Inform, Inspire, Embolden. Reconcile!

Omer AlBashir Wins “The Sudanese Election”

On Thursday night Sudanese polling stations closed their doors after four days of voting. On Wednesday, the three-day election was extended by one more day due to low voter turnout. According to Sudanese official news, the results will be announced on the 27th of April 2015.

However, no one is waiting for the announcement: the 71 year old sitting Sudanese president Omer AlBashir is already the winner. And that is not even speculation. Soon the state media will announce that the ruling National Congress Party (NCP) and president Omer AlBashir won the election by a landslide.

In 1989 Omer AlBashir came to power as a brigadier general in a military coup. In 1996 he was elected president for a five-year term, again in 2000, and once more in 2010. But before his official final term ended, he was able to amend the constitution to allow him for yet another five-year-term starting 2015. Opposition attempts to force or dissuade him from running didn’t bear fruit.

The deposed Egyptian president Hosni Mubarek had also extended the term limit to stay in power, but was deposed by a popular uprising before he could finish the term. Mubarek pretended he had grudgingly accepted to stay in power one more term after he yielded to public pressure to stay. He publicly quipped, beware, ‘this is the last extension I will accept, don’t come and ask me to stay at the end of this term!’

Omer AlBashir didn’t pretend he was running for one more term due to public pressure; simply, he thinks he is the only worthy person to be the president of Sudan. Campaigning around the country, AlBashir scared the people by mentioning the chaos that destroyed other countries like Libya, Syria, and Yemen. At the same time he assured them, “we will not allow this to happen to Sudan.” Nonetheless, similar chaos has been happening in the Sudanese regions of Darfur and Kurdufan many years before the uprising of the “Arab Spring” started.

Low voter turnout has forced the ruling party operatives to campaign door to door to get the people to vote, while in the polling stations, security officers slumbered outside empty rooms. A turnout of about 20% is expected out of the 13 million registered voters from a population of 38 million, “even after the ruling party unofficially allowed people to vote without ID cards.” But the state media lauded the high turnout that no observer could verify.

Major Sudanese opposition parties, including Sadeq AlMahdi’s Umma Party, which AlBashir overthrew in 1989 have boycotted the election, and a few activists who campaigned against the election have been beaten and harassed. Over a dozen contenders have competed against AlBashir, most of them publicly unknown.

Several facebook pages and websites, including joint action opposition groups under the slogan “Arhal” (Leave) have been set up to campaign against the election. Judging from the low voter turnout, they were successful in dissuading people from voting. But apparently AlBashir and his ruling party were not worried because over a dozen presidential candidates and close to fifty parties competed in the election. For AlBashir, the campaign was mainly to bolster the image of his damaged party, owing to the fact that his next five- year presidency is given. That is, unless the unexpected happens and he is unseated, just like his predecessors in the Arab countries.

The former Nigerian president, Olusegun Obasanjo chaired the African Union (AU) group that observed the Sudanese election. In 2013, the observer Obasanjo gave his approval to the Zimbabwean disputed election where the 91 year old president Robert Mugabe was reelected. Mugabe has ruled Zimbabwe since 1987.

On Thursdays Obasanjo estimated about 33% of the total number of qualified Sudanese voters cast their votes.

Hundreds of observers representing several dozen organizations have observed the Sudanese election. “Many women voted…,” an official stated, apparently excited by the votes, not for the rights of Sudanese women who are used as pawns by the ruling regime. A Sudanese opposition reached by telephone remarked, “If the condition of women was measured by voting, African women can boast the highest women turnout in voting, but they are usually coerced and deceived.

Omer AlBashir has leveraged the Saudi image implying that it supports his reelection and that investments will flood the country. Posters carrying the pictures of King Salman Bin Abdulaziz of Saudi Arabia and Omer AlBashir were displayed in the streets of Khartoum and other cities.

Sudan is part of the Arab coalition engaged in Yemen under the Saudi-led “Resolute Storm” and has committed more than 5000 ground troops and three fighter planes to the campaign. AlBashir was on an official visit to Saudi Arabia the day when “Resolute Storm” campaign started. Banking sources indicated that Saudi Arabia rewarded Sudan by depositing several billion dollars in Sudanese banks to rescue the Sudanese currency.

Under AlBashir’s rule, Sudan lost the South and is about to lose other parts of the country. In Kurdufan, an armed rebellion is raging against the NCP regime of Khartoum and has reached to the magnitude of the Darfuri rebellion of about a dozen or so years ago. As the regime pursues a military solution for Sudanese problems, the future of Sudan looks gloomy.

The NCP is deeply involved in South Sudan which was separated and announced a free state in 2011 through a referendum. AlBashir and NCP have been pitching one party against the other in a civil war that has been devastating South Sudan since President Silva Kiir and his vice president Riek Mashar ignited a bloody power struggle. All the countries of the region–Kenya, Uganda, Ethiopia, Sudan, and Eritrea–are involved in South Sudan in one way or another, some covertly others overtly.

In 2008, Isaias Afwerki of Eritrea visited Tehran and met the former Iranian president Ahmedinejad; the meeting was facilitated by Omer AlBashir. Last year Sudan’s relations with Iran, which used to be its ally, suffered after AlBashir ordered the closure of the Iranian cultural centers, which his regime accused as being “a conduit for propagating Shia’a Islam among the Sudanese Sunni Muslim population.” Since then, it has started to mend its strained relation with the Arab countries.

Sudanese diplomacy gained space after the International Criminal Court announced in late 2014 that it was stopping the investigation of war crimes in Darfur. AlBashir was indicted by the court in 2009 for crimes against humanity.

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  • selam

    Dear All
    we have been on this before but I think it is important to see some of the hot issues of our friends like hayat idea.
    here you can read
    http://www.tigraionline.com/articles/badme-is-tigrai-ethiopia.html

  • ‘Gheteb

    Greetings All,

    Merowe (መሮወ), Meroni,(መሮኒ) Rome(ሮም) and Romay(ሮማይ) In The Context Of Eritrea’s Ethnography

    In the last two posts, I have averred that I don’t consider myself a Habesha anymore. I contended that the Eritrean ethnography looks more Cushitic than Semitic. In this post, I intend to buttress that thrust of my assertion or contention by rendering the stories of Merowe (Meroë), Meroni, Rome and Romay as they relate to Eritreans ‘ethno-genesis’.

    Merowe ( مروى) was the ancient capital of the Kush Dynasty that spanned the period 800 BCE- 350CE in what is now North Sudan. The city was aslo known as Medewi or Bedewi according to some Meroitic texts. It was located on the east bank of the Nile River some 200 Kilo Meters North-East of Khartoum. This Meroitic Kingdom was referred as Ethiopia by the early Greek geographers.

    The ‘Periplus of the Erythraean Sea’, limns Merowe thusly:

    “On the right-hand coast next below Berenice is the country of the Berbers. Along the shore are the Fish-Eaters, living in scattered caves in the narrow valleys. Farther inland are the Berbers, and beyond them the Wild-flesh-Eaters and Calf-Eaters, each tribe governed by its chief; and behind them, farther inland, in the country towards the west, there lies a city called Meroe.”

    —- Periplus of the Erythraean Sea, Chap.2 —-

    The city (Merowe) used to be known by the ancient appellation Saba, named after the country’s original founder. Here, please try to remember this sentence as you watch the Youtube link in which professor Sebhatu Ghebremichael makes similar assertions based on the oral tales from the Eritrean Kebessa in a video embedded at the tail end of this post. Remember, also, that the name is not Saba but Seba (ሴባ ) per Professor Sebhatu.

    As I have alluded to in the last two posts, The Eritrean Kebessa people trace their origin to Meroni. This fact is also mentioned in the book, ” Mai Weini, a Highland Village in Eritrea by Kjetil Tronvoll (1998)”. The fact that Meroni is regarded as the ‘paterfamilias’ of the Eritrean Kebessa people should not be taken literally. What seems to be the case, though, is that either Meroni’s progenies or some from his clan or his followers or his soldiers may have migrated to what is now Eritrea. However, Meroni was the King of the Kush Kingdom and died in Kush and his cemetery is believed to be located in what is now Khartoum. Professor Sebhatu claims to possess a picture of Meroni’s cemetery or grave site.

    I believe that Meroni name is derived from the Merowe. You may ask how and why I making that assertion. Well, here is the reason. In the Kingdom of Kush, the kings were known to take the name of their kingdom. For example, there was a king named ‘King Kashta’. In a similar vein, the name of Meroni may have its derivation from the city of Merowe. Now, the question is how do we connect Meroni to the Eritrean Kebessa people? That is an awfully difficult task that will require years of field works by archeologist, historians and epigraphists. Until that time comes to pass, let me render my seat-of-the-pants rendition by connecting some tiny and highly undiscernible dots.

    As the story of Meroni is narrated by professor Sebhatu, Meroni had to children from two wives. The son was named Romay (ሮማይ) and the girl’s name was Qedes (ቀደስ). I will bit more about the two Meroni’s siblings later on, but for now let me concentrate on Romay who was assigned by his father to become the first King of The Aksumite Kingdom. Well, do we have anything such as folk tales, oral narrations and even lyrics from local songs that connects Romay to Aksum? Well, from the Eritrean side there is this song by Bekhita Ali where the word “Romay” is used. Here many thanks to the likes of Haile Zeru, AOsman, SJG for their help. Is there anythin from across the Mereb River, Tigray that says something about Romay? Well, at least there are these lines from a song

    Begin Quote

    ኣዋልደየ
    ዘንጊ ዶ ውሒጥክን
    ዘንጊ ሮማይ
    ስብርብር ዶ በላይ

    it must be a name of someone important whose ዘንጊ is also long that, if swallowed, would not allow the girls to swing (ስብርብር ዶ በላይ). Maybe it refers to the king of Axum : ሮምሃይ – ሮማይ Romhay?

