????

          • tes

            Dear Nitricc,
            I understand what you are saying and do you understand what I am saying too?
            If you were a caring person, you could at least sympathized with the Lampedusa victims but you are not. Can you hear me then dear Nitricc. Hear first to be heard later.
            tes

          • Kim Hanna

            Selam Nitricc,
            .
            There is an ad for some kind of TV show entitled “Impastor”. It appears to me to be about someone who becomes a pastor for all the wrong reasons. I did not see the show. I am going to look for it one of these days. I looked at the commercial, I don’t think he even believes in God.
            .
            You may ask what is that got to do with me? I will say nothing and then add when you said “what happen to humanity?????” somehow, that picture show that I have not seen yet came to mind. That is all.
            .
            K.H

          • Abi

            Fantisha
            The ladies were smiling because they knew you were around.
            Which one is Hayat ?

          • Hayat Adem

            Abi,
            It must be difficult not to smile in the presence of his Fantiness. All three wore their shoes, so if I’m not here, I could be in the other group of 14. The smile is so great. How about the care and help for one another? 12 years later (the picture is from 2003), I hope the water is purer and closer, but the culture of contagious smile and care should continue untouched and as such.
            The pained heart brings you a 12 years old picture to inspire nothing misery. It is the nature of the pained heart to simply focus on the problem. But good hearts see something else, something better and bigger. The picture simply shows smile, love and care. That is simply the Fantiness factor.
            Hayat

          • Abi

            Hayat
            If Fantiness is characterized by love, smile, care, and of course kindness, what is left for Abiless ?

            12 years later the water is cleaner and closer as anything else. The school, the clinic, the road, the electricity, etc,etc . Just as the late great leader predicted.
            20 more years we will be talking democracy.
            Inshallah! Right now I want dabo. I hope you know what I mean.

          • Hayat Adem

            His Abyness, Abyssin, Abyssinya, Anbessa:
            I usually get your fashioned humors mostly pointing to a bigger truth or perspective. You said here, “right now I want dabo”, “dabo, in the context of making the economy a priority over democracy. But when you wrote “I hope you know what I mean”, I keep on 2nd guessing if there is more to it.
            People always want to do something to people. There are people what Eckhart Tolle call “pain bodies”. All they think of is “what can I do to ruin the good day?”. And there are others taking the opposite role, making the next person smile. You are from the latter. And do not be scared of Fanti. We all need him to refresh our souls,

          • Nitricc

            wow; Abi, nice way of conforming long held believe of awatewyan that your Hayat is from Meqelle. lol. you know she always claimed that she Eritrean Muslim but your heart knows ir and you placed her where she belongs. nothing wrong with where she belongs but honestly you placed here on the place of her originality; which is in Tigray. thanks for speaking the truth in a away of the real truth. i don’t know if you know this but you just told Hayat Adam is a fake and a lier. well, i don’t know which one is Hayat but if i have to take a guess it will be the one who is haiding her face behind the three woman. key word; hiding. again thanks for telling the truth.

          • Fanti Ghana

            Hello Abi,
            Think about it; how can a Princess be fetching water?

          • Abi

            Fantisha
            I love a princess humble enough to fetch water.
            I see beauty , care , love in humbleness . They are real . They are not Fantacy.

          • Fanti Ghana

            Hello Abisha,
            Birhanu Nega is sick from food poisoning in Eritrea and he is requesting to be taken to Europe for treatment. I could not imagine Birhanu leading an army and actually risking his life, but I never thought he would come up with an excuse this quick. He has been the most self serving even from his early days with EPRP, but I honestly thought perhaps midlife crisis caught up with him and he decided to end his life with some dignity this time.

          • tes

            Dear Fanti Ghana,
            As food professional, I always look things from quality and safety point of view.
            Let me share this with you:
            1. Eritrea is a country where you can’t find any food science college. There is no one single first degree graduate in food science, let alone food technology. (It is just my interest that I shifted from agricultural engineering to food processing engineering thinking that one day I can establish a food science college).
            2. Eritrea is the only country that checks food expire date as a means of quarantine and food quality control through municipal police which do not have any knowledge about food handling and processing. If you read the only Eritrean news paper, you will read headings titled, “expired food was collected from this city and was burned” kind of daily news. Most food products are imported illegally. Even Coca-Cola packaged in plastic bottles come all along cross the border without any refrigeration system. Think on the high temperature and the fluctuation in between.
            3. Eritrea is the only country that has no Food Quality and safety control rules and regulations. No ISO on food has been approved yet except for very few in the 1990s.And Europe has tried to establish food quality control laboratory in Massawa and fully equipped for fish and is now almost non-functional.
            many many many points can be mentioned. I have ample information in this regard;
            Then, I am not surprised if Birhanu Nega got poisoned thinking his age and confront. I think he has tried to live like a rebel leader life (which is impossible at this age for him to be) and everything there will be not good for him.
            Just imagine, you have slaughtered one sheep and after eating what you can has kept the meat in the refrigeration. Then next 24 hours, there is no electricity. And then comes for 6 hours and goes again. Such changing temperature condition creates a favourable environment for poisoning bacteria to be multiplied.

            And we know Ethiopians like meat so much. Do you think Birhanu will stop eating such poisoned meat? In the first beginning he went there to end his struggle not to bring any change.
            tes

          • Fanti Ghana

            Hello Prof. tes,
            What a contrast from the days of the municibio! the street cleanings and the electric trash collecting vehicles in Asmara. Even by today’s standards Asmara was one of the cleanest cities. In fact, cleanliness had become a culture in Eritrea for generations.

            What was funny about Birhanu’s food poisoning is just that it was something I was expecting to happen. Not the food poisoning but his weaseling out of the potential hardship he was about to face. I didn’t expect something ready made as food poisoning, but something like shooting himself on the foot or similar. “The wounded hero” was what I thought he might try.

            By the way, food is one of my favorite subjects. I am fascinated about how nutrients are processed in our system, what type of nutrients complement or contradict each other, and generally, knowing what happens to the food we eat in the molecular level fascinates me almost like fiction. I believe with the right understanding of food, most illnesses of our region could be avoided. Our societies don’t give much thought about food the way they should, and I hope, some day, you will be one of the pioneers of food awareness in our region.
            Selam.

          • Abi

            Fantisha
            “kemechew meTana temelso hede
            EndeteTela sew endaltewedede.”
            Gublye ante gublye …

          • አዲስ

            Hi Fanti,

            Well that was fast if it really happened as you said. What’s your source ?

            Thanks,
            Addis

          • Fanti Ghana

            Hello Addis,
            The source is Elias Kifle of Ethiopian Review. It is a long story, but I always had zero faith on Birhanu’s integrity starting way before he became a household name. When I heard the news about his marching to Eritrea to lead his troops to save Ethiopia, I immediately suspected it to be a PR stunt. So I wanted that food poisoning news to be true so much so I didn’t try to verify its validity. So, there you go. Somewhat unprofessional of me but I found that news impossible to resist.

            mewdek layker bechinklat: while I am at it, let me add to my unprofessionalism: if this news turns out to be false it will become true very soon.

