Inform, Inspire, Embolden. Reconcile!

Territorial Integrity v. Human Dignity

The motivation for this article culminates from the ongoing intense discussion that continues to precipitate based on the talk that Dr. Bereket Berhane1 (henceforth referred to as Dr. BB) gave about his firsthand experience from working at the border between Eritrea and Ethiopia as a medical doctor. Dr. BB provides ample context for his talk… Gives somewhat detailed background of the Eritrean youth movement that coincided with the Arab spring…Mentions the Debre Zeiti gatherings and the 2008 California EYC movement… so on and so forth. Interestingly, at the outset, Dr. BB states that change requires sacrifice, time, capacity… and it is time consuming he says as he commends the individual who singlehandedly made the talk happen. In this paper, I am going to use Critical Discourse Analysis (CDA) to hone into Dr. BB’s talk translating it into English text, thereafter analyzing it. This undertaking, thank goodness did not go beyond the first several minutes of the talk. In the nick of time, Dr. BB promised to write an article in several days that would clarify his position. I must admit, this came as a big sigh of relief for me because to do CDA is labor intensive enough without translating the talk from Tigrinya to English. I would’ve had to do textual and contextual analysis frame-by-frame, which would’ve amounted thirty-to-forty pages of work. Now that I don’t have to do that as Dr. BB will give us all the needed context for his talk, suffice it to mention CDA can be extremely helpful when analyzing the work of individuals, be it a written text or the spoken word with visual medium to boot. So, CDA will have to be saved for some future endeavor when the right time calls for it.

I will venture, however, to write in today’s piece on my overall impression of the state of our opposition camp, which is fraught with so much angst that one doesn’t even know where to begin, but beginning one must. Perhaps continuing where Dawit Mesfin’s2 article, “All About Self-Liberation”, left off might as well be a good starting point for those of us who profess to belong to the opposition camp. Transcending the notion of “self-liberation” via “self-awareness…[and] the need to possess moral virtues, grow out of our objectionable nature”, requires us to deeply consider certain habits of mind; habits of mind that we have been accustomed to promulgating as though it was part of our characteristic way of arguing and counter arguing. How can one claim to be liberated if one cannot even admit to past mistakes? How can we claim to possess any “moral virtues” when we are incapable of speaking against Eritrean officials who happen to share the same DNA as we do, who served the menace at home? And, we don’t even find it contradiction in terms when accusing others? How can one have any credibility left if one’s political party is defined based on his/her region or vice versa? Guess who’s a master at that – Right you are: The menace at homeland. How can one refuse to denounce one’s siblings who advocate for agazian’s hateful campaigns or one’s family members who continue to uphold extreme religious viewpoints that are a notch or two below that of Al Qaeeda or ISIS or Boko Haram or al Shabab. We need to really do some serious soul searching before we begin accusing others of unpatriotic tendencies.

It is because of the above untenable positions that I continue to find exasperating when we intensely focus on territorial integrity amidst the existential threat we are facing, where our young are vanishing to the world at large. This to me is akin to focusing on carts, tents, and litters on skid row (the homeless quarter)  of downtown Los Angeles, instead of the people who inhabit the unseemly place. Dr.BB’s talk is being gutted to whether he is a patriot just because he made an effort of prioritizing matters of extinction of our culture, tradition, and heritage the essence of which is captured powerfully in መሬት ንቀብሪ ወይ መሰል ንክብሪ? 3 The colossal exodus of our young is triggered by that ultimate human urge for dignity, which continues to be robbed by the regime in power; yet, we wanted to make the subject to be that of a disputed territory writ so large and so analogous to the twgaHmmo catchphrase we’ve seen between 1998 and 2000 border war between Eritrea & Ethiopia. This, to me, reeks to the heights of heaven and absurdity writ to its max, as it were. There is no straw man argument here. What there is is the need for internal reflection and to admit when making a mistake. We are not doing the opposition camp any favors if we cannot admit of falling short sometimes.  In fact, it is those of us who seem to want to dance our way out of some of our errant ways of the past without admission that we consider it an art of skilled debate. We are not in a debating society here. This is about generations of young lives becoming part of the wasteland. This is no time for witticism. This is time for standing up to be counted in the direly needed changes back home. The social conditions and social structures as we know them are disappearing in front of our eyes.

The “social conditions” states (Fairclough, p. 19)4 determine the nature of discourse as it becomes unmistakably clear when paying close attention to the way we choose to frame our discourses. Sadly, the framing of this territorial integrity at any cost was coined by the menace at home with our help. It came from the regime sponsored propaganda that goes back to the 1998-2000 with Ethiopia when most of us were doomed into believing we were on the right side of history for standing tall with our country. But, seventeen years hence to stick to our guns and never acknowledging we were wrong when we stood with the regime that outwitted us all is a disservice to our cause. There are individuals who advocated my country right or wrong then and who continue to stick to the territorial integrity argument now even if it comes at the ultimate price of human dignity; even if it comes at the hollowing out of the nation from its vital human source – the youth – is something difficult to fathom.

So then, facetiously characterizing “language” in the aforementioned scenario as nothing more than “a dialect with an army and a navy” is not farfetched because all of the violence and the continued perpetuation of it are mechanized through language vis-a-vis policies, regulations, and propaganda laced in disguise of territorial integrity. Contextualizing language as a “social condition [] specific to a particular historical epoch” is an apt one (Fairclough, p. 21), as that magnifies the notion of how “power is typically exercised not just by the regime at the helm of power, but by an alliance of diaspora’s “Amen Corner” and others to boot, who see their interests tied to the commodities they may possess back home… [such an alliance Fairclough (1992) calls] the dominant bloc” (p. 33).

Beyond the monetary alliances, such dominant blocs exercise their hegemonic power through language so much so that some of us in the opposition who are being oppressed by this blatant hegemonic force – inadvertently or otherwise – not only appropriate such language as intermeshed by ideology but use it as though it was the truth and the fact of life. It is not that difficult to see how ideology could easily collude with having currency in the realms of staying in power to perpetuate the continuation of status quo of the ruling class, in this case, in the name of consent. Dr. BB tells us territory is not our priority, some of us are willing to go gang ho on him as if he were selling that part of the land to Ethiopia much as Russia did of Alaska or the French did of Louisiana.

The Subtlety of Ideology

Fairclough (1992) invokes notions of ideology as borrowed from Gramsci who conceptualizes it “as an ‘implicit philosophy’ in the practical activities of social life, backgrounded and taken for granted, that connects it to ‘common sense’” (p. 84). For the purposes of this piece, however, the preferred conception is the potency of ideology resting in its subtlety and the currency it gains when it operates seamlessly in the asymmetrical power relations that exist in society. As Fairclough (1992) points out that “ideology is most effective when its workings are least visible [because] if one becomes aware … [of] power inequalities” (p. 85) ideology loses its potency. Therefore, recognition of the critical role ideology plays in a society is of great import, because it is through ideology that “various social institutions contribute to sustaining the position of the dominant class” (p. 36). When discourses are interlaced with dominant ideology through various social institutions the outcome will invariably be citizenry ill-informed that easily accepts soundbite explanations on matters of social and political landscapes to the detriment of the society at large. Precisely, Dr. BB’s point about our young’s gullible disposition and whose ideologies are based on copying and pasting, the material of which they have neither the proper understanding of its depth nor its breadth.

Fairclough (1992) asserts further that “…certain key discourse types which embody ideologies which legitimize, more or less directly, existing societal relations, and which are so salient in modern society that they have ‘colonized’ many institutional orders of discourse” (p. 36). The effect of such a colonized mind is so seamless even well-informed writers in our midst fall to the bait of hegemonic forces that the dominant culture bombards the diaspora with, as is evidenced by the strong reaction to Dr. BB’s talk. This talk is, in fact, Exhibit A that shows ever so saliently and ever so seamlessly because many of us refuse to rid ourselves from the 1998-2000 frame of mind to a point of not only inadvertently colluding with the regime and its supporters but we don’t realize that we are pandering and acquiescing to the norms of the regime’s dominant bloc political frame of reference. This, in the parlance of Fairclough (1992), is “…ideology and the exercise of power by consent as opposed to coercion” [as he expounds further by stating that] this is often a matter of integrating people into apparatuses of control which they come to feel themselves to be a part of” (p. 36).

Obviously, this salient and seamless acquiescence and pandering does not occur in vacuum. There is an inherent dialectical process that helps in the shaping of the discourse as “…control over orders of discourse by institutional and societal power-holders is one factor in the maintenance of their power” as was suggested earlier, the notion of territorial integrity is one apparatus that keeps and sustains the regime in power. Therefore, social and political organizations are perfect antidotes that enhance the perpetuation of status quo. So, the relationship between social “structure” and “social practice” is made to be magnified through the discourses that take place where ideology is its undercurrent and language as the ultimate elixir, the adhesive, if you will, that bind it all together, making for well-oiled machinery that continues to operate with very little hindrances. Such dynamics Fairclough (1992) contextualizes it within “the social world [where] social structures not only determine social practice, they are also a product of social practice” (p. 37).

A thorough understanding of this dynamism is crucially important, especially if our educated lot are going to inculcate criticality in their sociopolitical strategies to defeat the regime at the helm of power that continues to wreak havoc. Power and privilege must be challenged in awate.com like spaces where the seeds of self-liberation need to be sown. These seeds of criticality have components of culture and the psychological makeup that breeds them. Gordon (2014)5 illustrates this notion rather succinctly: “To understand behavior one has to understand it in relation to those social structures that are part of the context in which behavior develops and exists…it is necessary to study human intention and human agency – that is, the actions of humans – as they are mediated by these social structures. To do this requires that we heed context, perspective, and the dialectical interactions specific to the behaviors under study” (p. 313).

All these and more are re-conceptualized in Tappan’s (2006)6 “Reframing internalized oppression and internalized domination: From the psychological to the sociocultural”, in which a step-by-step intellectual journey is meticulously constructed to show why both of the twin concepts of “internalized oppression and internalized domination” ought to be replaced. According to Tappan, the twin concepts, “appropriation of oppression and appropriation of domination” (pp. 2115-2144), have dynamism to them that would give room for growth. If you’ve come this far reading my entry, blessings, but I am way beyond my word-limit here.

References:

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  • Selamat g michael tzerai,

    Please contrast this statement of yours against Paulos’ ABSOLUTE TRUE/CORRECT OBSERVATION AND STATEMENT I have quoted underneath it. Honestly, contemplate it for now and I shall elaborate further in our subsequent discussions particularly with regards to your self admited “some of us in the opposition have a hart dime how to…”

    Dear g michael tzerai,

    Compare and contrast:
    Your Statement: “But why go into a side issue when you are making an excellent argument against prioritizing territorial issues when the whole country is in total ruins. You see, some of us in the opposition have a hard time how to look at this monster in Asmara through the lens of time and space. ”

    Against Paulos “the fast tracker Denmarkino’s:”

    “Isaias possesses remarkable political acumen. He has the ability to understand events and how the events are related to each other with respect to the short and long term objectives…’

    As for Prof. Beyan’s excellent argument against “prioritizing territorial issues…” consider the numerous Eritrean refugee camps villages ten times the size of Bademe in support of the absurdity fueling the junkyard bound rust eroded engine and transmission. However, there is more than meets the eye behind this new narrative that is amplifying the very thing they desire to render moot. [I realize you were responding to Beyan and not I in your reply to me– hence my generous ኢትኔን ታዕሪፋስ ዎርስዝ…]

    tSAtSE

  • sara

    berhe hawna
    yesterday i was to comment telling you haw it upset me the way Canadian media was covering that xxxxxx act that made it an ugly day for all of you recent immigrants… but stopped it to avoid any distraction on the current discussion that will make some of our seniors unhappy.
    did you notice haw fast they come up with the identity of the suspect… and name him a xxxxx national… is that haw it goes for those who are not recent immigrants—isn’t this person by now Canadian? its a bizarre world!

    • Berhe Y

      Dear Sara,

      I am not sure I understand what you mean and the relation ship to Canada. I have not heard the news you are referring to.

      In Canada citizen ship is a privilege and not a right if you were not born there. Any citizenship you get can be taken away, and you get deported to your country of origin in some instance.

      But before that you have legal representation and all the rights associated with it.
      The deportation is usually in extreme cases or repeat offenders.

      Berhe

      • sara

        Berhe dear,
        I think, edmonton is a city in canada.

        • Berhe Y

          Hi Sara,

          I searched something and I found the incident that you are speaking about.

          Like I said I didn’t know what happened so I don’t know what’s reported. But it’s common to identify someone by the country of his birth, ERITREAN born, Ethiopian born Canadian weather its good or bad.

          In this case, the said Somalian born did this or that and at the same news paper the quoted “a Somalian born minister of immigration minister”.

          I don’t think it’s means I’m wrong way, even if you are born and did something good for the country like winning a medal, a son of an Italian immigrant etc etc.

          Canada is multicultural and i think it’s to respect the other culture and so people to continue honour their heritage.

          At least that’s how I see it and it doesn’t bother me a bit.

          Like Mo Farrah I think I heard they refer him a Somali Brit, which is all good I think.

          Berhe

          • sara

            berhe
            i understand that all what you are saying, but the way it was reported when the incident happens was unusual.. on many such situation , the police and media stay gug until they go through their routine procedure to come out with the identity if the suspect… and that is for may reasons…but this time ..on the spot
            telling the world he is this and that was not the norm.
            refer.. recent incidents around the world and it takes hours if not days to name the suspects.
            but in edmonton/canada.. it was different and i hope it did not affect those recent immigrant communities.

  • ሰላማት ኣያታት ኣማኔል፡ ኢስማዒል፡ ሳልሕ ጆሃር።
    ከመይ ኣምሲኹም፡ ሰለስቴኹም ኣብዚኣ ክትጸንሑኒ ብትሕትና ይሓተኩም፡፡ አቲ ምንታይሲ፡ ትርጉም ትሕትና ኣብዛ ደቒቕ ተጋሂዳትለይ፡፡ አዛ ዓቢ ሓወና በያን ነጋሽ፡ ጠኒኑ ቅድሚ ኹሉና፡ ኣብዛ ቃራና መንገዲ፡ አንተ ንቑልቁለት አተ ምርሕ ጎደና አዝግዮ መሓረና ክርስቶስ፡ ኣብ ክላይላይሶን ንምህለሉ፡ ወይ ኣብ ቤት መስጊድና ‘ስታጣፉሩላህ ….

    ….
    yQtsil…

    ጻጸ

    • Selamat Beyan Negash,

      The fork on the road as a title is the above. Whereas one of the splits I barely touched on, the second choice was that of hope on the CDA basis. Kokhob Selam said “no one cares”, though in a totally separate topic. The convergence point we shall have a solid footing on very shortly.

      Rough day and a lot more rough day for those revelers in Sin City. … that’s all.
      Haji Hassen back then when…

      tSAtSE

  • Thomas

    Hi awatista,

    Only November 2016 the supporters of the dictator in Eritrea denounced Hillary Clinton and voiced to elect Donald Trump as the U.S. president. I feel very happy to say that the Eritrean regime has been slapped with three sanctions within only a month or so. The 3 sanctions put on the dictatorial regime (Eritrea mafias administration) by the U.S. state department are:
    1) U.S. Embassy in Asmara has discontinued issuing B1, B2 , and B1/B2 visas
    2) U.S. sanctions over human trafficking
    3) Sanction against Eritrea Navy

  • Bayan Negash

    Dear Nitricc,

    You’re way above your head. Listening to this might do you some good to do your job – Making some tea and coffee for as Ismail pointed out: “gitSAtSE Solomon wedi Hawey sleeps long hours, and then his ritual of enjoying on the rocks espresso in order to get in mood again.” This way, we will get a masterpiece rejoinder rather than gibberish language that you seem to pick up from who knows where…so here you go:
    https://www.facebook.com/bayan.nagash/videos/1977168959198683/

    • Nitricc

      Hey Beyan; Thanks for the link. I tried to open it and I was asked to log in and I was unable to log in because I don’t have facebook account. Anyway, thanks anyways.

      • Bayan Negash

        Hey Nitricc,

        You’re welcome, signor. Will save the link for the weekend thereby giving less headache to our hardworking AT moderators.

  • sara

    awtistas… its sad breaking new, in fact heart breaking news, another mass shooting 50+ dead and 200 +
    casualties. according the wire this is the deadliest mass shooting in the country. what is going on folks?
    flood, hurricane,storm,fire,earth quake and police brutality, and mass shootings, unlike any where any time in history. on top of that unpredictable person holding in his thumb a nuclear arsenal.
    I think its about time to go back to our PEOPLE.

    • Kokhob Selam

      Dear Sara,

      እዝግዮ!!!

      KS,,

      • sara

        kokob dear..
        indeed // ya allah/ya rabeeee… are what we should say in such tragic events and think
        going to our PEOPLE.

        • Kokhob Selam

          Dear Sis..sara,

          “in such tragic events and think going to our PEOPLE.” Why? how you say this as if our people are enjoying? Go read in Jebena I have good poem for you now..

          KS,,

          • sara

            habibna kokob
            its dinner prp time in my time zone… now to the kitchen .

          • Kokhob Selam

            Dear Sis sara..

            is that? OK,,, then R U Asmara?

            KS,,

          • sara

            Kokoby
            We had dinner…molokhya
            B’l araneb..

          • Kokhob Selam

            Dear Sis.sara

            I national dish lunch today, not molokhya B’l araneb..,,

            Thanks ,,(So you have… Ignored the problems we Eritreans are facing..)

            KS

          • sara

            Ya akhuna kokob,
            How dare ,i ignore my peoples sufferings, isnt that what i wrote about above.

          • Selamat Sara,

            I miss molokhya sooooooooooooo much. Rijla not to crazy about.

            tSAtSE

          • sara

            Selamtaka yetam..akheena.tSAtSE
            True Zemene Rijla was awful.

          • Kokhob Selam

            Sis Sara

            “True Zemene Rijla was awful.” It seem not kind to say it after your post of LV incident..

            KS,,

        • MerHaba Sara Haftey,

          ዘበነ ሪጅላ ዳርጋ መዓልታዊ ኢዩ ኔሩ፡ ሪጅላን ዓደስን፡፡ ግን ከምታ ናትኪ ኣበሃህላ ኣይኮነትን፡፡ ሞሎኺያ ድሕሪ ሒለት ሱዳን ኣን ሱዳን ኢያ ተለልያ፡ ብሕልፊ ምስ ዖጽመ ስጋን ለመም ለመም አንዳ በል አቲ ‘ኺያ? ዌካ፡ ጥሑን ንቑትጽ ባምያ፡፡ መን ክትንክፋ ሪጅላ ደሓር፡፡
          ጻጸ

          • sara

            sabah alkhair.. GitSAtSE
            you sound fond of sudanse gastronomy.. and here is menu of the day
            appetizer— umfitit
            soup- waika /kawari
            drink-karkade
            main dish-kisra,bamya/moukhbeza
            desert-shieria and of course— with jebena
            wo selam alekum
            sara

          • Kokhob Selam

            Sis..sara

            Now you sound the waiters of Sudan’s waiters..coming to the table and list the menu..

            I have something for you..

            KS,,

            https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CkkNUP1c77M&feature=youtu.be

          • sara

            Anta selam hawna..
            Though i dont know what the singer is saying,but ftom the pic of the singer
            I guess its a party song.
            Shookran

    • Ismail AA

      Dear sara,
      Indeed it is. It is shere madness that could it happen in a place people had gathered to enjoy a day without remotely occuring to them that also could happen in America. It is a bad thing for a country like USA that people should seriously contemplate on and think beyond what the media tell them and ponder on what is happening abroad and what their government has been there.
      Such atrocities routinely happen in many spots of the world. People die and hurt in hundreds at one go due to indiscrimate bombardment from the air or war weapons from land. When nations condone violence and wanton killings in name of national security or utilize acts of blood thirsty terrorists as reactions to undemocratic governments, then domestic border would not be water tight and prevent terrorism coming to them or happening as home grown. Terrorism and terrorist have address and move as ghosts and can strike any time at any place.

      • sara

        Am’na Ismail
        i was afraid you may take it a distraction from the ongoing discussion , but thanks you took it that such disasters are worth to comment as they affect us one way or the other..
        but why is this happening to this country, is this man made or an act of god? i hear these country has a history of violent past, but ever since this twitter man (as in rocket man) came the country is facing all types of disasters after disasters.
        i as an Eritrean have good wishes to all those who belong to that country, but i am always concerned about my PEOPLE when i hear this type of bad news… and ask my self what makes them tolerate or accept that place more than where their PEOPLE are living.

        • Thomas

          Hi Sara,

          Why is this happening to the Iraqis and the Afghans, the British and French people and in general all over the world?? Relatively speaking, the U.S.A is almost heavenly!!

          • sara

            hello Tom
            i was commenting because it is news of the day and a very tragic one that may have also affected my compatriots (people) .
            as for the rest of your comment, i will not drag my self to respond , as our respected elder -kubr am’na has given his words of wisdom for closure.
            btw, Mobrook.. you got the U.S citizenship.

          • Kim Hanna

            Selam sara,
            .
            You bring up a heinous mass murder in Las Vegas and try to pivot to your political commentary. Please don’t.
            .
            You don’t know what the facts are. For you, presumably an educated person, to flail all over your political sores is disgusting. It reminded me of how Nitricc behaved at the time of the Meditreanan tragedy. Look who is supporting you now.
            Whatever respect I had for you is diminished by your outlandish statements.
            .
            Mr. K.H

          • Selam Kim Hanna,

            I had read some time ago that one of the excuses given by those who are against gun control in the usa is that ‘guns don’t kill; it is human beings that kill’. I think that this was said by republicans and gun lobbyists, when president Barack Obama tried to introduce a law to control bearing arms after similar mass killing.
            If this criminal had no access to multiple lethal arms, some of them battlefield worthy ammunition, could he have killed so many innocent people, is a question that comes to mind.
            Why the rich are so greedy, arrogant and ruthless, although they are already so rich, is really mind boggling, that they have created a situation where the safety of citizens is not guaranteed.
            What do you think are the chances that an american stops carrying firearms whenever he goes out, and even carry semi automatic rifles, when he goes shopping. I have seen pictures, most probably coming from Texas, of people carrying semi automatic rifles on their shoulders as they buy their groceries.

          • Kim Hanna

            Selam Horizon,
            .
            I know the gun control issue is always a topic of discussion after one of these events.
            I don’t know if there is a law that forbids individuals in the U.S from buying a tank or artillery. That same law should be used to tightened or used as a common sense measure.
            .
            There is a lot of facts that is not known at this time. I had to contact, early this morning, family members about their safety. They are fine.
            We have deranged people who do deranged deeds. Some claim to have causes and others make up one, that is where I am at this time.
            .
            Mr. K.H

          • Berhe Y

            Dear KH,

            Sorry didn’t mean to sound insensitive in this hard times, but it seems the risk is quite high when the number of people carrying fire arms is just multiplied. There is only one use for it and that’s to shoot at someone (they call it, to protect my self and my family).

            I have been to places in the US, filling up gas and I have seen people with arms and it can get scary if one is not use to that. I have had an argument (including with Habesha people) that they believe in this notion of “protecting my family, therefore I must own it” argument. That everyone out there is trying to get them.

            The notion that majority people from all around the world, no matter what color, religion or race do want to live in peace and they do not want to harm another human being and Americans are no different in my opinion.

            So until that problem is solved, they will take about it for a little bit, and the republicans will block it and it soon will be forgotten, until another incident happens….and the cycle goes on….

            I remember this from Roger Moore movie, Bowling for Columbine and nothing really changed since.

            Berhe

          • Peace!

            Hi Horizon,

            hmmm…when the shooter is a privileged white male, it is always about a gun and mental disorders, and you are in it. What if the shooter were a muslim? I am sure you would bombard us with your usual wuhabism, alqaeda, ISIS, and other pious platitude.

            Peace,

          • Hi Peace,

            You are imagining things. Wait until I say what you said. As much as I am concerned, killers are criminals, wherever they come from. There is no justification whatsoever.
            By the way, are you trying to cash in morally on my expense? 😁

          • Kokhob Selam

            Dear Horizon,

            Do you see my massage to you in Jabena?

            KS,,

          • Peace!

            Hi Kim Hanna,

            I don’t think you understood what she is actually trying to say although you could simply ask for clarification before you let your ego speak for you. I usually resist not to let my tongue gets ahead my brain just to focus on what really matters.

            Peace!

          • MS

            Dear Sara
            You have within your right to phrase your opinion the way you want it said. Nothing wrong with wanting to leave the USA, honestly. I’m a father of four sons and fire arms-related crimes, be it done by police or civilians, concern me. You have nothing to defend. Well said. You expressed your heart-felt sentiments towards the affected people, and you added that it was time “to go home”. Nothing wrong with both. why someone could not go home is totally different than one’s statement wanting to go home. Amek IsmailAA put it well.

          • Nitricc

            Hi Thomas: I know, I will never expect anything reasonable from you but all Sara did was being the tragedy that happened in the US. Only sick and stupid mind will connect the tragedy in the US and the government of Eritrea. What exactly has to with it? No wonder your disgraced opposition goes no where. I mean, this happen in the US and you are connecting it to Eritrea? Dumb!!!

        • Ismail AA

          Dear sara,
          If we as Eritrean would be indifferent such a tragedy that cost innocent human lives then we will would be also forfieting the human aspect of our own cause. Sanctity of human life is at core of our cause.

          • sara

            Am’na Ismail
            as always your sayings are treasure// Hikma.
            thanks

          • Thomas

            Hi Ismail,

            You are right but only if you know whom you talk to. This woman, sara, has never addressed issues of our own (the sad mass migration of our own youth) and Lampedusa tragedy and the day to day crimes of our own people by the hands of mafias regime. Now, she is really good at bringing bad news coming from the U.S.A and she presents the news as if the U.S. (the country) is collapsing.

            When I asked her why she is not showing that care for her own Eritrean people, she goes that there could be Eritreans in the unfortunate incident as if Eritreans would attend a country music in a country club:)

          • Ismail AA

            Dear Thomas,
            You may have your reasons to critize sara. But the fact that she expressed her sorrow about loss of innocent lives does not change the essence and gravity of the tragedy. As you have written in your second paragraph, at the end of the day it was life of human beings – whatever their race or origin – that was wantonly wasted. I believe the root aspect of our cause the essence of life and rest comes next.

          • Thomas

            Hi Ismail,
            I think you missed the point I was making. Sara was actually Not talking about the people lost, but she was celebrating that America is in trouble. I have followed her comments here & I very much know what she is into. There is war in Afghanistan, Lydia, i Ethiopia even there is disunity of people in the US such as the tragedy she missed – all to say this Eritrea is peaceful now & we need to keep what we have now

          • Ismail AA

            Dear Thomas,
            Consider me as a bad reader for the moment. But I read her comments for third time now after reading them for second time when I saw KH’s rejoinder. If her listing of a number of calamities that had unfortunately visited the USA, and voicing dismay with the sitting president, were understood in a different way than I did, then I should take what you are saying as your opinion which I respect. Otherwise, although I might have disagreed with her views on other issues as I also with others in this forum, I do not take that as a measure to Judge her compassion and good heart towards loss of innocent life to be genuine or not.

          • Thomas

            Hi Ismail,
            Ok, good lack with her.

    • Desbele

      Hi Saba,

      How painful that one must pay 2% for the dictator and above all give up the freedom of free thinking to go back home.
      I better stay here with clean and clear conscience.

      • sara

        Ato desble,
        Saba the inteligent sis did ask
        Important qutions..not about 2% and the rest.

        • Peace!

          HI sara,

          No worries most of us understood your heartfelt message. It is unfortunate that the mad dog we raised is now turning on us.

          Peace!

  • Ismail AA

    Ahlen Beyan,
    I have just found your superb answer to my question. I was actually waiting for it. But I still couldn’t use the reply key as yesterday. I think there is a problem with Disqus. Incidentally, too, Paulos’ rejoinder has got the same mishap. That is why I am using this space. Thank you for extremely geneous quality answer to my question. The same goes to Paulos for joining in and Dr. Chefena for raising the issue to which you have responded.
    The issue had pricked my amateurish curiosity because I thought I had sensed that understanding this matter takes centrality in the discussion we have been having in the past days in this forum, which in fact stretch to the realm of the challenges we as a diverse society in which numbers and statistics may matter have been facing and shall continue to face.
    From what I learned from you answer and comments of Paulos and Dr. Chefena, I could note the following:
    1. I am follow of the Hanafi sect (one of the four jurisprudence in Suni tradition) because my great, great parents lived in a place where the Turks who were (are) also Hanafis. This notion could be weakened by the fact that the Turkish language did make any impact though could be explained by other historical facts. The Turks ruled through local representives known as Naibs.
    2. Many children , especially females, in the town where I grew, and who were born after the departure of the British, were give Ethiopian names such Shewainesh and Etopia. Some had modified or changes during the Ghedli era – Etiopia to Eretra and Shewainesh to Semainesh.
    2. Some ELF members who shifted sides to the EPLF after the 1980-81 civil war behaved more than the bona fide EPLF members. They acted harsher and hard liner in their interaction with their former comrade-in-arms. This was evident in the debates during to run up to the referendum and later, Some of have gone as far as been implicated in helping in plots hatched for assassinating key ELF cadres in the Sudan.
    I am jotting these as mere examples of how I understood the issue. Thus, political and material dominations are key bedrocks for cultural domination that could impact faiths and languages of the dominated. Material needs and inferiority complexes make individuals vulnerable. The cultures and languages of rulers become means to prestige and are source of material gains. An employer in Tessenei, I was told, had put proficiency in Tigrigna as conditions for applying for a job as a janitor. What other example can be more eloguent than this to explain this important matter. The question is did liberal democracy modify this phenomenon anywhere? Thanks again, Beyan.