    End Quote

    The above quote is courtesy of the rebarbative character with all the trappings of a Tigrayan revanchist, bar none, otherwise known as Gebrekirstos.

    A huge poser at least to me is this: How is Romay related or connected to the Romes whose mythologies, folktales that are so prevalently regnant in the Tigrayit language or culture of the Eritrean Tigre ethnic group? Well, I will going out on a limb and hypothesize that Romay was a member of the clan called Rome or that that group of clans took and adopted the name Rome from Romay who as the son of Meroni may have been their leader. Well, why wouldn’t these Romes end up going to Aksum and not end up living in what is now Eritrea, my guess is that by settling in Eritrean lands they were ensuring the contiguity of Merowe to Aksum and also securing safe routes for the transportation of goods between the two kingdoms.

    And, is there anything about all the mythology about the Romes of Eritrea, written by other historical writers at least to give us some ideas if the Romes really existed in Eritrea? Well, at least three authors mention the Romes and render some insights as who those ‘mythological’ Romes may have been.

    First, is Ahmad ibn Wadih al Ya’qubi in his book, Kitab al-Buldan (Book of the Countries), as quoted by Albreto Pollera, identifies the Romes of Eritrea as ” Zenafigiya” (ዘናፍጅያ), those Beja tribes that lived in Sahil and Barka and whose main city was Baqlin (ባቅሊን) located in Sahil in the areas of Rhora Baqla(ሮራ ባቅላ). Here, according to Pollera, ancient relics of buildings were discovered.

    Second, Pollera , again, quoting Conti Rossini, mentions the presence of large grave sites believed to be of the Romes in areas such as Habab, Barka, Maria, Bogos, Anseba and Semhar. He also cites big wells that were believed to have been dug by the Romes were found in Hamasein, Meraguz and Mai TsaEda.

    Third, quoting Conti Rossini, Pollera asserts that the Romes were part of the Hadendiwa (ሃደንድዋ) clans that were known as Aarum (ኣሩም).

    Fourth, some Portuguese travelers of the 17th century to those areas, the Romes were referred as “Rumos” (ሩሞስ).

    Fifth, some claim that the name Rome originated from the Greco-Romans name of the Romes as “Rumi” (ሩሚ).

    Now, as I mentioned earlier the relation between the two siblings of Meroni, Romay the son and Qedes the daughter. Remember that Meroni has assigned Romay to be the King of Aksum and Qedes to be the queen of Merowe. By the way who was this Queen Qedes (ቀደስ)? I know some of you would be scratching your head and others are just going to say that this an unbelievable act of a stretch, I am going to say it here and state that Queen Qedes is one and the same with Queen Candace (Kandake) who ruled the Kingdom of Kush around the first century BCE.

    My conclusion is that with all this Cushitic genetic stock that have permeated what is now Eritrea and with all the material culture ( language, food, dressing and cloth), my progenitors are more Cush than Semitic and hence why that I am getting more convinced by the day that I ain’t no darn Habesha, but a descendant of these very Beja/Cush people who hailed from no other place but what is now known as the Sudan.

    • selam

      Dear Gheteb
      Please take a trip to tigrai on line as awate.com do not want the link to be posted here. Please check there is one article about badme .please visit and deal with semere , Amanuel and others

  • Ted

    Dear KS, not only you lost your tooth but also your brains too, blaming Islam for atrocities of ISIS. Shame on you. How does it feel to wear a TPLF made denture instead of Ety Tseba zimesile Sinika. Wey wirdet Esikatkum.

  • tes

    Dear George,

    This was my political argument since I landed at awate.com. And I left Eritrea not long and hence BBC and France24 had zero influence. In fact, I didn’t know what France24 is before and I was only watching BBC in places like British Council (Eritrea) Library and later in my friends house. To your surprise, my family didn’t have TV tilll I left Eritrea. If I had access, thanks to PFDJ restriction, Eri-TV was my brainwasher.

    Regarding Yemane Gebreab, I know his teachings and deceptive lectures personnaly as he was my teacher during two months forced summer to be cadre courses. He talked the same way since he down played with his comrades.

    EU are not buying PFDJ politics but are dealing a business. As far as PFDJ promised them (though it will not happen), they will handle them as EU is now over flooded by refugees. And Eritrea is almost number one source and hence a target by EU policy makers. If PFDJ outlines a project that is aimed to build a wall (like that of Israel) all along the border and make a check to the exodus, EU will be happy to finance all the budhet needed. For EU, democracy in Africa and Eritrea in particular is not the priority. The priority is on how refugees can be stopped.

    What EU failing is that PFDJ number one to be benefitted from exodus. As exodus will give him more life to continue in power.

    Therefore, Yemane Gebreab is making a business wth EU, in fact for EU a risky and uncalculated political business.

    tes

  • selam

    Dear k.s
    Today I gave up, for the first time in awate.com forum I feel bad and sadned but I promised mahamed saleh I will not get heated so I will keep my word , I really do . I do not want to type any word at all. It is not that I do not have points to write and debate with you, it is a fact that I feel agitated due to your blame game to the muslims , with out even giving any answer to the PA people’suffering. I gave up to the point to ask some one to help me on this I am becaming emotional to reply to . I have watched news over news saying this and that about muslims , why is that how far are they ignorant ? You people have been sacking their wealth in any form and yet want them to sitt and die for your cause. Why is israel killing innocent Palestinian childrens , do you have any sense at all. NOTE: that I am not giving green card to the killers who are arogant at best but I do not believe also muslims start reading the book from 2001. No way I blame all the muslims

    I repeat for the first time you are able to silence me with things I know are not right.

    • Kokhob Selam

      Dear Selam,
      It seems you didn’t read that I said sorry. and you don’t want to write any more because of me! Okay here I have penalized Kokhob Selam for disappointing you. I am going to stop him giving any opinion for next 10 days. and then if you only call him to be part he will start. see you after 10 days. bye.

      • selam

        Dear k.s
        Please come back now but we need others issues not the one you rised . I was quite open to tell you my feeling and it is not that I hold against you. I just wanted to you continue say what ever you say about that love things because here very few do writethe word, I have never post one comment about love . But you did write about becoming one from inside in which I have great respect , I believe it is very hard to do.So k.s my point was only to the specific requests you made.
        welcome ♡♥♡♥♡

    • Peace!

      Dear Selamino,

      I am afraid what’s awaiting Eritrea after the fall of DIA looks much more worse. It is so confusing the same people who oppose DIA also support the oppression of other people.

      Regards

      • Saleh Johar

        Dear Peace,

        Lately I am begining to question a few things. Excuse me for the question, but I always read your comments that always target those who have no ability to harm people. I believe your worries about the opposition are legitimate provided they find the power (IF THEY DO) to inflict damages on Eritrea. But that is IF! Now I am lost because I do not see any arrows directed on the regime that is crippling Eritrea. Is it because you consider the probable damage in the future is more worrying than the real damage of now?

        • Peace!

          Hi SJ,

          First of all I don’t target people unless provoked, period. I only go after ideas that, I think, can potentially endanger the future of the country. And speaking of “HARM” I only know the bodies of the opposition groups is completely disfigured and scattered everywhere including Sebhat Nega’s House, and we are waiting for the detective to tell us who is the murderer. Your last question, I can’t blame you because you are beginning to notice and question my intention, but the reality is I have been saying any intervention will only cause chaos and even put the country in the verge of collapse, Syria, Iraq Libya, and now Yemen are perfect examples.

          Regards

  • Yoty Topy

    Hi Dani,
    I don’t think Ayssayas is where he is because of lack of elections.If that is your understanding of the current predicament then you are in here for a long ride.

  • T..T.

    Hi all,

    tes called the Sudanese AlBashir the untangler of problems, which makes Isayas the tangler. I would say: You got that right!

    Once, when Turabi and Isayas failed to reconcile their view about the East African politics, Turabi concluded the meeting telling Isayas that “so long you trust the Arab Gulf countries and I trust the Pop in Rome, we will not find common grounds.” Later, when the two were seen in their most friendly conversation, a Sudanese commentator asked a question, “is it Turabi or Isu who converted.” The commentator, then, continued telling Turabi that Isayas was a hypocrite, who “when utters a word lies, when promises breaks, when trusted betrays, and when quarrels abuses.”

    Here’s another, in an Eritrean wedding that turned into a political joke-telling evening, one started his joke by explaining that power is measured by love and not fear. However, in the case of Isayas, he explained that has become Kahshoshah. To many Asmarinos, Kahshoshah was feared in the streets of Asmara because the passersby did not want to be a stone thrown at them.

    • tes

      Dear T.T,

      If problem = politics, then may be. I believe politics and problems are different. If you correct that, yes DIA is the actor of tangled politics. Confused on purpose PFDJ junta leader.

      tes

      • T..T.

        Hi tes,

        While agreeing with your point, I still believe that political problems are everyday problems caused by misuse of hammers in the hands of politicians and as a result many suffer from the wrong nails. An old adage about politicians and hammers may help to explain my position. The adage goes “a politician who is equipped with a hammer only, everything around him starts to look like a nail.” tes, if convinced now: with everything looking like a nail we have everywhere problems caused by the politicians’ unnecessary hammering.