          • Kim Hanna

            Selam Fanti,
            .
            That is funny. This thing you started I am sure will get back to you with a value added news in a couple of weeks.
            .
            I myself have told a couple people because the story sounded SO believable. If the story turns out to be incorrect, we have to call this Elias guy a lying journalist. I think Psychologists need to come up with a name for lying journalists, there is such a large population in the group.
            .
            K.H

          • አዲስ

            Hi Fanti,

            Thanks for providing the source. Sew tira bilut Elias kiflen tera lol. Anyway my take on Birhanu is that, I used to like him before he decided an armed struggle is the only way to bring democracy to the country and on top of that when he chose Isaias as a partner (though understandably once you go on the road of armed struggle, there’s only few options to launch it from). I am all for peaceful struggle which I truly believe hasn’t even properly begun yet let alone to give up on it and chose the opposite road. May be he should have taken a page or two on how to efficiently organize and peacefully struggle from “Dimstachin yisema” group.

            Before all this armed struggle talk, I have to say he was one of my favorite politicians in the country. I liked his attitude towards EPRDF it was not all hate but believed in positively engaging them(worked with them when he was in the economic association). Some of the political savviness he showed in organizing the opposition for the ill-fated 2005 election, his debating skills, his oratory, and at the time I read his book which he wrote once he was in prison about that election and if I remember correctly he advocated for joining the parliament which I hoped they would no matter what EPRDF did.

            That’s all in the past and we are where we are now. In worst shape than 2005 in building democracy in the country. I wish for no blood to be spilled to bring change in the country. May be that’s being naive. But any assistance or partnership coming from the north in the form of Isaias, as the saying in amharic goes “bafinchaye yiwta”.

            Thanks,
            Addis

          • Amde

            Hi Addis

            Spot on.

            The tragedy of it is I believe both sides can find so much they can agree on.

            2005 was a tragic missed opportunity on both sides. I don’t think it will come around for another generation.

            Amde

          • አዲስ

            Hi Amde,

            Do you remember how engaged and hopeful the public was? Everybody reading newspapers, discussing about politics everywhere you go…I was so proud with the whole thing until…It could’ve been one of the(if not the) monumental stage in building democracy in the country. It was not meant to be. I hope we’ll see something like that before a generation passes.

            Thanks,
            Addis

          • Fanti Ghana

            Hello Addis,
            You just summed up for me what I was going to say as a response to your post above. My last straw with him and why I think he is too selfish to lead was based on his refusal to accept the results during the 2005 election. Regardless of whether the vote was rigged or not it would have been a historic moment for all Ethiopians to actually see a change of authorities through the ballot box. It could have been a good start for democracy. If his priorities were the well being of the nation and to see democracy take a foothold in Ethiopia he would have seen the advantage of accepting those results, and he would have drafted a plan of improvement for the following election. Many people who knew him during EPRP days say he always thought about himself first, and for me that day was the proof.

          • አዲስ

            Hi Fanti,

            As far as I know he was advocating for joining the parliament( in his personal case the Addis Ababa region parliament ) even though he believed the vote was rigged and EPRDF made it very hard for the newly elected MPs to work under the new laws. Do you have information otherwise?

            Thanks,
            Addis

          • Fanti Ghana

            Hello Addis,

            Aha! “…advocating for joining the parliament…” That means you have a lot of Lidetu Ayalew video watching to do. What Birhanu was saying in public and what he was doing in private is so scary that Lidetu summed it up saying something like “The fact that Birhanu did not gain power is one proof that God is really protecting Ethiopia.” Addis, most fascists are charismatic orators. That is how they gain popular support in the beginning. Even some of what they say about helping the common folks could also be genuine. Hitler’s Volks ‘Folks’ Wagon (VW) is a good example. The problem is that the price tag that will follow ends up being way too high for the country to survive.

          • አዲስ

            Fanti,

            Haha well I think you need to read more on the subject than watching Lidetu Ayalew’s videos. Those two have serious personal beef apart from their ideological differences. But most reliable records states that he advocated for joining the parliament. As far as I know no Kinijit leaders or observers stated a difference on Birhanu’s position. I am not sure if Lidetu said Birhanu internally opposed or worked not to get into the parliament. Did he? We all know their differences on many issues. But did he actually dispute this point?

            Thanks,
            Addis

          • Fanti Ghana

            Hello Addis,
            It has been a while but I think so. I don’t remember the exact phrases but it was something to the effect of: we, Lidetu and company, wanted to join the parliament but Birhanu opposed it strongly. Once we gave up on the idea, he declared ‘ine join enadrig biyachew inesu embi alugn’ iyale simachin maTfat jemere. Something similar is what I remember but l will watch those videos when I get a chance and update this reply if I find out my memory is shot. I hope I am at least half way correct.

          • አዲስ

            Hi Fanti,

            Thanks for that.

            Addis

          • Fanti Ghana
          • አዲስ

            Hi Fanti,

            Thanks for taking the time and sharing. I’ll take your word(not gonna watch it to be honest 🙂 ) and he said what you said he did. For me he’s still may be the only one to accuse Birhanu of advocating for not joining the parliament.

            Thanks,
            Addis

          • Amde

            Hi Addis,

            I do.

            Small things …. One of the things I liked … Ten years ago, this page http://www.electionethiopia.org/en/maps-a-data.html was a marvel to behold. You could go to that page, drill down to constituencies, find out who was running, who had what vote etc etc etc… That page has been dead for years.

            In my mind, even more important than legislating is governing. Ten years ago, an opposition coalition not only had legislative clout, but was about to also have governing responsibility for the capital of the country. Legislative power is good, but it is one thing to consider position papers, issue and craft policies etc, but quite another to have administrative responsibility. Dr. Berhanu would have made a very good mayor. That opening is also gone and today no opposition party has administrative responsibility for running a single qebele in a nation of 100million people.

            I guess it depends what you call a generation. Usually it is defined as twenty years. At 10 years past 2005, we are at a midway point. So two more elections. Do you think anything fundamentally will change for the next two elections? The analogy I have for the EPRDF is the Chinese Communist party. This is a supposedly communist institution that has millionaires and billionaires as members. In other words, its ideology is meaningless. But it is more than a party – it is in fact the state. It supposedly has factions, policy differences, etc… that are “resolved” in ways that are invisible to a non-member. It has been in power since 1949, and signs are that it will stay in power for the foreseeable future.

            Amde

          • አዲስ

            Hi Amde,

            Sure it was a bright moment in our long history. The point you raised about governing is very important. It’s one of those good opportunities squandered. About EPRDF looking more like the Chinese Communist Party, I do agree with you on that one. It looks like the fate of the country will be decided within the party.

            Thanks,
            Addis

          • saay7

            Hey Addis:

            Hope you kept some photographs from Ethiopias 2005 contested elections so you can show your grandkids cause that aberration ain’t coming back anytime soon:)

            When you think of the democracies in Africa, S Africa comes to mind, no? Today there was an article on an ANC official visiting China and expressing his admiration for its style of governance, which is in stark contrast to his country’s “rowdy, noisy and disagreeable” opposition as a summary I read described it. China perfected the Dabo Now Democracy Later model of the developmental state which appeals to many of the governing elite.

            My understanding from the 2015 elections is that the Ethiopian opposition were essentially EPRDF + Assab. Am I simplifying it too much? As for the Eritrean opposition I think our politico/economy model is still at the “things I learned at my civics class in 8th grade.” 🙂

            saay

          • አዲስ

            Hi Saay,

            haha I am going to tell my grand kids that I voted in the 2005 election and debated and discussed with my friends and colleagues. Just like our Arbegnoch used to tell us they fought away the italian invaders. I am hopeful though.