  • Selamat Dr. Chefena, Professor Beyan, Ayya Ismael AA, Dr. Paulos, Accountant Peace and fellow Awate forum contributors (debaters and detractors alike):

    Not so fast Professor Beyan. You have failed miserably, in my opinion, by opting for maximum points gain for your sincere conviction as well as your attempt at causing maximum damage, on those you perceive in the wrong, as your opponents (proponents, bidders and or abettors of the oppression / the instruments of the oppressive regime.) Though your arduous and meticulous researched analytical tool is due meritorious acknowledgement, it was very evident from its disjointed flow, uncharacteristic of your otherwise eloquent prose, immediately after your introduction of Critical Discourse Analysis. Hence, “it was very hard to read” for me as well, though my genuine due respect for your person as well as honed crafts, I maintained faith of the usefulness, in addition to teaching/introducing me to the academics of the analytical tool–CDA, intuitively I trusted and your true intentions were to flush or bring to the surface the “natural discourse” by our small community, a microcosm of the greater, would save the day. You stumbled, fumbled and dropped the ball several times, perhaps intentionally, to make your perfect scholarly presentation of an analytical tool fit and give support to what turned out to be, thus far, a soliloquy. You are to be congratulated and appreciated for your bold and risky attacks in order to provoke for the purposes of garnering full or partial agreements in support to your adamant and strong convictions from the heavy weights you methodically and selectively attacked. You even pleaded or pandered for a handicap allowance.

    At this point, you should fully recognized the positions taken by most but more importantly the noteworthy. The position of “Medical Doctors make very poor or lousy politicians.” Just contemplate, how Professors or literature or linguist scholars, such as yourself, are served very well, by their scientific research, and powerful tools such as Comparative Literature Analysis, Critical Discourse Analysis in churning out products ranging from poetic prose, ancient manuscript translations, classic novelas and mesmerizing poignant timeless essays etc… they fall significantly short in transferring these highly reputable skills when attempting to be politicians or political stance advocates. I am not necessarily in disagreement with your political stance or leanings, which is yet to be further defined by Dr. BB.
    Dear Beyan, though well intentioned, I truly believe you do not have a true grasp of the political dynamics affecting the dire circumstances you a significant segment of Eritrean nationals are describing and professing to know for sure. This is a prelude to a more detailed rejoinder I will continue later, but your last minute comic relief, the weekend is over, it is a brand new month announcing the dropping of the curtains “stockholm” syndrome, not only is it a cliche ish parting shot to rile up the detractors frenemies, sadly contributing to regress as opposed to progress. Do I sense a lack of confidence?

    Well, the prosecution has announced its rest, but we all know until the defense presents its case and all litigators make their closing arguments, we are have thus far only heard one side of the discourse.

    Defense case in point:Defining the “The Rock Rats” (only a brief intro)
    A new discourse I am coining to the Ararib, Winona, Selemuna.. short SaHil Children of Revolution School, i.e. Beit Timhriti Sewra. The Rock Rats as compared to The Rug Rats. As I am a diaspora grown Eritrean national, (my term of endearment would be “Beles” upon visiting Independent Eritrea) I fall under the category of The Rug Rats.”
    Just in the nick of time beating the TGIWeekend O-meter for this link of images. https://www.google.com/search?q=The+Rugrats&sa=X&rlz=1C1CHBF_enUS756US756&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&ved=0ahUKEwjDwrq5kNHWAhXky1QKHfenAN8QiR4IrQE&biw=1242&bih=579#imgrc=4m-zQbsXsFVbbM:

    The Rock Rats Symposium / Call for Paradigm Shift. Brief comment for now.

    Selam Dr. Chefena,

    “This is where ‘voice’ comes in. Proponents of various positions in conflict or debate try dominate modes of representation through variety of ways, ‘including inviting or persuading others to join their side, or silencing opponents by attacking their position’. So voice is used in the generic rather than individual sense. Representation through discourse also shapes our sense of identity.”

    That you are in the right direction of full conceptual comprehension of the effects of discourse on the dynamics, you need not I to give you assurance, but I am doing so regardless. And please understand that I also do agree that it “is to broad to deal with in this limited space.”

    However, where you fall short or have rushed the crux of the issue, in my opinion, is your selective choice of of “some of the examples.” Naturally, the astute reader, is capable of narrowing down your geographical location at the time when the “Eritrean transitional field” was developing its “stock of lexical labels:..” Furthermore your personal Eritrean background, Dr. Chefena, like the era of your birth, the Eritrean geographical subregion, you early childhood elementary schooling, the elements of the harsh terrain, dire needs environment that has significant influence on you, can be extrapolated with fairly high degree of accuracy from the accuracy of discourse you witnessed and lived through. Your choice of examples are absolutely true for they are the only discourses imposing said identities that contributed in shaping the identity you believe to be yours and your peers/contemporaries real identity of your choices. You are justified beyond reasonable doubt solely base on circumstantial evidence you and the entire jurors of your peers poised to rendering their verdict, vis-a-vis the anticipated paradigm shift or pending political stance.

    If you have found traction (Hizkani entekhonka) would I be in the wrong if gave ample examples from the diaspora opposition was developing its own “stock of label” lock and step colluding in designing the architecture of our current discourse we are mutually qualifying with natural. The natural discourse developers from the side you did not personally witness and experience. Though, part and parcel of The Rock Rats I can legitimately be classified, I assure you the closest
    experience and witness that can shed light on what you have missed I can fill. Not for the purpose of swaying the Winona/Ararib Rock Rats caucus in accepting or rejecting the imminent “Newer Paradigm Shift” and billed with the hype of a major tectonic shifts, but for academic honesty and integrity that is unbiased, which will prove to be the true facilitator of genuine dialogue for a lasting resolution.

    I am confident you can build on whatever little comprehension you are able to decipher and extract, if not all of, my above sound and valid points I am alluding too. (As I am tired, I am hurrying this submission before the momentum or steam from our important topic looses steam. This is only a tip of the iceberg, and the efficacy of my broader presentation, I assure will be felt! ) Look forward to your thoughts.

    tSAtSE

    • Paulos

      Tsatse Arkey,

      Is this you? Really! In “Good Will Hunting”, Matt Damon and Ben Affleck with other blue-collar friends from Jersey walk into a bar and the bar happens to be a hang out for a snobby dudes from Ivy League schools as in Harvard. And as it happens, a stuck up dude starts to hit on this girl and Matt Damon starts to talk to her as well. That dude looks down on Matt Damon and starts to brag about being Harvard grad and starts to lecture Matt Damon on a specific era of US Southern history. Matt Damon a born genius with an extraordinary strick for details destroys the Harvard dude like there is no tomorrow. Ben Affleck who was watching the whole exchange says, “Yea my boy is wicked smart.”

      • Hey Doc,

        Would you like to have a conversation while we share toufi caramels candy? Yeah, why must it be coffee, macchiato and the like for our first man date. Meet me at Uhuru or andy candy store near Blur and Young. As I am on the QWE pressing my accelerator between 120 and 140, I should be there in time for brunch. (Man I have forgotten how fun it was to drive north of the Peace Bridge. The road sign says 120 km/h which I reaድ as 120 ኪድ ማይልስ/ሕጂ.,, ,,,, ,,,) ጝኝ ሄክ ስማርቲ ወይ ሄክቴከር ስኩርድ ስማርቲ ኮይነ ኣይፈልጥን ወሪድኒ ሓውካ ጻጸ። ሰሚናር ናይ ዋዕላ ካርቱም ተላታ 78 ኢዩ ኣዝዩ ናይ ኒንጃ ቴክኒክ ማኑቨር ቴክኑዩክስ ዝወሰድክወን ዝላዓል ጽልዋ ዝህቦኡ ነዚ ጥራጥ ዱዱዕ ዋላ ፈሲ ሃመማ ዘይወጾ ኣቀራርባ ሊቀ ሉቃውንቲ ዘመሓላልኩም ዘለክሁ ንኩሉኹም ደቂ ሃገረይ ኣርትያ። ኤአ ኣነ ወናኒ ጸሊም ቁልፊ ካላይ ዲግሪ ኒንጃ ማስተር ማኑቨረር ዘይሓልየልኩምን ዘይ ደንግጸልኩምን መን ‘ም ብ ኣማኢት ኣሽሓት ዶላር, ብ ናቕፋ ባጤራ ሞ ዓሰርት ሓጎስ ሽሞም በቕሊ ዕስራ ክሻ ኮታ ብምለታ ባንክ ኦፍ ኦፍ ኤርትረያ ተሰኪሞም ን ረጂስተራር ሃርቫርድ ወይ ሚት ዶ ኤማይቲ ከረክቡዋ ኢዮም። ኣብ ክንደይ ንሰን ማርያም ትቐንጥሰን ከም ዘይበላ አነ በዕል ኣብሻይ ኣዳነይን?
        አወ ቁኑዕ ናይ ያታና ኣዘራርባ, ላዛ ዘረባ መልሲ ትሕሾ ንስኻ ዓርከይ ጳውሎስ ምበልኩኻ። ግን ትውሳኺትካ ዘይትዕድልትኻ ዘይተኸሎኻ አንድዩ ኾይኑ አቲ ሓቂ። ደሓን ገጸይ ግምጥል ኢለን, የአጋረይ ዘይጽን ኢለን ልሳንካ ዘይሰምዓሉ ምስ ወጠጠኣን, “ኣቦይ ዓንዱ ባዕሎም ይነኣዱ ኢልካ, ምስቶም መሳሕቕትኻ መዛኑንካ ሕመዩኒ፡ ኣጆኻ, አቲ ማስተር ማኑቨረር ኒንጃ ባዮኒክ ሂርን ከአለተይ ሶላር ፖወር ስል ዝኾነ ጸሓይ ምስ ዓርበ ግብ ኢሉ ኣይሰርሕን ኢዩ፡፡
        በል ኣላ ኩዋትሮ መዞ ፕሮንቶ ኣብ ብሉር ጥብ በለኒ። ሱሳ ኪድ ሞይልስ ፐር ሕጂ ን ቶ ዶ ቲ ኦ የሕብረኒ ኣሎ። ርብዒ ሰዓት ኢይ ልክዕ ተሪፋትኒ ዘላ፡። ኣይ ቸንቶ ቨንቲ ‘ንድይ ዝረግጸላ ዘለኹ። ተዘውሪ ማንኪና ተዘውሪ ድልድል ሰላም ናያግራ ፎልስን ኦንቶርዮን ከም ማይ ጀሕ ጃሕ የውሕዝ ኣሎ ሎም ቅነ ሸሪጥ ኣልፍ ቲዝዓ ሚኣ ሰብዓ ተማኒን ካብ ሓደ ቤላ ሮባ ኣጋር ነጋዳይ ኣብ ዎዕል ሓዲቓ ካርቱም ተላታ ሰብዓ ተማኒን ብጥራዛ ዝገአክዋ አንድ ሰማዕኩ ኢየ ዝሕምበብ ዘለኹ።
        ደሓን ሕደሩታ።
        ኣምሪጃይጻጸ ኣቡ ዓሸራ ወፖን X – ኤቮልሽን

        • Berhe Y

          Dear tSatSe,

          Are you doing google map driving or you are in T dot for real.

          Berhe

    • Bayan Negash

      Dear tSAtSE,

      Like Paulos below, I am ecstatic by your penetrating response. This will need another CDA, one that focuses solely on the text and context with no optics to boot. But, who needs an optic on this one, you have already given us picturesque and vivid response. Hey, I am going to use the classic MS response: due to time constraints, I can’t possibly give justice to your eloquent rejoinder. Let me just say this for now: If nothing else came out of my “disjointed” piece, it brought in tSAtSE one that nobody saw coming. In this respect, I can confidently say my piece was a smash success. I will have to re-read it later today to see if I can offer my cent worth of response, but I truly appreciate you “kid”. Not so fast! It is just a little humor from the heated exchange you’ve had with ayakha Amanuel. Wish this came over the weekend. Weekdays, as you know, in this land of milk and honey, tend to be tough to offer a due diligent give and take, at least for me. We will see.

      Abi Hawka,
      Beyan

    • Bayan Negash

      Dear tSAtSE,

      I have about half an hour before I prepare for the start of my day and then get my kids ready for school. Let see how much I can pump out. As I said earlier if my attempt at coherence failed me, it was paid back handsomely in your impeccably disciplined and coherent rejoinder. When I enter into dialogue my absolute intention is to engage. In the process of heated exchange, you may have perceived I had ill intentions to “causing maximum damage”, it is few and far between. I enter to convince or be convinced and in the process learn from the experience. The pleading for a handicap, I hope you knew that, that was meant to inject facetiousness to an otherwise intense discourse. At least, that’s how I took it when Paulos introduced it on the spot. The last person to compete with Sal’s skills at a debate is me. After all, didn’t I proclaim we are not in a debating society here in my article. So, just in case others perceived it to mean I was trying to win at any cost, I want to make sure the intent was completely different. I guess this is another failure, eh.

      And then, you caught me by surprise and gave me an out from continuing this comment because you have yet other good stuff coming our way. You said, “Dear Beyan, though well intentioned, I truly believe you do not have a true grasp of the political dynamics affecting the dire circumstances you and significant number of Eritrean nationals are describing as well as professing to be fully knowledgeable above others.”

      I never professed to be knowledgeable on sociopolitical matters above others. All I attempted to say was our territorial integrity was realized in 1991. We are part and parcel of the global community now, a quarter of a decade and counting. Too many lives were sacrificed for our geographical identity. We need to shift emphasis now on Eritrean individual integrity and personal liberty. In the words of Patrick Henry who in 1775 said “give me liberty or give me death” Enough to the madness that the regime in Eritrea has concocted about territorial integrity. I just want us to get out of the mindset, frame of mind that the menace at home devised seventeen years hence. No sane political actor would come to occupy Eritrea because it was proven to the world even if takes three more decades, Eritreans will not rest until their territorial integrity is protected. Let us now focus on personal sovereignty, Eritrea is going to be occupied by no one. Even Ethiopia when it had a chance to go all the way to Asmera, it didn’t because it knows better than put itself in a protracted war. That will have to do for now as I await for your second installment.

      Abi Hawka,
      Beyan

      • Ismail AA

        Dear Beyan,
        Do not worry. Just attend to your daily routine because gitSAtSE Solomon wedi Hawey sleeps long hours, and then his ritual of enjoying on the rocks espresso in order to get in mood again. If it doesn’t help, then another and a third much harder espresso. By that time the school day of your kids is over and will be save back home. You will have rested and ready to respond. Almighty help, brother.

        • ከመይ ሓዲርካ ኣያ ኢስማዒል።

          My big brother Beyan, as you and all know, is exquisite meticulous and my favorite artistic in his delivery. I have learned a lot from his writings and must admit I do possess a healthy envy of his style and over all demeanour. Don’t worry, I will grant him a handicap this time, particularly for the extra hour or two earlier he rises in order to see his younging to school. My three are at the Us, for several years now by the the grace of the creator.
          gzien mChue kunetat Haliye gn, I will certainly pick his brain in order for him to facilitate a very pertinent must timely serious discourse dialogue. And certainly I will draw the big wigs, nevermind how for I have my ways…
          With the Professor Beyan, rather than respond to his above due to legitimate haste response above, and yes it would have been very critical, I will only suggest to him now to play the role of a debate moderator with CDA being the guidelines for his moderation as well as ware the educators hat on the techniques of CDA. I think he has already picked up my drift. Sorry Ayya Ismael, I can not apologize for the miniscule advantage, due to the generous head start I am provided by you all. Besides, henceforth I will adapt the Admiral Saay7’s “not the apologizing” kind stoic and stern game face– a work in progress i know (amel ms megzen diyu zbehal, ykhdeneni!). My intent and mission is not to disappoint.

          I will yield for a few and challenge our esteemed awate u think tank to contribute towards a progressive dialogue. Else, oh yeah there is a plan 0, 1, 2, …B C D F hexadecimal combative reaction brewing too.

          tSAtSE

  • Haile S.

    Very funny Paul,
    ኣነ ኸኣ ኣንበጣ ዝበልዓና ጊዜ እየ ተወሊደ, meaning I could be older or younger than you. I remember locust serious devastation around Asmara as late as 1970/1. I agree movies were coming 5 to 10 years after release. There must have been few exceptions, I just checked one movie that played for weeks to months in Ci-Roma aroud tog-tog time entitled ‘bring me the head of Alfred Garcia’ with Warren Oates, and happen to be was released 1974.

    • Kokhob Selam

      Hala Haile S,

      “ኣነ ኸኣ ኣንበጣ ዝበልዓና ጊዜ እየ ተወሊደ ” When was that? I don’think it was those years that we people eat “ኣንበጣ ” .. Let us ask when was that exactly,,, Never that wasn’t In 1970/1..this must be before 1961 before we start armed struggle ..much more you must be mistaken Hailat..

      KS,,

    • Berhe Y

      Hi Paulo and Haile

      I remember Rambo First blood in the 80s. May be it was few years from the official release. And John Travolta…we didn’t call it John Travolta but instead we called it Johntra Volta….and Johntra for short..those deki Asmara hair cut…keep the back of the hair long and you lift the collar sort of to join the hair..he is Johntra was the common team….at least that’s what we (with my friends) use to call it.

      There were this artist at Cinema Empero who use to sketch the movies..I remember his Rambo cadro was almost read…I forgot his name…but he use to hang around that area all the time..he was Johntra him self..

      Berhe

      • Haile S.

        Selam Berhe,
        Those who didn’t experience johntra cut in those times must few. And I recall of another who use to paint for Roma, but forgot name, probably a Solomon?

      • Paulos

        Selam Berhino,

        Yea Jontra the hair style was the longest-lasted fad and I would think second to Jango the trendy male pants. I grew up in that area and I remember this guy I think his name was Samuel (the guy who used to do all the drawings for the Quadro) and he used to play Guitar as well. In fact in the 80s, it was kind of swell for a guy to call himself after a famous actor of course to impress gals. I am not sure if you know him, there was this dude we used to call “Cobra” for he used to sport shades exactly the same glasses as Stallone in that movie including tooth-pick in his mouth as well. The guy now leaves somewhere in Canada. Remarkably though he looked more like Stallone.

        • Berhe Y

          Hi Paulo,

          Your memory is amazing, if you grew up around Cinema Impero, you must be one of those fino asmarino (the elegant kind, who trade video tapes on weekends). I think the name sounds familiar but I am not sure. I don’t know his musical talents. The closest I the music scene in Asmara is going behind Ambassador hotel in Sunday afternoon when they use to have party. And we use to hear a glimpse of what’s playing inside when they open / close the entry door.

          I think it was SGJ who mentioned ሳንያ በለስ. I confess I was guilty of that. We go and target an innocent looking በዓል በለስ. And plan our our escape route and timing and which direction, who and when to run. At least in 4 direction, I was to run fast at least I convinced my self that if someone is going to be caught it will not be me (there will be someone else before me).

          So we approach the poor guy and we ask:

          ከንደይ ናይ ሰማንያ በለስ?

          And depending on the response of the guy we make the move. If he answers:

          ሓንቲ ሞቖለብ and grabs his stick…then we slowly move to the next target.. but if the poor guy starts calculating the amount of belles…5 cents for one so 2 for ten, 4 for twenty…we give each other a node and we got our guy…

          Then we start ordering and eating….and we as we enjoy the beles we use to feel nervous and give the sign, that we should get ready (around half way)….then comes the exist move..we ask the guy..

          ሕጂ ዝኪኒ (zucchini) ደሊኻ ሃብኒ: they are the unique color and usually hard to find..so the guy goes over his basket and flips and turns and looking for them…and then we shout Sanya and we take off…

          We learn and practice to duck or jump over the Moqlob when he throw it and run….like there is no tomorrow.

          If Beyan is wedi Akria, I am pretty sure he knows what I am talking about it…but Paulo wedi komishtato…I doubt:).

          Berhe

          • Paulos

            Selam Berhino,

            Yea I grew up right around that area. Sure enough I have had my own share of ናይ ሳንያ and of course we all are not proud of but as they say, it is insane to be young. If you remember, Asmara in mid 80s was divided by zonal gang members who were at each others throats where more often than not it was politically motivated as well. For instance, the gang group known as ደቂ ቃኘዉ who were mainly children of Dergue officers were always clashing with Deqi ገዛማንዳ where one of the people was Beyene Karatista who lost one eye during one of the clashes I think it was either at Club Mokambo or Patamata not entirely sure.

            The most notable ሓያላት ናይ’ኣስመራ I vividly remember are: ይሓይሽ: መንግስ a.k.a Carter, ወዲ ሑጻ: ኣያይ’ዶ: ስንጥቕ’ኢለ among others.

            P.S. I wonder why did we call it ናይ ሳንያ? What does the word mean?

          • Berhe Y

            Hi Paulo,

            You do have great memory. I think ናይ ሳንያ means ናይ ህድማ, may be sanya is hdma in arabic, I don’t know I am guessing.

            I do remember those days, although I was not part of any those fights. I remember those Hailat..ይሓይሽ I think he is in LA. I knew ወዲ ሑጻ in person because he use to come to my father shop and he was quite a gentle man.

            There was another guy, ወዲ ሬፎ (from Abashawel I think) and ፊናስ፡

            I heard ፊናስ is one of the guys who chase people around for National Service. He use to do that during the Derg time too..It doesn’t surprise me…he was at some point, wedo geba.

            The other day I met a guy who use to live in Hollanda and use to be boxer, may be like those guys. I forgot his name but he said ዱባ ወዲ ሓዝሓዝ: I don’t remember him.

            Berhe

          • Paulos

            Berhino,

            Yea I remember the infamous Finas where as you have aptly put it one shouldn’t be surprised given the background.

            The only boxers who made a reputation for themselves I remember are: ወዲ ኣፍሮ from ዝባን ስንቀ and ሳምሶም from እንዳ ዓሳ:: The latter particularly was a real champ. How about Basketball, who do you remember?

          • Berhe Y

            Hi Paulo,

            I haven’t been to see boxing few times and I don’t remember any of the guys. I knew Yonas wedi Ande (Yonas Andemichael) which I think use to box but never saw him. I heard he is in Europe somewhere.

            I was into food ball (ELPA way mot) and cycling (Yemane Tekeste Wedi Gilo, Zerea Ghabir, Wedi Redie,).

            My dad use to go to see basket ball and I have been with him few times. I remember Nuguse, he was the legend I think. I also remember one guy I forgot his name (Muslim, Abo I think, very friendly guy).

            Berhe

          • Paulos

            Berhino,

            Yea you’re right his name is at least he was known as ዓቦ And ኻልድ was another great basketball player including ጎደፋይ and his brother. All of them lived in the same neighborhood around Pocefilla. The thing about Kalid was he was short but the guy was born for basketball. I wonder where they might be. And of course the one and only ንጉሰ. Most of the basketball players including N’guse hailed from ስምረት ቀበሌ ዕዳጋ ሓሙስ and they always had an edge for they all grew up training at YMCA in Edaga Hamus. And I remember cycling and the greatest you mentioned as well.

          • sara

            Berhe dear,
            I like the exchange going on
            About the past,i may spot my bro of those times.

          • Haile S.

            Paul and Berhe,
            ወይ ትህኪት! ዓርበረቡዕ ወሪድኩም ከብድኹም ከይትመልኡስ፡ ናይ ሳንያ? ንሕና እዞም ናይ ቕድሚ 75 ቶግቶግ ዘረናጡ (ዘሮንጦጦታት) ዓርበረቡዕ እዩ ምውዓልና ነይሩ። ድሓን፡ ደርጊ ምሕላፍ ከሊኡና ኢልኩም ኣመኽንዩ።

          • Paulos

            Hailat,

            My generation was coward, selfish and spoiled brat in a sharp contrast to your generation which was gutsy to say the least. If the cliché says, a bum waits for the banana to fall itself, it was my generation.

          • Berhe Y

            Hi Pauo,

            No, you got it wrong. I think my generation, which is the same as yours, we are the only generation who are enjoyed life as Eritreans and who had actual normal child hood. We were too young to witness the atrocities of the Derg, and we were to old to wait for the independence and to witness the wrath of EPLF and most of us left before Eritrean independence.

            We were not bum or selfish but we enjoyed childhood as it was suppose to be and it’s called life.

            I think that’s why the EPLF from the moment they set foot in Asmara, they resented the people in my opinion. They thought we had enjoyed life while they were sacrificing and they have to make up for the lost times…. ዕብዳን ዕንደራን the order of the day

            Berhe

          • Paulos

            Berhino,

            We are or were the product of certain circumstances that had shaped up our psychological make up and I think Dergue to the very least the ideologues banked on it to their advantage. As you have aptly put it, we were sandwiched between the Eritrean political reality which seemed to have receded into a distant memory and the ephemeral comfort the Dergue ideologues imparted on us. For instance, if you remember, during the strategic retreat by the EPLF, Dawit Weldegiorgis the then governor of Eritrea created a semblance of normalcy in Asmara when he lifted the otherwise curfew hours and bike riding was allowed as well. Certainly, EPLF leaders were nervous for we were completely sold by it and we resorted into sprouting house-parties and the other missing perks of being young.

          • Haile S.

            Hi Paul.
            I wouldn’t go far to ‘the spoiled brat’, but count me there. True there were many couragous among us. I remember, just before tog-tog (sorry guys it was a before and after break-point for many of us), at Qehas 2ry some brave students called for a school-wide meeting in the football field and essentially said ‘እንታይ ንገብር ንሕና ኣብዚ ኣሕዋትና እንዳተቓለሱ’. Following that a bunch of them just left for the field. One of these people was my committee leader, committee formed to start publishing a students newpaper that we had already prepared the name and stencil of the icon we had choosen (Adulis) and some news and articles were ready. Touching the stencil between our hands was an exciting moment. Helas, tog-tog happened the following week and our plan never materialized. When I came back to the school after 2 years of interruption we were a bunch of different breed, our language changed to marxism-leninism, our preoccupation became which Cadre was going to come lecture us about the …..isms in school or Qebeles and to a certain regularity go to a burial of a fallen Cadre singing የታጋይ ድምጽ ይጮሃል….. .

          • Paulos

            Hailat,

            I vaguely remember when the Dergue Cadre was gunned down and I think his name was Wendmu. My oldest sister and her friends were made to hit the streets with a red piece of cloth around their heads reminiscent of the Red Guards in Mao’s Cultural Revolution. They were the darkest years where the vindictive Dergue avenged by killing in a broad daylight innocent Eritreans.

            Your generation had the political will and a burning sense of nationalism where the could-have-been stellar scientists and great artists opted to head to Mieda where my generation chose the road more traveled instead.

          • Haile S.

            Hi Paul,
            Just a word on those gunned down; there were many of them and folds of that number were killed and imprisoned in retaliation.
            Every generation has its own strength. The passing generation plays a major role in influencing the coming generation. Part of our problem is most likely a kind of miscommunication between generations. The ykalos transmitted to warsay the defense and bravery only, not enough at all of self-sufficiency and fulfilement. That is why our young are leaving in search of these two. I am repeating what so many of you said repeatedly before.

          • Paulos

            Selam Hailat,

            What went wrong? Where did it go wrong? Or did it go wrong at all for that matter? To look into these varied and pressing questions, one needs critical faculties sans emotions so that not only we can find closure but if the present generation is breaking-away, we can bring it back to the very objectives of the Eritrean spirit.

            Progressive society is anchored in the belief-system that, the next generation ought to have a better life than the previous generation. If I have to digress, Evolutionary Forces as in Variation, Mutation and Natural Selection work in tandem in a bid to weed out the traits that are not advantageous for the survival of species. In Thermodynamics as in the Law of Entropy, there is a tendency towards something. Here, we can see that, Social Progress, Evolutionary Forces and Entropy share something fundamental in common. Time! They are the function of time, in the sense that, they all move forward with in the arrow of time. As much as time can not be reversed, any backward movement with in the said three manifestations of reality—is considered as an aberration or anathema. The social, political and economic forces with in Eritrean context are anything but normal for they tend to defy the universal law of nature including the apparent reverse in generational progress as well.