        • tes

          Dear T.T,

          I can agree with you on how politicians go wrong through unnecessary hammering. but lets remember also politics is field of science that is aimed to solve a problem. Like any science, once the problem is identified (and sometimes remains unidentified), it goes on trials to bring a solution. The trials could bring a solution or not.

          Just like any chemistry or biology lab experiments which makes lots of samples and statistical analysis to reach into a conclusion; politics also follows the same procedure. What makes such experiments and their failed results usually is that human being is the sample. Politicians experiment their ideals on humanity. And if it failed, it fails humanity and hence creating another problem.

          Therefore, I would prefer to differentiate between politics, politicians and problems. But I agree with your way of explaining things.

          With regards

          tes

          • T..T.

            Thanks tes,

            I thought we were discussing political problems within the context of Isayasism, a rule without constitution. BTW, only those inclined to misuse the hammer in their hands, like Isayas, can become tyrants and make life hellish to his subjects with his cruel hammer.

  • Kokhob Selam

    Dear All,

    Africa is bleeding too much. are there Eritreans on those 700 people who dead today? don’t we Africans need an urgent take carer to be created to solve all those problems? is south Africa forgetting what we Africans has done during their struggle? why is ISIS killing our Ethiopian brothers? is really a Muslim supposed to be so cruel to kill his fellow human beings? isn’t time Muslims to loud and inform ISIS to stop those criminal acts.

    where are those useless African leaders? did they care about their people?

    http://www.aljazeera.com/

    • Peace!

      Hi Kokhob,

      “isn’t time Muslims to loud and inform ISIS to stop those criminal acts.” I think you are misleading people here by presenting as if Muslims have control on ISIS. The reality is Christians are aware of that ISIS slaughtering Muslims on a daily basis. No religion condones the mass killing of innocent Muslims and Christians, and the vast majority of ISIS victims have been Muslims.

      Regards

      • Kokhob Selam

        Dear Peace,
        Look, instead of thinking that I am misleading why don’t you think I am calling? why? the first thing you should understand is ISIS are exploiting Islam and the honest Muslim should be the first to oppose them. it i not about controlling them or not. it is about their use in Islam which will invite for more violent reaction from other extreme side. That is not all, it is a duty for a Muslim to fight those who destroy the true meaning of Islam. So I am not misleading and I am not saying Muslims are doing those crimes.

        • selam

          Dear k.s
          how will they oppose , imagine these people have no power to act on their own. All these western powers are just after their interest. They do not care what happen to the people. And how many times do you want the Muslims to say about things they have no control. You can not blame the muslims for all. If there was Gazafi in libya now these ethiopians could have been ok. Westerns are to blame .Please start to blame america not the muslims.People have been accusing muslims while americans killed 1.5 million people . Let the blame go to who it belongs. K.s sorry to say this , but I am sick when I see people asking the muslims to do some thing. Are not the westerners arm the libian fringe groups , is not it western arms and bullets who is cracking innocent muslims . For peace sake k.s I just have enough of this in my very few young age.

          • Kokhob Selam

            Dear Selam,
            No Selam, No ! I want you to be honest. I want you to think everything starts from inside. I want you to be tough toward yourself. don’t ever blame others it is he he and he who do the action on the ground who creates all those chaos. no one else can be blamed before him. we must start to think there is something wrong on us that cause all those problems. it might be our learning system -teaching system etc. otherwise we will continue blaming others as excuse. open any type of study and make research you will find external factor only exploits the internal factor.

            Libyan case is the same, they blame the dictator and kill him forgetting he is the result only and since they didn’t change their way of thinking they will continue suffering. it is the same with Eritrea. change starts first within.

            religion is the same if you only think you are right and others are wrong and if you think of the self only that goes to heaven you will be confused to think killing others will send you to heaven. No that is crazy, the golden rule should be fallowed “don’t do others which pains you when it is done on you” that is all. Islam has the same principle but the ugly group of men are not understanding it. when religion is understood for self expansion the result is what we are watching. who should correct it? US no! it is first the Muslim.

          • selam

            Dear k.s
            Lets just accept your understanding , do you think america will just keep quite and no way to interven in the ME. I respectively disagree . I can not imagine the muslims just readeventingook in 2001 and onwards. The Iraqi people have been in peace with every one around. You can not just say the problem is from inside muslims. What do you really want them to do ? What choice do they have ? You people are asking them to impliment western life style by taking their wealth, destrying their life style , killing their sons . Where have you been , what caused the israelis to kill and dismantle the core PA people ? Why is it some one from Ethiopia , some one from Germany or france special so they come to news ? Are not the muslims taken hostage for so long ? what do they really have to do inside their head ?

            k.s I understand your take but on this on this case i do not want you to waste time on me . I am done with the western talking points. They have eaten their wealth , their food menu, their everything and I have the right to blame them.

          • Kokhob Selam

            Dear Selam,
            I am crying day and night and loudly saying it. for century we have been blaming the external world. no Selam, Iraq/Sedam was not in peace with his people and Iran and others. they want to create external enemies and prolong their life. the people were always not with fixed stand. even after removing sedam they kill each other. the problem with people is they are in “me” my ethnic group my religion etc. sickness. they are living in doubt and anger and the only thing that satisfy them is to belong to some belief and politics. they kill each other and still blame others. others only want to use the chances. if you don’t open the door no one can enter. take my words and sure you will remember me. don’t open the way some one to enter between your lover and you you will live in heaven. I have done that.

          • AOsman

            Dear Kokhob Selam,

            A gift for you, listen and contemplate

            https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dn0ESckmRxA

            Regards
            AOsman

          • Kokhob Selam

            Dear Aosman,

            Thank you man, yes that is one way. more and more Muslims has to do. but above all investigate why this happens and take it out from the root. YASHEKH, you let me have a kind of peace, thank you. ጻባ ስተ !

          • Dayphi

            Jazaka/ki Allah ya A Osman. It was a beautiful clip of the shaikh i rever. Hamza Yusuf.

        • Peace!

          Hi Kokhob,

          First of all, Muslims have been speaking out against ISIS and other extremist groups. The problem is, some times, people either don’t know or choose not to know (of course you are not one of them)

          http://www.beliefnet.com/columnists/commonwordcommonlord/2014/08/think-muslims-havent-condemned-isis-think-again.htm.

          Second, the issue here is not about Muslims defending their religion; it is about the killing of innocent Muslims and Christians by the monster group called ISIS. The good thing is majority of Christians know ISIS, and it’s purpose. Do you remember al-Qaeda ?

          Regards

          • Kokhob Selam

            Dear Peace,
            just make your research. you will find out Islam is perfect but most of Muslims are not. the computer you are typing on is not made by Muslims, everything that you use now in your home is not Made by Muslims. there is something wrong and should be searched. laziness,craziness is normal in Muslims. what is wrong? is that US making them such type of people. no way my friend, visit those Arab countries and look how many people are killing themselves driving their comfortable cars. I want to say to you If you are a Muslim try to study the problem and solve it.

          • selam

            Dear k.s
            what is wrong with you today ? Who is lazy and crazy ? Pls some thing is missing from old K.s
            why is this all thing about muslims and the iraqi case about muslims , the PA thing about muslims .
            I am not religious but my mother is a hard working mother ans yet muslim. I can not believe you are blaming her .
            Note that I am not debating on behave of my mother . I always debate about religion with my mam as I am non believer and I always debate with mam about believe not about such thing.i am telling you from my personal perspective.

          • Kokhob Selam

            Dear Selam,

            sorry, please don’t do this to me. Mother is mother, please don’t forget to say to here sorry. it is because some time I come to this level to visit this material world. I am sorry and I am no more going on this. Just know only I am human and I am disappointed to see when men are killing each other. sorry again.

          • Kokhob Selam

            Selam,
            what have you done to let me ask pardon to you? why only on me? I want you to use this type of method to bring back when some one is far from you. put him in corner peacefully you won and he wins too. Hey, but don’t forget there are some things to learn from what I said too.

          • tes

            Dear KS,

            Sometimes I question behind the normal intention and sometimes not. And today, I will not ask the intention behind but I would like to remind you that computer is the product of mathematics and computer is nothing but maths.

            Let me remind you this: computer understands only “0” and “1” not what we see now in the screen. And the number Zero is invented by Muslim people, the Arabs. In fact, Moslems are the fathers of modern science.

            Then, how are trying to describe them as: “laziness, craziness is normal in Muslims”. The most disappointing statistics you gave is surprisingly for most Muslims. You wrote, “you will find out Islam is perfect but most of Muslims are not. ”

            Brother AOsman has tried to correct you about ISIS. And I would like to correct your image on Muslim people.

            Please refrain from commenting when you are in high emotions. Please, please, please. If you follow some political debates at governmental level like USA, France etc, they are dropping the word Moslems and Islam followers to describe ISIS.

            In my point of view, some people are using a misinterpreated Islamic teachings to advance their political ambitions. For this, Moslems are standing more than anybody to oppose such tendencies and the world should come together and stop such fanatists from creating further damage to humanity.

            With respect
            tes

          • Kokhob Selam

            Dear tes,

            this is another method of bringing back loved once to normal situation. today you and selam won and let me win also. this is the style I want from you. this must be the best day for you and me. yet, please don’t forget “ካብ ነይርኒ እነኣኒ” Muslims did a lot of inventions but they remain behind. they are supposed to more advancing. talking about what the ancient Arabs have done is just talking about the past. but really I appreciate your today’s style. so you said it is tes the original one. Hey take care if I will find you talking emotionally I will say ” you can’t help yourself did you” Lol who said that. it was Saay7 to Hayat. I don’t know if he has used it in proper place but you may face the same. I will be flowing you! Lol. ጽናሕ ተስፋ ብርሃን ሓወይ ክረኽበካ እየ ::

          • tes

            Dear KS,

            I told you these days that I will cool down. I am trying to be yet keeping my principles.