            If South Africa is also looking up to China for style of governance, it’s a shame to what they’ve built so far.

            I think Ethiopian Opposition=EPRDF + Assab is oversimplifying it, even for the 2015 opposition.

            Eritrean opposition, I am mystified by it 🙂

            Thanks,
            Addis

            p.s I am watching the GOP debate and having the time of my life. It’s a beautiful disaster.

          • saay7

            Hey Addis:

            I was at the worst possible place–airport gate, with a TV blaring–when there was nowhere to go but be trapped by the GOP debate. Really, Addis, you watch THAT? Is ur remote control broken? Why, oh why, would you watch that? And to think there are 12 months—months!–of that kind of “debate” televised. The snarky tweets about it are more fun. Here’s how one described one of the guys –Ted Cruz–position:

            I will protect you from aborted fetuses who emerge as zombies and go underground to break the U.S.-Mexico fences and allow illegals in.

            Uggg

            saay

          • አዲስ

            Hi Saay,

            Come on I had to watch that train wreck for at least its first installment. Trump didn’t disappoint. It was a great reality tv.

            I also read a tweet on Ted Cruz: Every time I see Ted Cruz, I expect him to say “Live from New York City…”

            Safe travels.

            Thanks,
            Addis

          • Amde

            Hi Addis,

            On change coming internally from the EPRDF, I agree with you but …

            In a way, the political and governing system of EPRDF is not new. If we set aside the specific ideological differentiators for a second (I think people may not like to hear this) but Ethiopia has ample historical data on the performance of a closed absolutist system operating with opaque internal rules. What do I mean by that?

            Haile Sellasie’s system identified what it saw as talented promising people who were willing to within some limits of the system, and co-opted them via titles, government positions and even political marriages. Much of his cabinet were people that came up from poor families through schools he had initiated. This system did not involve the people at large, but it tried to involve those it saw as “elites” or potential elites within it, and resolve political issues via internal mechanism. For example, how many Eritrean Grazmaches were minted in the Haile Sellasie era? Obviously, this model did not work and was done away by forces that were completely not represented within this system.

            If one accepted the absolutism of Mengistu and Marxist-Leninist dogma, one could be a member of the WPE and the state institutions and work to create a socialist/communist system. The assumption being that it was your class that defined your political worth. And many former political opponents/enemies did serve in the Derg led system. We know how a lot of internal differences were resolved (brutally). But the system did not really involve the people outside itself, and in the end it to was done away by forces that were not represented in the system.

            In that sense, EPRDF is not unique in the history of Ethiopian governance systems. It has an overarching ideology. It has monopoly of power throughout the land. It identifies and co-opts what it thinks are promising elites. Whatever policy differences etc there are , they are “resolved” internally through opaque processes.

            The question is, how is it fundamentally different from the previous two regimes that it can hope to represent within itself all the political forces and constituencies and accommodate them all constantly? Remember EPRDF was formed and more or less sustained by people that were motivated by principle, and led by people that more or less proved they have the skill set needed to run a guerilla organization. Once that generation is gone, EPRDF will be filled with people of different motivation (primarily career) and led by people that show the skill set of climbing up through bureaucratic ladders. (This last is not a criticism of EPRDF by the way – it is a fact of life for any organization as it ages.)

            Anyway, this is a long-winded way of saying that I agree with you change will most likely come from within the EPRDF system, but we have already a track record of not managing changes well from such systems. I hope somebody pays heed.

            Amde

          • አዲስ

            Hi Amde,

            Though I agree with most of the things you said. I am afraid the premise you started with, change coming from EPRDF, is not something I believe in. In the risk of ruining all the things you agreed with me 🙂 What I was actually saying(like you said in your previous comment and elaborated in the above comment) is that the country’s fate at this time and in the near future will be shaped by the internal politics of EPRDF just like Chinese Communist Party. Other than that, I completely agree with the point you raised on the history of Ethiopian rulers ruling with internal system without participation of the public.

            Thanks,
            Addis

          • Wolde ab

            Selamta Addis
            I, like you, used to admire Birhanu until the 2005 fiasco.
            I strongly believe that Birhanu and his cohorts are the responsible agents for that debacle.
            My reasons are:
            1-His injection of a handful of so called ” muhurans” in to positions of power in the nascent kinjit.
            2- Creating division in the kinjit support committees especially in North Amerca.
            3- By undermining the two main groups of kinjit.
            Should I go on..

            Thanks.
            Wolde ab

          • አዲስ

            Hi Wolde ab,

            Many have written and commented what went wrong and who’s to blame. Generally for me both the opposition and EPRDF are to blame. Mostly EPRDF as it was responsible as a governing body. I don’t want to go in detail about that because I have debated and discussed it for quite some time now. what I rather want to focus on is what that stage meant for the people of Ethiopia, and why we seem to fail in cultivating a mind-set from both camps that is far-sighted, not just a power grabber but believe in the long process of building a democracy and actually making steps towards it. Not backward as EPRDF doing. I wonder what it takes.

            Thanks,
            Addis

          • Fanti Ghana

            Hello Addis,

            sew Tira bilut, haha.
            As much as I disagree with most of Elias’ political position and while knowing that he is advocating mine and my families destruction, I always respected him for his honesty. He doesn’t hide behind lack of democracy nor poverty he simply hates anything Tigrean. I know they all say ‘we don’t hate Tigreans, only Weyane or TPLF,’ but so far, he is the only one I believe when he says that.

            About Birhanu, whatever I had to say you said it better as your reply to Amde below.
            Selam.

        • Nitricc

          Betri_weyn; as much I disagree with every thing you stand for; but i respect for not hiding behind Addis, Hayat, and all the bull crap your people hied under with. respect brother.

      • አዲስ

        Hi Nitricc,

        When you say “what’s wrong with you people?” , who are you referring to?

        Thanks,
        Addis

        • Hayat Adem

          Addis,
          I don’t think you need to ask. He is referring either to Ethiopians as a whole or just Tigrians. Either ways, he is acting a bad boy like always. I wonder if the decent are being outnumbered by the indecent when it comes to counting supporters of the regime these days. If an Ambassador represneting an early cultured graceful people in Africa on a mission of selling values and images in a modern conservative culture of the Far-east happens to be wild-badmouthing on a twitter like that, what is surprising about Nitricc just nitiriccing!
          Hayat

          • አዲስ

            Hi Hayat,

            I understand how Nitricc sees his neighbor to the south. But referring to Ethiopians in a derogatory term in a forum that I really like to engage our neighbors just pissed me off.

            If the ambassador you referring to is, Ambassador Estifanos, then yeah that guy rather makes me laugh in a what’s wrong with him kinda way.