          • Berhe Y

            Dear Hailat,

            I am sorry I think you are trying to be nice. I don’t believe what you wrote:

            “The ykalos transmitted to warsay the defense and bravery only, not enough at all of self-sufficiency and fulfilement. That is why our young are leaving in search of these two. ”

            I don’t think any of this has actual fact in the ground. If they have transmitted bravery then where is that, tgat they can’t defend themselves at home or outside. They are herded like ships to their death, endure any abuse in the hope to make it safe to live.

            And it’s for not lack of self sufficiency and fulfilment that they leaving but rather they can’t live in their country in piece to build life for their own.

            What I think is, EPLF like any other front that come to power by force, blood and sweat is NOT able to transfer to peaceful civilian life.

            For example, during the 1998 war they tool 8 grades (13-14 years) old boys and girls took them to the boarder to see the dead corps, without knowledge and information where the saw bodies of human flesh.

            What kind of bravery is that?

            I personally think, these EPLF fighters do suffer from some sort of post traumatic disorder like many other who went through that experiences. The only problem unlike in the other countries, they continue to life their life like they are at war.

            I can’t describe any other reason that they would expose children in such horrific flesh of human beings.

            Do they actually think that, that experience would make them nationalist and brave.

            Berhe

          • Haile S.

            Selam Berhe,
            Good point. My intention was to draw contrast between their desire to transmit the bravery they brought from the field and their short sightedness approach at educating the young. I was not necessarily attributing congratulatory points, though I am not taking away the bravery the young showed in defending the country. I was looking at the intention to building bravery, believing that the negative way it was done was not by design. On what is causing the young to flee, we are not far appart either. I concede to the way you put it. On shawing dead corpse to that young age, I agree is despicable.

          • iSem

            BY:
            Youknow my rehearsed response to this:
            “And tSaSe and iSem, keqi Sudan have no clue..”
            Because our independence came before 1991:-)

  • Paulos

    Awatistas

    How about Sunday Night Football. Indianapolis Colts against Seattle Seahawks. Or should we talk about locking arms and getting on the knees? It’s all about perspective. If you’re watching, enjoy! We talk after the game.

    • Paulo Demarikino,

      We are taking a knee in protest of statesmen distortions of peaceful civil disobedience. Luckily, we don’t own TVs. The OG’s have long ago heeded Timothy Leary’s LSD psychedelic analysis with the motto: “Turn on, Tune in, and drop out.”

      tSAtSE

  • Amanuel Hidrat

    Hi Moderator,

    Could you pls pull my comment, it is on hold in desques?

    Regard

    • Bayan Negash

      Selam Amanuel,

      I’ve been noticing similar problems with DISQUS. Some just seem to disappear from the scene altogether, the last one of which was when I responded to brother Ismail where he asked about cultural dominance vis-a-vis Isaias. I don’t even know if he saw it. Once I am assured the intended target has seen my response, I simply ignore it. It is the vagaries of modern day digital communication we will have to learn to live with, I guess. I am using this as opportunity to see if Ismail had seen my now lost rejoinder.

      Cheers,
      Beyan

      • Amanuel Hidrat

        Hi Beyan,
        It usually happen when you try to edit after posting your comment. It is always the case with me. It is still hanging in my disques file.

        • Bayan Negash

          Hey Aman,

          Oh, okay. I will stop editing then, which means all I have to do is copy and paste the finished product into DISQUS – Problem solved.

          Many thanks,
          Beyan

  • Bayan Negash

    Selam to all,

    It has been a rollercoaster ride. I thank all those who participated in the last few days for taking time out of your busy schedule to get engaged. Since the weekend is now making room for the new weekday with the new month descending upon us shortly, I thought I’d share something light hearted that I hope will give us to keep a sense of perspective from a young man who sees the Eritrean world from a unique sense of place. Enjoy.
    https://m.facebook.com/mikle.habte/posts/1352605788170002

    • Paulos

      Beyan,

      That is so funny and creative. Thank you for sharing. I wouldn’t call them ደገፍቲ but ለኽባጣት instead.

      • Bayan Negash

        Selam Paulos,

        When I came across this clip today, I thought what a good way to wrap up the discourse. In fact, it reminded of someone who had asked about needing to have a spectrum of sorts about the opposition. This is a very narrow one, but well done. The kid is very creative has numerous Arabic ones that he did a skit when he first came to the social media scene where he challenged Eritreans who preoccupy themselves with the issue of Palestine and Israel but never consider about those Eritreans who are languishing in refugee camps. He seems to be making a great transition to Tigrinya. I didn’t even know he had in him to do a Tigrinya comedy sketch.

        Cheers,
        Beyan

  • Amanuel Hidrat

    Selam Awatistas,

    Below is a link on “the peaceful settlement of disputes,” a speech by Malcolm Shaw, a professor at the University of Leicester. The speech has relevance to the issue we are debating on territorial sovereignty, the respect of verdicts and and its mechanism of application. Good for learning and enjoy it.

    http://webtv.un.org/news-features/audiovisual-library-of-international-law-avl/watch/malcolm-shaw-on-the-peaceful-settlement-of-disputes/2662573292001

    Amnanuel Hidrat

  • Berhe Y

    Dear Saay, Beyan, amanH and MS,

    I am singling you out because, my message is to you. Not that the others are not important but I feel if I can address you four the issue of debate becomes irrelevant.

    I do consider you all that my elders and the respect is still there.

    I want to forget everything that was said and ask your self a simple question.

    “Do any one of you is a paid agent of PFDJ, or nay ezni or wants the PFDJ regime to stay in power?”.

    I know all of you are on the same side, on the same team when it comes to see the PFDJ regime gone.

    Basically this is the big picture we are all trying to fight. If there is no PFDJ there is no debate such as what’s going on.

    As to the issue with regards to Dr. BB, I think let’s give him time until he address it himself.

    But I would ask kindly you to take time off and do not add words to describe the other that you wouldn’t otherwise.

    And there is no reason we need to get personal or pass moral judgement on others. We all do what we can and with what ever means that we have.

    With respect.
    Berhe

  • MS

    Selam Bayan and Emma

    Sorry for the frequency of engaging you- please let me know if enough is enough- but I see you proving SAAY right when he said it was all about “You are hurting my feelings”. SAAY, he does not wear the mask or the nick name. Also please don’t fall for cheap jabs of Emma. Emma has ax to grind when it comes to attacking SAAY. And their intellectual feud is open. Emma shops for good sounding concepts that may not be applicable to the context of Eritrean realities, and SAAY shreds them to pieces. This is a typical fight between someone who runs shopping carts for concepts and someone who does diligent examination of what is workable and what is not. It is a contrast between someone who wants to hone his intellectual skills and someone who is arguing for a solution-oriented direction. Both of them have their unique qualities, and we have to understand them as such. Tzigereda is also a well known professional on her own right and is openly advancing practical ways in confronting PFDJ, more lethal, I believe, than you guys. I’m sure you know her. Mahmudday, is a nonentity person who is known-unknown (ignore him), but he does not use nicks, and does not call for attention to be raised to the level of SAAY and Tzigereda, but we all have the right to speak out. Yes? so, please stick to the substance instead of veering off to personal issues. Emma said that SAAY is losing the argument. Really. If you acted in the ways SAAY has been calling for, PFDJ would have been history today. Gentlemen, it is a rational expectation that someone examines his/her strategies if failures is what they reap time and again. The current niche of “We are for the people, damn the land” has been in the market since during the war. SAAY and his colleagues fought for the dignity of Eritrean sovereignty, people and land; you guys were on the wrong side, which you call was and is right…..Anyway, the result is clear. Eritreans seem to be afraid more of the opposition than they are afraid of PFDJ. Jus check out videos of seminars and other venues the opposition was conducting a decade ago. Their presence was palpable. Today, that rank and file have shrank. A serious person who intends to make change should examine why. If you are not serious you will continue dismissing disinterested and disheartened citizens as “silent majority or kebero junks”; you will attack critical views that would actually help the opposition get back on track.

    Remember, on this topic (criticizing Dr.BB’s speech, in which he said nationalism and patriotism was the main culprit for the opposition not to get traction), while we are called supporters of PFDJ, we haven’t called you names, although our inventory is full of such arsenal and, at sometime, it would need to be depleted if we were to stay in business. I hope that will not happen because name calling is not good, say my kids.

    The fact remains that there are folks who chose to remain masked, and that is fine. They are on both sides. As far as Emma’s characterization of folks who appear to support SAAY’s argument as his disciples, I think it is just below standard that awatista forum is known for. People who believe in free speech don’t utter such an utterly denigrating insult.

    Wo deHanka.

    • Ismail AA

      Tayati Sir Mahmoud,

      “… please stick to the substance instead of veering off to personal issues”. Do you know why I closely read your long Hetetas despite they steal a lot of time I spare for other things? It’s in order to check whether you have stolen some nice idea I reserve for myself, and for the beloved forumers when I am in mood. Sticking to the substance and avoiding matters that fit in the peripheries should be our guiding motto in this forum. I think we have spoken about this in the past; and actually our SGJ had admonished us recently, too. The idea is simply, we do not gain anything from lossing focus on intended messages with which writers come to this forum. Any views on a substance are useful: those we think are right add to our foresight and knowledge we relish and adore them; and those we think wrong are also useful because they give us chance to know them and try to correct them.

      The ideas on which discussions are going right now are timely and important (at least for me). BB’s comments or views read juxtaposed with Beyan’s are initiatives ( ijtihad in Arabic) oriented to give us chance to revisit our regime vs opposition affairs that have stagnated in favor of the dictatorship and need some mechanisms to shake them. I do not understand why we do not want to read them in that context. In essence idea’s tabled for discussion in forums like ours do not change established matters such as sovereignty, patriotism etc. And if I may reiterate my take on BB’s views, I did not detect negation of or heresy about those things. He just called for re-visiting the order of priorities for reasons of not losing other equally essential assets for the survival of our nation such as the youth while waiting for other equally essential things to happen when we are just powerless as we are and dependent on our appeals to be heard elsewhere such as the UN. Beyan had also volunteered to help us broaden discussing those important national matters. I see now harm in all this if we choose to take them with open minds and hearts and within the context relevant to them. The point: you raised the point I keep on raising and you deserve a thumps from for that.

      • MS

        Dear Ismailo
        It’s too late on this side of the world, but it would be a negligence on my part not to throw a couple of lines to your reply. Thank you. I think I read your mind and/or vice versa. Haha…dear Ismailo when it comes to long Hateta, I think you are too good at it (kabaay ente zeyHayilka, ayteHamQn ika), but I enjoy yours. Please keep it up. I totally agree with your suggestion. May the Almighty give us direction. I hope the political debates we do here won’t affect our personal relations. I sometimes feel bad about it, because most of the individuals I disagree with in this forum are good people whose advice I would seek and appreciate. Amen.
        Once I reminded my friend Emma to try to separate the mistrusts he sees in conferences among the elite and the social co-existence between our social groups. I wonder what is holding the opposition from coming together is similar personal difficulties. Otherwise, how could someone mistake SAAY as someone who has enabled and abated, as brother Bayan put it? I don’t know. “Kendo'” say Tigrayet and Blini speakers when they face a baffling scenario. Kendo ghedm Ustazna.

    • blink

      Dear MS
      I come here because I believe this is the right place to be , I don’t support people because I admire them , I support them because their views seems to me applicable to most of Eritreans ,even though I have no numbers to back up. I know I am not saying it right but neither do they . To suggest that we these who support you or saay as dispels or PFDJ is simply an acceptable. He even suggested ” saay made Nicks like blink, peace, haile.s ….. many of them . How do they reach on such understandings is mind boggling to an honest Eritreans. I will stay nameless in this forum as far as the owners find it acceptable or the guidelines are in place as of now . I lash out at people because I am not familiar to their world and I got slashed in to pieces by people who knows nothing about me in this forum or in the hate site , so it is mutual for me but not to all people who support you or Saay. As for my profession , I will not use my profession as a bragging right. Let them bragg and I will do all the dirty work for people who are patriots and justice seekers.

      • MS

        Dear blink
        It is unfortunate, but that is the reality. It is a normal thing o express your admiration towards folks who you think represent your view in a better way. Nothing wrong. That does not make you a disciple. We know you blink, you are not a passive follower. You are an active and curious participant; you are more than capable of expressing yourself. If an admiration of SAAY makes you a disciple of SAAY, is he then a disciple of Meles Zenawi? He has proudly told us he admired him. Anyway, don’t read too much into it. You are fine.

    • Amanuel Hidrat

      Selam MS,

      Stop of echoing the baseless words and phrases that Saay keep creating to tag people. Who told you that our hearts are hurting? Is that your tools to discourage people when you lost the debate? It will not work, how ever you try. It only shows your characters how you deal with your fellow Eritreans. If you are doing to hurt the feeling of your fellow citizen, which both of you admit, what good is good for you to win a debate? Bad debate ethics. Defending each other at every turning and every issue says something about you.

      • Selamat Ayya Amanuel,

        The debate is on going. No one has won or lost the debate. Brace yourself for its going to be very bumpy. Now winners or losers. Rather, not only is it a win win for all end product and you can take that to the bank, but also; should you feel you have lost, you will still win because you will not LOOSE THE LESSON.

        Senay Sembet nAAkhum.

        tSAtSE

      • Kokhob Selam

        Yes Amanuel

        “Bad debate ethics ” Yep really !!!Thanks,,

        KS,,

      • Mez

        Dear Amanuel,

        Please stay on “within the realm of ethical debate”.

        Thanks

        • blink

          Dear Mez
          I did not know you have such witty and yet amusing comments in your guns.

          • Mez

            Dear Blink, thank you for “slapping me” with a tumb-up.
            I hope our debate will be: to the point, timely, and objecive–as we move on.

            Thanks

          • blink

            Dear Mez
            I mean it in a positive way sir

          • Mez

            Dear Blink, I understood it the way you said;

            your truly “student”. Thanks

  • Selamat Forum,

    Checking and here is a warm up. Let us not miss the finish line… TGIWeekend link here:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YugLDVcaQTs

    tSAtSE

  • Kebessa

    Hello forumers,
    The courageous Debre Bizen Monastery did it again. i.e. it excommunicated the two lawless leaders of the Orthodox Church for violation of Church canons, violations including telling members to enlist.
    And how does the lawless PFDJ respond? The only way it knows, round ups to jail houses of course!
    Here is the letter of our pride, the Monastery
    http://tewahdo.org/images/pdf/Debre_bizenDecree_09122017.pdf

    • blink

      Dear kebesa
      What is wrong or special thing about 50,000 , I mean the norther administrator of PFDJ used that to punish families, and now for teskar 50,000 . What is wrong with these guys . By the way everything about teskar is simply horrific economics. One family lost its work force and is required to borrow for his name . Our way of life back home is horrendous and evil to growth. Yet I am happy the old bachelors are standing against the sadistic regime. Good for them.

  • Saba

    Hello All forumers, do you like quiz show :)😊

    I am getting more confused about what people are advocating for in this forum. I am a one liner and here are 5 points that might explain in one line your view on the topic “meriet vs kibri” . Can you please tell which one defines your view the most? And which one matches the most to the PFDJ’s position?
    1. We will get our Eritrean territory by any means and at any cost, similar to 1998-2000 war
    2. NO democratic reform in Eritrea until the international community pressures Ethiopia to vacate the occupied territories and also no dialogue with TPLF
    3. Call for Democratic reform in Eritrea while we wait for the international community to pressures Ethiopia to vacate the
    occupied territories and also no dialogue with TPLF
    4. Call for Democratic reform in Eritrea while we wait for the international community to pressure Ethiopia to vacate the occupied territories and also dialogue with TPLF without compromising any Eritrean interests including its territorial integrity.
    5. Call for democratic reform in Eritrea and dependency on TPLF for financial, political and moral support. The question about territorial integrity will be on hold until we have a democratically elected government.

    Mine is #3

    • Fanti Ghana

      Hello Saba,

      Finally, we are neighbors! Mine is #4, besides the obvious, because I believe recovery would be quicker.

      • Peace!

        Hi Fantish,

        Do you think PFDJ can be reformed?

        Peace!

        • Fanti Ghana

          Selam Peace!,

          Although anything is possible under the sun, reformed PFDJ leadership is unlikely. However, “Call for Democratic Reform in Eritrea” naturally must include all Eritreans. At least that was how I understood Saba meant.

          • Selamat Fanti Ghana,

            Supposing there is new leadership within the PFDJ, would it still be unlikely for the new leadership to be reformed? Why? And would it be desirable by any, some, most or all?

            (I am en rout or Halfmengedi at the moment and just jotting notes as they are conjured by what I read.)

            tSAtSE

          • Fanti Ghana

            Hello GitSAtSE,

            Assuming the new leadership with a new policy acceptable to majority Eritreans, I would call that reform and it should be welcomed. Of course high crimes already committed would have to be addressed and justice served, but the new PFDJ, as an organization, should not be criminalized. Let the ballot box decide its fate. How quickly the healing process will progress will depend on how many Eritreans are willing to forgive one another.

          • Selamat Fanti Ghana,

            I understand that at times I make my questions a bit difficult to answer. I will save this and address it fully as one of the bullets, a very significant one at that so that we can both issue a more polished diplomatic and translucent transcending mutual statement.

            Yes, my above sentence is a run on sentence. Do acknowledge as a pending challenge. Thank you.

            tSAtSE

        • Kokhob Selam

          Dear Peace..

          Ask everyone of us ,, Here is mine– NO WAY PFDJ can’T be reformed..

          KS ,,

          • Saba

            Dear Kokhob,
            That is bold. Am i reading it correctly?
            For me, PFDJ can be reformed and exist as a party but should step down from the government to form with others a transitional unity government in order to draft a Constitution. Then voters will decide the fate of PFDJ in the ballot.

          • Kokhob Selam

            Dear Saba-

            You are reading it correctly.

            KS,,

      • blink

        Dear Fanti
        The time for PFDJ to reform passed in 2001 , the only realistic way at this time is for them to get lost from Eritrea once for all.

        • Kokhob Selam

          Dear blink,

          The time to remove PFDJ is yet to come..People first ..the nation is found…

          KS,,

          • blink

            Dear Kokhob
            Yes but i do think the word reform is really an insult to justice , I mean, PFDJ rule because we are not good enough to remove them , it is also possible PFDJ can go on kill Eritrea as we know it , it all depend on how we all do our job.

      • Saba

        Dear Fanti,
        It might be quicker but it wouldn’t rally the people unless a courageous and charismatic leader comes down into the Eritrean politics with an escalator or ascala 🙂

    • Semere Tesfai

      Selam Saba

      Mine is #3. If civilized dialogue was possible, we wouldn’t have got into the 1998 war. We went to war and we went to the international community because we were unable to solve the “border” problem without outsiders. Now what is left is, to abide by the EEBC ruling without any ifs and buts – and move on.

      Semere Tesfai

      • Fanti Ghana

        Selam Semere T,

        Almost 20 years! People are changing, perceptions are changing, the world is changing. Can you at least accompany Haile S. and his (3+4)/2?

      • Saba

        Hi Semere,
        It is a vicious cycle
        Border dispute–>dialogue–>no agreement–>war–>agree for mediation–>final demarcation–>and then the loser says can we dialogue again and then may be go to war ala “no war and no peace”
        I think the position of those who say they are for “people’s first” is as follows:
        We can’t beat TPLF/Ethiopia and our people are dying fast. So better to accept the TPLF’s position and save our people from extinction.
        But that seems going against Eritrean history. The PEOPLE didn’t accept Haileselassie/Derg terms in 1961-1991 and TPLF terms in 1998-2000. Why now? It will destroy Eritrea as we know it.
        We can keep our territory and seek democratic change simultaneously. That seems the only solution that the silent Eritrean majority could agree.

    • Haile S.

      Hi Saba,
      ላንጋላንጋ ኣይንስኣን። ሳላና እንድያ መሬት ጠጠው ኢላ ዘላ! Mine is (3+4)/2. Just replace the ‘and also no’ in number 3 by ‘and then’. With 1000 km of our back laying on the head of Ethiopia, dialogue is inevitable or a must.

      • Amanuel Hidrat

        Hailat,

        Of course, there is no solution to the current impasse without dialogue. But…,but, will happen when we lost our young and families start to disintegrate in front of our eyes. They were wrong during the war and they are wrong now to hold hostage to the nation and its youth.

      • Saba

        Hi Haile,
        I know it is a tough choice. We can dialogue as very close neighbors but abide by the EEBC ruling.

    • Nitricc

      Selamat, Saba: I think you are mixing orange and apples. Our internal issues has nothing to do with the internationally decided border dispute. There was a border issue and the two countries couldn’t solve it through dialogue and they went to full scale war. The war didn’t solve the dispute ether and they went to the court of law. The Ethiopian government signed the final and binding and the court rendered its verdict. The only logical and legal thing to do is for Ethiopia to vacate the land, no ifs, no buts. Even if you want to dialogue, what makes you think for the weyane to keep their words? they can’t even upheld what they agreed and signed in front of the world. i could have agreed with your take if it was before the war and the court of law but now, to late too little. We shall wait as the balance of power is shifting in Eritrea’s favor.

      • Mez

        Dear Nitric,

        “…..We shall wait as the balance of power is shifting in Eritrea’s favor.”

        What,facts on the ground, makes you feel that this can unequivocally happen?

        Thanks

    • MS

      Selam Saba…Sabina
      The genius in the house, I enjoy your feeds. They are short, and specific.And you tend to hint to us that there is a better way of conducting debates.
      My choice would be number 4, with the following changes:
      1. strike out ” wait” and replace it with “…act to persuade”. What’s missing is action, that’s persuasive approaches that would show the USA that the implementation of the border ruling would in fact promote USA interest in the region…
      2. Contacts and dialogue are not bad, they are actually needed, but the question should be on what. Somewhere in Mahmudaism, you will find that “Eritrea has the upper hand, it has a map drawn by the UN, it has a verdict from an international tribunal; it has an agreement that the AU< UN< USA witnessed, etc. So, for the sake of peace, it is not bad to explore what the ethiopian side wants to dialogue on. If it is outside the scope of EEBC ruling then you could just walk away from it. But you have dealt a blow to the Ethiopian "let's dialogue" proposal in front of international observers. It would be one way of exposing Ethiopia's hypocrisy. But you need a political will for that bold action. However, we still need to act and not wait for the international community to bring our file to the top. Remember, today Ethio=Eritrean border is not a priority anymore. The world is literally on flame. A peaceful border, and an African one, at that, is not an issue the international community will be bothered about.
      Geiga yKle'aley de'a 'mber.

      • Saba

        Selam MS,
        Tihisho tihisho, especially with your hateta you put things in perspective and give hope when people tend to go to the fringe elements.
        I try to focus on the topic. I know my style is not suited for long debates, it is better may be for twitter. You know somebody has copied my style and become a president lol. Semiruley that is not evidence based:)
        1. Amended as you said it. Now do i qualify in drafting or amending our Constitution? lol
        2. We should dialogue with TPLF for the benefit of ourselves and our brothers and sisters on the other side. But we should not compromise our principle and also we should listen the people in that regard. There are a lot of people who lost their loved ones due to the border war and we should allow these families to have their say for e.g. we can debate about the dialogue with TPLF in public seminars and hear the people. At least it might help to heal.
        Not sure if we can win in the Ethiopian “let’s dialogue” proposal because in the diplomatic and mass media front so far TPLF won against PFDJ.

    • Selamat Saba,

      (Abzi qniatt beAAle Mesqel, bahliawi damieran hoye hoyen… ane wn nkheyfle (tselaina ‘fele..)) kmlis:

      You ask:
      “Can you please tell which one defines your view the most? And which one matches the most to the PFDJ’s position?”

      4. Call for Democratic change in Eritrea while we wait for the international community to pressure Ethiopia to vacate the occupied territories and also dialogue with TPLF without compromising any Eritrean interests including its territorial integrity.

      And yes, I trully believe #4 is in fact the PFDJ’s current position. Qn to you: Do you agree? Do you believe I am right?

      tSA

    • Mez

      Dear Sarah,

      Very interesting options. Realistically forget ” international community” doing any thing about this border challenge. Every nation goes by the cost-benefit approach for itself (with it’s allies and quasi allies)–this as a function of time.
      It may merit to rethink the whole framework of nation building in Eritrea: a) Eritrea has now no immediate war condition (and no external enemy), minimize substantially military expenditure, b) stop the social engineering experiment in the country and focus on reigniting economic growth in the country, c) reset the political way of thinking to the pre Federation era, and geniunely work to accommodate each other at political and individual level; target towards: ” free flow of ideas between and among all”.

      PS: the Army shall really be no more than 5k; to keep up with subject specific technologies, and if the worst comes to serve as the core.

      Thanks

  • Tzigereda

    Selam Bayan,

    Am sorry, I have time constraints so that I am forced to make it short.
    Your article reminded me somehow of ” kabey tebegiska nabey ktbexiH iKa” ( from Ghedli era, to be precise in the EPLF, ybl afe tariK) a phrase used to silence critics ( I missed you practicing the ( in this issue) “self liberating” idea, you much call for).
    Since Mahmuday made a long Hateta, I will not repeat the essence of the critics on Dr. BB’s speech, but I feel saying this, as it was me, who triggered the discussion by quoting some of the statements in his speech ( after Paulos’s comment )with no intention of undermining his contributions.
    In one of your comments you wrote “Nonetheless, look what I learned subsequent my writing the article from friends who called to inform me of the dignified way in which Dr. BB leads his life as he helps our young who are in dire need as you may have seen in my response to MS. These are seemingly subtle matters, but are of monumental import that say a great deal about the character of the man.” Am sure you remember that the first question asked and discussed in that meeting was indeed ” the border issue”, by the young Samson ( the son of tegadalay Solomon Habtom who died weeks ago, after 14 years in prison without any trial) Amanuel Iyassu and some others, who were the inviters and also know the speaker very well. Would you categorize them as ” territory vs Human dignity”?
    Does one’s contribution to hager, hizbi (or being member of the opposition) makes him/her free of criticism? What has substantiated criticism to do with discouraging or undermining?

    On the ” border issue”, it is not only PFDJ who is misusing it, but also many western governments ( due to the refugee influx) this is what they say: as long as Ethiopia rejects to abide by the verdict of EEBC, Eritrea is in threat, so that Eritrea has the right to self defence & the indefinite National service is to some extent understandable. Challenging this statement by saying ” the border issue is not our problem” or ” Territory vs Human dignity” won’t do it.

    • Bayan Negash

      Dear Tzigereda,
      I am sorry if I made it sound like I was demanding from anyone to pay me attention. I have Ismail to blame for this – he made me do it! Kidding aside, really, I do understand it that Sal has loyal followers and that loyalty I do not expect it to be broken nor would I necessarily want it either. What I was alluding to there is that he preemptively and cleverly focused on subject matter that had nothing whatsoever to do when he knew all along the piece was addressing him. Any reader who follows awate on some regularity would know that. But, clever guy that he is when he does not want to address something he not only not abstain but makes certain that he occupies others from the centerpiece of the matter and engages them on the tangential pretending to respond to the characters like Nitricc, what have you?

      Hey, we all know how busy life is in the west and I will be the last one to make demands from others to engage. There were times when I could not even engage commentators in my own article because of time constraints.

      But what I am afraid is that we may be speaking past one another here in that territorial integrity versus human dignity are not mutually exclusive. But, when a man is doing greater good why can we not focus on the greater good rather than serving the very purpose the regime would want its followers to do by disrupting our attention. Let the regime bark about territorial integrity and us not against someone like Dr. BB, but direct that attention as MS eloquently put it pressuring Ethiopia and try to make it see the issue the opposition way. That, of course, is where the opposition groups have been failing us all in.

      All what I am saying we should not go out of our way and defend the regime inadvertently by aiding and abetting. One does not and should not divulge all of his/her strategies on the table for the regime to capitalize upon. There have to be times when we should dodge questions, especially questions that we know the regime will bank upon, one that will put us in negative light. I am not here to lecture you kbrti Tzigereda or anyone in this as ya’ll are far more astute politically than I would ever be. I am just humbly noting my observation in how best to tackle these issues where our ideas coalesce with our opponents and where they invariably converge, at minimum we should stay quiet and where they diverge is when our megaphones should come out in droves.

      Cheers,
      BN

      • Tzigereda

        Dear Bayan,

        Let me tell you straight forward: am disappointed that you ( the eritrean male feminist, the way I see you) reduce me to a ” loyal fan” though it was me, who raised the issue.