            Regarding the Moslem people, please be specific when you talk. It is better to make a delineation. For example, generations we refer.

            Let me ask you this: in today’s Eritrea, Eritrea under PFDJ, do you expect any inventions adn innocations to come out and be known to the world? Most Moslems are just victimized society like us. Their leaders destroyed their rich heritage and the greatness in science and innovations. Neverthless, some Moslem countries are still keeping their dignity. Iran comes at the forefront.

            Dear KS, we need to make a precise description when we talk about people in general. On individuals, it is ok as the collateral damage is not always of multiplicative.

            tes

    • Dayphi

      حياك الله بالسلام يا نجم السلام
      Indeed we woke up to that grim news of 700 souls perishing within minutes in one place.incalculable tragedy. I dont know if there were Eritreans among them. But the loss is so painful. And honestly i dont know how much are we responsible of this madness. The captain of the commercial ship who was next to the migrants boat absconded instead of giving hand rescueing the victims. A sad day.
      As for the massacre of Ethiopians over libyan territEzekiel 30:5-7King James Version (KJV)

      5 Ethiopia, and Libya, and Lydia, and all the mingled people, and Chub, and the men of the land that is in league, shall fall with them by the sword.

      6 Thus saith the Lord; They also that uphold Egypt shall fall; and the pride of her power shall come down: from the tower of Syene shall they fall in it by the sword, saith the Lord God.

      7 And they shall be desolate in the midst of the countries that are desolate, and her cities shall be in the midst of the cities that are wasted.

      ry, here is the thing. There are hidden devilish forces who do not want to see our habasha people whether Eritreans or Ethiopians, they dont want us to taste or smell the flavor or aroma of peace. They want us to live in constant war, oppression, scattered allover the world landless, homeless. To further understand what i mean, please read Tinbit Hzqiel, special chapter 30 in Full Context. This is a cut of the chapter.

      • Kokhob Selam

        Dear Dayphi,
        yes ended there are really enemies against our peace and prosperity. Yet, if we don’t give them the way they will not be able to do anything. we Ethiopians and Eritreans are suffering all over the world. we are leaving our nations for simple problems. we are really suppose to leave with dignity in our lovely nations.

      • Dayphi

        ( i dont know why the sequence of my comment changes everytime i paste a quote ). If you havent watched THE ARRIVALS, full documentary, please do it soon. Then you will see what i mean by the derailed people on both sides of our camps who are working relentlesly, to ” hasten” the arrival of Dajjal ( anti christ ), Mahdi, and Jesus Christ. They will do anything and everything to see the ‘ prophecies ‘ fulfilled in their life time. You can’t reason with please who uphold that kind of inevitable disaster occur. They will do everything to prove the prophecies are correct. Sothey will creat havoc in libya and Ethiopia as the prophecy says, unless they revisit those longtimehold beliefs of disaster and destruction and adjust them. That where, as i meantioned few days ago, i evolved in some of my longtime hold believes to a more peaceful, meaningful with positive vision. Many of IS are there on training camp preparing for the arrival of the anti christ and the battle of the armegeddon.
        We can only beat them if we can alter that ” prophecies ” out of their brain. And convince them if they are true prophecies, God doesnt need our hand to hasten the fulfillment of ” His Prophecies “. He will fulfill them in His own schedule, not IS time table.

  • selam

    Dear Guest
    First lets find who you are. Second I do not understand half of your sentence so I do not intend to say a thing.
    From your sentences , you resemble to mizaan.

  • tes

    Dear AT,

    When I see Sudan, I have two scale measurements at hand: (1) the peace loving and hosting Sudanese people and a paradize to disadvantages refugees and (2) Al-Bashir, who untangles politcs of the horn of Africa.

    1. Sudanese people hosted and are hosting Eritreans since the days of chaos. They provided unreseved access when we need it. They have opened their gate for us at anytime and still are doing it. For this, if I consider a second country to fully endorse as my home country, it is definitely Sudan. I didn’t land there yet and enjoy their wonderful and beyond to measure hospitality yet I felt always experiencing it as home of my family members, brothers and sisters (4 out of 8 lived there for a while from my own family and almost 60-70% of my extended family. They all made their living happily and have deep appreciation for the freedom they got during their stay.

    Despite the hardships of making a sustainable living almost all who stayed in Sudan for a temporary or permanent base have an extended opportunity. Eritrean cultures, religious practices got a chance to survive there. No matter who is who, Eritreans are free to live there.

    2. The untangled politics:

    Al-Beshir is brave enough to evolve with any wind that blows. He became a friend with PFDJ regime, a regime that played his negative role in the division of grand Sudan. a regime that put his satanic hand in Darfur, a regime that armed East Sudan opposition group who became an instrumental in the human trafficking process and black market business.

    This may question the principle of him. To his credit, Al-Beshir accepted the insanity of PFDJ regime and this is nothing but for his own political advantage. Yet he remained pragmatic in his discourses. He united with different actors at different times and maintained his position while forming other unities.

    Fromr these two scales, I try to see their complements if we Eritreans as a people and of justice seekers can go one step further and change our focus in steering Al-Beshir’s unstable and of interest base politics and exploit much further in organizing our society there so that a safe gateway can be built towards future Eritrea.

    So far, PFDJ is using his satanic tools to stay engaged with Al-Beshir. Beshir played his negative role in weakening the strength of the opposition group as he was encountered by opposite but multiplied responses of PFDJ junta. Al-Bashir was so late to align himself with PFDJ as the damage was already done. Today, if Al-Beshir is in a friendship with PFDJ regime, it is only because he is forced to do so as a last option to stay in Power and maintain Sudan undivided further.

    Therefore, to maintain Sudan’s positive role in the making of democratic Eritrea, let’s work hard to penetrate the hardlines of Al-Beshir and build trust by all means possible.

    So far, from the opposition media; I have seen almost none focusing and steering the political position of Al-Beshir with PFDJ. Once they were kicked, they accepted the kick and distanced themselves. If PFDJ can play a role in Sudan’s politics for his own advantage, why not we?

    Dear AT, I call you to give us an enlightenment discourses about Sudan’s politics. We can’t leave alone and focus on the Ethiopian based opposition. Let’s stretch our horizon. If possible, even let’s follow Somali’s politicl developments. Only in this way we can shrink the magnitude of PFDJ politics.

    tes

    • AOsman

      Dear Tes,

      Only if you are armed to protect yourself, you would consider Sudan. Otherwise they will sell you for a bag of sugar.

      From the debate that have been raging you have three choice:
      1. Opposition from Ethiopia, with protection afforded to you and lost independence.
      2. Opposition from Sudan, exposed to killing while maintaining your independence.
      3. Opposition from Eritrea, [democratic coup 🙂 ], well still don’t know how that works, apart from waiting for a spark like Forto.
      4. Opposition from WWW and the rest of the world, you feel the gap…………SG may use his stick on me for being pessimistic.

      Regards

      AOsman

      • selam

        Dear Aosman
        I agree fully , but I have one question for you to help me through. Do you think an opposition with lost independence will have any sensibility in the Eritrean people?. Plus the past history of the Ethiopian leaders in eritrea is as dark as it can be.

        • AOsman

          Dear Selam,

          For those on the ground, #1 is the safest, most convenient and proximate place to play opposition with sufficient room to maneuver. You can accuse those in Ethiopia that they have lost independence or cannot trust Weyane, they will still believe their challenge is easier to manage than options #2 and #3.

          In the discussions that we have been following so far, Hayat, Emma and others who have accepted #1 have challenged us to come up with a better solution.

          My choice would have been armed opposition positioned between Eritrea and Sudan. It would have played a role in:
          1. Fighting the human trafficking,
          2. Giving those leaving Eritrea an option to resist,
          3. Maybe a more reception from EDF as they will not be considered “in bed with Weyane”
          4. Also more support from Diaspora

          Without resistance (armed within Eritrea) we go nowhere, but launching from Sudan will need strong financial support from Diaspora, which is split on the violent vs non-violent mode of struggle. That my simplistic read of our dilemma.

          Regards

          AOsman

          • selam

            Dear Aosman
            Yes , I think such strategy is far better than losing your vision and also in debt to Ethiopian government .it is the safest way possible. My fear over the number one is that we can never ever have our way. It is impossible for weyane to invest for the betterment of Eritrea to be transformed to a fully democratic nation. Thanks for the reply

      • tes

        Dear AOsman,

        My intention was of much wider in its scope though you took one part within the package and did justice by viewing the pros and cons. The other dimension is of more political compaign and possible diplomacy.

        Let me anyhow concentrate on your take.

        Can we use mathematical rules in order to harvest maximum yield? Independence can not be achieved without killing. But to minimiae killings, we can use a place were can set our foots. if we have the two, Ethiopia as strategic place (dejen), Sudan as launching place, war zone.

        Then democratic coup is possible.

        My problem with democratic coup is only with the actors involved and its main target. Democratic coup that does not involve EDF and PFDJ members is welcome. As far as the military junta of PFDJ, not defense force of Eritrea, involves there, it will only lead the country into conflict of interests and never to end power based revivals. I prefer a democratic coup like that of Tounisia (technocrats) whose primary mission is to over take the administration system and dismantle the PFDJ system within limited number of years..