            Thanks,
            Addis

          • Hayat Adem

            Hi Addis,
            Normally it should piss all of us off. “Normally” is a key word here. But, once you know people like Nitricc are unfixable, you stop taking them seriously. The more you do that, the more they try to yell out the worst way for attention. Again, normally, the moderator is to take notice, and they do and warn, warn, warn and take action. I don’t know if PFDJ guards at the border warn as many times before they shoot at people fleeing Eritrea. The moderators try to supply sense and normalcy into the discourse. Most people outside PFDJ heed and act accordingly. But the ones that are sympathetic to PFDJ, well, what tools do they have in their mind? Would they support PFDJ if they were cultured and decent in the first place?! Look at this boy, he is telling us how he cares about the blacks who died at the hands of the police when he has to acknowledge yet 3-5k are running away from home and family every month. YG put it at 2k and playdown the size of the number until he was reminded by the sarcasm of his host. Guys like Nitircc would never take it even from YG unless they hear it from Isaias. And they go on other non-issues and indecencies. And the task is cumbersome, high maintenance for moderators. As an added solution to the regulatory control of the Moderators, we can help them neutralize vulgarity by also ignoring. As there are glassy ceilings to block you, some walls are empty presences and they don’t interfere with your walk unless you mind their yelling.
            You are right about Estifanos.
            Cheers

          • አዲስ

            Hi Hayat,

            Thanks for the advice. I will start Ignoring this kind of behavior even in this form from now on.

            Thanks,
            Addis

          • Bayan Nagash

            Hello Addis,

            Seconding Hayat’s motion, save yourself from headaches and heart burns. I doubt anyone takes Nitricc seriously. I recall vividly upon returning to Awate after long absence, I wrote an article to which Nitricc threw a tangential bait, of virtual sorts, and I took it, and it was downhill from there. In another topic I just tried to inject some sense into his fascination with the tangents. So, I wrote this: Heavens, why do you Nitricc preoccupy yourself with tangents. I
            really appreciate you sharing the story of Haben. Here is what the caption on my FB reads, which I shamelessly shared without giving you credit for it:
            Uplifting story of untold proportions that speaks to the Eritrean resolve in
            that how Eritreans when given an opportunity they thrive to the ultimate
            heights. Here is a story of a young woman who cannot see and cannot speak, yet, became Human Right’s Attorney, aptly named Haben, indeed, Haben!

            So, kbur Addis, please heed HA’s suggestion. At any rate, I have long since learned not to take him seriously, but he has those lucid moments that rubs one the right way, and on those moments, I gladly respond. Here is what I think is going on with Nitricc that I wrote from a day or two ago that you may not have read:

            Through the persona Nitricc, this Awatawi, has shown a great deal of malleability in the way he generates discussions. Hyperbole is one of the marks to his genius, which leaves us so dumbfounded that we cannot help it but respond.

            The other dispensation is to feign ignorance when he knows that the reader will feel it at a visceral level, mind you, it is something he posts, yet, in a nonchalant manner throws his bait leaving us fuming at the clueless (ness), indignant at such callous mind, it stirs us to go for a rejoinder. Notice this morning’s post, there is a mark of fluidity and fluency to his language, but, seemingly deliberately, he adds certain grammatical errors here and some typos there leaving lingering doubt on the reader, thusly, sucking you right into that bait he set for you to take, taking it lots of us do type away our response.

            In one my favorite dehai writers from the old days, “severely ignoring” Nitricc will definitely do the trick. I only write when I have a little time to spare without expending my energy, using simple facts and common sense, not for him personally, mind you, but for other readers who may not know this virtual persona and take him seriously.

            Sincerely,
            BN

          • አዲስ

            Hi Bayan,

            Thanks for your advice too. Ignoring as you both said is the way to deal with him.

            Thanks,
            Addis

          • tes

            Dear Addis,

            I hear you loud but this ugly minded Nitricc has been here more than a decade. He is well smart enough to throw his dirty politics (PFDJ’s) and provoke the forum in a negative way.

            The question is then whether to ignore him or not? Let me tell you from my point of view: “No one can be left ignored unless he wanted to be so”. Then, if he doesn’t care whether you ignore him or not and still agitates the inner conscience, the solution is to contain him with in your limits.

            Because of this, Nitricc is my favourite creature. I know his narrow mind and I act accordingly. try that and sure you will be happy when ever you are provoked and to reply.

            A 1 cent experience share from the x-Newtonian Awatista

            Stay blessed

            tes

        • Nitricc

          Hi Addis, would you follow the story, please? it was declared that
          “dancing to a Tigrigna guayal in Addis”
          who do you think i am referring too? come-on Addis.

          • አዲስ

            Hi Nitricc,

            I was trying to give you the benefit of the doubt but obviously you don’t deserve it.

            [To Moderator: Why is he allowed to refer to a whole set of people in a derogatory term ? I usually don’t engage such kind of behavior but I respect this forum so I want it to be clean of such tones. If it’s a time or resource restraint I understand.]

            Thanks,
            Addis

          • Ted

            Hi, Nitricc you got it all wrong. After 100% Weyane win hysterical laugh of hers, it is the least she can do to make up to them. They need a little drama like this to make the charade going.
            Although for wrong reason, you got weyane lovers to stick up for each other,All is not lost .

            PS. Tigrigna supposed to be easy for foreigners, watching them do Amharic Eskista is always hilarious.

        • belay

          Dear Addis,
          Nitric have no respect to Eritreans either, even to those who died in the desert.
          So, what do you expect from Nitric?
          ke jeb Atent?

  • tes

    Dear L.T,
    welcome back my friend. Forget about me now, How was the demo in Sweden? No more festival now by the name of Eritreans. If your house of lords, PFDJ wants it, next year, they will conduct it while in exile. Stay around to be punched hard dear. awate.com is cleaning here room from any traces of PFDJ.
    Here are some good news to you:
    Ted is officially dead after he showed his wild opposition to Geneva 26.
    Nitricc has been demoted and got a new title called, BuluQbash
    Peace! is promoting his “Divide and Rule policy” towards Ethiopia. He is trying to be a good moslem while he is close to ISIS.
    selam, the lady from Asmara behaved like a naughty street lady.
    Well, george is around to give unreserved support to tes as he happy to see us making progress for justice seeker’s cause.
    keep around my friend
    tes

  • tes

    Dear AT,

    Indeed the chains that divided us for so long because of PFDJ divide and rule policy has ended. PFDJ has went for such long time to play his racistic card.
    tes

  • Bayan Nagash

    Selam Awatawyan:

    A little ray of hope for two young Eritrean refugees in Germany. The ray of hope comes from an unlikely source: German politician (conservative at that) opening his home to these two young men. Now, that’s what you call a politician with heart, who is able to go beyond political rhetoric, as it were, practicing what he preaches and standing up for human dignity, human rights, and social justice.

    Anyone reading this from Germany, please send brief e-mail thanking the German MP Patzelt. I don’t know about German politics all that much to suggest anything more than just a thank you note to the man, deservedly so, because as ya’all know tension has been rising related to the increasing number of refugees. This ought to serve as antidote to diffuse the tension a little.

    http://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-33771112

  • Peace!

    Dear All,

    Today is a sad day for Ethiopian Muslims in particular for families of wrongfully convicted Muslims. The TPLF led government has officially declared war against Muslims by sentencing innocent Ethiopian Muslim scholars to die in prison despite a mounting evidence that the deliberate and malicious accusations against them are proven nothing but a plain charade. In the last twenty years Muslims have been experiencing discrimination and systematic displacement under pretexts of terrorism and social developments respectively.

    It is very unfortunate that the Ethiopian government has chosen to engage in sectarian politics rather than politics of peace and democracy, which is dangerous path to the country and to the region in general.