        • Bayan Negash

          Dear Tzigereda,

          I was only referring to the title (of Dr. CPA, what have you) not the original one who brought it for Awatistas to discuss about Dr. BB’s talk. I didn’t even notice you were engaged in the title subtext dialogue. I know Paulos was and he did make it clear. So, my sister, the last thing I would want is to disappoint the space in which where there are literally no females other than you who engage regularly …you stand tall and you have my support at every turn…how could I reduce gual gejeret who paid her dues in the struggle for independence to shadowing Sal or any other man. You’ve shown your sense of independence when you went to fight for your people and your country. You need nobody’s approval to hold your own. So, Tzigereda, rest assured, you’re held in high regard and high pedestal, a pedestal that no man would dare bring down – it is cemented in Eritrean history.

          It is one thing to take positions based on issues if that position happens to jive with someone like Sal or me or any other, but another altogether to be tifozo blindly that I am now beginning to see them come out of the woodwork. It is not even drip, drip, drip … it is blink, blink, blink…and a bombshell drops but seems to miss its intended target each time. As Paulos concisely put it: “Tifoso-O-meter” is on and the clock is ticking. The score of tifozos 2-0 by Paulos’s count.

          At any rate, my sister, rest assured I will not shortchange any Eritrean women in the dagme qalsi tekayd’o zellekhen. Now, let me find my fans out of the woodwork, well, on a second thought who needs that when many Awatawyan have already registered their input…I concede referee Paulos, I will give the man – Saay – for he paid his dues in being at the frontline through the written word for over two decades. I am a part-time writer – Two incompatible competition here, Paulos…do I get some handicap, say, I will start at 20 points (1/2 a point for each year that Saay has been actively writing since, say, 1987 and I know Sal would catch up in no time.

          Cheers,
          BN

          • Paulos

            Beyan,

            I am your number one Tifoso. No doubt! And your article was not only brilliant but of course readable as well. That said, I think we should recognize the fact that it was Tzigereda who started the debate and had it going with an intense momentum. I am sure history will remember her.

          • Amanuel Hidrat

            Selam Beyan,

            Don’t surrender when you are on the right side of the argument. It doesn’t matter whether he (Saay) had been here for decades or even a frequent writer. What it matters is whether his writing is on the right side of the issue and on the right side of history. I think you are overwhelmed by his funs attacking and barcking to discourage you. The trio will never seperate their views. Even by their adjectives, it is us that we should be criticized (do you remember Saay’s adjective weirdo I was criticized for it). So stick with your guns as far as you are on the right side of history.

            Second, whether Tzegereda start the critics or not, it is Saay that degenerate the debate using unnecessary adjectives to dissuade well meaning individuals and to derail well meaning debates. They don’t critic each other. They don’t critic their teacher, and in their view teachers are always right (refer to Blink’s reply to you).

            Let me tell you a short history in my family. Once upon a time I was helping my daughter in algebra. I start to give her a short way of solving the algebraic equation. Do you know what she told me: “No this is not a correct way of solving it, b/c my teacher didn’t teach us that way.” So when people worship on their teachers, there is no returns even if their teachers are wrong.
            Mesilka entay amtseaka beleni. Well Saay’s funs are not different who says don’t touch my teacher. Have a good one and let go to sleep before they throw their stones.

            Senay Nekulukun, Aytisanu.

          • Bayan Negash

            Selam Aman,

            Thanks for the encouraging words. I sometimes wonder with nicks…if they are tools of the master who created them himself or truly disciples of the master. it is one tricky area that one will never know. Of course, that is the big disadvantage when people choose to employ pen-names, one never knows whom one is communicating with…but it is what it is…this is one major flow of this forum. At any rate, I will not get dissuaded by unseemly characters with no real names. Real men fight by wearing their real names as a badge of honor. After all, I have a digital helmet that I always wear when exchanging pleasantries with hostile environment. I’ve had enough experience to know how dodge them.

            Have a good night!
            BN

          • blink

            Dear Beyan
            That is not fair ,come on “disciples “, what is wrong with you these days , were not you cool ? is this already a past ? many questions . I try to read all your comments because i was expecting i will find some thing nice or useful by “accident”. Keep saying , who know ,we can have one for closure.But i want you to know this , I speak for myself, i am an independent person ,it is just that I find saay ,MS ,Haile.S ,peace and some others views happens to be the once i root for, that is all.I do not like any one who sale his loyalty for selfie with a one minute star.Unless the doctor come up with an explanation that can explain his misstep ,he would be forgotten in a minute.

          • blink

            Dear Mr.Amanuel
            Don’t you remember, you are our teacher too, I will definitely defend your views if only if I find them acceptable for me. It is not like we are defending saay , it is just beyan tried to bring down our house tree because he is jealous of it’s edible fruits. People first means Ethiopia first as we all know it.

            Since when standing for your country and people at the time of war becomes a crime ? We heard many things but I have never ever heard some one choose Ethiopian policy over his beloved one, that is a shocking development . By the way your daughter was right to not accepted your method of solving her algebra homework, it is step by step. No short way of cutting nor does it look easy to dismantle our patriotic people.

      • Paulos

        Beyan,

        Nitrikay is a young dude who is still on experimenting and trying to find his place in the vast universe. I heard he cries at night holding Meles’ picture 😃😆.

      • Ismail AA

        Hayak Allah Beyan,

        My heartfelt regret if I in even remotest way one can imagine my comments on keeping focus on the subject matter of your well-written article and not diminishing the momentum of discussing the ideas it contained due to digressions had sounded as complaint about lack of attention to you as an author. The intention was sincere and for the common good that could be accrued from such a timely contribution.

        In my view, and from the perspective of readers who are interested to write their views about matters that concern people and their affairs, one of the yardsticks is the topicality, relevance and timeliness of ideas writers provide in their contributions. The ideas Dr. BB had voiced and the broadening ideas you have provided do fit this specific juncture our nation is going through. In such circumstance, as far as I am concerned, the author of those ideas becomes neutral right after his contribution has been put at the disposal of Awatistas’ domain. Attention or no attention become none issues except that the good hearted should express well earned gratitude for their time and intellectual resourcefulness.

        • Bayan Negash

          Dear Ismail AA,
          I did say kidding aside, if you notice. I meant it facetiously. No, please Ismail, I appreciate what you were trying to do. To bring to the AT’s attention what needs to be done when there is a serious issues that needs to be discussed why does it become a playground for the likes of Nitricc. I get that. I loved every single aspect to your entry. I tried to put a rationale by explaining away the variables as I conceived of them based on my own experience when I wanted to participate so badly but I couldn’t for one reason or another. Look, your intervention is generating many discussions now. My head is beginning to spin from so many entries coming left and right. So, you are in good company Ismail. Keep on sharing your fair minded posts – it is a much needed balancing act.

          Mucho Gracias!
          BN

      • chefena

        Selam Brother Beyan

        You write “Power and privilege must be challenged in awate.com like spaces where the seeds of self-liberation need to be sown. These seeds of criticality have components of culture and the psychological makeup that breeds them”. I concur.
        It is indeed exiting to read CDA employed in your well-crafted exposition. I want to give Dr BB due recognition for the bold he arguments made : we need to question conversion and ask if what we know is true. New social realities will require new ways of understanding them i.e. a new paradigms.
        But I also found the lady’s, Ibtisam’s, contribution very interesting to help us sowing the seeds of criticality.
        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4S1w7MW-v9Y

        I found her ideas of ‘representation’ vs ‘misrepresentation’ relevant. Ibtisam went on to elaborate on the need for groups and individuals to tell their own stories, hence the idea of ‘Voice’ i.e. ‘who speaks, about whom and how?’ As people don’t appear that their voices matter, I think she was making a case for the group’ rights to make their voices heard.

        Voice is powerful analytical concept to deal with issues of identity, dominance, and resistance, which is what Ibtisam’s comments focused on. ‘Silencing’ and ‘misrepresentation’ was what we have been exposed to since 1998. The handful in the inner-circle got us to where we are now because they had the monopoly over ‘voice’ or ‘symbolic domination’ (Bourdieu,1977), understood as control over representation of reality and social relations, in this case the Badme discourse. Now the question begs ‘who has the privilege to speak about how to get out of these impasses ?’ How about the voice of the very communities affected by the Border Commission’s ruling.

        • Paulos

          Selam Chefena,

          What do the voices say? Do they echo Ethiopia’s unlawful occupation of Eritrean territory or the unimaginable plight of the Eritrean people. The crux of the matter particularly in this forum is the intentional lose in translation where the voices are misrepresented for specific reasons-reasons only known to those who are doing the bidding.

          Bereket spoke about the people who made a living right at the border. No he didn’t talk about their call for border demarcation, he said, they are not even there any longer in the first place. Their displacement is not because of Ethiopia’s refusal to abide by the Hague ruling, rather because of the man who started the war in the first place. What is so bizarre is, instead of holding the man accountable for starting the war, we are holding Ethiopia responsible for the dire consequences after the fact. To use Bereket’s words, ዘሕፍርን ዘሕንኽን እዩ.

          • Peace!

            Hi Paulosay,

            Who is holding Ethiopia responsible for the dire consequence, could you name one opposition group? My understanding is there is a consensus that PFDJ is the sole responsible for the dire consequences, and the opposing side hasn’t stopped from doing everything it can to hold PFDJ accountable: tried to indict DIA at ICC, supported sanction despite initiated by Ethiopia, held countless demonstrations… don’t you think the opposition groups are taking hits form both sides.

            Peace!

          • Paulos

            Selam Abi Seb,

            Don’t you say Ethiopia needs to pull out of Bad’me?

          • Peace!

            Hi Paulosay,

            Does that mean you can’t name one 🙂 Well, I will go with the majority.

            Peace!

          • Selamat Paulos,

            ” we are holding Ethiopia responsible for the dire consequences after the fact. To use Bereket’s words, ዘሕፍርን ዘሕንኽን እዩ.”

            1. Are you and or Dr. BB strictly have in mind opposition organizations(all, most, some, few– including political parties w/without armed wings, civic organizations… opposition media outlets… “opposition” minded individuals etc..) OR the majority of the Eritrean People?

            2. .”..The crux of the matter particularly in this forum is the intentional lose in translation…” Yours truly is guilty as charged and vaguely though it may feel I can see that you do not exclude yourself– which is indicative of your personal contribution to the overall paradigm shift clouds (weyy Debena*) …
            speaking of Debena, see Dr. Chefena’s indexing Lady Ibtsam of AArarib.——> Natural discourse Vs. Critical Discourse analysis.

            * “Ab semayy zelo debena, yharim doh khon AAdina, ytSibe alekhu btesfa kriA AAdey teHaQuaQuifa. DMTSI NEGODA!….” Yemane G.Michael BARYA

            Music break TGIWeekend…https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V3iY8i7fBgE

            tSAtSE

          • Paulos

            Tsatse Arkey,

            Thanks for the song. Eritrea produced only two greatest artists ever. Barya and Wedi-Tq’kabo. The rest are…..

          • Paulos,

            I am disappointed in that the Demarikino would not include the late Legend Abraham Afeworki. Even if it is to indulge tSAtSE. And you there are a lot more than just Two, Starting from Ustaz Alamin Abdulatif, …. Fehira, Abrar Osman … Fetsum.

            tSAtSE

          • Paulos

            Tsatse Arkey,

            Sure the artists you mentioned are good but they are not great!

            P.S. When Eritrea in the near future beat Denmark in every index the UN measures against, the world will say, “Road to Deqemhare” instead.

          • Haile S.

            Selam Solomon,
            What is Demarikino? Is it a virtual Eritrean woodstock? BTW I like your woodstock dove avatar. In the mid seventies, the week Wattstax movie came to cinema Roma, it was a woodstock moment for Asmarinos. Everyone tried to look like Isaac Hayes, except no one shaved his head like him. Luther Ingram’s ‘if loving you is wrong’ was on the lips of everyone.

          • Ismail AA

            Selam Paulos,

            The difference is appraising a situation on the ground and appreciating the extent of the damages and losses as opposed to looking at the same situation from atop of a high mountain thousands of miles away and trying to evaluate with the help of theories and notions pertaining to sovereignty and nationalism as written into the laws and norms of international instruments such as the UN. For me, BB was moved and spoke from experience on the ground. What would any conscientious person among us say and do when meeting a minor walks in wilderness without anyone accompanying him or her after surviving the ordeal of hazardous odyssey to cross a border with ever alert guards with order to shoot at sight and kill? What compelling reason would one await more than this to call for reconsidering the nation’s priority.

            That is what at the gist of BB’s message is. He is alerting us what the fate of our sovereignty and territorial integrity would be when it had lost future citizens that are asset for preserving its sovereignty and boundaries that we cherish and envious about. In fact, we should be applauding him and demanding others like him to follow in his foot steps because it is high time that wall the regime has erected by dubbing the people under the pretension of championing supreme national interest such as sovereignty should be hallowed right at the middle. Taking the regime as indispensable agent for protecting sovereignty is a fallacy that has to be obliterated.

          • Paulos

            Selam Ismail AA,

            What I admire about you of course among other things is that, you pay focused attention to details. All my comments including when I first commented and presented BB’s speech to all my good brothers and sisters here in this forum, I pointed out two issues: BB has an advantage over the rest of us simply because he is right there as opposed to thousands of miles away where the view is extremely blurred. Second, his call to the rest of us to set our priorities in order. Thank you so much Sir!

          • Kokhob Selam

            Paulos,

            Yes,, really this man is reading every detail..That is great job!!

            KS,,

          • Selamat Ayya Ismail AA,

            I will go back and study BB’s speech again. I think Saay7 said, there is a two part video and I doubt the above share by Chefena, consisting of what I will take liberty to call them “The SaHil Rock Rats” (sobur wudeyu… there are plenty of examples where Rats are positively connotated–“Year of the Rat”) is not the 2nd part…

            But thus far I did not get the following out of what I have heard from the speech and have been reading. These sort of statements are from other sources of knowing including one’s own assessment that happen to coincide with what BB has and or intends to propose.

            ” He is alerting us what the fate of our sovereignty and territorial integrity would be when it had lost future citizens that are asset for preserving its sovereignty and boundaries..”

            What is divulged to the public, I suspect is based on think tanks and self interested powers directing…. (My “point of departure” I have need to state.. …. )

            As you were Haw Abbuye Ayya Ismail.

            tSAtSE

          • Ismail AA

            ከመይ ሓዲርካ፡ ኣምሲካ፡ ኣንጊህካ፡ ውዒልካ ጻጸ ሰለሙን ወዲ ሓወይ።
            እንታይ ደኣ ኮንካ ኣቦታትካ ከም ዘይመኮሩካ ትኸውን። ንዘረባ ዘረባ የምጻኦ ( ኣል ከላም ዩተፈሰር ብልካላም) ክበሃል ኣይሰማዕካን። ኣያካ ከኣ ናይ ኣቦያታትን ኣያታትን ልቦና ኣሕዲሩ እቲ ዝጠቀስካዮ ዘረባ ለጊሱ፡ ኣይተስተዋሕዶ ከኣ። መሓዛካ ዶክቶር ቢቢ ንላባም ኣምተሉ ንዓሻ ከምዚ ከማይ ከኣ ደርጓሓሉ ዝብል ናይ ኣቦታትካ ልቦና እኮ እዪ ገይሩ። እቶም ዝኣመተልና ከኣ ስለ ዝተዛረበ ከምቲ ዝነበብካዮ ተዛሪብና ኣቡየ ጻጸ ዋድ ሕውየ።

          • Bayan Negash

            Dear Ismail AA,
            There is nothing that one can add to make your statement above anymore potent or prudent other than perhaps reposting Dant’e poem in this thread. That’s precisely what Dr. BB is doing, “midway” in life finding himself in the wilderness that he cannot fathom kids half his age or young enough to be the age of his kids leaving their homes in droves into the wild. And, we are supposed to side when it comes to sovereignty with the very element that’s causing all of the bottomless abyss on our young. Here it is the poem:

            “Midway along the journey of our life
            I woke to find myself in a dark wood,
            for I had wandered off from the straight path.
            How hard it is to tell what it was like,
            this wood of wilderness, savage and stubborn
            (the thought of it brings back all my old fears),
            a bitter place! Death could scarce be bitterer.
            But if I would show the good that came of it
            I must talk about things other than the good.”
            Dante A.

          • Ismail AA

            Dear Beyan,

            Thank you for the poem. I read it very long ago. It depicts the ordeal every family in our homeland has been facing. It is the odd times we are living through. A mother and father praying God could halt growing up of their children and await them with enormous anxiety on the day their schools close lest they would show up with “promoted to the next grade” stamped on them. Imagine going back to your days and mine how much satisfaction passing from one grade to next created in households and how much worries and anger failure used to cause. The dictatorship had pushed our society to that level that very much warrant clarion call as the one BB had voiced.

            My every day worry is lest my generation (liberation struggle era (ghedli) would leave the scene without candidly apologizing to the current generation for handing them over a poisoned gift that is destroying them while we had time and means to hand them de-contaminated gift we called independence. We could not do it because we prisoners of a negatively shrewd bogyman who hid behind well meaning culture of part of our people. I pray not to disappear from this world before I witness the still living generations had done better than us and closed ranks to succeed and avoid passing the increasingly hopeless situation in our nation to the generations after them – if there will actually be any.

          • Braten Paulos

            “The crux of the matter particularly in this forum is the intentional lose in translation where the voices are misrepresented for specific reasons-reasons only known to those who are doing the bidding”

            This is open mic at the improve. Before TGIWeekend clock ceases I am going to get an appropriate image link as it is the crux of our synthesised discourse, that is as opposed to natural:

            https://www.pinterest.com/pin/517773288383972328/

            Regards,

            AmEritrean GitSAtSE Azilo40 Agnieya40

        • Bayan Negash

          Dear Dr. Chefena,

          Glad we found commonality, among many I am sure we just don’t know it, the CDA. I’ve listened to Ibtisam intently. She makes a lot of sense with one exception where she came a bit elitist in her take about our people being less educated. But, the overall message she was conveyed made a lot of sense, points you alluded to in your entry here.

          Well what is “growth mindset” but evolutionary process, whether of a personal kind or that of institutional kind as the reference of calling the American constitution, for example, as the living constitution affirms its ostensible evolutionary nature. The question would be whether it is going to evolve (“growth mindset”) or devolve (“fixed mindset”). Dweck (2006) aptly notes though that “change isn’t like surgery. Even when [one] change[s], the old beliefs aren’t just removed like a worn-out hip or knee and replaced with better ones. Instead, the new beliefs take their place alongside the old ones, and as they become stronger, they give [one] a different way to think, feel, and act” (p. 214); in other words, meaningful changes can be challenging, which is why at times we human types pander to their excess and acquiesce to the whims of evil as we try to remain neutral we are also taking a position, albeit choosing to not act. It isn’t in the lack of action that I find an interesting voice, however, it is in the likes of Sal (I will come back to you, Sal, bear with me) who would have no compunction about sharpening their pencil on behalf of their country whether right or wrong; whether a butcher is at the helm or not, they are willing to aid and abet an evil regime like our own homegrown ones. Unless I misread him, he says, he would write to defend his country again. At any rate, I digressed.

          What I wanted to point out is what you’ve alluded to in your note about Bourdieu’s notion of “symbolic violence”. “For Bourdieu, change is constant and in that constancy lies a dilemma of sorts for us. Our history has been such that we readily accept one change for another without making any demands…from Italians, to Brits to Haile Selassie to Dergue, and now to one of our own that’s turning out to be worst than all of them combined. You’re right to point out that “New social realities will require new ways of understanding them i.e. a new paradigms.” As Emirbayer and Johnson concisely put it: “The only way to bring about organizational change that does not entail merely replacing one modality of domination with another is to address specifically and to undo the mechnisms of dehistoricisation and universalization – “always and everywhere has it been this way” – whereby arbitrary workings of power are enabled to continue’ (Emirbayer and Johnson, pp. 47-48).

          And E & J continue to bring their point home when they say this:
          “At the core of Bourdieu’s politics is the emotive notion of symbolic violence. This is a similar concept to the Marxist idea of ‘false consciousness’, whereby people internalise the discourses of the dominant, meaning that “the most intolerable conditions of existence can so often be percieved as acceptable and even natural” (Bourdieu in Emirbayer and Johnson, forthcoming; 46).” That in a nutshell has been Eritrea’s dilemma accepting everything that comes our way without questioning it. And the outcome has been disastrous to the core of our being.

          Beyan

          • Nitricc

            Selamat Beyan: enough of quoting dead white people. can you share with with us what Seyfu had to say on his today’s show?

          • Bayan Negash

            merHaba Nitricc – I love you, too, bro! When you become as erudite as those “dead white people” I will definitely quote you without hesitation. Your obsession with Seifu is reaching a milestone because it has reached my obsession with TwgaHmmo (per Sal)…now…give Seifu a break, he is imitating the West the best that he could. Hey, you know how it goes…if you can’t beat them join them. That’s what the man is doing…he can’t beat the dead white men so he is doing the next best thing…join them in their way doing things. When talk shows in Addis reach to that of Jerry Springer or Geraldo Rivera is when I will begin to worry…until then, enjoy the imitation.

            Hey, I know you are one proud Eritrean. You agree with me we’ve had our own copy and paste show didn’t we in Shingrwa:

            https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UMNKD5kLDW8

          • Kokhob Selam

            Dr.Bayan Negash!!

            Wow !! BN …very good reply to our Nitricc. The poem part was very good but not his voice …

            KS,,

          • Ismail AA

            Ahlen Beyan,

            Forgive me for using this entry. It is yours udner Chefena’s entry did not work for me. May be it’s still hanging under awaiting moderation rubric of Disqus.

            One point in the context of response to Chefena has stimulated my curiosity. And this is about the notion of “internalis[ing] the discourses of the dominant”. If one would filter out the “discourse” part of the assertion and translate it to mean a reigning culture that also transcends to encompassing power in all its aspects, could we in retrospect understand that Isaya’s journey to the peak of dictatorship is nothing more being successful realization of the process: internalizing dominant discourse?. And if this is the case, thus, is our dilemma as a nation in dire predicament our debate and discord on the need to penetrate that internalized culture of the dominant to change the national calculus in favor of change that will have to make room for the collective discourse to internalize? Please, ignore this if it lacks sense. Otherwise, I also address this to others such as Paulos and gitSAtSE.

          • Bayan Negash

            Dear Ismail AA,

            Thanks for your query. Your question also works in tandem with Dr. Chefena’s clip that he shared in which Ibtisam tries to explain in how to empower the diverse cultures of Eritrea that Dr. Chefena characterized nicely in his entry. Not only Eritrean media in general distorts the representation of Tigrinya in our society as though it was the only majority culture but the various minority groups accept it as such, that’s what makes it potently powerful.

            Cultural hegemony is powerful – so powerful in fact – that those in the minority many times do not only appropriate it but accept it as being the superior one to theirs. Of course, there are mechanisms in place that make these minority groups feel that way. Take individual examples from the U.S. in how Justice Clarence Thomas epitomizes this. Married to a white woman, lives privileged life and accepts the dominant cultural norm as his and doesn’t give a whit about how he got there through Affirmative Action. There was this remarkable open letter crafted by a lawyer that addresses the Justice directly. It is lengthy but a joy read, where the footnotes are just as important as the content of the letter. You will miss a lot if you don’t read the footnotes carefully. It is rather lengthy. When you have time give it a look. I read it a while back and it might be time I read it one of these days, you know, in the MS speak, I am pressed for time, courtesy of Fanti Ghana, but here it is:

            http://scholarship.law.upenn.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=3690&context=penn_law_review

            So, you will see many Clarence Thomas like characters in ours as well. Former tegadelti from minority groups who so appropriated the dominant culture’s language, for example, tend to act more Tigrinya speakers than the Tigrinya speakers themselves. You see this tendency in American Iranians in the U.S., where they act more White than White Americans themselves. In the U.S. one can afford to act more American than Americans because a citizen is a citizen and has every right that those who were born and bred here with the exception of maybe not rising to the level of presidency. But, if you go to Saudi Arabia, you see our Eritreans wanting us to appropriate the Arab culture more than the Arabs themselves to a point of them forgetting their own language and culture…

            As for Isaias in particular, though you put it in a question form, I think it summarizes it succinctly: “…our dilemma as a nation in dire predicament our debate and discord on the need to penetrate that internalized culture of the dominant to change the national calculus in favor of change that will have to make room for the collective discourse to internalize?” Isaias didn’t only take advantage of his dominant privilege being from the Tigrinya biher with Hamassien to boot, but also he is shrewd enough to learn Tigre and Arabic, which gave him a fodder for his cannon to use it lethally when he needs it.

            Because of this unique disposition he is able to sow a discord between, say, certain segments of the lowland shmaglle Addi by rewarding some and depriving others, thereby, gaining the trust and protection of the sub-majority in the lowland. If you come in the Kebessa, he has his favorite bogeyman to insult whenever he wants loyalty from other non-Jeberti Muslim minority groups. So, the discord between and among minority groups works giving him the staying power as long as he has been so far. I can’t speak to how he does with the three regions of Kebessa whether he favors one over another, again, to gain loyalty and trust from one region versus another…so on and so forth.

            It is to this, in my estimate, what Ibtisam was addressing though the context was media, the message no less the same.

            Hope this helps
            BN

          • Bayan Negash

            Dear Ismail AA,

            Please note: This is a resubmission. If you’ve read, please don’t waste your time.

            Thanks for your query. Your question also works in tandem with Dr. Chefena’s clip that he shared in which Ibtisam tries to explain in how to empower the diverse cultures of Eritrea that Dr. Chefena characterized nicely in his entry. Eritrean media outlets in general distort the representation of Tigrinya in our society as though it was the only majority culture but the various minority groups accept it as such, that’s what makes it potently powerful.
            Cultural hegemony is powerful – so powerful in fact – that those in the minority many times do not only appropriate it but accept it as being the superior one to theirs.

            Of course, there are mechanisms in place that make these minority groups feel that way. Take individual examples from the U.S. in how Justice Clarence Thomas epitomizes this. Married to a white woman, lives privileged life and accepts the dominant cultural norm as his and doesn’t give a whit about how he got there through Affirmative Action. There was this remarkable open letter crafted by a lawyer that addresses the Justice directly. It is lengthy but a joy read, where the footnotes are just as important and as longs as the content of the letter. You will miss a lot if you don’t read the footnotes carefully. When you have time give it a look. I read it a while back and it might be time I read it one of these days, you know, in the MS speak, I am pressed for time, courtesy of Fanti Ghana, but here it is:

            http://scholarship.law.upenn.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=3690&context=penn_law_review

            So, you will see many Clarence Thomas like characters in ours as well. Former tegadelti from minority groups who so appropriated the dominant culture’s language, for example, tend to act more Tigrinya speakers than the Tigrinya speakers themselves. You see this tendency in American Iranians in the U.S., where they act more White than White Americans themselves. In the U.S. one can afford to act more American than Americans because a citizen is a citizen and has every right that those who were born and bred here with the exception of maybe not rising to the level of presidency. But, if you go to Saudi Arabia, for example, you will see our Eritreans wanting us to appropriate the Arab culture more than the Arabs themselves to a point of them forgetting their own language and culture.

            As for Isaias in particular, though you put it in a question form, I think it summarizes it succinctly: “…our dilemma as a nation in dire predicament our debate and discord on the need to penetrate that internalized culture of the dominant to change the national calculus in favor of change that will have to make room for the collective discourse to internalize?” Isaias didn’t only take advantage of his dominant privilege being from the Tigrinya biher with Hamassien to boot, but also, he is shrewd enough to learn Tigreit and Arabic, which gave him a fodder for his cannon to use it lethally when he needs it. Because of this unique disposition he is able to sow a discord between, say, certain segments of the lowland shmaglle Addi by rewarding some and depriving others, thereby, gaining the trust and protection of the sub-majority in the lowland.

            If you come in the Kebessa, he has his favorite bogeyman to insult whenever he wants loyalty from other non-Jeberti Muslim minority groups. So, the discord between and among minority groups works giving him the staying power a shelf life that has served him well until now. I can’t speak to how he does with the three regions of Kebessa whether he favors one over another, again, to gain loyalty and trust from one region versus another…so on and so forth. It is to this, in my estimate, what Ibtisam was addressing though the context was representation in media and lack thereof, the message no less the same.

            Hope this helps
            BN

          • Paulos

            Selam Beyan,

            You certainly raised an interesting point where one tends to assign the seemingly human condition if it in fact happened in Eritrea’s historiography, it is precisely because Eritrea is not an exception either. The human condition in this case is to aspire for the values that are more dominant with in the society. If history is to attest to that effect, the Romanov Dynasty spoke French in their daily lives where it is incidentally depicted in Leo Tolstoy’s “War and Peace” classic novel as well. With in Marxist school of thought as well the dominant class not only has economic upper hand but cultural dominance as well where the Italian thinker Gramsci calls it “Cultural Hegemony.” If the trend is to hit close to home, one notices the impact of the dominant “Amhara” culture where Tigreans used Amharic not only in writing letters but new born babies were given Amharic proper names so that they can be accepted with in the dominant class when they come of age that is.