        Hence, all three possibilities can be exploited at best.

        tes

        • AOsman

          Dear Tes,

          I think you need to revisit the Tunisia example, SAAY and Emma had a long discussion and the contrast between the two countries is that we luck strong institutions and the level of education is not comparable, therefore organized civil disobedience and military mutiny are highly unlikely, especially after Forto.

          The maximizing idea is all good in theory, what we see is the minimization effect when some proponents are at each others throat and wasting each others time.

          Regards
          AOsman

        • sara

          Dear Tes,
          since you are good at making unix analysis of who is who on ideas, thoughts,intentions i just want to ask you of how you see the respected ethiobian gov, representatives who share their good intention for eritrea with us at awate forum,on how the eri oppo has to work towards a change in eritrea.i am not asking what their gov official policy and what they are doing there, i want you to tell me from what you read here in this forum.

          • tes

            Dear sara,

            I think I know no one so far as an Ethiopian government representative here, at least officially. They may act as guardians of Ethiopian interest and sometimes government but what I believe and what I have so far read is of their own personal opinion.

            If they look more protective sometimes, so are we too. I believe that we Eritreans are doing our best to advance our interest and if Ethiopians do, let’s not be surprised. What we all need is “are we trapped or not.”

            But I am not worried, if we are weak, they will advance their ideas and the opposite holds true when we are strong. Hence, it is better if we remain ourselves and keep the strong side we have in order not to be hijacked by these guardians. This is just my opinion.

            tes

    • Dayphi

      Good morning tesfabirhan Hawwey and blessed be your Sunday. Kullu Zegebra Letzidq Tzaadiq We’etu, Wezekebr Senbete.
      I totally agree with your presentation and your eloquent words towards ” …the peace loving and hosting Sudanese people, and paradise to disadvantaged refugees.” Well said bro. It is an indicative of your nobility, your upbringing and the pedigree of your genuine parents who raised you in the old school of appreciating the generosity of strangers. I have lots to say about the good hearted Sudanese people, but i wont do it now; you said much of i would have said anyways. The one regret i have of my beautiful time with my sudanese hosts is that i didnt stay long enough to wittness and experience their ” Group IfTar ” on the neighbors’ streets during Ramadan Sunsets. Yet, it bleads my heart to see some unmannered Eritreans not only take advantage of the unsuspecting pure hearted hosts, but go low to mock them as ” Gejjif meTemTemi ab ru’su zellowo ember, gejjif Hangol zellewo Sudanawi yelbon ” kind of racist stereotyping, with others listening in joy hahaha. Very racist comments of some Eritreans who with their sharp tongues mutilate the hands of the people who gave them comfort when they were vulnerable who fed them when they arrived Kessela empty stomach after been lost for 10-15 days in Eritrean drylands.
      Sadly, I hear these days of some who downsize the generosity and protection a hundred thousand+ our refugees getting in our neighboring Habesha-land of Ethiopia and talking ONLY of the negative things they encounter in the refugee camps including the “sariets and temens and 3inqribts” they might have seen or even been stung with; as our Meda was free of those crawling insects bibereket Sayyidna Esays and his faultless widdib. They even claim Ethiopia is hosting the refugees ONLY because it is collecting big money from UNHCR and other western humanitarian agencies.They may be receiving some compensation to help them cope with the expenses, BUT i believe and will continue to believe it is because they are the descendantes and students of the Habasha lineage who were taught by their parents for over a thousand years to host and secure people who cross to their land from oppressors, whether those oppressors are meccans like Abu Jahl or local oppressors like Esayas and HEGDEF. Shame on those ungrateful people. Let’s compare the protection we have in Ethiopian refugee camps with what is going on to our people in the most advanced and richest African nation of South Africa. I dont want to even describe the way their are murdering our people there. I think some of us needed to see that savagery in order to appreciate the treatment of Eritreans in Addis or refugee camps. Our elders said gratitude is an attitude. We need for once to be appreciative of strangers generosity, lest we be treated everywhere the way we are now being treated in durban and johannesburg.
      I dont want to comment now on Liwa Omar Basheer because i …..hehehe… vote for Sadiq Al Mahdi ( so to speak ) and Bashir hurried in killing the government of the elected PM when he was given contract by sudanese voters for 4 years and his term was to expire in just 8 months. But yhat is another talk. I must must zip now.
      Burukh Me3alti

      • Dayphi

        Haw tes.
        I agree in stretching our horizon, as you said it and spreading our eggs in many baskets. I dont think the opposition lacks that simple strategy. My guess is the only basket there is in the market is the only one they have for now.
        The recent visit of one of our opposition party to Turkey, another one to Saudi Arabia is appreciable. We need more of such expansion.

      • Amanuel Hidrat

        Dear Dayphi,

        I share your concern of some Eritrean’s attitude towards the hospitable Sudanese people. I have witnessed myself the racist stereotype of some Eritreans mocking on the decent Sudanese people. They are by far educated than us at least at the time I was in Sudan, but yet because they wear Jelebya, they are ignorant in front of those racist Eritreans. I hate myself and those who utter shameful derogatory words when I happen around them by coincidence. So your points are well taken and are truth token with validity.

        regards,

  • T..T.

    Thanks Ayneta, you put everything into one.

    Isayas has no comparison in irrationality. When his half selected (own yes men) and half elected parliamentarians realized his irrationality in 2001 and refused to rubber stamp his decisions, he froze them all and then dissolved the whole house.

    Ever since his super irrationality, Eritrea joined the rogue nations and has been isolated. In response, Isayas has become active in international anarchy and black marketing for his survival, while life and time stopped for Eritrea and the Eritreans forcing them to adapt to ways worse than stone-age life, to mention a few: no water to use bathroom, no water to wash hands, no food, and no electricity.

  • selam

    Dear democracy
    African election is a jock . We have to make entertainment business out of it.imagine one party is elected for life with zero opposition. That can never ever happen in a fair election.No African nation is able to demonstrate a fair election with sound economic policy non. Most electrote aremarried to their blood kinship or are forced to vote for a government that rule by force. Just mention any nation .stop calling nigeria , stop calling south africa and even stop calling ghana. The best election just happened in Tunisia , I hope all africans copy tunisia model. All the western african nation are just a fancy whow up.

    • Kokhob Selam

      Dear Selam,

      እሞ ሃገርና ትሓይሽ እምበር :-ቁልቁል ዝኣፉ ዲሞክራሲ የለ :- ምርጫ የለ – ሕጊ የለ — ብዓንደ ርእሱ ቅዋም የለ ::ብሒም ዝበለ የተሓጎም :: እንታይ ትብሊ ?

      • selam

        Dear ks
        I did not say that. What I am saying is that most african democracy is not a prime example for eritreans.

        • Hope

          Hello Folks:
          Here is how I understand it:
          -Elelection for the sake of it, per se,is NOT a feature of Democracy but to have the right to vote for whom one believes is the right Candidate for the nation and the people is!
          -On the same token,Democracy is not juts having elections–case in point,the African style,with out going further–the Ethio-Sudanese-Kenyan and the West African Style.
          -For me, the major feature of Democracy is making sure that there is Social Justice for all people–irrespective of their Religion,Region,Ethnicity and Social Class under One and Inclusive Consitituion…where ALL PEOPLE ARE EQUAL under the Law.
          Take the case of the fake American Democracy,where Partisan Politics, Racism and Discrimination is the norm and the Unwritten Law–the exact opposite of what I said about Democarcy.This is NOT to mention the Republican Style of Voting Law,where Blacks are literally forbidden to be involved in the name of some weird and wicked Voting Rules and Regulations.Very funny,indeed,where a Citizen is ripped off his/her right for some wierd criteria!
          The Ethiopian Style:Be the Judge but a good start…and it is up to them–to judge it,not us!
          Eritrea?No categorization at all,hence,the Struggle—-It is not just one man rule but kind of wierd and never seen any where…chaotic,trial and error style rule,unpredictable,etc….and yet–we are still mute about it despite we bled for the exact Opposite of what is going on and blaming Ethiopians about their Democarcy!
          My choice for Africa,at least temporarily!
          Singaporian style Dictatorial Democarcy…..where the real Social Justice is at its best under ONE man Rule—and that should have been a starter for Eritrea and S Sudan.

          • Kokhob Selam

            Dear Hope,
            That is one choice too, that should be discussed during transnational period. nice choice I could say adding and putting in to consideration the reality and social make up – modifying things which needs change and copying and pasting what are right practical, why not.