    Regards

    • Kim Hanna

      Selam Peace,
      .
      Why today peace? If a court passes a judgment, one can at least appeal. It is not a question of simply disappearing.
      Why are you sitting on your high horse and passing a judgment as if you care.
      .
      It appears to me you care only if you can mine for discord and strife in Ethiopia. I am here to tell you that you will go bust. George Orwell will be proud of your nick name, Mr.or Mrs Peace.
      .
      K.H

      • Peace!

        Dear Kim Hanna,

        Why today? Because today was a sentencing day.

        With all due respect which court are you referring to? If you are thinking of the same court that approved the 100% election victory of EPRDF, then you are living in denial. So please let’s be clear on that.

        The imperative point I was trying to make was that TPLF is not a genuine partner for Eritrean struggle for justice given that this is exactly what awaits Eritreans should TPLF backed opposition groups win tomorrow. Why would any Muslim Eritrean team up with TPLF? If there are, their head must be examined. There is a saying in Amharic:

        Y’germal Ahia K’gib Y’kermal
        Berie K’ne Araju Y’guazal

        By the way, no reason to get personal.

        Regards

        • Kim Hanna

          Selam Peace,
          .
          Nothing personal. You see I said “as if you care” about the Ethiopian Muslims. Your answer proved you did not.
          .
          K.H

          • Peace!

            Dear Kim Hanna,

            Deflection is not an argument: again it is not about me caring or pretending, but rather it is about the injustice being committed by the TPLF led government.

            Regards

          • tes

            Dear Peace!

            I know you are anti peace and one who promotes division. But I never expected you to go that low to make your political agenda. And your political agenda better serves Tesfanews (aka Turning News) and madote (aka madness) I don’t know why you posted it here.

            Awate Team came witha a hope filled title “Unity in Action” and you went away to create a seed of PFDJ divide and rule policy “lets divide them”.

            Your anti-Ethiopian political agenda is well known to the forumers though you are much harmful to the Eritrean movement for peace. An OTTO is everywhere and so are you.

            No one can be fooled by you for raising religious issue. awate.com is for sure against your statement and I don’t know why they are keeping it floating.

            Stop therefore diffusing PFDJ ideology here. awate.com is home for genuine people. If PFDJ has a last weapon to use against Ethiopia, it is RELIGION, the same he did to Somalia. And you; well as usual doing your business: “creation of confusion”.

            You don’t deserve this much, but I did it for the respect of readers.

            tes

          • Rahwa T

            Dear Kim,

            Endet neh? It is interesting to see that some falks at Awate keep remind us to stay away from meddling from the internal affairs of Eritrea, which they are very correct. The moment they sense some hot issues related to religion in our house, they will never feel shy and hesitate to send their dirty hands. I like the way you are dealing with them. Good argument.

          • Kim Hanna

            Selam Rahwa,
            .
            Thanks.
            Did the first line of his Amharic saying made sense to you? The 2nd line is o.k but the first line sounded goofy. I was gona summon abi to tell us what it was supposed to be. If you tell me the saying is correct, I will stand corrected.
            .
            K.H

          • Rahwa T

            Hi Kim Hanna,

            I have never heard that sort of saying in Amhric. But if you modify it this way
            “ ይገርማል፥ አህያ ከጅብ ጋር ይከርማል ::” it may make sense. He seems a bit funny guy. He said he was opposing the TPLF court’s decision out of his concern for humanity.

            “ እንኳን ይችን፣ የዝንብ ጠንጋራን እናውቃለን ” ብሎ ማን በነገረው?

    • Amanuel

      Hi Peace
      There is a saying in Tigrigna “ኣብ ዓይንኻ ዘሎ ገፈል” where are those Eritrean Muslims who were round up and taken by the Eritrean security from Keren and Asmara back in 1994? Were they brought in front of court of justice ?People who live in a house made of glass should think twice before starting to throw stones.

      • Peace!

        Dear Amanuel,

        Why do you think I am opposing PFDJ? Of course not only because it is committing crime against Muslims, but also against all Eritreans.

        My comment was simply intended to creat awareness that the TPLF government is increasingly becoming sectarian. It is not good for the country and the region in general. As simple as that. (I didn’t even mention Somalia)

        Now, if you are for justice, you should condemn such oppression and atrocities; otherwise, EPLF’s crimes do not justify or give a right for anyone to commit crime. Logic matters.

        Regards

        • Amanuel

          Hi Peace
          Please don’t insult my intelligence. You are a closet PFDJ supporter.

          • Peace!

            Dear Amanuel,

            With all due respect, I did not insult your intelligence. I just found your argument shockingly illogical. Nevertheless, if you are Ethiopian, you should stand for justice.

            Regards

          • Amanuel

            Hi Peace
            I am an Eritrean and i can see your naked political agenda disguised with humanity and justice. I read your comments and most of them criticise the opposition more than PFDJ. Most of the time you complement or agree with Nitiric, Ted and Selam. You might not a PFDJ card holder but you agree more with them than the opposition, hence I called you closet PFDJ supporter.

          • Ted

            Hi Amanuel.
            It looks like Some of us here in awate university are as diversity visa holders:-) We are legit forumers that you need to get use to, as opposed to, the inbreeds who churn out nothing but “PFDJ is bad” axiom to be considered opposition. You know how inbreeding is bad for the genetic pool. It changes you all to annoying identical blue colored Smurfs/Smurfette- Weyane loving smurf, US loving smurf, regional smurf, religion smurf. Some one here tells us our country is in dire situation and yet has not have a slightest tolerance for ideas for a way forward. People need to sober up from Geneva intoxication and get back to real work. PFDJ won’t fall just a bunch of you sticking a needle on a voodoo doll, it takes walking the talk. We might aswell try it, better than nothing.

          • Amanuel

            Hi Ted
            Now, it is not time to sit on the fence, it is time to raise your hand and to be counted. Are you on the side on change or status quo? It is really as simple as that.

          • Peace!

            Dear Emma,

            There is no naked agenda here, I am just being honest.

            As for not criticizing PFDJ, criticism is positive, and I strongly believe it should be directed toward people who can listen consciously and devote their effort for the betterment. Now, tell me who deserves criticism: the opposition groups or PFDJ?

            If you are talking about bashing PFDJ, I am happy with the number of up-votes I have.

            Please don’t give PFDJ too much credit:)

            Regards

          • Amanuel

            Hi Peace
            To answer you question shortly. Opposition groups deserve constructive criticism, which yours weren’t most of the time, but PFDJ is beyond criticism and you should oppose and resist it, if you are on the side of change.
            Kind regard

          • Peace!

            Dear Emma,

            May be you are right I am a bit harsh on my criticism although I don’t believe all opposition groups have the right vision for our country.

            To me, It is not about who supports what; it is about having consensus on what future Eritrea should look like. Oppositing PFDJ is neither a vision nor a strategy.

            Regards

          • Amanuel

            Hi Peace
            I agree all opposition groups can’t have the right vision for our country but this is only according yours or my opinion, and other Eritreans could have the opposite opinion. That is why I think it is not possible to have consensus about future of Eritrea as far as we have a minimum agreement like to agree that PFDJ is the biggest threat to the future of Eritrea and we should have a unity of action to remove it and to build future Eritrea based on rule of law, democratic process and reconciliation. I think the rest are a good to have agreements but I don’t believe we should have consensus about them.
            Kind regards

          • Peace!