            Isaias obviously lived with a thorn in his back so to speak where he had to travel extra mile to masquerade his full-blown Tigrean roots where it took a dark life of its own at the expense of the Eritrean people.

        • Ismail AA

          Dear Chefena,
          Excellent elaborative rejoinder. Thanks.

        • Amanuel Hidrat

          Selam Dr Chefena,

          Welcome back and am glad to read your interjection to the ongoing discussion by way of highlighting Ibtisam’s remark on the importance of group’s right. At one time there was a hot debate on group right vs individual right in this vibrant awate forum. While both are complimentary to each other in the discourse of advocacy, they have their own realities in the social space to impart “unity in diversity” in the discourse of change. There is great resistance to “group voices” in any shape or form in this awate forum. In my view opposing group’s right is opposing representation. Could you have a more say on the subject to untangle the negative perception on group rights or group voices or group grievances. Your inputs will help us to decipher the concepts and their application in the paradigms of our discourses.

          Regards
          A manuel Hidrat

          • chefena

            Selam Haw Amanuel
            Thank your interest in my rejoinder. I will try to do that if you bear with me as I am bound to be on an intercity journey in an hour. But, surely I will try to elaboration on the ideas before you go to bed and before the momentum wanes
            Best regards
            Chefena

          • chefena

            Haw Amanuel
            Just by way of elaborating the concept of voice how that relates to group/ individual rights, I will make a modest attempt will briefly state some preliminaries and see if we can take it from there. By ‘representation’ we mean claiming what one says ‘is true’ in discourse processing. So people in power have communicative, discourse, social and cultural resources to dominate modes of representation and/or mis-representation. And they present us with their own version of reality. To make this seemingly confusing concept more concrete let me illustrate it using the border war as an example. The regime presented us or represented how events unfolded in May 1998. It shaped our sense of reality using all the resources its had at its disposal such as media, its political capital that feed on the nationalist narrative, etc. This is where ‘voice’ comes in. Proponents of various positions in conflict or debate try dominate modes of representation through variety of ways, ‘including inviting or persuading others to join their side, or silencing opponents by attacking their position’. So voice is used in the generic rather than individual sense. Representation through discourse also shapes our sense of identity. This is too broad to deal with in this limited space but to just give some examples. It is through discourse representations that identities are imposed, contested, desired, resisted, or invented. In the Eritrean transnational field the party-state assigns identities on who is ‘sufficiently Eritrean’ and has a stock of lexical labels: woyane, hadami etc. Let me stop here for now until such time that we deal with associated concepts and ways of clarifying them. WodehanKum!

          • Amanuel Hidrat

            Dear Dr Chefena,

            The quote below is the take home lesson for me. Thank you very much.

            “It is through discourse representations that identities are imposed, contested, desired, resisted, or invented. In the Eritrean transnational field the party-state assigns identities on who is ‘sufficiently Eritrean’ and has a stock of lexical labels: woyane, hadami etc”

            Regard
            A manuel Hidrat

  • MS

    Ahlan Ustaz Beyan Negash and IsmailAA
    Thanks, both. The purpose of juxtapositioning the argument we have been making that recognizing the rule of law as applied to territorial sovereignty does not negate the fact that PFDJ has been the cause of almost all of Eritrea’s current problems. It does not amount to supporting PFDJ policies. I agree with you Beyane that as a medical doctor, BB could have a better grasp of the human dimension of the problem. However, once he holds the MIC as a political activist, there is a better way of presenting the balance between extreme nationalism (luxury) and the anxiety citizens have towards an issue that carries the possibility of igniting another round of war and hence consuming more tens of thousands. These are true anxieties. They should be recognized first and then be placed within a context in clear and reassuring manner. dismissing them simply as blind nationalism “that borders fascism” or as blind patriotism is not helpful. The best way is to recognize that Ethiopia’s position is not helpful; that we care for our territorial integrity, but we are not state actors to demand Ethiopia to sign agreements with us; that Ethiopia’s location is crucial to impact the situation in Eritrea…and explain why once the opposition comes to power it will have a better chance of solving the border issue peacefully, etc. Sorry, for the mini-lecture, but here is how my position and I believe the position of the individuals who are mistaken for PFDJ supporters should be seen: that recognizing and promoting nationalism and patriotism actually help citizens to feel dutiful to their country (people and land). The sense of duty propels one to sacrifice his/her time and energy for the common good. It creates a state of preparedness and commitment in citizens, without which no change could be achieved. Calling for territorial integrity is part of that duty, one should not de-emphasize territorial integrity for the integrity of human rights; they are two faces of citizenship. PFDJ does not have any moral claim when it says “border security or death”, because it could have done almost all of the modest demands citizens are raising while calling for the EEBC ruling to be implemented. Here is how I see things (sorry, I have repeated these points so many times, but since I continue to be misread, i repeat them again).
    1. We know PFDJ has used the border issue for wrong ends. Instead of wasting time and the goodwill of international bodies by countering UN/USA and other superpowers by investing in reconstituting fractured Somali factions, and when that failed, by waging futile attempts in order to constitute its own version that would counterbalance the transitional federal Government of Somalia. Obviously, those foolish policies would eventually boomerang on Eritrea. It is still to prove to the architects of the sanctions that it has eventually and totally unraveled itself from the politics of Somalia. Particularly after the war, it would have been a smart strategy to pull in all Eritrean political segment and initiate reconciliation process. That would enhance Eritrean defense capacity and readiness while denying foreign powers excuses.
    2. The border issue did not pose a cause for PFDJ to round journalists and political dissenters to prisons.
    3. The border issue did not warrant the culture of impunity to mushroom among top military commanders, an acquiescence from the office of the president which created a prison industrial complex where each zonal commander owns cottage industries of prisons rampant with practices of abuse of power and money laundering.
    3. The border is not a reason for the government not to launch internal reviews and investigations when many national service recruits complain of abuses of power and sexual assaults. It was not a reason for the government not to be alert early on and do something in order to solve the exodus of the youth, to acknowledge it publicly and to try to work with communities and the subjects themselves (the youth) in order to introduce or change policies that would help solve the problem.
    4. The border issue is not enough of an excuse for the government to marshal a failed economic policy
    In a nutshell, the border issue has never been the reason for the government to stall the process of institution building, the process of laying down constitutional institutions and practices. Eritrea could have done all the above while calling the international community to pressure Ethiopia to let the EEBC ruling implemented. I believe the more free citizens are the more likely they are to die defending their freedom.
    I believe this is the assessment of the folks who are accused of putting land first. I believe we all agree on the above. And for assurance, ask any person that comes from Eritrea (I have met many informed individuals), Eritreans do not buy PFDJ’s versions of spins such as wayane and CIA, or the endless projects of resistance commonly known as”meketes”. The same individuals, however, will tell you that most Eritreans believe Ethiopia’s refusal to implement the border agreement has given PFDJ a formidable fortress where it could barricade itself from domestic calls to implementing rule of law.
    Coming to the forum, I think we are not that far apart. The only difference is that of emphasis. Nevertheless, I believe stating the fact (that Ethiopia should be pressured to implement the EEBC ruling) does not call on the opposition to boycott Ethiopia. It does not even call on PFDJ to go to war against Ethiopia. It does not give PFDJ any recognition for its destructive policies.
    BTW: I’m against war, or any armed conflict, be it in Eritrea to solve a domestic problem, or against any neighbor country to settle border disputes. I have always been against armed solutions. But I’m comfortable with any political and logistical support an Eritrean opposition gets from neighbors provided that there are a united political platform and a clear roadmap.
    Thanks both.

    • saay7

      MaHmuday:

      Paul Graham has a famous pyramid called “The Hierarchy of Disagreement.” Given how precious your time is to you, I will list it here and then you tell me what sort of disagreement you are encountering in the form of comment or article. It is ranked from the lowest to the highest:

      7. Name-calling: sounds something like, “you are an ass hat.”
      6. Ad hominem: attacks the characteristics or authority of the writer without addressing the substance of the argument
      5. Responding to tone: criticizes the tone of the writing without addressing the substance of the argument
      4. Contradiction: states the opposing case with little or no supporting evidence
      3. counterargument: contradicts and then backs it up with reasoning and/or supporting evidence
      2. refutation: finds the mistake and explains why it’s mistaken using quotes
      1. refuting the central point: explicitly refutes the central point.

      Due to its insistence on having it moderated and showing little patience for abusers, Awate Forum is a vast improvement over every Eritrean discussion forum out there which hasn’t progressed beyond arguments 6 and 7. But it does occasionally lower itself to argument 5 which I call the “you hurt my feelings” argument and a lot of the negative reaction towards what you wrote regarding Dr. Bereket Berhane has nothing to do with the content but the presupposition that you hurt his feelings. So your post, while impeccable, will not address the grievance of the “you hurt his feeling” friends.

      saay

      • Bayan Negash

        Dear Sal,
        A quick note about “gele gele sebat, ab gele gele botatat…”. Well, my brother let me be honest with you here: When I wrote the article I had you in mind all the way from the beginning to end. Hope you don’t this offensive, but the only time I read I was wrong on any topic – I will stand corrected – is during dehai days when wittily said the lunar eclipse made you do it. It was smart. It was brilliant. It was funny as you know what (lest DISQUS flag my response if I use the word I have in mind).

        So, any of your disciples – and you’ve earned this because of your brilliance and persistent writings – who are mum now know exactly who my piece was addressing. But, they probably didn’t want to cross you until you say something about it. What they see you talk about instead is CPA, Dr., titles and the like. So, if you would rather I call you out on it than saying TwigaHmmo this TwigaHmmo that, let me then spell it out for you: The late Tekie and you were at the fore front – in the trenches – fighting against Ethiopia with your proverbial pens. Now, Sal, do you have any regrets – a hint of it – that the menace at home used you to a hilt. When you criticize individuals in diaspora today for one reason or another , does it dawn on you that Awate.com – again, I will stand corrected here if you did as I don’t always read it religiously – never issued an official statement or by way of an article or by way of commentary criticizing Ali Abdu either as an official of the regime back home or former official? If not, doesn’t that reek of hypocrisy to the high of heaven? So, forget about “gele gele sebat, ab gele gele botatat…” This is being addressed to you driectly…I look forward to hearing from you.

        Respectfully,
        Beyan

        • Paulos

          Selam Beyan,

          Short comment here. I see that you took offense when I talked about the tittle “Dr” as opposed to your otherwise brilliant article. Really brilliant article! I was going to comment on it and of course you don’t necessarily expect me to comment on it but I thought it would be redundant if I repeat what Ismail AA or Hailat already said for that was exactly what I had in mind. And of note, I see a regression to the Dehai days b’gele gele sebat.

          • Bayan Negash

            Paulos,
            No offense at all. I was merely using it as an example to illustrate a point to Sal, as one of the moderators I thought he would be privy to help the conversation going to the subject matter at hand. I honestly like the comments that were being exchanged. It is funny though the way you ended your note in that you seeing “a regression to the Dehai days b’gel gele sebat.” I want to unpack that subtle humor to its bones and marrows, lest I be scolded by my brother Ismail by saying ሐጺራ አንተበልኩ ደኒና ትሰዕስዕ ከይከዉን ነገሩ

            Regards,
            BN

          • Paulos

            Beyan,

            Some of the lingo that turn me off every time I watch videos on Opposition meetings are:

            ኩሉ እቲ ዝባሃል ተባሂሉ’ዩ ግነ እንታay ክብል ምደለኹ…..
            ቁሩብ’እኴ ትንክፍ ኣቢልዎ ኔሩ…..
            ብገለገለ ሰባት…..

          • Bayan Negash

            Selam Paulos,
            …and then they go on a long diatribe more than what was said and then some more…that’s a classic Eritrean speak as a shield if the words don’t come out the way they intended it, then, they have already prefaced it with ኩሉ እቲ ዝባሃል ተባሂሉ’ዩ

            Good one.
            BN

        • Fanti Ghana

          Hello Bayan Negash,

          “When I wrote the article I had you in mind all the way from the beginning to end.”

          Thank you, thank you, thank you!!!

          I always had a high regard for you and it is still intact!

          You won’t believe my agony yesterday evening reading your article. Half way down to “The Subtlety of Ideology” I was fairly sure who you had in mind mostly because you had a reply to Saay a few days ago which I thought was a little harsh (spin doctor).

          I couldn’t phrase a decent response quickly enough to correct you in that reply without risking confusion, but I was thinking about saying something later this evening regarding the tone of this article (ezgiher awTsi’uka!).

          Then and now, Saay has been extremely disciplined, you owe him a quote by Damar of Cardassia* “with people like you on our side, how can we fail?*”

          * (Star trek DS 9)

          • Bayan Negash

            Dear Fanti Ghana,

            It is “with people like you [Fanti Ghana] on our side how can [our region] fail. The best Awate.com has done for our region is attracting individuals like you who are willing to grace this site and engage with their brothers and sisters. And you always do it with a touch of humor, too. I can’t tell you how many times I chuckled, the last one of which was just yesterday when you told MS to write when he is in a hurry as he seems to put some of his best pieces when he is hastily jotting his thoughts…Indeed, he seems to overplay that, doesn’t he?

            Regards,
            BN

          • Legacy

            Hi Bayan,
            I would love to see the shades of opinions represented in this forum plotted on a spectrum.

        • saay7

          Selamat Bayan:

          In the words of the incomparable Fihira: ሕጂ ግርም! I hope you will accept this as a combo comment to your article “Territorial Integrity…” and your recent reply to my reply to Mahmuday.

          1. I didn’t reply to the article because I didn’t find it readable. Believe me, I tried a couple of times. And I try not to comment on articles I cannot finish. As a writer, I know that sometimes we write well and sometimes we don’t and the best way I can describe it is the way someone (Burhan Ali?) replied to some unreadable monstrosity I had posted: he called it a SalaTa Tursh. The most generous thing I can say about it is that you were trying to give moral support to Dr. Bereket Berhane and, as Southerners say, bless your heart, but he doesn’t need it: he is a capable guy. But many awatistas found it commedable and brilliant so…vive la différence! Including when we differ with Dr. Bereket and we (those who differ with him) are very, very specific why we are and we are asking those of you who differ with us to be very, very specific.

          2. On this twgaHmo thing you are obsessed with: wwhen I wrote a satire about us, and characterized you as “something something twgahmo something something” I hadn’t seen your article and it wasn’t published yet and bang here came a new article with something something twgaHmo something something. You are saying (a) I was wrong to write those articles (1998-2000) and I haven’t apologized for it (b) after the war ended I raised issues that I should have raised during the war (I think) and (c) I haven’t criticized Ali Abdu because he is my brother.

          As you said, you are not a regular reader of awate and you take long sabbaticals where you miss things. I say this because I have written an article entitled “I Was Wrong” (for those who don’t like subtlety) on the Arab Spring. (link provided before.) In your sabbaticals, Hayat and Papillon (now baptized Paulos: hi there!) have beat the Badme/Dehai things to death. But since writing is repeating to different audiences, I will repeat it here again:

          (a) I was not wrong then, and, in retrospect now, I am still not wrong to express my honest opinion about the war: that a large country for purely political reasons (to consolidate its power in Ethiopia) was willing to expand a manageable skirmish into a World War I war. That party is/was the TPLF/EPRDF led government. In other words, I said exactly what I believed. And if circumstances repeat themselves, I will do so.

          On the other hand, there were people–you included, apparently—who believed the path Eritrea was on was very wrong. And what did they do about it? Nothing. Oh, sure, they will say, “I wrote an article” but in a two and half year bloody war to write an article or two? Now, if there is any apologizing that needs to be done it is by those who, in the face of public opinion, chose to be silent. Don’t you think so, Beyan? There was one and only one lonesome exception: Saleh Gadi Johar. All the ones now trying to ride his coattails because they wrote one or two articles and then went deaf, dumb and mute…nah, that won’t do, bro.

          But I have never asked those people to apologize because I find that very unhelpful to the cause. It is the same misguided campaign some have pursued with people who were in leadership positions with EPLF/PFDJ: apologize! To whom? Why? If that chronicle of “apologize” starts, well, would you like to extend it to the leaders of ELF–some still part of the opposition–who squandered the hopes of tens of thousands of their supporters by leading to ruin the mighty ELF? For their role in the civil war? For their “revolutionary justice?”

          (b) For a guy who who wrote an article about prioritizing, it surprises me that you are taking issue with the fact that I didn’t raise Eritrean government’s human rights abuse DURING THE WAR. I can take this from people who didn’t know my writing before, during and after the war and don’t know that the twgaHmo articles of 2000 were a continuation of my writings PRIOR to the war. But you are one of the few who do. You have read my articles written for the Eritrean Exponent (1993-1996), and for Dehai prior to the war (1995-1998.) A critical review of them will show that they praised the gov when warranted and criticized it when warranted specially after the arrest of Ruth Simon when I must have written at least 7 postings. So, to me, the pause in criticism was because the human rights violations were coming from a different side: the Gov of Ethiopia. And, in any event, you attach a bigger significance to my and Dr. Tekie’s postings: they made Eritreans feel that they had someone to speak up for them at a time when the Eritrean government did not even have a website or a spokesperson. If the gov of Isaias was emboldened, it probably is most likely because those of you who disagreed with its policies became suddenly silent.

          (c) On Ali Abdu, I didn’t see him any different from Yemane Gebreab, Zemehret, Hagos Kisha, Wedi Kasa. They are tools. And I never get mad at tools. I challenge you to find anything negative I have written about Wedi Kasa or Hagos Kisha or Yemane Gebreab in a single article of Al Nahda. If I did, then you will find me apologizing: not for refraining from criticizing Ali Abdu, but for criticizing them.

          It is still the weekend, so just to show you no harm, no foul, and so Mahmuday doesn’t think I ruined the weekend, here’s Fihira’s Hji Grm:

          https://youtu.be/MQAYmYcgshA

          saay

          • blink

            Dear Mr.Saay
            First You do not need to apologies for some thing you have done in 1998 or 2000. Believe me , i know many people who swear to protect and defend your view , by the way you are a fighter and people have learned a great deal from you and continue to do so. Many people know, you are not going to give an inch to people who live in their small cave , let them shout ,talk and write endless articles .they are shouting because they know they can not beat you in the game , they know we know their criticism is originally from the old times and rotten once. The fact is, beyan wrote his article looking at your face says it all.

          • Paulos

            Blink,

            This is typical “Whose side are you on sort of thing.”

            Tifoso-O-meter:

            Sal 1 Beyan 0

          • blink

            Dear paulos
            I did not buy popcorn yet but you know for a fact whose side i am . I will not support some one who cry fool for a ” people first and land what ever” like thinking. while tesfatsion is a shouting lunatic the Dr.on his speech seems smart person talking from Tesfaston!s dinning room and here we have beyan trying to protect the Dr while every one is waiting an explanetion from the Addiss based Dr. What do you say ?

          • Paulos

            Blink,

            A new word is hurling around at Awate these days. And the word is “Unreadable.”

          • blink

            Paulos
            That one is perfect ,I like it .

          • sara

            Mr paul..
            There is another word too..
            Being hurled..”M’tquas”

          • Peace!

            Hi Paulosay,

            Do you really think Saay should apologize for being patriot during Ethio-Eri war?

            Peace!

          • Paulos

            Selam Peace Abi Seb,

            He should be commended for being a patriot but he should explain to his readers why he was on the wrong side of history. Apology is about conscience. He shouldn’t apologize if his conscience is clear.

          • Peace!

            Selam Paulosay,

            He answered a call like anybody else and like in every country. There is no such thing a good war. The other day you quoted Nixon and admired Linden Johnson whom both are responsible for wars in Vietnam and Cambodia. How would you reconcile with what you are saying now?

            Peace!

          • Berhe Y

            Dear Paulos,

            Apologize to whom? To the Ethiopian government ? For what ?

            1) for deporting innocent Eritreans and Eritreans of Erhiopian origin
            2) for bombing Asmara and escalating the war and causing so much of life and death
            3) for displacing 500,000 Eritreans and their livelihood
            3) for advising the ERITREAN government to call their bluff of “peace” by accepting the “modalities”.

            What exactly and to whom he needs to apologize for?

            Berhe

          • Paulos

            Selam Berhino,

            I said, he shouldn’t apologize if his conscience is clear and no one knows about his conscience but him. The rest and what you have just listed are debating points and let history be the ultimate judge.

            Tifoso-O-meter:

            Sal 4 Beyan 1

          • blink

            Dear paulos
            You forget one tifoso on your side and he is called Tesfatsion .

          • Berhe Y

            Dear Paulo,

            I like you and sorry if I misunderstood you. But you also said, he was on the wrong side of history.

            I think when someone is expected to apologize at least he should know what his apologizing for. But saying that “he shouldn’t if his concise is free”, I think is not a reasonable request from philosopher like you. When someone apologize it’s not only for his concise but also to those others who has done wrong.

            I am sorry but I don’t agree that you see this as a game and you are keeping score. I know you mean no harm but I think this is really personal and it does hurt his feelings (not score game point but the whole accusation of BN).

            I know Saay does not need my defence, but I think there is no one who has suffered as much as him personally by the regime that is fighting the same regime as Saay.

            He said three generation of his family, father, brother and niece are in prison. Sometimes I feel may be he is the reason (his writing) and I wonder how he keeps his sanity, continues to write, without showing any sign of hate.

            But his love for his people and his country superceedes all else, even if he has to pay personal price, he is fighting so that our country doesn’t fail to the wrong side and that we all come to regret.

            How much more can we ask and expect of a man?

            Berhe

          • Paulos

            አታ በርሂኖ ሓወይ ሰይቲ ሓውና’ድያ ነዞም ቆልዑ ጸባ ኣምጻሎም’ኢላ ካብ ድቃስካ ኣተሲኣትካ? I would imagine, it is super late in Toronto.

          • Fanti Ghana

            Selamat Paulos,

            Something is wrong with the “vote down” arrow. I tried three times and it is not working. Any idea?

          • Paulos

            Selam Fantination,

            Simply because “Vote down” is not your thing. Thank you for being you!

          • Fanti Ghana

            Selam Paulos,

            I had three different way of saying what I wanted to say, but I thought this one was funnier.

            You and Peace, two of the sharpest minds, one comes up with a misleading question, and one plays along because it suited him. Ashakhum dileyu.

          • Paulos

            Fantination,

            When I first read Sal’s comment for Beyan, first thing that came to my mind was you. I was going to write, “Fantination where are you?” Glad you’re here and already putting out the flame. Thank you!

          • Kokhob Selam

            Yes, Dear Fanti Ghana

            I also wonder …why !!

            KS,,

          • Saba

            Hi Fanti,
            I added captcha for voting down:) No one is answering correctly.

          • Amanuel Hidrat

            Fanti,

            It has never worked. Arguing against it, is voting down. Don’t you think so?

          • Fanti Ghana

            Hello Mr. Amanuel,

            Peace and Paulos were being sneaky, and that was my attempt to joining the club, to argue against without sounding I was arguing against.

          • sara

            Dear fanti
            I also had same problem, i am afraid the Rassians are around.

          • Fanti Ghana,

            Its working just fine. I am seeing red. Will you provide us with the criteria for voting down too? Please.
            I don’t like this comment of mine. There fore I will go ahead and click the appropriate arrow.

            tSAtSE

          • Haile S.

            Peace,
            A patriot should not apologize for hitting a scud coming from an enemy line. However, he should do if he misses his target and hits the innocents.

          • Peace!

            Hi Haile,

            As far as “እጃምካ ምብርካት” is concerned, he should be fine.

            Peace!

          • Bayan Negash

            Dear Referee Paulos,
            Referees generally need some tools – I know Sal has no problem with tools even if they come in human forms. Here are some that I recall: I see no watch. I see no cards (yellow and red). No pen and a note. No whistle. No coin. No ball. I will add for the modern – digital world of communication an essential component – No fake names, such as blink and nitricc – these should automatic disqualify them at once. What say you Mr. referee?

          • Nitricc

            Hey Blink: ” The fact is, began wrote his article looking at your face says it all.”
            Sir, Say no more! Amen to that! What an attention seeker? His life must suck. Who writes garages after garages with someone in their mind? Dimm, the Power SAAY! May be Beyan got the idea for the his garbage article from Seyfu show, you know the trashy amharic show. lol

          • blink

            Dear Nitricc
            The thing beyan does not know is , people are googling saay old articels just to use them as reference and this guy come around trying to score late goal ,what a shameful emotional break down is that.

            https://www.facebook.com/AsmaraMediachannel.co.net/videos/509881426030831/

          • Nitricc

            Hey Blink: what took me by surprise is that how this guy named Beyan can be intimated by any one, reading his writings sounds tough and someone with a bone to stand for? This tells you how week and gumption less he is. how do you write thinking someone in mind? I understand the Power of SAAY, he will leave any one in the dust, no doubt. SAAY will not be judged by the likes of Beyan who are contaminated and toxic. SAAY will be judged by us and we have nothing but an absolute respect and honor. The man stood when his country were at war. he defended his country when his country was fighting for her life. the man stood tall when his country was outgunned and unnumbered. it is shame people like Beyan cowards come today to take their shot at the honorable SAAY.
            Like I have said, SAAY will be judged by us not by the corrputed the likes of Beyan.

          • Paulos

            Nitrikay,

            If you watched or listened BB’s speech, he spoke about the danger of “Cult of Personality” and I assume he had what you’re saying in mind when he spoke about it. That is not a good sign.

          • blink

            Dear paulos
            You wanted saay to apologies for defending his country and people and you are trying to explain the Addis Dr. imagination , is not it too much for you and beyan alike. How many steps are you guys to go up and down , take a stand . beyan , who is he , where was he in 1998 , what does he say in 1998 , does he object or was he in the pockets of weyane praying for the fall and take power over Eritreans blood and life ? who is he any way , who knows him in 1998 , no one . Saay stood in a knive edge while most his opponents in this forum where silent or clapping for weyane to pay them back for the criem of 1980.

          • Nitricc

            Hey P: you know I love you and i can say to whatever i ever i feel. Now, if you write an article, would you offended if SAAY won’t comment on your take? Now who has a cult personality Nitricc or Beyan. By the way did you catch that the so-called doctor bragging about bing lucky to work for Ethiopian government? By the way i will never defend SAAY, he doesn’t need it only week people need to be defended, although, i expect you to defend Beyan, he needs it, you must stay in his side, he needs you.

          • Teodros Alem

            Hi nitricc
            How many forumers here in awate u think are eritreans or eritrean diaspora? Outside S.G, saay, G.H, M.S, S.T and u . am confused help me up pls. Forget A.H already know.

          • Paulos

            Nitrikay,

            I love you too ma lil bro. Here is the deal: Sal is a national treasure. Do you know how many Eritreans gave up along the way and stopped fighting for justice all together? The guy is still hanging in there and fighting left and right with tenacity and with a remarkable mental acuty as well. He inspires all of us. There is no question about it. But and I say this with a big but we need to call him out when he is wrong. We need to challenge him when we feel priorities are misplaced. That is called character.

            I say commenting on article is another ball game particularly in this forum. We all come with certain personalities and we sort of create “alignments” with certain people we feel in synch and the rivers is true.

          • blink

            Dear Nitricc
            I suspect beyan is asking people to comment on this article and when the best man stay away , he get angry and go on the attack , This guy wanted saay to apologies for his braveness , indirectly beyan is saying all the 19,000 people who payed their life defending their people and country should apologies .This guy is saying he prefer to see weyane tanks run to Asmara in 1998 and see raping our sisters , kill any one who oppose their wishes wishes , this guy wanted to score late goal now . where was he in 1998 , what does he do at that time , i suspect he said nothing and did nothing orprobably smile at weyane radio when the reached barentu ,

          • Nitricc

            Selamat, Blink: I am trying to figure it out how a grown old man feels hurt because one man named SAAY wouldn’t respond to his garbage article. Mind you, people like Aman-H read his post and gave hime his props, People like Ismeal read his post and praised him. All the Awate big guns gave him his all the undeserving credits for the garbage article he has written, yet, he couldn’t be satisfied at all he was hurt because SAAY won’t respond and compliment him. This shows you not only the greatness of SAAY but the inferiority Beyan feels to SAAY.
            SAAY stood for his country when he felt it was the right thing to do and SAAY opposed the government when he felt it was the right thing to. I have nothing but an Absolute respect for SAAY and SAAY have nothing to worry his place in history because we going to judge and write it. Even though when criticisms comes from people who spends their time watching teanage girls show,like the Seyfu show, that say volumes about Beyan and his week mentality.

          • Kim Hanna

            Selam Nitricc,
            .
            I know you change facts on purpose. How do I know that? You told me so a couple of weeks ago.
            .
            SAAY, never said or intimated that his country was outgunned. In fact, his pronounced leadership in fanning the flames of war was providing the slogans like this…..WE ARE OUTGUNNED NO MORE.
            I actually believe, he believed that breakfast in Mekelle and lunch in Addis was a good possibility. His demeaning insults and bravado was not equaled by anyone.
            His baptism came after Eritrea lost the war. I could see the change.
            Then slowly he started turning the direction of his arrows …north.
            .
            I just wanted to shake your memory if you were an adult at that time. If you were too young, well then learn the facts.
            .
            Did you know YG and SAAY were practically twins prior to the 98-2000 war?
            .
            Mr. K.H

          • saay7

            Mr KH:

            Context for “outgunned no more”:

            During the armed struggle, every Eritrean of my generation knew one thing: that Eritreans could fight Ethiopia on the ground but it owned the skies and could obliterate them at will. When Ethiopian MIGs appeared, Eritreans had only one solution: run and hide. This happened for three decades as Ethiopian MIGs bombed combatants, civilians, and in one event that was very memorable to me, artists including Xehaitu Beraki. Thousands of Eritreans were killed and maimed this way for a generation: combatants banned wearing colorful clothes to detract the menace in the sky….

            Until 1998. When Weyane bombed our capital, something even the Derg hadn’t done, Eritrea had, for a brief moment, the ability to retaliate. (No this wasn’t the Meqele Ayder bombing* but the one before it.). This was what I was celebrating with “outgunned no more.” But it’s a free country and you are welcome to believe your alternative facts.

            Saay

            * incidentally, on the Tragic bombing of Ayder elementary school is the type of tragedy one apologizes and expresses remorse for. And guess who did? Not Beyan, not the revisionist historians. But me. Ah, facts are such a menace.

          • Bayan Negash

            selam blink,

            This is spot on funny. My mind was rushing from the going down the steps to the going up the steps as to what in the heck was the guy screaming to have him come down. On the going up I kinda figured it out it was going to be a variation of yrka’ka, Al-allah, what have you. It reminded me during the dehai days when people got pissed off, they would use the term yrd’aka. But, this one, with the optics to boot it dramatized it just nicely. But, I ain’t going no where, blink.

            Cheers,
            Bn

          • blink

            Dear Mr. beyan
            You tried to mess with the guy i and my friends look up to ,You have no clue how many saay students are around. You could have acted nicely then, if not we close the door , probably you will go down the stairs but but my advice sir , do not waste much time on the zebra crossing , crazy drivers may hit you ,and i forgot please put your foot carefully on the steps going down , as you know saay has a push factor that people some times lose their mind and fall horribly , you can consult Mr.Amanuel for that matter.

          • Bayan Negash

            Dear blink,
            Warning heeded. I’ve seen Sal running results on his FB several years ago, a marathon of 5K he finished it like one does a one block of jogging. Why do you think I am already asking for a handicap advantage, tightening the rules to suit me in the name of fairness. I have a plan though. Here is brutally bloody fight and I hope that’s not what you have in mind. Is he as quick with his hands when punching as he is with them feet that did the 5K in no time. Now, here is one for your gory pleasures. I would rather watch Seifu’s show than this though to be hones about it:

            https://youtu.be/5lJBjYailHk?t=124

          • Hi Beyan,

            The Admiral is Fifty and O. “Go ahead make my day punk.” Your knetiba Eastwood said 😉

            tSAtSE
            PS: I have a rejoinder in mind, but I too am calibrating my O meter…

          • Paulos

            Beyan,

            Sal was wrong in 98 and he is wrong this time around as well. Beyan-II will challenge him say in 2027 and Blink-II will have a pile of videos which couldn’t make it to the “America’s Funniest Videos” by then.

          • Paulos

            Sal,

            This is “Clash of The Titans” a sequel. I here by call on all Awatistas to grab popcorn and drinks and relax and enjoy. During intermission (read: the show is at Cinema Odeon and there will be intermission) Kokhob Selam will read out one of his superb poems. Enjoy!

          • Kokhob Selam

            Dear Peulos,

            Yes, why not? If I am alive till that time ,,,If not,, one of you guys will read it,,

            KS,,

          • Desbele

            Hi Saay,

            How do Saleh Gadi’ stated his stand during the war 1998-2000 ? Did he also wrote articles then? or had issued statements regarding his party(if he had one then). It seems you recognized him the only one taking a stand against the tide then. How public was that position ? I just want to learn.

            One person i admire most is historian Tekeste Negash for his cautionary paragraph on his 1997 book “The federal experience”. Here is what he wrote regarding future Ethio-Eritrea relations ,
            It would be wise of Eritrean leaders, now when they enjoy an opportune
            moment, to concentrate their energies on building Eritreo–Ethiopian relations
            on a firmer basis. As things now stand, a change of government in Ethiopia may
            bring with it a change of policy which could directly affect the security of Eritreans
            in Ethiopia and Eritrea’s access to Ethiopia. A vivid example that friendly
            relations can suddenly go sour is that of Eritreo-Sudanese relations.It is hardly an exaggeration to state that during the past three years Eritrea, more than Ethiopia,
            has been anxious to keep open its access to Ethiopia. The sea ports of
            Massawa and Assab (now under Eritrea) are presented as bait for Ethiopian
            cooperation.

          • saay7

            Desbele:

            Saleh Gadi was then living in Kuwait with an Ethiopian passport (common for Eritreans who were in the Gulf since before Eritrea’s independence.) He expressed his strong disagreement about the two countries going to war when they could have settled the border issue peacefully. So Ethiopia withdrew his passport. And Eritrea wouldn’t grant him one. Undeterred he continued to write (at Dehai) and when Dr TEKIE Fessehazjon wrote that Eritrean ship is safe hands, Saleh wrote a piece for Dehai saying that not only is it not under safe hands but the captain is drilling a hole in the ship. He posted other posts with similar views and he became Stateless: which in Arab Gulf means no work permit no residence permit no school for your children.

            That’s who the “I was always opposed to the war” latter day pacificist now want to equate themselves with when they said nothing when it mattered. They paid nothing because they wanted to have it both ways. And now they are our moral philosophers 😂 And, oh, after they found their voice very belatedly (until it goes mute again )they also ridicule the silent.

            saay

          • Desbele

            Thanks saay,

            My huge respect to Saleh Gadi. As they say:Justice is truth in action!!

          • iSem

            Hi Sal:
            Thanks for this comment.I am not KIDDING!. Sorry for shouting, I am doing it becasue some times my jokes and kumnegar thawawusso I was told
            I feeel u wrote this comment from the heart.
            Well, I loved Twgahmo and my take was just like your grand father who threatened to tame a young family member who misbehaved ewan zeyblu, you were saving the punishment (criticism in this case) for when the war stopped and true to the words almos the next miute after IA and MZ shook hands you started criticizing .
            now now to clue u in with teasing u several times with the himeret in Himbert Kolboy also comes from your writing and I was telling BY 14 years ago about one article your wrote (cannot remember title) and it went like this , responding I think to Warsai Eritrawi and I praphrase from memory, “some of us put our real names and faces behind our writing waiting for history to render its verdict and in an other paragraph same article, u wrote again paraphrasing, “Let say if some guy in Hmeret Kolby… wants ,… 🙂
            You forgot to some thing before the link of Fihira and since now is the weekend and MS does not thing I spoiled it and also to get into the nevervs of my friend iSem I present u with with the incomparable Fihira,

          • Paulos

            Selam Semerile,

            I often wonder what happened to those people as in Warsai-Eritrawi, Zeyh’lel and I also remember this guy I think his name was (real name) Dr. A.A. Taddesse. Oh those years!

          • Beyan

            Selam Paulos,

            How about ones of our own here. Who was Haile The Great (aka, Haile TG). Papillon (brilliant thinker peppered with philosophy and literature)…I bet Sal would definitely know some of them…He may even driven them off the cliff when they pushed back and challenged him. Beware, Paulos, if Paulos is not your real name, you may be made to disappear from this forum as our moderator Sal has insider scoop on you that we don’t. So if you want to last long you may want to stay away from supporting certain individuals or certain topics that ticks off brother Sal (think of an emoji of I kid, I kid here).

          • Paulos

            Selam Dr. Negash,

            Most likely Sal will be Head-Of-State in post-Isaias Eritrea but his dictatorial tendencies are worrisome unless otherwise we build strong institutions that can keep him leashed. But of course, if you run against him for the highest office, you have my vote for the simple reason that you’re Asmarino and Akhria-yino as well.

          • Nitricc

            Hi Beyan: I don’t if this is Beyan Negash or another delusional by the name of Beyan but how can you blame SAAY for the disappearances of Haile TG and Papillon? obviously you are slow to know who is who but Papillon went no where. She is alive and kicking it. One memorandum to all Anti SAAY; I understand the attacks against SAAY, because you can’t tie his shoes-lace, you must resort to stupid attacks, I get that. The Only Brother Sal ticked by is distillated stupidity.
            I alos understand only the great once are attacked unfairly.

          • Bayan Negash

            Selam Sal,
            I appreciate your composure in the way you respond hope I can reciprocate in kind. It is completely understandable. God knows how many articles I stopped reading mid-way or even sometimes one paragraph later because reading requires certain level of a-mood- for, if you will, much as writing requires certain level of muse being on one’s side. So, I get it if it didn’t do it for you. I’ve read you – off and on – over the last two decades. Indeed, from the exponential magazine days, one particular piece that stands out in my mind is an imaginary interview you did with the filmmaker Oliver Stone. Your brilliance has no bounds, and ain’t no one going to take that away from you. Here comes the but part. But,

            1. I’ve said enough on your twgaHmo. You think you did the right thing to stand with your country even in retrospect you refuse to budge that you stood with a leader who was bent out of shape to put the country and its people through the abyss. You think it was worth it. I don’t. When you said you would do the same thing all over again, it is as clear and as unambiguous as they come. Just for clarification purposes, are you saying you would put everything aside to fight with your pen should Eritrea of today find itself in conflict, say, with one of our neighboring countries with this menace residing over the warfront? Am I hearing you clearly here?

            By the way, nobody in his/her right mind would try to bank on SGJ’s position. I remember it vividly when he said he would pay for the table and cloth so the leaders can talk…that’s someone who has lived through war for you because he was at the warfront and knows nobody wins in a war. As for me, well, I stood with the menace at home for nine months but bailed out on it when I realized the imbecile had no inklings about human life. You remember the skirmish with Yemen in which we lost 12 lives and nobody gave a damn about the lives lost over something that could’ve been resolved by the International Court, which is what ended up happening. At any rate, the only reason he threw the white flag because Ethiopia was going full throttle deep into Eritrea…he needed a face saving much as in the first Gulf War, Saddam was saved by the bell because the Bush senior decided not go all the way to Baghdad – ousting the man from Kuwait was the objective and mission successful. Well, guess what? The U.S. had to go once again to nab the man and had to get rid of him. Ethiopia might be regretting it now that it didn’t do that when it had its chance. Our menace is gaining strength.

            At any rate, I just need clarification from you, I genuinely don’t understand when you say …if circumstances repeat themselves, I will do so.” Meaning you would put everything else aside and begin defending the menace at home, through your pen, of course? I am repeating it because I am having trouble understanding this logic here. Please help me out. And from the looks of it, Veteran fighter MS will follow suit, mind you not by writing, but by going to the trenches in person to fight a war on behalf of the imbecile at home. I can hardly believe what I am hearing from MS.
            2. Admitting one was wrong on the Arab Spring and Tunis in particular can hardly be equated to your most writings that tend to have Eritrea/Ethiopia specific tilt to them. I am asking you specifically from your voluminous writings, not to mention your comments in the forum, is there one or two that you wrote about Eritrea, the regime, the people…I don’t know maybe one that stands out in which you can admit a mistake…please don’t sound like our imbecile in chief at the White House now.
            3. On the rest of your rebuttal, I will let it stand as I have nothing to counter argue about it with you on. All I hope from Ali Abdu at this point is that he joins the opposition camp and I am certain he would have a lot to contribute as many former officials are doing their due diligence in the dagme Qalsi to unseat the man from the helm of power so Eritrea may try peace, tranquility, prosperity for a change.

            I truly appreciate you taking the time to respond to my query.

            Many thanks,
            BN

            Oh, let me leave y’all with Dante’s short but patently lethal poem to the chagrin of our Nitricc, oh there comes another dead white man, bud:

            “Midway along the journey of our life
            I woke to find myself in a dark wood,
            for I had wandered off from the straight path.

            How hard it is to tell what it was like,
            this wood of wilderness, savage and stubborn
            (the thought of it brings back all my old fears),

            a bitter place! Death could scarce be bitterer.
            But if I would show the good that came of it
            I must talk about things other than the good.”

        • MS

          Selam Bayan
          You are very wrong here brother. This has nothing with the espresso SAAY paid for me…you know he goes for the cheap when inviting people…anyway, I think you wrote this while you were REALLY mad, with buds of sweat streaking your chicks….
          1. I think SAAY did what a patriot would have done during those days. It was an all out war, the intellectual and psychological part of it was even more daunting. Marshall SAAY had come out of age at the right time.
          2. I can not speak for Awate.com but I think they published a lot of damning articles criticizing the regime that Ali Abdu served. I remember in some articles, SAAY appeared to have been directly communicating with his brother because he was touching subjects that would be directly associated with Ali. For instance, I remember in one of his article writing something like “and this is while his son is a minister..”. He was referring to his father’s arrests.
          Anyway, it is like you are writing about Tesfa News when you say Awate.com “never issued an official statement or by way of an article or by way of commentary criticizing Ali Abdu either as an official of the regime back home or former official? If not, doesn’t that reek of hypocrisy to the high heaven?” Officials of the government get mentioned depending on relevance, that’s if the news item or article is relevant to any of them, security, defense, foreign, information related, etc.
          I’m a bit confused but it seems to me you are siding towards desperation (sorry for the word) to justify that criticizing BB was not warranted, or I’m missing it all?

      • Amanuel Hidrat

        ሳልሕ አያዲኡ,

        ንፋለጥሞ ንማለጥ እንድዩ እቲ ነገሩ:: ሕያዋይ ሓታታይ ንነብስኻ አብታ ስእላዊት ፕራሚድካ አበይ ተቀምጣ እንተበለካሲ: አበይ ትብሎ በጃኻ? አይጣራጠርን አብቲ ቁጽሪ “ሐደን ክልተን” ከምትሰርዓ:: ንሱ አረኣእያን ነብሰ-ሚዛንን እንተዘይህልወካሞ ነዚ ቢሂላዊ አቃራርባዚ አይመቅረብዮን:: ነብሰ-ምጎሳ እዩ ዝመስል ዘሎ: ዝኾነ ኾይኑ ነዚናትካ ነገር: ከምቲ ብጻይ ስዩም ሐረስታይ ከምዚ ናትካ ነገር ምስ አጋጥሞ ዝሃቦ መልሲ’ዩ ዘድልየካ ዘሎ:: ክሳዕ ዝዳጋገም ሸለል ክንብሎ ኢና::

        ስዩም ናዚ ከምዚ ናትካ እንታይ ምበሎ? ሰው አቢሎምልና ብየማን አሕሊፍናዮ:: እንደገና ሰው አቢሎምልና ብጸጋም አሕሊፍናዮ:: እንደገና ሰው አቢሎምልና ደኒና አሕሊፎናዮ:: እንደገና ሰው አቢሎምልና: ተቀቢልና ኢና ኳሕ ዘበልናዮም:: ስለዚ ሳልሖም ንወስትታካ ብየማና ሸፈፍ ኢሉ ከምዝሓልፍ ገይርናዮ አለና ንግዚኡ::

        ምስ አኽብሮት

        • Kokhob Selam

          Aywa Amuni

          You massage must be clear now to Saay7.

          KS,,

        • Semere Tesfai

          ሰላም ኣማንኤል ሕድራት

          ክምዕደካ ‘ይለ ዘይኮንኩስ፡ ኸታሓሳስበካ ብማለት ‘የ……. ኣብ ባሃሊኡ ዘይኮናስ: ኣብቲ ሓሳብ ኣተኲርና እንተተዛረብና ይሓይሽ በሃላይ እየ። እቲምንታይ፡ ኩልና ስለ ንመሃር፡ ኩልና ክንረብሕ። ልክዕ፡ ሓደሓደ ግዜ ይውዳኣካ ‘ዩ፡ ግን ተተወዲእካ ካኣ፡ ስቕ መን ወሰዶ? የቐንየለይ።

          ሰመረ ተስፋይ

          • Amanuel Hidrat

            መርሓባ ብጻይነበር ሰመረ,

            እቲ ከርሰ መልእኽቲ ናይ ብጻይ ስዩም አይተረደአካን እምበር: ሓሳብ ሐዘል ምዕዶኮ’ዩ ነይሩ:: ሰባት አጋውልኡ ዝሰሐተ ሰነ-አረኣእያን አብ አጉዳይ አጉደኻን ክሰርዑናን: አብ ፒራድ ክነድቁናን ኸለው ደአ ከመይ ገይርና ስቅኢልና ከነሕልፎ:: እቲ ተግባርኮ ጥዕናዘለዎ ኣይኮነን:: ነብሰ-ልዕልና ዝእምት ጥራይዘይኮነ ንሕንግዳዊ ክትዕ ዝዕድምውን እዩኮ:: ሳምራይ እስከ እንደገና ነቲቴምኡ’ሞ ግልህ አቢልካ አሰተማቅሮ: ነቲ ትሕዝቶ ክበርሃልካ እዩ:: ካብኡ ንደሐር መአዝናት ፈሊጥና ክንካታዕ::

            ሰሰናዩ ንዓኻ

      • MS

        Hala Ustaz SAAY
        Now you are spoiling the spirit of the weekend…but I have to admit it is a great resource. I will add it is a must-have-sticker that every awatista should check off each of the numbers of the list to make sure our replies/arguments are somewhat up to standard…

        • saay7

          Mahmouday:

          It’s to be used when gele gele sebat actually think they have made a compelling argument backed by facts when all they are doing is saying “you hurt my feelings.” Feelings are important but it’s difficult to understand what sets people off in a country reeling from generational PTSD. Be as gentle as you can be but don’t be surprised if they are not satisfied until you agree with a point they thought they made persuasively which for you is about shaming you with guilt by association. I wish you would give a brief BTDT answer instead of explaining yourself over and over.

          saay

          • Selam Saay7,

            Thanks for sharing Paul Graham’s famous pyramid. I have already copied it and utilize it sooner than later I hope. Having said that:

            I sincerely apologize to you if I have come across as ..”trying to shame you with guilt by association” or otherwise. Taking liberties with certain modes and pokes towards you is due to my belief that you are more than capable to understand it, handle it, or overlook it. There is absolutely not a dam thing Saay7 should ever feel ashamed off is my personal conviction.

            Disregard anything else and maintain course, on Moc 7 Speed*, Admiral.

            *The Oust MOC 7 Speed bearing was designed specifically for speed and maneuverability under extreme skateboard conditions

            tSAtSE

          • saay7

            Hey tSatSe:

            I am disappointed: clearly you have mistaken me for the arbitrary“apologize now!” team; the one that wants to win not by playing the game but by calling for forfeit. I am on the other team, remember? You got nothing to apologize for buddy.

            saay

      • SA

        Dear Beyan,
        If I remember correctly, when Sal was challenged about his brother about a couple of years ago, he responded by saying that his brother was a grownup man who speaks about 5 languages and that he can speak for himself. Sal obviously does not want to be held accountable for what his brother did. As to your complaint that he has yet to criticize your brother, what do you want Sal to criticize his brother about? For being an ex-official of the regime? My understanding is that people here at Awate discuss ideas, and I do not think Sal would shy away from disagreeing with his brother if his brother were to start sharing his opinion about the state of the opposition or the future of Eritrea.
        Having said that, thank you for defending Dr. Bereket by giving an alternative context to his speech. Without the writing of you and others like you, I would probably have breathed a sigh of disappointment at what Dr. Bereket said.
        Finally, I am surprised that Sal seems to belittle the importance of tone in a debate. No wonder he is losing this debate in my opinion 🙂
        SA

    • Bayan Negash

      Ustaaz si tHisho d’a MS & Ismail,

      There is hardly anything that I will have any disagreement with your lucid points but would like to highlight this. You said, “…most Eritreans believe Ethiopia’s refusal to implement the border agreement has given PFDJ a formidable fortress where it could barricade itself from domestic calls to implementing rule of law.” If most Eritreans believe this to be the case, which I wholeheartedly agree with, then it would stand to reason for the opposition to disarm the regime by devising a “road map” as you rightly suggested that counters such a strategy that has given it a shelf-life. You’ve answered this – as far as I am concerned – when you said “…(Ethiopia should be pressured to implement the EEBC ruling) does not call on the opposition to boycott Ethiopia. It does not even call on PFDJ to go to war against Ethiopia. It does not give PFDJ any recognition for its destructive policies.” And then you added this: “But I’m comfortable with any political and logistical support an Eritrean opposition gets from neighbors provided that there are a united political platform and a clear roadmap.” We are not only on the same page, the same chapter, but I reckon we are on the same book, my friend. Now, how does one make the political opposition lot see their interest is better served when they have no more than ten minimal point plan that they can all sign to so they disarm the regime while they clearly spell out of what it is they want to see our neighbors in the south work with us on this. Call it pressure. Call it neighborly living arrangements. We have gotta to assure Ethiopia the opposition would be a far better partner than they have had in PFDJ. By the way not the extent the regime goes to inflict pain on its citizens, citizenry held hostage by a system run amok: file:///Users/BeyanNegash/Desktop/PFDJ’s%20Blackmaling%20a%20Former%20Supperte.htm?view=nocookies

      Sincerely,
      BN

    • Bayan Negash

      Dear MS & Ismail,

      The clip below is what I wanted to share with you gentlemen when I responded to you MS earlier this morning. This regime must be challenged on all fronts from what you eloquently articulated MS on its fake framing of territorial integrity as be all end all to the cultural and other frontiers. Here is one. I am of the opinion that we can not only counter the Eritrean regime’s state coffers that it uses to keep Eritreans in line to its whims, at times through propaganda and when need be through intimidation and blackmailing.

      The recent example is the planned concert that is slated to take place on the 21st of October 2017 in Rotterdam, Holland. Eritrean embassy in Holland through its YPFDJ issued the beware kind of smearing campaign claiming the duo was using Ethiopia’s influence to entertain Eritreans in diaspora.

      Here is another sort of blackmailing of a personal kind that the regime uses to keep its supporters in line. The young woman below shows determination not only to fight on the evil regime that knows no bounds of decency. It shows how much its supporters must sacrifice if they attempt to drop from the scene akin to the way gangs and mafiosos conduct themselves when someone tries to deviate from the line that has been drawn for them to follow. The anger in Yodit’s face, in her voice, and in her demeanor clearly shows the extent she is willing to fight on. This is the frontier we can all find a way of morally supporting courageous individuals like who tells it like it is despite the regime imprisoning her daughter and her mother.

      https://youtu.be/SCH02wewJH4

      • Kokhob Selam

        Dear BN..

        The entire nation is arrested …No single person is spared..

        KS,,

      • Amanuel Hidrat

        Selam Beyan,

        Whatever you make them to hear including the crying of the people, it does not change their hearts. It doesn’t matter to them what so ever. When their philosophy becomes “Sebay kilte zereba kihilowo Yeblun” it will take us down the hill. We submit to the powerful at the cost of our families and our people. The cry of the woman and her story is the story of every house hold in Eritrea. Damn….Damn.. we lost every kind of courage.

        • Bayan Negash

          Dear Aman,

          I hear your cry for our beloved country much as Paton (1948) did when he wrote “Cry, the Beloved Country”. Man, I can’t seem to get away from dead white men, I am afraid…darn it even in South Africa I am finding myself quoting white people to the chagrin of our Nitricc. At any rate, we’ve been so desensitized to a point of no amount of pain will faze us anymore. Somehow, someway, someday, we will eventually find our of the mess…that we cannot afford to lose hope on.

          Bn

  • Kokhob Selam

    Dear All,

    This is the most open article and we shouldn’t just read and pass it ..we have a lot discuss, come on!!!

    KS,,

  • Ismail AA

    Selam all,
    Dear SGJ and moderators! are you there and watching? Our dear brother Beyan spared a lot of time to give us here in this forum some serious matters to discuss, debate and learn from. A few comments later the substance and intention of the thread shifted to 4th gear and rolling down the road good Providence knows where it would stop. Does this do justices to writer and the time he invested in producing the article when we lose focus on passing comments and get bogged down in whether or not people trained in medical professions make good or bad politicians?

    • Bayan Negash

      MerHaba Ismail AA,

      I hear and heed your concerns. Remember though my dear brother, discourse at its best comes when its participants begin to discuss issues that are vitally pertinent and what fancies them at the moment in time it does. Dialogue needs to take its natural course. Some will fancy the most mundane matters; others about petty and tangential matters that they find fascinating. It used to be point of consternation for me in the past when I saw topics beings discussed that seemingly have nothing to do with the article. Look at how Dr. BB’s entry came in a round-about way, but unleashed some of the most passionate discourses at the last count of which it was close to 650 entries. This happened because one individual wrote something that triggered an avalanche of what others fancied…so on and so forth.

      I submit to you though, it did occur to me before I wrote it whether my input would be constructive when it squeaks at that space right before Dr. BB’s post shows up. I decided to share it while I knew all too well ‘forumers’ will be anxiously waiting for the man to give clarifying statements one way or another. But, what I found vitally important was that I share my impressions because there was a larger messaged that needed to be said that I felt I had to at the time I just now did. Sometimes, some articles are meant to be read and wallowed in and at other times they are meant to trigger discussions. I reckon mine falls under the former. Nonetheless, look what I learned subsequent my writing the article from friends who called to inform me of the dignified way in which Dr. BB leads his life as he helps our young who are in dire need as you may have seen in my response to MS. These are seemingly subtle matters, but are of monumental import that say a great del about the character of the man.

      In Facebook, for example, one individual wrote this: “This is a never ending discourse, even in the most democratic countries. Any country will never fail to accommodate the nationalists, the liberals, the globalists and what have you – all of which are important for the existence of a nation. These ideologues are the essential organs of a nation where one cannot exist without the other.”

      I answered few minutes ago as follows:

      I concur with every letter and spirit of the well crafted message here. No quarrel there. The only caveat that makes some such circular discourse detrimental for the diaspora to keep undermining one another has to do with this: That Eritrea is under a repressive regime, the likes of which it’s never seen one, where it goes out of its way to hollow out its vital source of economic, cultural, and sociopolitical means: Its youth and its young. That’s what makes Dr. Bereket Berhane’s argument of monument import. Otherwise, in any normal circumstance discourse of the sort you mentioned are vitally important component of being a healthy nation – Eritrea is nothing but…”

      And the band [the discourse] plays on, Ismail…I appreciate your matures, wise, and gregarious rejoinders…

      Cheers,
      BN

      • Ismail AA

        Hayak Allah alf kheir Beyan,

        I agree with you that casual and meaningful digressions that come with urgency as the one Paulos had raised in connection to BB’s speech are useful and those who track such things and alert us in this forum should be commended. But in my humble judgement discussing issues that are raised on the side of running thread should as much as possible supplement rather than submerge the message the running thread intended to pass. The effort and time of writers who spare time for us should get proper reward and that is exhausting the discussion and drawing conclusion thereof.

        My concern is about losing focus and discouraging erudite and skillful brothers and sisters from budgeting their time to contribute things that help us understand our national affairs better and those among us in positions to do something could be more equipped. Brothers like BB and you have been responsibly courageous just to do that which should be duly appreciated. I think what we are doing, sayin, writing, reading and listening are happening at critical juncture of our country and people that passing through real crisis phase of existence. What we do or not do would determine the future.

        • Bayan Negash

          Yahala Ismail AA,

          Your points are well taken. I am in complete agreement with your sensibilities here not because my piece happens to be the point of discussion, but the subject matter you raise merits broader dialogue in the way we each conduct ourselves. Something else to remember, too, weekend tends to be a time in which forumers like to engage in light hearted topics…that’s also something we should be cognizant of.

          Hawka,
          BN

        • Selamat Ayya IsmaelAA,

          Natural discourse reveals the indecisions, the preferences, pulls and tugs through the seemingly without due thought vested responses. The much ado about conversations signify more than meets the eye. Surely respect is mutual. Mutual exchanges and agreements are achieved, when without undermining any questioner, the direct question is answered with a direct response.

          Slow is slow is slow is slower. We know who are bartering with Eritrean lives. We have known who are the official spokes persons of these traders. So when Berhe Y asks me a veteran “when was the last time I asked the PFDJ to comply with the UNSC” I can only be as indignant as you and join the adgis as if I needed to learn how to pass gas.