          • Amanuel Hidrat

            Dear Hope,

            First let us have election even with irregularities. Then we will fight against the irregularities of an election. Without having an election we will not go and talk about the specific nature of the election. That is at least the rule of democratic process brother. If we don’t have like theirs, the basic democratic election, we can’t talk about a clean democratic election. By the way there isn’t any country that has a clean democratic election. Even the so called democratic countries do not have a clean democratic election. Look USA the so called leading democratic country, how the election is rigging by “suppressing the voting process”. So let us have the rule of democratic process of an election, then and only then we will talk the shortfall of an election. Ethiopians have the rule of law unlike us the Eritreans. The have the constitution as the basis for fighting any unconstitutional decisions. Don’t compare oranges with apples. It will makes us funny when we argue about the flaws of Ethiopian election when we don’t have even “an election” in our country. Let common sense rule in our talking point.

            regards,
            Amanuel Hidrat

          • Ted

            Amanuel, what is the difference having one for show and not having it at all. Since you are sensitive about Ethiopia, i will discuse the Sudan matter. Albashir won the election with most political opposition withdrew from participation knowing the reult before hand. For Eritreans election can be the same as of the other countries, rigged, but when you fight for social justice it

          • Amanuel Hidrat

            Hi Ted,

            I don’t know your generation, but if you are from my generation, we were singing like a song that we are a unique people from the other African countries. Meaning we will have a democratic government that will be governed by a constitutional law and will always observe the rule of law. It was often remarked by cadres of the organizations back then. Now Eritrea hasn’t even the basic foundation for a rule of law and institutions of democracy to exercise the basic rights. The empty rhetorical slogan of the past, just proved to be realistically empty now. Look Ted, instead of talking about our failure, we love to talk about the failure of other African countries. I think we are taking it as a compensating loop to satisfy our self that at least we are not alone. That mentality is weak mentality. A fighter always fight to be better, and I don’t think we have that stamina as I observe our debate. Fighters who look and weigh themselves into equating their failures with other’s failures, and keep saying after all we are Africans, have nothing to offer, to a country that demand a fundamental change. In order to bring change about our own country, first we have to stop talking about other African countries, we have to talk strictly about our problem and how to solve it. Talking about Ethiopia and other African countries, will not help us to address the problem we have as many of you has nothing to talk about your country but about Ethiopia.

          • Ted

            Dear Amanuel, I said nothing about Ethiopia, i guess your mind is programmed to defend it no matter what. we can’t win PFDJ or transform Eritrea by election. Election is not a magic bullet to take all out pains away. We need to improve of living standard of Eritreans. We can play our part in this( advocate for the removal of the sanction, defend Eritrea and expose smear campaign to weaken Eritrea, empower Eritreans politically and economically, ….) these are the hardest things and the most important things we need to do to achieve changes. As people get empowered and equipped with the necessities to withstand adversaries, they will demand whatever is important to their community and country. Who do you think would win if there is election tomorrow in Eritrea. IA of coarse. it will not be about liking him or not or don’t respect their human right but it is about survival. Doing the right things is not easy and fast but we need to start it now.

          • Kokhob Selam

            Dear Ted,

            “Who do you think would win if there is election tomorrow in Eritrea. IA of coarse.’ so what makes him hesitate to allow election?

          • Ted

            Hi KS, who is forcing him to have election, the toothless opposition or impostor TPLF pamphleteers. He is comfortable the way it is.

          • sara

            Dear Ted,
            KS has made his choice known and he is living it with comfort, the best we could learn from him is about ethiobian customs ,stories, food, etc which i found it helpful for most of us who have never crossed our southern border and we know little about those things i mentioned of our neighbors.
            just wish well in ethiobia!

          • Kokhob Selam

            Dear Sara,

            I am safe thanks to Amanuel for explaining which sara is which. the best reply to you was ዶ ሽኮረይ!

          • Hayat Adem

            Selam Ted, yes you were talking. Wasn’t it yesterday you used words like arebia and beles in relation to an entire population in Ethiopia? First, learn civility before you prescribe nationwide solutions. You can’t be Eritrean let alone a good Eritrean before you become normal human.

          • Amanuel Hidrat

            Dear Ted,

            First you didn’t answer my question whether you are from my generation or not, Because my message to my generation and my message to the young generation is different. You should come out with the reasons why I am saying that (your homework).

            Second, there is nothing in your comment that doesn’t include Ethiopia or Tigrains, or TPLF or any ethnic Ethiopian to make your argument. Actually you are of the few who debate on Ethiopian problem than Eritrean problem. You are uncomfortable to talk about our “domestic political crises” that eats the social fabric of our mosaic. You are uncomfortable to talk about our young who are drown in the high sea of Mediterralian Sea trying to secure their freedom. You are uncomfortable to talk about Eritreans who are beheaded by ISL in Libya. You are uncomfortable to speak about the modern slavery of our young in Eritrea. You are uncomfortable to speak about the refugee of Eritreans in Sudan and Ethiopia, or everywhere else in the world. But you comfortable to speak about Ethiopian democracy and how flaw it is or any African country for that matter. You see how odd you are. Your optic about the Eritrean socio-political Issue is non-existent.

            Third, You have the political control of the PFDJ as we speak, and you have the improving living standard of the Eritrean people, if political resolution isn’t part of your advocacy. You have said “As people get empowered and equipped with the necessities to withstand adversaries.” But you are telling the Eritrean people not to withstand the domestic enemy…. just resist only for Ethiopian….Ethiopia and its allies are the only enemy. You are trying to camouflage the real enemy of the Eritrean people which are “Issays and his party”

            Fourth, to fight for constitutionalism, rule of law, and elections is tantamount to fight for human rights for the Eritrean people. Because without them no human right will be respected. No body told you election a magic bullet. Democracy is a process, and as process, at least you have to lay down the infrastructures for democratic process. So brother, you are allergic to those ideals so often can be read in your comment. There will be no improving of living standard of Eritreans without political stability. Political stability with coercion and subjugation will not produce productive citizens, rather it pushes citizen to leave their country in droves as we are witnessing in the current reality of nation. Democracy and accommodation is the only process that create productive citizen, who can defend their rights and their nation. For you it is not about human right it is about survival of the current regime.

            Amanuel Hidrat

          • sara

            Dear sir
            would you be kind to tell me (us) where is this reported, that eritreans are beheaded by isl (do you mean isis) in Libya. if true , it is real news and very bad to our compatriots there, of course to others as well.
            with respect.

          • tes

            Dear Amanuel Hidrat,

            Please focus. Focusing is the main driving force for success. Your task is so divided and worse different to different stake-holders. PFDJ divided Eritreans as Yikealo and Warsay, just like that of India. And you are making such divisions. My generation and young generation and with different messages. Can’t we be liberated from such classification system?

            If you have a message, any generation will pick them accordingly. Why you are introducing such divisions? Can’t you embrace all and give the same message? Look, Jesus Christ gave a message to all, without discrimination and according to his believers, he saved those who believed on him and still is the savior.

            Yours can be the same but you are dividing it from the very beginning and hence not an honest mesage but a weighted one.

            tes

        • Kokhob Selam

          Dear selam,

          I got it. really “african democracy is not a prime example for eritreans.” I hope we will make our nation the best example for all Africans.

          • selam

            Dear k.s
            Yes , we should work only for the best result unless why will we spend blood and time for sunday exercise of ethiopian like democracy. I mean the habesha will domunate every thing and I hate to see it that way.

          • Kokhob Selam

            Dear Selam,

            what ..what is that? what is that Sunday exercise, and that dominate”” thing?. please clear it ማሕበር ሰንበቴ እዩ ዘድልየና ወይ ሓበሻዊ ጠቅላሊ ስርዓት ንመስርት ዝበለ ዶ ኣሎ እዩ? make it clear please .

          • selam

            Dear k.s
            what I mean is that , most people probably eat much faty or heavey food at sunday .All your habesha wuray is on sudnay and imagine democracy in Eritrea which is dominated by some group. I want you to think about monday morning going to work , and think african politics.

          • Kokhob Selam

            Selamino Shikor,

            I was having a nice time on this.. Now do you you know the saying in Seraye,,,some one said “ዓረዛ ዶ ሰብ እዮም?” and some one from ዓረዛ was wondering what this man want to say and ask him ready to quarel .. “እንታይ ድኣ? ” when the frist man noticed war is infront of him wisly said “እዝጊ ” then the one who was upset said “ነብስኻ ባ ኣውጻእካያ ኣንታ ኣድጊ” Lol.

            have you ever notice Selamino, unlike others I am on line always. I have been sleeping only 3 to 4 hours daily and the remaining all is divided for job,family care and education (Lol, you may have wondering why I am still in education that is a long history that you should after my departure). I am so slow I am working long to complete my duty. within those hours awate and other 3 sites are almost open, Lol.

            now about that Habesha think please don’t misunderstand me. and since you said “All your habesha wuray is on sudnay” really I wish I am around you in Eritrea to eat my wonderful Habesha cultural food. what do you feel when you remember your favorite dish? if you are like me the enzymes start to flow like a fountain, AH!! see the picture,

          • selam

            Daer k.s
            lol I laughed about the reply from the first man . Please add more if you know such things. way of life is quite complex you know. It would be nice if human being was created like birds , I mean the birds these travel from africa to far north of Europe only in search of food , have you ever them fly in arrow design , I would love to be in these group of birds. They never fight in between. Now imagibe I sitt between Ghebre and Fanti . I am sure every one knows my choice and that is due to the nature of humanity to avoid conflicts. Now what will ghebre choice ispredictable , he will try to mwke sure we never see eye to eye witn fanti. By such view he will choose a political career.

          • Kokhob Selam

            Dear Selam,

            you see actually no single man or women is bad, ugly or criminal by nature. it is the journey every one of us chose that makes some one to be cruel or kind. The biggest problem I face in life was the day I understand I am everyone and everyone is me. no where to escape. if you kill one man you have killed the entire humanity..that is my “university” to borrow tes’s categorization of schools. during the fist step to this university I became crazy to learn “cause and effect” thing. then I lost enemies. the only group who remain as challenger was PFDJ and even that my “university” rules don’t allow me. I am struggling to convince my school that PFDJ is illegal and should be my enemy. you know what, that also is not acceptable still, when you reach to higher level you will not be able to have enemy. Hey, don’t tell to others – this is top secret. Lol.

            lovely Selam, again no single man can remain against you if you continue to teach them. sometime you should use the language they use. so that will let the mind in alert. but normally you have to show them we are one. we are really one. and if one of us is in wrong line, we still pay for it because we are one. we need to work for good of human.
            have you eve noticed how mobiles work? there is a receiver and transmitter, we human being already are able to work in the fine side of the universe. that exactly is the system in our mind. if you think bad there is a wave that will translate it to it’s language and creates bad somewhere. that is a big lesson but for now I want you to think that Gebrat is a victim of our society. he has suffered and someone has treated him bad. he is transparent and he is saying it. his thinking can affect you and your thinking can affect him. you can’t challenge and won but you can challenge and let him be great-full around you which in turn makes him a winner with out making you a loser. hey, again this is only for you today…don’t tell I am theosophist to my lovely awate men and women. shishshhsh. That is the proud habesha Kokhob Selam, he never forget what nice things he found in Habesha but forgot all the problems he faced in Habesha. did I face even problems, I can’t remember. the memory for bad things is destroyed. deleted.What could have been been bad to be recorded in the nation where I take free education, and stay respected.nothing.

        • operationmi15

          Don’t generalize look Zambia,Mozambique,
          Zimbabwe,Botswana,Ethiopia,Senegal, Kenya … Etc All these country are a huge example.but for hamasenai the prime example is the legacy of Libya and Somalia

          • selam

            Dear operation

            Ethiopia is a failed state if we measure the institutions of democracy. While you brew your wine in Tigrai some one is looking at his home burned by weyane cronies specifically oromo. Now who in his right mind think ethiopia a democratic state only the corrupt officials. Go give your lecture in Tigraionline.com , eyob will give great attention with his eyes open .

          • operationmi15
          • operationmi15
    • Amanuel Hidrat

      Hi Selam,

      Can you believe, I found something you agreed with me. Here are your words (which myself have written about it): “The best election just happened in Tunisia , I hope all Africans copy Tunisia model.” Keep that string of advocacy and hammer it into the mind of our people, as the best alternative for a democratic transitioning to future democratic Eritrea. Watch our friend Saay, he will come to say “wuh-wuh” at us, and will tell us “no way Jose” how dare you want to bypass PFDJ-2, the only organization that is fighting Ethiopia and its allies. How dare you want to give space to the “Rukan organizations”(by sharing the words of Issayas Afeworki) to play on equal foot in leveled field with PFDJ-2. How could you not understand, that the only technocrat who can lead “modern Eritrea” are those who have experience within PFDJ “state craft” for the last 23 years. “Tuf-belwo” if you don’t the Eritrean people will spit on you on your face. Look Selam, I am keeping my degen heavly protected from the arsenal of Saay. if he is so kind enough, he will only draw pictures of the two “Amanuels” opposing the two “Saays”. In any case the Tunisia model is the best alternative political discourse that will give us an exit strategy from the mess we are in.

      regards,
      Amanuel Hidrat

      • selam

        Dear Amanuel , I and u only disagreed on mechanism not the result , I only opposed your way due to our lack of independence .We can never ever have a free transitional government while you depend every thing from ethiopia.

        Tunisia was able to pull off very very nicely. Even now the population have so much to say but they already have a base to move on to a very good future. You see Amanuel I always wished to have change basically that root out any of the present system in place. How we do that is really a very tricky way. France was asking the Tunisian opposition to intervene yet they told to the out siders , you people do not understand our people. Al nahada party was full of intellectuals and they gave every inch of t.heir knowledge to their people ,We need such people .Amanuel we are sandwiched between two strong adversaries the choice is our own unless they will make our struggle very very hard. Yet we did not develop any alternative if some day some how IA is gone.Eritrea at the moment have none , nada. All of them are just the other side of IA.
        You can not just have sudan type election and say , oww we have done it. I hate power sharing between the top elites people of interests.

        • Amanuel Hidrat

          Hi Selam,

          You seem either you are a member of Alnahda or one who knows them very well and is still sympathizer of Alhanda. Can you tell us a little bit as to how they see the debate going on in awate forum, and what are their take on the issue? I have no doubt that Alnahda could have enough intellectuals in their rank and files. But since some how, you hinted that their intellectuals “gave every inch of their knowledge to their people” can you please educate us and share with us as to how, when, and what their particular messages were? Could you link any resources of their effort so we can learn something from of them?

          regards,
          Amanuel Hidrat

          • selam

            Dear Emma lol no jock at all if you are looking at spellings of Ennahdha it is my way of making it short.
            As you know the leader of the ENNAHDHA party was living in london for almost 20 years and his party was banned in the corrupted government of bin ali. What they did was convince the educated memberes of their party and draw a line where they will never ever go in bed with elites and also never to entertain the right wing islamists. They maneged to creat a sense of belonging with their people. They show them they care more than the corrupt. The west did not like them but they have hold on their principles which is not to shoot their own people. They were the largest party to say no to arms and the rest small parties fellow their root. That able Tunisia to form a responsible transtion government. I can say more about ENNHAHDHA party but that is enough to show their intelligence. If you want to read about them please visit the book by Albert Einstein institution for peace. Here I can mention one book from the institution called HOW NONVIOLENT STRUGGLE WORKS BY GENE SHARP please read the book. This book is sensational book. You can find every thing about Tunsia , brazil, colombia and others.

          • Amanuel Hidrat

            Hi Selam,

            Good for you, you make me lost for few minutes. When you mention Alnahda party, I was thinking about our “alnahda party. I guess you don’t know it. Anyway I will point and say few words about two things (a) the elites (b) non violence as means to an end.

            (a) Elites are the educated section of any society, only to be grouped on what interest they stood for. In any revolution the elites are divided into two (a) those who advocate for social revolution (b) those who oppose any social change and resist at any cost with statue sque as you see many in our case. So there are also elites for transformation. Be aware about that and have the brilliance to identify them. In the Tunisian transition the elite-technocrat (non affiliated with the contesting parties) of all colors have contributed in leading the transitional period and in drafting the constitution of Tunisia. So please do not only attribute to Alnahda or “ENNAHDHA party” the progress achieved by the Tunisians.

            (b) Regarding the “no-violence” I have a different take. None violence as means to an end is always situational. If the regime in power allows for peaceful demonstration to air the public their grievances, then none violence as a means to change is a favorable than the alternatives. Because, it allows either for “soft coup” or bring an organized technocrat to pressure the resigning of the regime peacefully. But if the regimes are ruling by an iron feast, who hold the power by coercion and forced conformity, and who do not allow peaceful resistance, the only type that match for a violent regime a violent resistance. Those who advocate peaceful resistance for a violent regime like ours, until they show us practically a peaceful resistance inside Eritrea, either they are supporters of the regime or neive enough to understand the reality of the regime we have. No body dislike non violent resistance as far as the circumstances inside Eritrea allows for peaceful resistance. But to worship and advocate for non violence resistance against any type of regime is simply an Utopian dream to happen in the current reality of Eritrea sitting from thousands miles away from the besieged nation of ours.

            regards,
            Amanuel Hidrat

          • Saleh Johar

            Ammanuel,
            I feel you are talking of a different Nahda. I believe Selam is talking about the Tunisian AlNahda, a major party.

          • Amanuel Hidrat

            Abu Saleh,

            You are right. Do you know, I am always drained into our domestic struggle. That is why. Anyway I gave already a short answer to Selam. Thank you.

      • saay7

        DeHan do Hadirka Gedeem Tegadalai Emma:

        Deja-vu. What I recall about the discussion is that when I asked you for the model you want to use to bring about change in Eritrea, you used the example of Poland’s Solidarity and Tunisia’s Revolution. And I told you that the two were exceptions (Poland was the exception in how it pioneered the break-up of the Soviet Bloc; and Tunisia was the exception to the Arab Spring.) Yodita (where is she by the way?) asked for clarification and rather than repeating myself, I will just copy what I wrote then and, for good measure, I added an update to Burkino Faso.

        +++++

        1. Tunisia is not just very different from Eritrea; it is very different from the rest of the Arab world which is why it is the only place where, after Arab Spring, democracy appears to be taking root. Tunisia has Arab world’s most educated and largest middle class. It also had an extremely strong labor union and a long suppressed MODERATE Islamist movement. It was the labor union and the Islamist movement that was leading the charge and, happily for Tunisia, the Islamists didn’t do what they did in Egypt. Eritrea has neither a middle class, nor the proximity to democracies (Tunisia is a hop away from Western Europe) nor an independent labor union.

        ANOTHER HUGE DIFFERENCE WITH ERITREA: Tunisia’s army was neither battle hardened nor was it a popular military and it was NOT a factor in Tunisia’s Arab Spring. Tunisia, like Eritrea, had a huge security apparatus but it was not loyal to the Tunisian dictator. Why? Because, according to Wikileaks, “more than half of Tunisia’s commercial elites were personally related to Ben Ali through his three adult children, seven siblings, and second wife’s ten brothers and sisters.” Ben Ali was not sharing the loot with the security team.

        2. Poland: If Tunisia is markedly different from Eritrea, Poland is an entirely different world. If I were asked to pick a country LEAST LIKE ERITREA, I think I would put Poland’s on the top 5 list, next to probably the Baltic States. Poland’s 1989 revolution (Solidarity) was a continuation of 1956, 1968, 1970, 1976 and and 1980 movements. It didn’t spring out of nowhere: it had been in the works, off and on, for 33 years. It was based on the “Third Road” approach to civil society. Until Poland re-defined it, Civil Society (or bourgeoisie society as Marx called it) was either market-centered–like the ones in the US–, or state-centered–the “mass organizations” of PFDJ and communist states. In Poland, they created the “third road”: civil society that was society centered–discussion clubs, forums that were about empowering the individual citizen. Solidarity argued for decades that it was NOT interested in politics–state power–but individual empowerment. The last time we had civil society in Eritrea was when labor unions were around in the 1940s.

        Poland does not have diversity issue: it is 86% Roman Catholic (almost approaching Tigray’s 95% Orthodox Christian) and it didn’t have, to use your favorite phrase, “social groups with grievances.” Thus, anti-communism was a sufficient basis for organizing. The Roman Catholic Church just happened to have a Pope who was from Poland and had strong moral authority and influence in Poland. Eritrea is diverse country with no unifying slogan for the opposition, and certainly no religious authority to inspire it.

        Finally, I don’t know if you are just being mischievous or you don’t understand PFDJ-II: it is supposed to be for a transitional phase while the country is being stabilized. I realize there is a danger with that (lots of “transitional” end up becoming “Permanent”) but there is a danger with everything in life. For example, the last revolution you were in love with was Burkina Faso. It looks like they had their own Amanuel Hidrat’s calling for “dismantle the system!” and that is have the results that everybody can predict–everybody except people like Emma who haven’t transitioned from the textbook cadre world to the real world.

        saay

        • Amanuel Hidrat

          Dear Saay (our future technocrat a candidate for transitioning),

          Do you know Saay, I have learned from you few tactics (though are not good in their nature) as part of your debate tactics. Those tactics are “ashmur” “demeaning as a person” “sarcasm” “show off humors” and I hope I will use them as a tool when I debate with you (not with others). Whether, I could have that ability to challenge you with your tactic or not , I will see it as I go forward. But I knew you and understand you, what you are up to in crashing the personality of individuals.

          Regarding about the text book cadre: I don’t see any difference from all the history “historical narration” and all the versed quotes of philosophers, sociologists, politicians you name it, you mention in all your comment, makes you different than what a revered cadre could be. You are by far a cadre than myself with the tools and connections you have, and the nature of your inflexible principle that sounds the principle of an organized cadre. My friend you are doing the best a cadre could do especially in an entangled nation of ours. You are no more or less than the most versed cadre I have ever seen in my political life.

          Regards,
          Amanuel Hidrat

  • Yoty Topy

    I think , elections are waste of resources in a region that can barely feed its population.Even the phony ones. I wish someone has the guts to publicly declare that. There should be elections moratorium in some countries until they are able to provide all basic needs to their population.

    • selam

      Dear yoty
      But how do you do that. Who control the mechanism for economic development ? Why we need election is just to have abetter choice from what we have now nothing else . You go to the ballot box and choose the same person again and again if that is the case yes I agree.

      • Yoty Topy

        Hi Selam,

        Where there is a will there is always a way. For example, international and regional organizations can create large beaurocracies that can move in to partner with local beaurocracies durning the infancy stage of young nations. Help them at least until they reach middle income status and then they can conduct elections. That’s just off the top of my head.

        • selam

          Dear yoty
          Large international organizations do not want africans to climbe up to the middle class. They want us just to remain consumers of their products and also remain on the hands of their banks. It is quite complicated sir.what wehave to do is shif our interest to east and cut the middle man.

  • Millenium

    There is nothing laughable about this; it is the truth. Besides, this guy was not arguing whether or not the Eritrean government is killing people, he said the government is secular as a counter argument to the claim that the said government is aiding Islamic fundamentalists, there was therefore no need to bring Stalin to this.

    • Hayat Adem

      Millenium,
      In all the sanctions, isolation , conflicts and criticizes against the Eritrean regime, secularism has never been invoked. No was heard the Eritrean government was supporting al-Shabab for religious ends. Right or wrong, the charges against the regime have never been “because of” but “in spite of” its being secular. As all non-secular governments can not be automatically accused of supporting extremists, secular governments can not be considered as always and for all other reasons as having nothing to do with extremists. It is all about actions and activities. you know the US has a secular government. But is has been recorded that it had been supporting the Afghan Mujaheddin, later Taliban, in their fight against the Soviet occupation. The thought approach here should be inductive: building it pieces by piece as in a puzzle. Did it do it or it didn’t and the evidence for that. In that context, the guy’s reasoning are absurd and laughable. But what else is new?

      • Millenium

        Hi Hayat:

        There was no reason for Beyan to talk about Stalin beings secular in the context of the video; that would only make sense if Glen had said the Eritrean government is not killing people because the government is
        secular. That is not however what the video is about.

        Now, talking about the point you raised, it is not about whether or not the government did it, it is rather about whether the Eritrean government is in the Americans good grace or not; like you said, the American’s themselves do it when it serves their interest. Then Glen is making the point that if alshebab is the ball America played to score political scores against Eritrea on the diplomatic sphere, the real reason is something else.

    • ‘Gheteb

      Hello Millenium,
      What is comically risible, on the other hand, is the fact that those who wanted to see Eritrea sanctioned didn’t bother to engage in any kind of logical ratiocination in the first place. In the silent drama we have witnessed, those forces who wanted to handicap Eritrea cherry picked all the pretexts that they needed to give the sanctioning of Eritrea all the veneer it needed and viola Al Shabab offered them the perfect excuse to sanction Eritrea in order to achieve their grand strategy in the Horn of Africa.
      One need not be utterly conversant in the inner workings of the Foggy Bottoms to read the tea leaves of US foreign policy. Well, in one of her appearances in the U.S House of representatives Secretary Condi Rice, never referred to Eritrea as separate entity but as Eritrea/Ethiopia as Eritrea slash Ethiopia and the message is not lost to those who can think geometrically. Well, if sanctions were to be applied fairly on all “bad or rogue nations”, then I think the genocidal tribal junta that is governing Ethiopia would have qualified as the primary candidate for a sanction. But, as Glen correctly observed sanctions are selectively applied as a prelude to those governments that the sole super power wants to see removed from power.

  • Bayan Nagash

    The link below is intended for the heavy hitters of Awate. Glen Ford’s support of Eritrea on the basis of it being the most secular country in the whole continent is laughable at best; as if Soviet Union was not a secular nation under Stalin, who managed to kill millions of its population. It’s is only seven minutes long, but you may want to consider putting your blood pressure medication nearby, if you suffer from one:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=XJ0uoqiZ_8M

    • SenaiErtrawi

      This is all PFDJ can or is willing to afford as far as lobbying, what a failure! Even me, from my little savings, could buy this kind of lobbying 🙂

      • Nitricc

        HI Senay; I am just wondering; what is wrong with what the guy has to say. He spoke the truth. Why would you have a problem with it. is not true that Ethiopia is refusing to uphold the deal it signed because Ethiopia is American’s beech? Is not true that Eritrea is trying to do what it can with what it has. Is not true the USA is the main reason there is no peace no war between Ethiopia and Eritrea? Isn’t true, Eritrea have not democratic but secular government? I agree with the guy with what he has to say. Tell me your beef.

        • Hayat Adem

          Hi the Amazing Nitricc,
          I would answer all your questions with upper case “no” except the last that speaks to secularism. Eve then, it is not that Eritrea has a secular or non-secular government. It is not a not a normal government at all. Why that government is abnormal could be partly because it has many abnormal supporters who don’t act normally like yourself who don’t think twice before publicly denouncing and disgracing a holly Book worshiped by 50% of Eritreans and billions of people in the planet.

        • Ted

          Nitricc, if ain’t bad news about Eritrea , it is always false news. Go figure.

          • ‘Gheteb

            Hi Ted,
            Well, “crazy Ted” you need “to wise up, mature up and grow up” fast as was ordained by ‘Aboy Qeshi’ Amanuel Hidrat. Man, I had a sidesplitting laughter when I read that yesterday!

          • Ted

            Gheteb, that is what happens when Aboy Qeshi takes off His biretta,

          • Nitricc

            What up Ted; the guy told it as is; nothing but the truth and the so-called toothless oppositions are having hard time accepting the truth. To be opposition it does not mean you have to oppose the very truth. What surprises me most is; when the opposition wonders why the silent majority is not following them. I am not saying the Government of Eritrea is saint and with out faults but when the government has an opposition that opposes the very truth; no matter how the government sucks; people will stick with the government.
            The greatest point and the difference between the government and the so-called opposition is that the government is considered the one who cares about the well being of the state and as long as that is the image; no sane individual, let alone the silent majority will buy in what ever the opposition do. If you need any evidence; look no further; why would any person’s of the truth and love his country will oppose and have a problem with what this guy is saying?

      • Bayan Nagash

        Selamat SenaiEritrawi,

        In a word, you described and captured the essence of the clip – thank you kindly.

    • ‘Gheteb

      Ahlan Beyan,
      Thanks for the YouTube link, Beyan. First, I don’t know if I am a heavy hitter, a “light hitter”, a “soft hitter” or a “no hitter”, however here is my take on the issue at hand as ‘Gheteb qua Eritrean and not as ‘Gheteb qua ‘Gheteb. I think what Glen was trying to show was that how a secular government like that of Eritrea can stand accused of aiding and abetting an Islamic fundamentalist group such as Al Shabab of Somalia. You may say that he tried to show the accusation lodged against Eritrea of supporting Al Shabab to be a prime example of a non sequitur. I think he makes an excellent point.
      Apropos secularism, you are right the Stalins, the Maos and other dictators were secular polities and those who may even go further and demand no religious influences in public life at all are known as secular fundamentalists and I think the French are getting closer to achieve that title.
      Regarding what the US stances are vis-à-vis Eritrea, my “emic and etic” take is that I think he makes some valid observation. What he has described fits the U.S foreign policies strategic imperatives undergirded by naked realpolitik. