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Beyan Negash

Activist, a writer and I am a doctoral candidate (ABD) in Language, Literacy, and Culture at New Mexico State University (NMSU). I hold a bachelor of arts in English and a master of arts in TESOL from NMSU as well as a bachelor of arts in Anthropology from UCLA. My research interests are on colonial discourse and post-colonial theories and their hegemonic impact on patriarchy, cultural identity, literacy development, language acquisition as well as curriculum & citizenship. The geopolitics of the Horn of Africa interests me greatly. My writings tend to focus on Eritrea and Ethiopia. I have been writing opinion pieces at awate.com since its inception (1 September 2001).

Eritrea’s Socio-Politics of Slash and Burn

Back in 1990, The New York Times had an opinion piece titled, “The Politics of Slash and Burn”. The gist of the article speaks to the beginning of down spiraling political discourse in the US where Republican candidates were encouraged to use words like ”Sick.” ”Traitors.” ”Bizarre.” ”Self-serving.” ”Shallow.” ”Corrupt.” ”Pathetic.” …

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Mesfin Hagos Should Resign From His Political Party

[This is part 3 of 3 in a series under the title of “Can Mesfin Hagos Lead Under a Banner of “One Country, One Destiny”?] “Honesty is the first chapter in the book of wisdom” Thomas Jefferson The earlier two pieces1 were meant to show how complex the Eritrean socio-political terrain can be. And negotiating …

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Mesfin Hagos: Before the Egg Hatches

This is part 2 of 3 series under the title of “Can Mesfin Hagos Lead Under a Banner of “One Country, One Destiny”? The third part will follow soon. Eritrea and its people have been on a trajectory of existential threat for two decades from the very revolutionaries who brought the nation …

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Multi-dimensionality in Storytelling

Masterful storytellers are akin to quilt makers, it is just that their woven products are delivered through the spoken words. Each narration engages listeners at different levels. The crux of the matter is to be aware that there exist multi-dimensional levels of storytelling. Such awareness will inevitably free us from that one-dimensional …

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Myth, Politics, History, Religion, and Eritrean State

Human beings are endowed with that unique ability to recall our history, live in the present, and plan of future (Close to Heidegger’s notion of “temporality” in “Being & Time”). Similarly, thus, we are also endowed as F. Scott Fitzgerald quipped, with “the ability to hold two opposed ideas in …

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Education and Citizenship

“The individual has always had to struggle to keep from being overwhelmed by the tribe. If you try it, you will be lonely often, and sometimes frightened. But no price is too high to pay for the privilege of owning yourself.” Friedrich Nietzsche A nation without higher education institution that allows …

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The “Sacred Cows”

Nationalism pushed to its extreme equals ultra-nationalism of the fascist kind*. Ethnic pride pushed to its extreme leads to a narrowly defined ethnocentrism or even worse. Religious beliefs pushed to the extreme leads to fanaticism of the Boko Haram, ISIS, Al Shabab and of Myanmar’s genocide (on minority Rohingia) kind. …

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To My Dear Son Selaheddin,

It has been three months-and-a-half since I’ve read the open letter that you sent that was meant to be read by all Eritreans, Selahaddin weddey. I keep it in my pocket and read it every day, because I draw energy from it. It gives me life. It gives me sustenance. …

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Liberation Theology & Intergenerational Discourse on Eritrea

African liberation theology: Intergenerational conversations on Eritrea’s futures. Ghirmai Negash & Awet T. Weldemichael. Trenton, NJ: Red Sea Press, 2018. 135 pp. Analysis by Beyan Negash* Liberation theology & intergenerational discourse on Eritrea** Negash and Woldemichael’s (2018) African liberation theology: Intergenerational conversations on Eritrea’s futures is at once about Eritrea and its …

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The Hurt Locker: Film Review and Analysis

In an era of the Internet, in the age of sound bites, and in the world of texts that collapse the meaning of words into a single letter or two; where the bombardment of information ceaselessly flows, the ability to analyze, synthesize, and correctly processing information becomes ever more crucially important.  …

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The Akhriya Uprising: Lessons Gleaned

To expect convergence when canvassing various Eritrean opposition media outlets during any confrontational events like the Akhriya uprising would be par for the course. What shouldn’t be par for the course is the colluding, inadvertently or not, that aligns us with the supporters the PFDJ (the ruling party) with the …

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To My Dear Father

It has been about forty years since I saw you last. I am writing this open letter because instead of the usual intent of letters, which tend to be private and intimate; why this open letter, well, because you are Eritrea’s father. Eritrea’s grandfather. Eritrea’s big brother. Open letter because …

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The Skin That We Speak: A Book Review

The skin that we speak: Thoughts on language and culture in the classroom. Lisa Delpit & Joanne Kilgour Dowdy (Editors), New York, NY: The New Press, 2002, 229 pages. Reviewed by Beyan Negash Note: This was written as book review several years ago, but I edited it now for awate …

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Territorial Integrity v. Human Dignity

The motivation for this article culminates from the ongoing intense discussion that continues to precipitate based on the talk that Dr. Bereket Berhane1 (henceforth referred to as Dr. BB) gave about his firsthand experience from working at the border between Eritrea and Ethiopia as a medical doctor. Dr. BB provides …

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Abrar And Fitsum: Mesmerizing Duo

When a society’s every endeavor is consumed by political upheaval for decades upon decades as the embodiment of its history, norms of various types are impacted by it so much so that they stay stagnant. As luck would have it, stagnation is not equivalent to demise. One corollary of such …

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