          Direct your complaint at specific persons as I have.

          What should we first gain from Beyan’s submission. I think it is with appreciation CDA.

          tSAtSE

          • Ismail AA

            Ahlem tSAtSE Solomon wedi Hawey,
            My concern (and yours too) is that ” much ado about nothing conversations” should not be so greedy and take the lion’s share of space at the expense much to do conversations article writers want us to do. Your sort of allegorical point on knowing “who are bartering with Eritrean lives” is well taken. Devils that think others are too inept to recognize them by just wanting to take the place of angels have no shame.

          • Selamat Ayya Ismael AA,

            “Devils that think others are too inept to recognize them by wanting to take the place of angels have no shame.”

            I beg your pardon, but nothing gained in moving the discussion or the overall goal oriented motion forward. Simply a positional statement. And I beg your pardon for resenting “a lion’s hare of space at the expense…” A lion’s share of space and time was yielded to. And only the price tag and real losses we should probably higher auditors for whatever it is worth.

            Yes it is like Devils hiding behind women and children… hard to differentiate who is an angle or a devil. Trust me, I have lived and live with it first hand.

            tSAtSE

        • Amanuel Hidrat

          Selam Beyan & Ismail,

          Generally speaking our society are not good readers, hence debating on big issues will be limited accordingly, and slowly derailed to unrelated issue of less importance.

  • Selamat Awetawyan

    Statement of HE Minister of Foreign Affairs Osman Saleh: TGIWeekend.

    http://www.shabait.com/news/local-news/24848-statement

    tSAtSE

    • saay7

      Hey tSatSe:

      Annnnd? I am sure you have an opinion or two on the speech.

      The UN is an interesting place to say the least. Before Eritrea, the scheduled speaker was Iraq and guess what its speech was focused on? A request to excercise its right to have nuclear weapons. It’s like the 1990s all over again.

      saay

      • Ney Saay7,

        It is like the ‘asmarian’s’ looking over Hadrian’s wall calling the Irish uncivilized because they were not conquered by the Romans. This would be my first opinion.

        Sure, it is time for nuclear proliferation talk as much as it is for a legitimate concern for one’s nationals topical address presented as part of the “dog and pony” show. What is that the Americans call it? A circus! thats right. I have also took a peak at Mugabe’s David staring at the Goliath?

        How interesting is the UN? Do we have an observers seat? That would be real media deprived, because information is power. That is right power Admiral VIIII7

        tSAtSE

        • Paulos

          Tsatse Arkey,

          You see how eloquent you’re when you want to! We get lost when you pull us to the encrypted world and I say please keep us pinned down in the former instead. You’is da’best!

  • said

    Thank you Beyan Negash.
    Greeting,
    in the Dreams of finding Eritrean leadership

    Psychological warfare is getting the better of us in the Eritrean World, politicians and statesmen more than intellectuals and lay people. Self-deprecation, heralded the good part of the time by our non-representative regime, is the hallmark of the present general mood in Eritrean I came to this shocking realization after moments of reflection for some time.

    Eritrean in search contemporary leader who entwined concept of personal welfare with the grander cause of the deliverance of the Eritrean masses. As excessive extroverts are prone to delinquent conducts, great leader will harnessed our youths’ excessive energies into captivating ambitions of realizing loftier goals of freedom, social justice and economic welfare for all.

    If many Eritrean felt robbed of a future, they were not wrong. Eritrean ’s future was indeed stolen — by the present regime. especially Eritrean young people, need to be part of something much bigger than themselves or even their nation and families, some immense idea to devote one’s life high education and opportunity to come.
    The plight of Eritrean these refugees is known fact , we all witnessed first hand as Eritrean youth in the display of injustice and assault on Eritrean human in their most naked forms. With predominantly simple agrarian economy of limited job opportunities, the luckiest among these bodily-abled refugees could wind up performing menial jobs as hired hands running domestic chores or field works to earn a near subsistence level of an income. The pains and miseries of their fresh, amp Eritrean marked on their wounded souls and battered human pride. The poor peasant , they often recited, with a twinge of exaggeration of forgone convenient amenities to gloss over their humiliations, were an outlet, a source of relief in the face of helplessness, despair and dehumanization. Instead, their exclusion has given Eritreans the sense of being outcasts and victims — which, in turn, has given credence to embittered jingoists, dictator, merciless and ruthless IA , who see all the disasters that have befallen in this small beautiful country over the past 27 years.

    A leader with honest incredible articulation of the grievances and the aspirations of the downtrodden masses, and bring Eritrea dignity (Raise our head, brother and ister ), appealed immeasurably to the oppressed Eritrean populace. A leader with embodiment of the saviour, the messiah long-in-awaiting. After a long age of superpowers’ conspiracies and colonization of eritreans lands, culminating in the loss creation of the refugees’ problem, a leader true quality s revolting outcries galvanized th comam man and wowmen in the street. Will first time in half centuries, an Eritrean leader appeared to show us one face and speak with one tongue. The leader will sprang from the midst of the commoners. He will be a no detached blue blood ruler, securely fastened to a seat of power of the design and dimensions of not a ruthless leader .

    Eritrean need grand designs for a free and strong Eritrean faced, from the very inception, the constraints of local, regional and superpowers’ geopolitical designs and realities not withstanding most of it our own making . and the premature assumption of the leadership of the movement of Eritrean was in cooking for long time
    Legitimate criticisms of the IA Nasser are abound. Some center on his ruthless leadership
    controversies over abuse of power, some enumerate the blunders of mismanagement of the economy Eritrean and others highlight the unjustified ill-conceived and costly military and political adventures, such as the badema debacle. What, in all fairness, are overlooked in such analysis are the hard realities of looming conspiracies to frustrate and thwart ’s plan Eritrean s to empower the people for a better future.
    One day history will told The archives are thrive will be open declassified documents attesting to the extent and depth of designs of dominating western powers of the today and time to come , a constant catalyst and a proxy in brewing the conspiracies. The details of the clandestine talks at Sevres.
    Eritrean need their objective to be outlined The Philosophy of building a nation , Eritrean vision and the vision of Eritrean opposition and their colleagues, the objectives of their Eritrean. Very humble Simple six objectives that are all centered on longer-term solutions to lingering social, economic and security ills besetting the lives and well-beings of the Eritrean people. A leader , as a grand reformer, aspired to jumpstart a campaign of modernization that would launch his country into the age of an industrialized nation and beyond .

    Why were EPLF collective leaders were willing to take such unconscionable risks with the fate of Eritrea ? Why did so many of them believe in dead worthy less inhuman cruel ideologies that they, at other times, would have realized could not possibly remedy and hold all the economic solutions they were looking for? .which at very least blindly pretended that all Eritrean could enter their promised paradise of new nation.
    like the Eritrea today, had a lot of clear obvious sickening ills. We Eritrean know well ,the injustice and oppression became more obvious to us and visible .Eritrean political issues of concern beyond Eritrean s territory should be avoided .

    Eritrean’s doctrine and philosophy should be stemmed from a humanist’s concern for the well being of the downtrodden masses and the legitimacy of national dignity. a leader with universalist in his outlook to life, matching his motto “the Cause of Justice is Indivisible; and the Cause of Freedom is Indivisible,” a leader with strong humanism and universal values, found strong expressions in his active role to mitigate the effects of the current Eritrean situation and no cold war, and no need ills of the ideological rivalry in a bipolar world bent on extreme capitalism and communism ideologies .
    America and the West in general are starting to recede position, by default, as leaders of the world, setting the cadence of world political events and singularly forcing their agendas on the world in what so-called World Order. The post-Cold War era was therefore not an aberration but a continuity and confirmation of an absolute historical purpose for the United States. Gradually, however, over the course of the generation that has passed since the Cold War, the United States has become less and less able to afford global predominance.

    With the emergence of BRICKS and the Shanghai Group, representing more than half of the entire world population as intent on building parallel and alternative supranational institutions to the Western-dominated ones, e.g. World Bank and the IMF, the Western powers and their historic allies will start to diminish in influence and power. The consequence is an America less prepared than it could have been to deal with the big challenges of the future: the rise of China and India, the transfer of economic power from West to East. China is often seen as a major beneficiary of the Cold War.

    Given the BRICKS’ rising economic power; continuing prospects of high economic growth; excellent foreign exchange reserves; increasing command of the know-how and technology; and both enhancing and more assertive military prowess and technologies, the balance in the World Order will start fast changing.

    The new emerging World Order will be more consensual, operating out of a fairer win-win formulas as excellent examples of which are being set by the Chinese in Africa and the Southeast Asians’ environs. We can start witnessing, in the longer foreseeable future, a more stable and a better more Morally Guided and functional World as variance of the Wild Capitalist, Neoliberal Opportunistic and exploitative agendas.

    In the author Charles Dickens “The Tale of Two Cities”, “the Great Expectations” and “David Copperfield.” As I came across Dickens’ vivid narratives of poignant emotional scenes as I was absorbed in those readings, I appreciated great humble servant leader ’s reasons for an answer to the “why” Charles Dickens of all the renowned novelists. The deduced response was because of Dickens’ incredible ability to vividly relate human sufferings. Those deep humanitarian sentiments hopefully will shape great leader ambitious and far-reaching social and economic reforms, notwithstanding the insurmountable challenges to their fructuous implementation, not the least of which the voracious and ravaging designs by some internal and external enemies . Always the little downtrodden non-entity, forgotten lot, that mattered and should appealed the most qualified leader with the humanist heart . NO cult of personality, must a be true leader of a nation. the epitome of a dream, of the deliverance of the Eritrean masses and the redressement of wrongs befallen the refugee and dispossessed Eritrean ,That hope leader will guide Eritrean national strong civil institution .

    Eritrean will popularise free education and healthcare for all. A leader should emphasized the need to industrialize Eritrea and improve the standard of living of the Eritrean people. A great many learning institutions and hospitals must be built. Suddenly, Eritrea will belonged to all the Eritrean and not to the privileged mere IA his cohort less of ½ of 1% of the total population representing the cruelest and PFDJ monopolies. Eritrean New economic will be need to activated and will be sprang, with new institutions creating a great many jobs to absorb the new manpower of population.
    All these thoughts crossed my mind at the solemn moments of my pose about Eritrean youth. At least, this how, as my mind simplistically perceived the realities as nourished by Eritrean s promises, always viewed from the optic of a more benign and a trusting universe.

    • Kokhob Selam

      Dear said,

      Since you are with such knowledge, why don’t write an article?

      KS,

      • said

        Thank you so much for your input and suggestion KS ,it is much easier to write as opinion and cover wider scope .it is not so easy to write Politics ,obviously I may have self-interested reasons for denying that they, the other may have misinterpreted, miscalculated and then persisted in their opinion. Eritrean write their opinion for many different reasons, Those with narrow mind and agenda interest-induced myopia allows some of them to believe that if they only stick to their strategy they will prevail suddenly . This is certainly the case with Our Eritrean situation that deals with very serous matter of death and destruction by own countrymen. When one write an excellent essay it have to be so rightly and so timely diagnostic of the Eritrean problem squarely pointing to the futile moving in the void of in a lingering self-fulfilling prophecy of self-righteously and not so blinded PFDJ polity stuck to a stone age dominant political culture of the “Politics of Expediency” never reaching to the root causes of our problem and bravely facing up to effectively solving it equipped with the courage of conviction and with intellectual integrity.one have to write in considering widely and deeply that having hit it right on the nail showing it in simple straightforward logic and what seems at time to virtually lie at the roots of what otherwise remains the unsolvable Conundrum of the ravaging our country that is Plaguing Eritrean, that we all are victims . The dominating political atmosphere, political discussions and political discourse in the political quarters in Asmara are very reminiscent of the coming Final Days end of regime like former regimes that they are bygone in short TIME and this will come to end to come.

    • Bayan Negash

      Thank you Said for giving detailed narrative about leadership. There is a lot to unpack here. I owe you one in that I hope to reread it so I may offer my rejoinder in due course. I agree with KS, you should entertain the idea of writing articles.

      Again, many thanks for taking the time to share your thoughts.

      Cheers,
      Beyan

      • said

        Thank you very much for sharing. This is a very deep, extremely eloquent, comprehensive and inclusive an article with concentrated style and expressions. A quite impressive and admirable, the obvious deep sense of patriotism and caring touching on a deep sense of duty as most exemplified with the eloquence and strong communicative verbiage that with the Eritrean politicos of verbiage, poignantly gets the message clearly across.

  • Ismail AA

    Hayak Allah ustazna Beyan Negash,

    Please accept my sincere gratitude for gracing this wonderful forum with a well-written and robustly argued article on a timely issue. Investing the time it took to elaborate in a concise form the disparate comments that Dr. Berekhet’s speech has unleashed in this forum is extremely useful contribution supported by reading and summarizing relevant material. It is a welcome addition to serious debate on ways of how to re-approach the opposition and its work to change course towards separating the regime’s power sustaining strategy by holding our people’s patriotic attachment to the border and similar issues in relation to the national sovereignty and the work of the opposition. Your contribution has added emphasis and power to Dr. BB’s call, which the mainstream of the elites should realize if they choose to be part of our people’s positive future rather than becoming accomplices in the ruining of the nation by way of silence or active participation in the service of the regime.

    • Bayan Negash

      allah yHayyik Ismil AA,

      You have a way of capturing the letter and the spirit of people’s ideas through the written word. This is no exception. You’ve delineated the areas the opposition should do its due diligence to reframe the issues. Much appreciated, Ismail, for your encouraging words, as always.

      Cheers,
      Beyan

  • Haile S.

    Selam Beyan,
    You seem to be calling for a public confessional.
    The close door confessional still works. All of us ruminate, regret what we did and said wrong and celebrate with a smile what we did/said right. The public confessional exist as well, silently in debates, idea by idea, perhaps not as explicitly as wished to an influential or exemplary degree. However, calling for group hara-kiri of idea (events of 98-2000) especially when blended in an innocently or wishfully framed dichotomy reminescent of “either with us or against us” is counterproductive. Isn’t that the kind of thought that partially led us to the troubles we are in in the first place?
    I GET IT, I think many do as well; the country bleeding of its young demands urgency. In that sense, except for the ‘sentionalization’ of the dichotomy, YOUR IDEAS ARE WELL TAKEN. They are very constructive.
    I am not going back to BB’s controversied comments or your take on that, I am waiting his post.
    On a lighter note, when we were huddling up in front of door steps, some of us were picking fresh elfa bread from the basket on the bread-distributor’s bike, poor guy. You might have not known this, I look older than you. I never did BTW; here you go I am publicly confessing.

    • Paulos

      Selam Hailat,

      That’s what I had in mind actually and decided not to post a comment. Alffa and Samarsoni….fresh from the basket. That said, here is something not bothering me so to speak but makes me wonder. Why is that we refer or address someone who is a physician as a Dr. anywhere and everywhere when the issue and the place is remotely related either to medicine or hospital. If you meet the person say Bereket at his work place and seeing him about issues related to health, maybe it is appropriate to address him as a Dr. but again what is the reason when he is addressing not related to medicine and in this forum. I don’t get it. Really.

      • Amanuel Hidrat

        Paulosay,

        That is his “educational title” from an accredited college of medicine. To call him otherwise is disprespect in any set of discussion.

        • Paulos

          Selam Emma,

          How is that even disrespect when the degree of Doctor of Medicine awarded to him is in its place. Do we have to address say an accountant as Accountant “Gebre” for instance.

          • Saleh Johar

            Paulos,
            Catch up! You would appreciate that if you Egypt where everybody is bash muhndis Paulos or some other title proceeding the name. We do it in Eritrea. Haven’t you heard engineri Asghedom or Ragineri Ahmed or even memoir Negash? What do you say Ustaz Paulos:-)

          • Thomas

            HI SGJ,

            hahaha that is funny. In Eritrea, there are many who live behind a fake a title. Many nurses (or practical nurses not even RN nurses) are called DOTRE. Also, many who don’t have engineering degree are called engineers:) Enjoy the George character in the Seinfeld show:

            https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0u8KUgUqprw

          • Nitricc

            Is it weekend or people with low IQ are excused and okay they break the law? Response and clarification for from authority is appreciated for clarification purpose.

          • Thomas

            Hi Awatista,

            I thought Friday is part of the weekend. I think the useless guy is trying to cause trouble here. If I have broken any forum policy, please accept my apology and delete or I can delete my posting above.

          • Nitricc

            If it is not for your low IQ then Weekends are Saturdays and Sundays. Since when if Friday a weekend? you must be a job less.

          • Nitricc,

            Your salutation is missing here. The other one up top the Filho must have had it for lunch.

            tSAtSE

          • Paulos

            Ayay,

            Yea I heard the stuff in Egypt. And it is true that it is a cultural thing but don’t you think that it is cumbersome and redundant to address Bereket as Dr. Bereket everytime he is relevant in the comments.

          • Thomas

            Hi Paulos,

            I think it has to do with how close you are to the person is. Say if the person is your friend, colleague or relative, you can simply refer them with their first names and nothing else matters. I have to say this because some expertise like their work titles (Mr/S, Dr., Prof, Engineer etc:). I think it is a decision the person has to make. So, the safest thing to do is to include their titles when referring them unless you are well acquainted with them.

          • Saleh Johar

            Hi Thomas,
            The Germans ask “Konnen wir dudsen?” (Sp ?)and they go from du to sie. You to plural you like attum Hawna!

          • Amanuel Hidrat

            Paulosay,

            I hope we are not calling you as Paulos, when we should call you Dr Paulos. If the referred accountant, say suppose Mr “Saay”has the title “Dr”, then he should be called Dr Saay. The title is prestigious title and ought to be respected.

          • Paulos

            Emma,

            I sure never wanted to be called by a tittle maybe when it is needed say in a work place. That is precisely the reason I say there is no need to “bother” addressing one as a Dr. when we should say Bereket instead. And it can intimidate people and can be a psychological block as well.

          • Nitricc

            Hey P: Medical Doctors are the worst in politics. I don’t know what it is but not only it is a very bad mix but once in politics, they lose all common-sense.

          • Paulos

            Nitrikay,

            Well, here is the deal. Intellectuals are generally “timid” in the sense that they make bad leaders but superb in analyzing otherwise complex scenarios. One can cite Woodrow Wilson but the rest are or were career “professionals” when we see US leaders for instance (I can see Sal rubbing his chin). When it comes to medicine however, physicians are not intellectuals in the strict sense of the term for practice medicine itself is not pure science for it could be subjective as well including Psychiatry. That said, when it comes to problem solving, the entire training in medicine is problem solving and I say they have an edge in that regard. The reason they probably suck at politics is not lack of understanding the dynamics in politics rather I would think lack of political will as in courage.

          • saay7

            Nitrric:

            Life is more complex than that: think of that anytime you want to me categorical statements. Some medical doctors were good politicians and some really bad. And since being good in politics (finding creative ways to get and hold power) is different from doing good with politics (improving lives of your people), you will also find MDs in both categories probably the most famous ones bring Bashar Al Asad and Baby Doc Duvalier.

            During the 2015 Ethio elections I remember during a debate one of the opposition politicos grilling the then foreign minister of Ethiopia “hey, you are a Medical Doctor: what qualifies you to be a Foreign Minister.” Maybe the Foreign Minister listened: he ran to be the chief of WHO and he won (he was the African candidate Eritrea was one of the countries which voted for him). Now: you don’t think running a huge org like WHO doesn’t require political skills?

            saay

          • Paulos

            Sal,

            Tedros Adhanom is actually a Ph.D not MD.

          • saay7

            Paulos:

            I stand corrected: he is not an MD; he hired and fired MDs:) It’s probably because his undergrad and grad studies were focused on malaria research and he was minister of health before he was minister of foreign affairs that we make the mistake of assuming he is an MD.

            saay

          • Saay7,

            It is like the Secretary General for Atomic Energy is not a nuclear physicist. What is it with the dropping of names? Should I question whether or not a PFDJ CPA for his certification if he is a lousy accountant. Derivatives or not all investors are gamblers and crooks.

            Do a RobertD impersonation in an Uber. “Are you talking to me? Are you talking to me? are you talking to me?”

            It is all nonsense. Whether it comes from an accredited U or Aya U. So where do we start making the X markers to delineate territory? I know here: Abbu X. Ain’t no such thing as a free lunch.

            Abbu AAshera Weapon X – Evolution

            tSAtsE

          • Nitricc,

            How are Baby Doc Duvalier and Bashar Al Assad different? I ask only because a good example would be diverse. It seems I am missing to bridge this because my aversion to the Ton Ton Macute?
            Also, is the directive from both big Papas for the sons to be Docs an indication of the benevolent dictators? What can be said of other benevolent dictators who produce UPAs as sons?

            Here you must heed Dr. Paulos’ suggestion earlier when he said “beware of your enemies who are being nice to you.” but kindly answer the above questions.

            tSAtSE

          • Amanuel Hidrat

            Paulosay,

            Now that I know you are with a doctor title, get use to it you will be called Dr Paulos. No pressure and no intimidation from it.

          • Emma,

            Should we call President Isaias Afeworki, Isaias? How about President Donold Trump, “SOB”?

            Whom is to blame for not calling any elder “uncle.”? Incidentally, since it is TGIF, the term “Ayay” is derived from Mai doh tSeba and or when yo uncle open a can of whup ings. Yeah, what is that term of endearment you have for your contemporary gentleman scholar who just mentioned the failure to account for derivatives in audits.

            n Tomyyy ye Lemont: Derivative is the f(x)—> sneAemurawi werarr laEli ambeb. “No child left behind.”

            Memhr Mez for example.

            tSAtSE

          • Nitricc

            Hey P; hahahahah ” Accountant “Gebre” lol that is funny. I have a question for you though, why is when it comes to accountants, there is this “Certified public accountant” I mean I have never seen any other disciplines such discrepancy. I mean , I never heard people say ” certified public doctor, lawyer, pharmacist etc, why for the Accountant Gebre’s such discrepancy?

          • Paulos

            Nitrikay,

            That is a good question. I really don’t know to be honest.

          • saay7

            Nitrric:

            Until Peace (an accountant) comes to explain things to you a CPA (certified public accountant) is someone who has met the requirements set by a professional association (Work experience, passing a tough exam whose pass rate is below 50% for first timers like the bar exam) to become one. In many businesses—including highly regulated, publicly funded or publicly-traded companies—a year-end audit that is not conducted by a CPA is below standard (unacceptable.)

            saay

          • Nitricc

            Hey Sal Thanks for explanation and you are right Peace came through and it all makes sense now. I know there some Amharic lovers in here who are hooked in the trashy show, the likes of Seyfu, don’t want people talk about academics but it is all good. How low one can be to get mad because people they won’t respond to his garbage. Hold on i will post latest Seyfu’s garbage if the moda promises not to delete it. lol

          • Peace!

            Hi Nitrric,

            CPA is a licensed accountant qualified to sign and represent a client for audit purpose; similarly, an accountant can do all the work, except audit and reviews. The core differences are licensing, fiduciary responsibility, taxes and regulations, state requirements and codes of ethics.

            Peace!

          • Paulos

            Selamat Peace,

            Just curious though, what makes the certification exam so hard that first time takers pass is below 50%? What kind of exam could it be? Really.

          • Peace!

            Selam Paulosay,

            The exam consists of four parts: financial, audit, Tax, and law, and relatively speaking, each part takes up to 4.5 hours to finish the exam. It covers almost everything and the responsibility can also be huge given the practice is pretty much about detecting fraud.

            Peace!

          • Paulos

            Thank you Peace. I appreciate!

          • Peace,

            Can you say Fiduciary? The article by Professor Beyan, excellent read on language. CDA analysis for literature majors.

            tSAtSE

          • Paulos,

            Weedout process. Similar to the MCAT. Lots more people counting as opposed to healing is the anecdote here/

            tSAtSE

          • Paulos

            Tsatse,

            MCAT is a monster but if you make it through the feeling is awesome.

          • Peace,

            Similar EA. No, Lemont, that is note the great grand child of Atari, Discourse subtleties and ideology. Substitution method partial differentiation.

            tSAtSE

          • Nitricc

            Hey Peace thank you sir. Now it makes sense. Thank you. There are worthless history majors on this forum and when you talk about real disciplines, they might get angry with you lol. what a pathetic character!

      • Haile S.

        Hi Paul, Emma, SGJ,
        As Saleh said it is a cultural thing in our countries. I am not exaggerating if I say ጸንጢልካኒ ኢሎም ዝባን ንጉስ ዝልዓሉ። Even the one who collects salt block (ኣሞሌ) near dalol had a tittle, I think በልጋዳ. Imagine በልጋዳ ሃይለ! I think in most countries, people address physicians with their title. Less in France, it is not shoking if you call you Dr. Monsieur Levebvre or Madame Lafond.

        • Saleh Johar

          Hi Haile
          And you accept to be treated by someone named laberbere 🙂

          • Paulos

            Funny!

          • Haile S.

            Saleh,
            ሓቅኻ ክሕከም ክብል ብሃንትሸው ክመውት 🙂 🙂 . You got me. I did a mistake in his name. Now corrected.

          • Al Qadi Johar, S:

            When I fill out forms, I am always reminded of when my middle name was born. M is the initial.

            On Macro Forms: La Forma dela Primavera

            Laberbere mrirr,
            riEsi Galina sberberr
            deHriou mengebgeb fir ferr
            biati sber sber nab friq naqfa
            enkab Hilmi brirr kab bir
            sbirr bir sbir bir

            Sobur Wude:

            Leberbere sraH Gar wede sraH Fenqil
            niencho Laboro koboro merero 🙂

            tSAtSE

    • Saleh Johar

      Selam Haile,
      Every “asmarion” needs to confess they stole from the poor beles sellers–an escapade they reminisce effectiobatley with no regret!

      • Haile S.

        Selam Saleh,
        You remind me of my notorious Aya. We were in Akria at that time. He will call the guy. We will select all the beles we want and then he will tel my mom ሳንዳይ እስኪ እንጀራ ጨውን በርበረን ጌርኪ ሃብዮ። ገንዘብ እንታይ ክገብረሉ እዩ። ንእንጀራ እንድዩ ዝሽቅጥ ዘሎ። The poor has no choice, will accept murmuring.

        • Paulos

          Hailat,

          Are you sure that uncle of yours is not Isaias Afwerki?

          • Haile S.

            Paul,
            You are funny! No he became a teacher later. If you went to Biet Giorgis JH school, my uncle might have taught you history.

      • SJG.

        Ha ha, now you are sounding like your old self. Vibrant and energetic. niow beloa letharrgy ney weldezgi.

        Ideologylogy

        tSAtSE

    • Bayan Negash

      Selam Haile S.,

      I completely understand for choosing to hear it from the man’s mouth – point well taken. I didn’t mean for us to have confessional boxes in our respective communities… rather for us to not only to be cognizant of it, especially, those who hold public spaces should speak up the way Dr. BB has done. Public discourse can become a space of illumination and aha moments if we do it with purposeful intent.

      For the lighter note part, I was precisely thinking what SGJ shared below about beles. market that was located in Edaga Arbi. May the the cosmos forgive us, we’ve done our share of akla waharba (eat-and-run without paying, of course) from Edaga Arbi area all the way to our headquarters in Akhriya… these were childhood vices. Good to hear from you, Haile S.

      Cheers,
      Beyan

      • Haile S.

        Selam Beyan,
        No question, BB’s and your input are percuting. The horse will say something about it in my way. Now at the risk of driving astray the core message of urgency, let me mention names of place of our childhood place: going from Edga arbi to downtown akria you pass by riga-somal (hmm). Before the Italians, akria’s wild name was daEro meKan (ዳዕሮ መኻን), a place heavily trampled, filled with bones and blood of the war between degiat Hailu and ra’esi weldemichael (source: Yishaq Yosef, ንግስነት ሃገር ምድሪ ባሕሪ).

  • MS

    Selam kboor wo Hfoor Dr. Beyan (or soon to be Dr.)
    I find interesting material in this beautifully written article. I understand I don’t have to agree to everything you say and in turn I understand that I should not expect you to confirm with everything I say. We are adults; we agree where we agree and disagree where we disagree. The process of building consensus and reconciliation speeds up when we recognize this crucial aspect that each of us constitutes an independent entity that should be respected as such. Necessity draws us closer to cooperate because we have to address a task that demand inputs from the actors involved (in this case, Eritreans from all diverse political views). Building a platform that reflects the diverse views and agendas while at the same time using the diversity as a dynamo for advancing the common cause requires that: a/ an understanding that the participants need a common approach to address the challenge (reminiscent of the motto: united we stand, divided we fall); b/ a consensus on how best to address it (technicality); c/ a common understanding of the nature and magnitude of the outcome they expect from their common endeavor, knowing that each of them will have to sacrifice certain demands in order to sustain the undertaking. Usually, individuals and groups are more likely to be willing to compromise as the the common challenge gets more urgent. Obviously, the current state of the opposition tells me that there is something missing in here. So now instead of focusing on what is missing, instead of having courage to examine the main cause creating the impasse, folks are shopping for scapegoats.
    I’m not commenting any more on Dr. BB. As i said before, I will give him the benefit of the doubt; and I’m waiting fpor his article to see how he clarifies the area of his speech that caused the controversy. i am looking forward to seeing how he could reconcile his speech with his stated position for the “inviolability” of Eritrean sovereignty. I was certainly encouraged by his engagement.
    As i see it, we are not debating on a concrete plan. There is no one hindering the folks who have been de-emphasizing patriotism “for the sake of saving” our people. No one. There is no party that said we should regain our territory before fighting for justice. i repeat no one has said that. If there any, we have challenged you guys time and again.
    However, there is a reality on which any entity worth of speaking on behalf of Eritreans should have a principled position.That is the border issue. According to the argument you are trying to buttress, Amanuel Eyassu who asked Dr. Berhane to clarify his position on that subject is what? A supporter of PFDJ? If, as an Eritrean, i were to ask you what your stance was in the border issue, would you be ashamed, as Dr. BB said he was? Why would calling for EEBC ruling to be implemented constitute as hindering the task of “liberating” out people? Where is the energy and resource diverted from the fight for justice? Is there an instance where this issue [calling for the inviolable sovereignty of Eritrea, its land, people and the state- please differentiate between the state and the party at its helm] has created a considerable hinderance for the forces who are truly committed to seeing a better Eritrea? Mind you i did not say PFDJ should continue its rule until the border is demarcated.
    Generally, I’ an admirer of the person Beyan negash, I believe you have an interest in seeing a betterment of our country; you are a heck of an intellectual; i expected you to come up with a reconciliation tone, putting things where they should.
    Here I present an excerpt from an article I wrote within hours, when I was under tremendous pressure, literally as i was watching Eritrean representative making his government case in front of the UN body hearing reports on human violations. It was visceral, I meant it then; I mean it now. This is to show you that if we could tweak certain areas most of us are not that far apart; we all like to see a better future set in motion for our beloved country before the sun sets on us. That’s all. It is easy to fall for self-praising and for claiming moral upper hand. Having a moral stand is something, and translating that moral stand into political action in order to bring change is something else. The first one entails a personal statement on, or a conviction that something is right or wrong. The second one demands apply all political skills in order to rally people to change what you morally believed is wrong. It needs not only a moral position but a strategy to translate thsat moral indignation into actionable plan. For that to happen we will have to have principled stands on key issues that many Eritreans consider are important to them. Anyway, Please don’t skip the last quotation because it deals with the discussion we are having on sovereignty.
    With Respect.
    “እቲ ምኽያት ናይ ምንዋሕ ሃገራዊ ኣገልግሎት ናብ ኢትዮጵያ እንተኣጸጋዕካዮ፡ እቲ ኣብ ውሽጢ እቲ ኣገልግሎት ዝግበር ግህሰት ሰብኣዊ መሰላት ግን ከመይ ኣቢልካ ኢኻ ናብ ኢትዮጲያ ክተልግቦ ትኽእል?”
    ““ቀደም ኲናት፡ ሕጂ ከኣ ‘ኣይኲናት ኣይሰላም’ ንፖለቲካዊ መስርሕ ዓንቒፍዎ” ኢልካ ትገልጽ። ሕራይ ንብዙሕነት ፖለቲካ ብከምኡ ነመኽንየሉ። ምኽንያት ናይ ስእነት ግዝኣተ-ሕጊ ኸ እንታይ እዩ? ኣብታ ሃገር መባእታዊ ምሕላው መሰላት ንኸይህሉ ከመይ ኢሉ እዩ ጉዳይ ዶብ ክጸልዎ። ንኣብነት ኣነን ንስኻን እንፈልጦም ሰባት ንሓሙሽተ ወይ እውን ንዓስርተ ዓመታት ተኣሲሮም፡ ምኽንያት መእሰሪኦም እውን ከይተነግሮም ክፈትሕዎም ንርኢ። ንኸይዛረቡ እውን ተኣጊዶም። ኣነን ንስኻን እንፈልጦም፡ ብዙሓት ኣበይ ከምዘለዉ ዘይፍለጡን፡ እቶም ሃላዋቶም ዝፍለጥ እውን ብዘይፍርድን ስድርኦም ከይረኣዩን ኣብ ኣብያተ ማእሰርቲ ይበልዩ ኣለው። ሓሳብካ ናይ ምግላጽ ጉዳይ ንጎኒ ገዲፍና፡ እታ “ፍትሕን ሓርነትን ዝዓሰላ ሃገር ክንሃንጽ ንጋደል ኣሎና” ትብላ ዝነበርካ ኣበይ ኣቢላ? ጉዳይ ዶብ ከ ከምይ ኢሉ እዩ መመኽነዪ ምርጋጽ መባእታዊ መሰላት ዝኸውን? ኣዘዝቲ ሰራዊ ከይተረፉ ንሰባት ብ”ይጽነሓለይ” ናብ ኣብያተ ማእሰርቲ ይዳጉኑ ከምዝነበሩ ብኡ ዝሓለፉ ኣዕሊሎምኒ። እቲ ቐጻሊ ግፋን ግፍዕን ኸ መርኣያ ተቓውሞ መንእሰያት ‘ዶ ኣይኮነን?”
    “ዝበዝሕ ኤርትራዊ ኣብ ዓድና ፍትሒ ክነግስን ሂወት ናብ ንቡራ ክትምለስን እዩ ዝደሊ። ካብ ተመክሮይ ከምዝረኣኽዎ፡ ዝበዝሑ ካብቶም ጸላእቲ ኤርትራ እትብሎም ሰባት፡ ብዘይካ ሰናይ ኤርትራ ካልእ ሕቡእ ኣጀንዳ የብሎምን። መንግስቲ ኤርትራ ሰናይ መገዲ እንተዝመርጽ፡ ልኡላውነት ናይ ህዝቢ ምኻኑ እንተዘረጋግጽ፡ እቶም “መንድስቲ ክግምጥሉ ይደልዩ” ኢልካ እትኸሶም ወገናት ጸግዖም ምሓዙ። ምኽንያቱ፡ ኣብ መወዳእታ እቲ ወሳኒ ህዝቢ እዩ። መንግስቲ ኤርትራ ዝኽተሎ ዘሎ ሜላ ግን ህዝቢ ናብ ጎነጽን ጥሩፍነትን ከም ዘብል እዩ ዝገብር። ምኽንያቱ ንጨፍላቕን መላኽን መንግስቱ ክንድ’ዚ ዕድል ዝሃበ ህዝብታት ኣዝዮም ውሑዳት እዮም።”
    “ልኡላውነት ሃገር ክትደጋገም እሰምዕ እየ። ብሰንኪ ምስምስ ልኡላውነት ሃገር ደቂ ኤርትራ ክኸላበቱን ክሓስሩን እንክርኢ “እንታይ እዩ እዚ ናይ ልኡላውነት ነገር” ክብልን ርእሰይ ክሓክኽን ጸኒሐ። ኣምባሳደር ወዲ ገራህቱ፡ ኩልና ከምእንፈልጦ፡ ልኡላውነት ሃገርና ክንክልልን፡ ርእሳ ዝኸእለት ኣሃዱ ኮይና ክትቐውምን ብዙሕ ሃላኽ ኣሕሊፍና ኢና። ምንትኡ ትፈትዎም ብጾትካ ከፊልካ ኢኻ። ምእንቲ ምርግጋጽ ልኡላውነት ኤርትራ፡ ትፈትዎ ጅግና ሓውኻ ተቐጥቒጡ ምስጢር መታን ከየውጽእ ብከኒና ሰያናይድ ሂወቱ ኣሕሊፉ እዩ። ዕላማ ልኡላውነትን ዶባትን ግን ኣብ ውሽጣ ርግኣት ዝዓሰላ ሃገር፡ ልኡላዊ ህዝቢ ዝነብረላ ኤርትራ ትበሃል ስድራ-ቤት ክንምስርት እዩ ነይሩ እምበር መቐጥቐጥን መዐፈንን ህዝባ ዝኸውን መካበብያ ወይ ዘሪባ ክንነድቕ ኣይኮነን። ሃገር ምስ መሬታን መንግስታን ህዝባን መማዕበልን መመሓየሽን ሂወት ነበርታን እንተኾነት እምበር፡ ዜጋታታ ዝጭፍለቑሉን ዝዳጐኑሉን ግቢ እንተኾነት እንታይ ጥቕሚ ኣለዋ? እቲ ኤርትራውያን ዝወሰድዎ ሃገር ናይ ምምስራትን ዶባታ ናይ ምክላልን ሕርያ ንብልጽግነኦም ደኣ እዩ ነይሩ እምበር፡ ከምዚ እንርእዮ ብዘይፍትሒ ዝጎሳቖሉሉ ክሉል መሬት ንምምስራት ኣይኮነን። ብሓጺሩ፡ ኤርትራ ዓድና ልኡላዊት እትኸውን ብምክላል ዶባትን ምንብልባል ባንዴራን ጥራይ ዘይኮነስ፡ ህዝባ ልኡላውነት ምስ ዝጭብጥን ዝለብስን፡ ባዕሉ ዝሰርሕ መንግስቲ ምስ ዝሽይምን ዝባርኽን፡ ነቲ ዘይሰርሕን ገስረጥ ዝኾነን መንግስቲ ድማ ምስዘባርር እዩ።”

    • Bayan Negash

      Thank you, kbur Tegadaly nebber MS.

      I am hastily noting here to give you a courtesy response, to assure you that I have not only read your well crafted argument, but also that I will be responding in due course. As you just alluded to it – life in this land of milk and honey – we are all pressed for time, yours truly here no different. But, I shall offer my rejoinder in due course.

      Respectfully,
      BN

    • Fanti Ghana

      Selam Mahmuday,

      I think you should always write when you are in a hurry. Some of your best posts are those you write when you are time pressed and I am loving them.

      Ever since the sovereignty speech, your reaction to it and your responses to the push and pull that followed were appropriate, well-measured, and well reasoned. It is only fair for some eyebrows to go up When Eritrea, Ethiopia, Land, and Sovereignty are in the same topic.

      By the same token, those who state “people before land” should also be taken at their word, because the chances are the great majority of them are as nationalists and patriots. Perhaps, they just simply don’t see anything they can do for now regarding forcefully occupied territories.

      • Selam Fanti Ghana,

        You said “forcefully occupied territories”, although the issue is that of the refusal of the implementation of the result of an arbitration, from what I understand. How badme came into tplf’s hands in the first place, I think, you know better than I do.
        This is soothing to eritrean ears, but not to the ears of the relatives of tens of thousands young ethiopians sacrificed by tplf to ‘FORCEFULLY occupy eritrean land’, according to your saying. Why did tplf send young ethiopians to their death for a piece of land that did not belong to it? Why did it not say in 1998 that pfdj is right in occupying eritrean land that was under tplf rule, and things did not end there and then, before the bloodbath. Why did it present it as a violation of ethiopia’s sovereignty?
        I wish tplf gives to eritrea ten times the land it occupies, as a compensation for the damage done to eritrea by tplf. That is not the only point. The main point is that it is disingenous, when young ethiopians are sent to their death, only to tell the ethiopian people later on that “badme and the environs are forcefully occupied eritrean territories”.
        The eebc said that it concluded that the land should belong to eritrea depending on the papers presented by both sides, and not that it was a ‘forcefully occupied land’, for force was used for the first time by pfdj. Otherwise, this could be called a double crime committed by tplf against the ethiopian people and against eritrea.

        • Fanti Ghana

          Hello Horizon,

          The day after we signed “final and binding” and refused to vacate, it became “forcefully occupied territory.” May be the right phrase is “illegally occupied territory.”

      • blink

        Dear Fanti
        Can you expand your take on the people’s first patriotism? How can you differentiate Ali salim and Tesfatsion views from the doctor’s tail? Do they really love the people? Are they ready to walk the talk?

        • Fanti Ghana

          Selam blink,

          Case 1:
          1) Majority Eritreans did in fact contribute to the struggle for independence.
          2) Majority, almost all, Eritreans did in fact vote for independence.
          3) I have known a great deal number of Eritreans and I never met, not one, who wavers about his/her patriotism.
          4) The “people first” bunch are Eritreans.

          Therefore, the great majority Eritreans are patriots. How is that for calculus?

          Case 2:
          The difference between Dr. Berekhet’s ወይ ኣነ ህዝበይ፤ and Ali Salim’s በቲ ዝርደኦም ቋንቋ ንዛረብ is shahi.

          I am not sure what Tesfatsion is doing here, but if you are not old enough to recognize crazy go outside and play soccer instead of bothering ayatatka.

          • Amanuel Hidrat

            Selam Fanti Ghana,

            Indeed these two phrases “ወይ ኣነ ህዝበይ and በቲ ዝርደኦም ቋንቋ ንዛረብ ” are two complementary phrases, that are pragmatic in nature and timely messages that we should focus for. The former sympathy to the plight of our youth and the later let us tell the truth with language they understand.

            regards

    • Bayan Negash

      Selam kbur Haw MS,

      First and foremost, your tone of respect and the high pedestal in which you place me – kebidatnni ezi Hawway. When I enter into dialogue, I try my best to ask myself how my participation would contribute positively at the macro level and micro level to the Eritrean people who have been less fortunate by sheer geographical accident. So, I hope to not only meet the expectations you’ve levied upon me, but also hope exceed it when the occasion for such an opportunity presents itself for me to do right by my people.

      That said, I’ve read your penetrating Tigrinya letter that you sent to your former comrade-in-arms when you first shared it in this forum several years ago. Gegay yikhlallay da’mber, unlike in this truncated version, in the original one, didn’t you start with yeizekerekka do…weddi Gerahtu…it was heart wrenchingly touching. But the part you shared here, obviously, is the most pertinent one for the subject at hand. It reads freshly refreshing to see the depth with which you stick to your principles to the preservation of human dignity.

      Not wishing to delve to Dr. BB’s topic, I can certainly understand. Let the man speak or in this case write, thereafter, you can take a position as you deem it fit. Meanwhile, allow me to share with you what a close friend shared with me today over the phone when he read the article I have penned. Let me qualify this by saying, this is the only time I’ve heard Dr. BB speak. I knew nothing else about him. I based my position on what I heard in those two parts and what was not said was deduced from context. What I heard was a man who deeply cares about Eritrea’s future in general and the young in particular. What I didn’t hear him say but was able to surmise from context is that the man didn’t have to be at the border but chose to be close to the people that he deeply cares for. What I didn’t know but came to learn from a close friend is that Dr. BB houses young Eritrean sons of many former Higdef officials in his home – up-to ten of them at one time or another. Not only that, but the good doctor – I am told by this trusted friend – is helping some four Eritreans to finish medical school under his tutelage.

      Of course, tiHtnna na Eritrawyan is such that we will probably never hear him say that he is doing these things. To be fair to many of his critiques, this new info is just now coming to light. But, humbleness should have its limits. This is a story that should’ve been told and retold so that other fortunate professional Eritreans can begin to think along these lines to help other unfortunate Eritreans. Now, the question is: Why would anyone show such intense interest in Eritrean youth if he didn’t believe in Eritrea’s territorial integrity and Eritrean dignity. Why would the man go out of his way to tell us about the Eritrean youth movements? Why would he not even want to mention the perfidious lips of the Agazian crowd for fear of dignifying them, perhaps.

      You know what else kbur tegadaly Mahmoud? This, another friend, reminded of: That critical moment, soon after independence, we didn’t collectively demand the interest of Eritrean people to be met. We ignored two crucial areas about Eritrea’s predicament that should’ve been handled pronto: The country is divided into two camps – between Muslims and Christians and various ethnic groups. These should’ve been tackled when independence came and we should’ve put the public at ease. Now, I submit to you, Ms: How can one have nothing but reverence to the man.

      Cheers,
      Beyan

    • Ismail AA

      Hayak Allah ustaz MS,

      “‘ብሓጺሩ፡ ኤርትራ ዓድና ልኡላዊት እትኸውን ብምክላል ዶባትን ምንብልባል ባንዴራን ጥራይ ዘይኮነስ፡ ህዝባ ልኡላውነት ምስ ዝጭብጥን ዝለብስን፡ ባዕሉ ዝሰርሕ መንግስቲ ምስ ዝሽይምን ዝባርኽን፡ ነቲ ዘይሰርሕን ገስረጥ ዝኾነን መንግስቲ ድማ ምስዘባርር እዩ።'”. These words highlight the crux of the continuing debate.

      Objectively seen, this what the Dr. BB’s core message indicated and now our good brother Beyan skillfully expanded. At this juncture of our post liberation struggle county’s existence we are facing real challenge of how to break the vicious circle of whether to stay on glued to the status quo framed on regime strategy of sustaining it, divided and weak opposition and the indifferent paradigm shift setter silent majority that is being held hostage by the regime’s strategy of appealing to legitimate attachment to patriotism as related to sovereignty and what it entails. Determining the urgency of national tasks especially when the fate of the nation hangs on balance, it is incumbent on the elites to raise to responsibility before that balance tilts on the ominous side.

    • Bayan Negash

      Selam kbur Haw MS,
      At the risk of it reappearing hours from now, at which I would rather delete the double, but here is my response to you brother MS, something I sent last night before bed to only see it disappear into the vagaries of digital communication courtesy of DISQUS. Here you go:

      First and foremost, your tone of respect and the high pedestal in which you place me – kebidatnni ezi Hawway. When I enter into dialogue, I try my best to ask myself how my participation would contribute positively at the macro level and micro level to the Eritrean people who have been less fortunate by sheer geographical accident. So, I hope to not only meet the expectations you’ve levied upon me, but also exceed it when the occasion for such an opportunity presents itself for me to do right by my people.

      That said, I’ve read your penetrating Tigrinya letter that you sent to your former comrade-in-arms when you first shared it in this forum several years ago. Gegay yikhlallay da’mber, unlike in this truncated version, in the original one, didn’t you start with yizekerekka do…wedd Gerahtu…it was heart wrenchingly touching. But the part you shared here, obviously, is the most pertinent one for the subject at hand. It reads freshly refreshing to see the depth with which you stick to your principles to the preservation of human dignity.

      Not wishing to delve to Dr. BB’s topic, I can certainly understand. Let the man speak or in this case write, thereafter, you can take a position as you deem it fit. That’s sensible. Meanwhile, allow me to share with you what a close friend shared with me over the phone when he read the article I have penned. Let me qualify this by saying, this is the only time I’ve heard Dr. BB speak. I knew nothing else about him. I based my position on what I heard in those two parts talk he gave; and what was not said was deduced from context. What I heard was a man who deeply cares about Eritrea’s future in general and the young in particular. What I didn’t hear him say but was able to surmise from context is that the man didn’t have to be at the border but chose to be close to the people that he deeply cares for. What I didn’t know but came to learn from a close friend is that Dr. BB houses in his home young Eritrean sons of many former Higdef officials who are languishing in the dungeons or have been liquidated of which you eloquently write in the Tigrinya version of your response above. I am told up-to ten of these at one time or another, Dr. BB cares after such kids. Not only that, but the good doctor – I am told by this trusted friend – is helping some four Eritreans to finish medical school under his tutelage.

      Of course, tiHtnna na Eritrawyan is such that we will probably never hear him say that he is doing these things. To be fair to many of his critiques, this new info is just now coming to light. But, humbleness should have its limits. This is a story that should’ve been told and retold so that other fortunate professional Eritreans can begin to think along these lines to help other unfortunate Eritreans. Now, the question is: Why would anyone show such intense interest in Eritrean youth if he didn’t believe in Eritrea’s territorial integrity and Eritrean dignity. Why would the man go out of his way to tell us about the Eritrean youth movements? Why would he not even want to mention the perfidious lips of the Agazian crowd for fear of dignifying them, perhaps.

      You know what else kbur tegadaly Mahmoud? This, another friend, reminded of: That critical moment, soon after independence, we didn’t collectively demand the interest of Eritrean people to be met. We ignored two crucial areas about Eritrea’s predicament that should’ve been handled pronto: The country is divided into two camps – between Muslims and Christians and various ethnic groups. These should’ve been tackled when independence came and we should’ve put the public at ease. Now, how can one have nothing but reverence to the man.

      Respectfully,
      BN

    • Bayan Negash

      Dear MS,
      If you have not seen my reply, please e-mail me at beyan.negash@gmail.com so I may send it to your email. It showed up twice and vanished. I don’t understand the way of DISQUS. If you’ve seen it already, never mine. When something like this happens, I used to catch it when I receive DISQUS entries in my mail box – now, that’s not happening either.
      Regards,
      beyan

      • MS

        Marhab Beyan
        I got both of them, thank you. I actually upvoted you yesterday just to let you know I got it. I did not read it then because as you know I was meshqool. I read your reply this morning, and I have a caravan of camels loaded with angabgabi waqtawi Hateta, addresed to you and IsmailAA, coming towards you, led by none other than the good shepherds, Fanti Ghana and HaileS.
        Regards.

  • Nitricc

    Greetings All: the more I think about Eritrea, the more I am convince the current system better than the alternative. it is amazing how you people are as fake as a three dollar bill. I thought the guy supposed post his take in clarification of his statements and then have your say. If so, why are you defending him before you hear his case and examine his statements?
    The Dr. is nothing but hypocritical, I say this, if you are going to defend him with out hearing his clarification, then it is all fair for me to do the opposite. You know how I was tacked by the likes Berhe for not waiting till the so-called Dr. have his takes, I wonder what hypocrite Berhe will say now. I bet you, he will come out admiring the writer and kissing up all they way. People, have some decency and self respect.

  • Amanuel Hidrat

    Selam Beyan,

    I applaud you that you came up with this article in defense Dr Bereket Berhane, the good and conscious doctor who became the patriot of our people, particularly to our youngs. Blessed to those who stand for their people.

    The following quote captures the whole essence of your message in your piece:
    “seventeen years hence to stick to our guns and never acknowledging we were wrong when we stood with the regime that outwitted us all is a disservice to our cause.” If we were people who acknowledge our wrongs we would have never in the position we are now. The Eritrean people have the attitude “live with your words and die with your words” no matter how wrong we are and how immensely consequential our stances are. Remember that wrong adage we adorn and live with it : ” Seb-Aydo kilte yezareb”. Eritreans will never learn from our mistakes, and don’t count the “few pearls” who took steps at the risk of their lives and their reputation and are trying to change our thinking. Here you are, the good doctor and yourself have taken the high road to prioritize our people before that piece of land called “Badume.”

    Regards

    • Kokhob Selam

      Dear Amanuel Hidrat

      You and people like you are here to say the truth and keep us from the danger…. your principle is perfect Amuni keep it up!!!

      KS,,

    • Thomas

      Hi Amma,

      The very sad thing is Issayas is on record saying the border is virtually demarcated that later or sooner the land will be handed to Eritrea. He said he is not worried about it even it takes a really long time. He also in their faces told them that he is never handing his power as long as he is alive (3 to 4 decades = 30-40 years). If he is 70 years now, 70 + 30 would be 100 years or if he stays 40 years it would be 110 years. So, he will be our president for life. Since he climbed to power, he never indicated when he would step down. However, some people have chosen to waste their time on the weyanes/Ethiopians rather than focusing on what Issayas’s intention is.

      • iSem

        Hi Thomas:
        “….he eats those around him for lunch and looks for the others to come around”
        This is an other spin on sewra deqqa eya tibeliE (the revolution eats its children)
        This is fascinating, because people line up to be eaten for lunch by IA. I always wonder, if he had no qualms murdering and disappearing Haile DruE with him he has blood oath, with he he shared childhood, all the new comers are nothing to him, most of teh G-15 hIA knew from childhood like Petros Solomon and Haile D and others long friendship, some save his live and the morons like Yemane Monekey and Yemane G still stay put to be eaten for lunch, Ali Abdu had his cut off date, smart and he fled.
        This is human enigma manifested through Eritreans
        Waiting to be eaten for lunch! I think when IA finally eats Hagos Kisha the day we hear that we must make it our independence day

        • ghezaehagos

          iSem,
          Q.: what song reminds Isaias of Ali Abdu?
          A. The one that got away.
          G.

          • Berhe Y

            Hi G,

            Or the kids nursery song of Henry the VIII 6 wives.

            Divorced, Beheaded, Died,
            Divorced, Beheaded, Survived.

            Berhe

    • Bayan Negash

      Selam Aman,

      Thanks for the vote of confidence, bro. The disillusioning seems to continue unabated. I honestly feel to many in this forum and beyond winning an argument is more important than learning from it. Not only that but also personalizing issues so much so that we treat it as be-all-end-all instead of a means toward better understanding and toward better ending. It looks we may have found our leader in Dr. BB who can save us from our endless distractions (mental confusion) and disillusions that need redirecting. Using Higdef’s frame of reference to argue and counter argue about territorial integrity is to fall prey to its propaganda machinery, which seems to be serving it well as it keeps us in disarray and in shambles…

      Cheers,
      BN

      • Amanuel Hidrat

        Selam Beyan,

        Remembering the games you were playing when you were a kid with your friends, reminds me a song written by Redi Kifle, a poet and a writer “HinQ-NeQ Eluni NikiZikereka”,mentioning all the types of our cultural sports. Beyanom, Our cultures are lost in the mist of the ideological myth of the current regime. Very sad.

    • Semere Tesfai

      Selam Amanuel Hidrat

      “Let us save our people, fix our society, then we can defend our land.” Tegadalay Amanuel Hidrat.

      The good doctor couldn’t have said it better!!!

      Semere Tesfai

  • Kokhob Selam

    Dear Dr. Beyan Negash

    “In fact, it is those of us who seem to want to dance our way out of some of our errant ways of the past without admission that we consider it an art of skilled debate. We are not in a debating society here. This is about generations of young lives becoming part of the wasteland. This is no time for witticism. This is time for standing up to be counted in the direly nee”ded changes back home. The social conditions and social structures as we know them are disappearing in front of our eyes.”

    “We need to really do some serious soul searching before we begin accusing others of unpatriotic tendencies.”

    THANKS,,

    KS,,

    • Bayan Negash

      Dear KS,

      Do you remember, I don’t know if this was countrywide activity, but in Asmara growing up I remember it vividly, where we kids gather at the doorsteps of a certain home in the front door that would have enough steps for all to gather. Soon, someone shows up with a ball made out of light-brown nylon stocking, game is on. The corrogated iron mad into a solid gate to the very home we gathered becomes our goal post. The kind of game I am remembering now is one where NO-teams are composed, but the kind where each kid’s aim is to score a goal if and when he is able to dribble his way out of – I don’t know – about 8 to 10 kids just trying to do the same with one ball. Of course, those who knew how to swag and zigzag with the ball under their feet had better chance of scoring. But, if my recollection serves me right, whoever scores becomes the goalie until another one scores.…so on and so forth.

      That’s what the opposition sociopolitical discourse feels like sometimes in the various social media outlets, we talk and talk until the kingdom comes it seems so long one outwits another and keeps on scoring through the written word or the spoken word with no higher purpose, the conversation goes on in this cyclical fashion where at times it gets recycled back after several months like a drier that spins and spins with its switch power turned on indefinitely. Where to from here?

      Cheers,
      BN

      • Kokhob Selam

        Dear Dr. Beyan Negash,

        I also ask my self most of those years..what is next?

        KS,,

      • blink

        Dear Beyan
        The difference is , when we play and disturb ,the owner of the house beside the goal post will open his door and ask us to leave or even some houses owners throw black car oil all over the steps . In the opposition there is no one who can say enough with the talking and back stepping. Where I grow up I played with my peers and even slapped by my older brothers for not delivering their requests , here in our opposition talking and writing we have people like Ali Salim who is equally lunatic with his peer Tsfatsion but not only that we have sick people that try to do more crazy things.

  • Aron

    Hi Beyan,
    It would have been very nice to have both teritorial integrity and human dignity at the same time. Unfortunatly we have neither. Like Desble said, EPRDF is known to sit at the table and negotiate without being forced unlike dia who would not until he is forced. DIA the known saddist and human abuser, I hope he will not be ejected by external forces for that entails a lot of risk war botties—- and all. I hope there will be some kind of inside revolt with out diminshing the military that will lead to some kind of trasitional govt and elections. Let me stop my day dreaming.
    Aron

    • Bayan Negash

      Selam Aron,

      May your wish and dreams are heeded by the gates of heaven! Indeed, “…hope there will be some kind of inside revolt with out diminishing the military that will lead to some kind of transitional govt and elections…” peace and individual sovereignty to boot is “day dreaming” that should never seize…Keep on day dreaming young man…it will, in due course, materialize…one hopes it comes sooner than later.

      Cheers,
      BN

      • Aron

        Hi Beyan,
        I agree and pray sooner than later.

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