            Dear Emma,

            I agree with you and I wish it is the way you said it. But if you look what’s on the ground, it is totally different: we have different buses heading to the same direction with no clear destination.

            There is no doubt seeking change is a critical objective toward democratic Eritrea; however, how change should be delivered also equaly critical step toward the same goal you and I have in mind. In other words, change through intervention and change from within will not always produce the same result. Needless to say, look the Libyans, Yemenis, Syrians, and the Iraqis where they are now; they had a dream of ideal change too, and it is an opportunity or a learning process that sustainable change will only come from within. Therefore, the consensus, I was referring to, remains urgent to move forward. Now, could you help me which bus should I hop-in?

            Regards

          • Tafla

            ሰላማዊ ዓርከይ፣

            “Now, could you help me which bus should I hop-in?” እዛ ቀላል ጠፊኣትካ፧ :). The answer is get your own bus and we’ll see who gets to Asmara first. ኻምሲን ይእውደካ…

            ጣ.ፎ (ጣዕሳ ፎርም)
            ናይ ጸወታ እያ ኣማን ሓወይ 🙂

          • betri_weyn

            Dear Amanuel
            peace-(anti) he was a run away trenches digger. But he is lucky to survive.

          • Nitricc

            Hi Amannuel. So what if Peace is what you say? How are you insulted? If you wanna know the truth; it more embarrassing to be the culules and ghost opposition than being PFDJ. As much as you have the right to oppose PFDJ; why are taking someone right to support what you oppose. You can not say you are for justice and be selective about it. You can not say for freedom while denying the freedom it self for someone else.
            Respect individual liberty, for starters.

          • Peace!

            Dear Nitricay,

            They are literally trying to put muzzle over my mouth just because I expose TPLF’s sectarianism.

            Cheers

          • saay7

            hey Peace:

            Can you send us a pic of them “literally trying to put a muzzle over [your] mouth”? 🙂 I think you were absent during out discussion of the misuse of the word “literally”:)) on a serious note, any country that has no vibrant opposition, vibrant press and independent media will always be seen with jaundiced eye when its gov arrests people.

            Two more things to say about that: (1) this is Standard Operating Procedure (SOP) in Africa and (2) except in Eritrea, where it is even exponentially WORSE and the government doesn’t even pretend to go through the formalities of due process. The government in Eritrea always wins the game by forfeiture (the opposing team is denied from showing up) whereas in the rest of Africa including Ethiopia, the winning is done by re-writing the rules of the game, and reminding the refs that their owe their livelihood to you.

            saay

          • Peace!

            Dear Saay,

            I absolutely agree with you. I don’t even recognize PFDJ as a government, let alone comparing to any other government. I thought we are looking for solutions:)

            Now, do you think Eritreans can afford to partnership with a government that believes it can win by re-writing the rule of the game to decide the fate of their country?

            Regards

          • saay7

            Selamat Peace:

            I read your message loud and clear and I see where you are coming from. Many Eritreans view of sovereignty is absolute and live by the Churchilian maxim: “If Hitler invaded hell I would make at least a favourable reference to the devil in the House of Commons.”

            During the armed struggle, we partnered with many odious regimes (Sudan, Yemen, Syria, Iraq) but it was clear we were in charge and any time there was a question that they were coming close to calling the shots, it was a moment of tension for Eritrea’s revolutionaries. So, it is a case of the debate continuing, and it should.

            saay

          • Peace!

            Dear Saay,

            Thank you you! ما اعرف كيف أشكرك

            وسلام

          • Saba

            Dear Saay7,
            So are you looking for “tplf-style” democracy for starters and then improve it or a better democratic system from the get go?

          • haileTG

            Hello የኣድሃሪ ሃይሎች ሊቀ-መንበር saay….haha

            Honestly though saay, when you said you wished Eritrea to be like the average African country in the past, I misunderstood you because I was thinking the social, economic and noble aspects. This one made it clear and I agree with you fully. I can only speak for myself here in that if the regime in Eritrea was to do the simple things like not locking up people and throwing away the key, no suffocation of the population to point of the latter LITERALLY consider death to be a better risk that its police state open air prison and have a basic rights of accorded to humans for the inhabitants (as work, travel and choice), I would be lying to tell you if I’d oppose them in the same way:)

          • saay7

            Hey Hailat:

            ምርጫው ይቅርና ስብሰባም አልነበረም, so how can I be the chairman of the reactionary forces? 🙂

            I am glad you get me though: when you are drowning, all you should hope is to get above water and BREATH; you can dream about flying once on solid ground.

            The way I see it, the difference between EPLF/PFDJ and TPLF was: in the EPLF/PFDJ, power was always heavily stacked towards Isaias Afwerki (don’t blame the EPLF for that; it was all the massive hero worship that the Eritrean people indulged in) and in the TPLF power was always diffused between two currents. After independence, and specially after 2001, power within EPLF/PFDJ got entirely concentrated in Isaias Afwerki and his narrow flunkies; and in the TPLF it got kept getting diffused within EPRDF (slowly.) Otherwise, the two “vanguard organizations” have the same worldview, as described by Bob Marley in “i shot the sherif” ( “He said kill it before it grow, He said kill them before they grow.”)

            In short, the EPRDF discusses who to kill, torture, disappear…whereas with PFDJ it is Uno Mano, as we used to call it when riding bicycles. And in their entire time in power, nothing has scared them more than Dimxachn ysemma whom they tortured and now have sentenced them to long terms in prison after their kangaroo courts.

            Cousin Peace (I am sure he is a cousin) most likely have relatives who were tortured and arrested (as do I) and that’s why he reacted the way he did: don’t jump from the frying pan to the fire.

            Peace out, Hailat.

            saay

          • Amanuel Hidrat

            Merhaba Saay,

            Othe big, big differences are (a) you may call it ideological difference as I do. EPLF/PFDJ believes a party can compete with national enterprenuers ( selfi tikal kitwnen tikeal eya). The intent is: to control the economy of the country. EPRDF do not. They believe, a party could only susrvive and stand from the dues of its members (the universal understanding of party rules). (b) EPRDF leadership are “leaders as well as students” but EPLF/PFDJ took themselves only as leaders (the alpha omega of Eritrean mind) as late PM Meles distingushed EPRDF from PFDJ in principles and action. EPRDF not only listen to their intellectual capital they have and learn from them, but also cultivate themselves by going to higher education, especially those on the leadership level. Good example to this, all the senior and junior military officers acquired a college diploma, thus (C) EPRDF believe education is the key for development while PFDJ serfdom is the source of development. It is a big deal and big difference.

            Regards,
            Amanuel Hidrat

          • saay7

            Selamat Emma:

            All valid points, though I could quibble with all (particularly their similar approach to the role of parastatal organizations in the economy) but the only issue here was their approach to JUSTICE and particularly civil liberties.

            Essentially, if Ramadan Mohammed Nur (or any of the other members of the central committee) was left to be the boss of the EPLF, I think the EPLF would have gone on a completely different trajectory. But that is in the unknowable and unprovable category:)

            saay

          • Amanuel Hidrat

            Saay Arkucha,
            Even in the civil liberties areas, though extremely limited, they do have, as copmared to us none. In the area of justice, they have court do process, and accused individuals can defend themselves in the court. Due process is key here.. We don’t have it. There is nothing to compare with government we have. I wish not to spend our time to compare them, for there is nothing that could help to our current struggle.
            Regards,
            Amanuel Hidrat.

          • tes

            Dear Amanuel Hidrat,

            Then why you started it? Saay7 was responding to haile TG and you interjected. And now you are….

            tes

          • saay7

            Selam Emma:

            Well, I think I already said that the Erhiopian system, as unjust as it is, is better than what we have in Eritrea (which u call a system and which has been described more accurately as monocracy (I would have called it manocracy.)) With the Ethiopian system, you get a verdict but not Justice; with the Eritrean manocracy, you don’t even get a verdict (frdi) much less Justice (ftHi): but I am repeating myself.

            I disagree also on the merits of discussion of Ethiopia in relations to our current struggle to bring about change. We are talking about replacing the governance in Eritrea and the word “replace” is always followed by “with.” The late Seyoum O/Michael once said “we should bring solutions to our people; not new problems.” Since there are Eritreans who look up to the Ethiopian model as an adequate replacement, it’s fair to ask if that would be bringing a solution or a new problem.

            I think one of our problems is that we attribute bad motives to people who criticize the governance in Ethiopia (they are closer PFDJ, they are trying to deflect attention, they hate Ethiopia, etc.). In this particular case, there was a big even in Ethiopia covered by major news organizations that Ethiopia sentenced Ethiopian Muslims to long prison terms having found them guilty of trying to create an Islamic State in a majority Christian country. Peace criticized them for it and now we are here.

            saay

          • Amanuel Hidrat

            Dear Saay,

            I think our struggle is to bring changes in Eritrea and not in Ethiopia. I believe the Ethiopian people could manage themselves to bring change for their own country. Saay or Amanuel or any Eritrean for that matter do not have any stock in their nation, and our criticism does not have any value, especially from people (like us) who do not remove the plank from our eyes. I don’t understand what political compensation or mental satisfaction we could get from engaging on the Ethiopian issues. The only issue we can talk with Ethiopia is only on peace, stability, and mutual economic development, which unfortunately will not happen with the regime we have. So if we are highly concerned about our people, let us do our home work and bring the needed change for our people – a change that remove the suffocating regime, and install a democratic regime that bring domestic peace and tranquility, peace with region, and peace with international community. As Eritreans, talking Ethiopia’s problem will not solve our problem.

            Regarding awatistas “Peace’s criticism” on Ethiopia, it wasn’t genuine criticism, for I know in my heart that, if our Eritrean Muslim tried to create an Islamic state movement, he will jump to criticize the movement and naturally will echo to put them down, unless he is part of them. It is easy to recognize genuine non political criticism. By the way if the Ethiopian Muslims were trying to create an Islamic state in a “Muslin and christian country”, it is not a healthy effort to say the least. With that I close my case.

            regards,
            Amanuel Hidrat

          • Kokhob Selam

            Dear Amanuel.
            I 2nd you.
            by the way it is really true, the movement in Ethiopia regarding Islam was really not for good of Muslims. Ethiopian government during Meles era has tried the best to solve it and they knew how the movement started. the biggest problem was that there were innocent personalities involved without knowing the intention. The biggest Problem was even it was easy to play the game and attract Islamic scholars by reminding the past kings era.

            I appreciate the majority Ethiopian Muslims recognize it early and the Christians didn’t use their emotion and they allow the government solve the problem. I love Ethiopia to see peace and prosperity in Ethiopia and I reject the idea that says change in Eritrea is possible when Ethiopia is in mess – it never works.

          • Fanti Ghana

            Hello Saay,

            First, congratulations on your ሊቀ-መንበር -ship.

            Ethiopian legal system is okay. However, in most cases, there is a serious capacity issue so much so even
            for a minor case one would have to appeal their way up to Kilil (administrative zone) courts or even federal before they can find justice. My 72 years old uncle is in some legal entanglement as we speak (sentenced 5 years in jail two months ago, the court above reduced it to 2 years, and now we are at the Kilil to get rid of those 2) and my nephew, a very reputable judge in a different district, is following the case closely and explaining it to me as the family keeps going up on appeal. From what I gathered it is all about

            1) Capacity (biKAt)
            2) Zealousness (fear of appearing corrupt or just following the law to the letter without applying
            personal ‘judgment’)
            3) And of course, Corruption.

            According to my nephew, the first two are the most common, at least in Tigray. My point is that there
            is actually a genuine judicial system, but it is short of proper enforcement mostly for the reasons listed.

            I don’t know if Eyoba followed the case of the just sentenced “Ethiopian Muslims,” but according to
            an article I read at AigaForum, their trial was public for all to see. It is not a good feeling to appear
            justifying it when there are so many families affected by it, but for whatever it is worth it went through the legal system of the nation. Their case seems very complex going all the way back to the attempted assassination of President Mubarak in the mid 1990s.

            Another interesting lesson I learned in the Ethiopian legal system is that anyone sentenced to 5 or less years can be released on parole if it is their first offence. If the sentence is more than five years, only the court above can reduce or annul the sentencing. So, some judges hand 5 years and 3 weeks or some weird number like that to block the potential release of the subject on parole. I hope the just sentenced group gets some relief on appeal, but the judiciary system is not as bad as you think.

            Saay, Mr. Amanuel:

            This discussion may not be as irrelevant as it seems, because it won’t be long before Eritrea faces the same dilemma Ethiopia did in the beginning between firing all government employees of suspect nature and
            producing new ones quickly verses keeping some of the so-so employees and rebuilding personnel slowly but cleanly. Remember, every district in Eritrea will need a judge soon!

          • saay7

            His Fantiness:

            This is one of those objections where I am asking “how did we get here?”

            Ok, part of the reason that I shake my head vigorously to say hell no whenever people invite me to be a politician is because in any Citizen vs State dispute I automatically assume the citizen is right and the State is wrong. If you show me a citizen confessing on film that he commuted a heinous crime, I will assume that he gave that under duress. So, clearly, I am biased against the State, any state.

            Please don’t invite Eyobai as he will aggravate me with his gigantic conspiracy theory involving Saudis Wahabbits Gulf Arabs. I tried to follow this issue as closely as I could: and it appears to be a case of conservative Muslims wanting an autonomous religious leader and the State saying, nah, we won’t allow that: we would like someone with that kind of power to be, preferably, subservient to us or, at the very least, indifferent to us. But NO POLITICS. This is why they brought all the aHbash preachers to preach give unto Ceasar what’s Ceasars. A fine sentiment, but not found in Islamic jurisprudence.

            The “capacity” issue I am very understanding of when it comes to schools, potholes, and medicine. I have no sympathy for that when it comes to justice particularly from civilizations that claim to be 3,000 years old. When the PFDJ was sued by Mussie Ephrem for arresting citizens it replied “its failure of capacity” and the African Commission said “tough! That’s not an excuse.” Having said I do appreciate that the accused Ethiopians were given a semblance of due process and their families knew what they are accused of, what their sentence in and where they will serve their sentence: all alien concepts in Eritrea now.

            As for Emma, I think he has made his position clear: talk only about how to defeat the Asmara regime and everything else is a distraction and a waste of time, unless I say it is not:)

            saay

          • Fanti Ghana

            Hello Saay,
            So, I was preaching to the choir after all. If I knew you followed it even a little I would have been quite with one eye staring at Mr. Amanuel. I am not crazy about politics nor religion even separately let alone when the two comingle, but guilty or not it is a very sad affair. If guilty the social fabric is really in jeopardy, and if innocent the sheer injustice of it all. Ethiopian Muslims have been extremely tolerant of all sorts of oppression for so long that we are used to them being as the ‘quiet’ ones. With the global ISIS crisis being on the news daily any ‘loud’ move by Moslems anywhere, no matter how justified, will be viewed with heightened intensity for the foreseeable future. Now that is tragic.
            Selam.

          • Nitricc

            Hi SAAY; i think you are becoming toothless one. if you going to have one miserable, aid dependent, self depreciating country, then, what was the point to wage 30 years bloody war? if you think all the suffering and the endurance that was/is paid is just to become a typical miserable African country then you are for a huge disappointment. politics is in large a culture; one you start the game of political affair by deception; by ragging the votes and shredding the constitution at will; no way out or return. at least PFDJ didn’t introduce that dirty political culture. our constitution is organic never abused; our election is clean never contaminated and our constitution is unblemished and unsoiled.
            the people of Eritrea have paid a price more then any people in this world and they shall deserve to live in serenity, in peace, with dignity and with absolute properties; this is my personal mission in life, as well as my generation. of course i could lacked up like Dejen no one to hear from me, i am very much aware of it but i am welling to deal with it.

          • Amanuel

            Hi saay7
            I agree, what do they say in Tigrigna “ኣድጊ ዘብሉስ በቅሊ ይንዕቅ።”

        • Kokhob Selam

          Dear Peace,
          why don’t you leave Ethiopians to manage their case. religion is sensitive and easy to exploit. Those very calm and lovely people are facing problems that was not there in their history or at least they have manged to leave in peace together for centuries .

          we all know how others play the religion card, when a nation start to progress and we all know fundamentalism always get a way to manipulate innocent people. solving this case, Ethiopian government is doing it through proper channel and in open.

          instead, we Eritreans have experienced Eritrean government always try to blame religious people to let the mind of people ignore the real timely problems. we have lost a lot of scholars and teachers in all religions. no legal step was taken and no one to ask. but people are careful and no revenge or resistance was taken from families of those arrested, killed and disappeared so not to complicate the problem as you have seen till PFDJ was exposed (at this era).

          Dear peace, our problem is right in there in Asmara, not in Ethiopia. waiting Ethiopian government to collapse will not help in solving our problem.

          • Peace!

            Dear KS,

            Is that a warning:) And who is waiting for Ethiopia to collapse?

            You said “why don’t you leave Ethiopians to manage their case.” Are you advising the secterian TPLF government to leave Eritrean opposition groups alone to manage their own business?

            Why is it easy to accuse your fellow Eritrean in order to defend a foreign country? What I said was true with overwhelming evidences. Yes, TPLF is in a business of sectarianism. You may not agree with me, but a short visit to Ethiopian Muslim Community in your neighborhood will do it. Listen to their jaw dropping stories: their Shieks (scholars) either disappeared or imprisoned, their business infrastructures have been dismantled or forced to disperse under pretext of social developments, and now, their mosques are under constant surviliance to prevent peacefull protest. You may ask someone you know how Masjid Anwar looks like specially on Fridays.

            Now, of course you may say it is not your business let the Ethiopians worry, and this is sensitive issue we should not talk about it. Well, it is a problem now and it will be a problem tomorrow: we need to be prepared for any eventuality, who knows TPLF backed opposition group may be in charge tomorrow.

            Regards

      • Amanuel Hidrat

        Dear Amanuel

        Peace ‘s comment is purely politics. It is not from caring humanity and justice. We haven not heard his Voice when our 120 muslim brothers were herded to unknown places and liquidated. He does not want to focus on our own problem. He want to compensate his disappointment by finding similar issue in Ethiopia for trading. That Is why actually many Eritreans enjoy talking about Ethiopia when even have plenty to speak about ours.

        Regards ,
        Amanuel Hidrat

        • Amanuel

          Hi Aman
          I couldn’t agree more.
          Amanuel

        • Peace!

          Selamat Amanuel,

          I know you are a big fan of secterian TPLF government despite you know for fact that it is not helping your cause. How many times you have admitted that the reason why the opposition groups are failing to form a united front is because of “MISTRUST.” Have you ever asked why and tried to restore or promote TRUST? Do you think bashing PFDJ 24/7 would do the job? Amazing!

          Respectfully

          • Amanuel Hidrat

            Selam peace
            You asked me if I have promoted trust building. Oh yes throughout my life in our struggle and still continuing. In fact all my writing are focusing on addressing our social groups. My record in the public domain clearly shows that. People like you who do not have an idea about our social contradiction are many and you don ‘t even lend ears to listen or make their own research to have first hand knowledge. Aren ‘t you one of them Peace ? I wouldn ‘t surprise though for I have passed through the denials you are going. The Issue is how fast you could catch up to help us on the Solution.

            Regards
            Amanuel Hidrat

          • Peace!

            Selamat Emma,

            We are at the point where we were twenty years ago! Am I the only one not listening?

            Regards

          • Amanuel Hidrat

            Dear peace

            You are from the many who complain without contributing something yourself. Again to contribute for the public good learn first about your societal problem without characterizing from your sweet home. Join the struggle in the open face on. I do not think you cut your ambilical Chord from the regime when somehow you advocate reform Of the regime. The listening is there Only from the tolerant Section of our people. And who is tolerant I will leave it find out yourself. This is one Of the many you have to work out to know them.

            Regards
            Amanuel Hidrat

          • Peace!

            Selamat Emma,

            I could reverse your comment and make it fit your position, but I wouldn’t go that far to disrespect you. I understand the panic whenever Ethiopia is mentioned, but I am sorry everything I said is true and appropriate.

            Regards

          • Amanuel Hidrat

            Again Haw peace

            The Ethiopian issue is not my issue at this time. The Ethiopian issue is only for diversionists who do not want to deal with the predicament of our people. Stay away from that. Deal With our problem. Thank you for the respectful stance.

            Regards
            Amanuel Hidrat

          • Peace!

            Dear Emma,

            With all due respect, I disagree. Why we shouldn’t talk about the a country that is hosting some of our opposition groups? Are you sure??!!

            Respectfully

      • T..T.

        Hi Amanuel and all,

        I find the following advice (which I paraphrased) from someone years back very enlightening:

        Intentional or unintentional distractions of political discussions embolden the tyrant Isayas. Only those pro-tyrant and anti-Eritrean people are seen engaged in bringing up issues that do not have direct relevance to the topic under discussion.

        Those on such an errand always drop discussion-bombs in order to creat confusion and irrelevance in the ongoing discussion. The best is to kill their disruption by ignoring and not responding to them.

  • haileTG

    Dear AT,

    Thank you for the update. Once a cause is taken up by the youth, success sure to follow. The opposition is being fielded by large numbers of youth at rate much faster than expected. If the Sweden, the hgdef strong hold of migrants from the 80’s like Lamek (remember him?), can be brought to be opposition hub, well the regime is counting its days. Aida kidane has the following video. And, true to her standards, this won’t disappoint either. Feel the energy of the youth calling out the regime for what is:)

    https://www.facebook.com/aida.kidane.73/videos/10153504960488839/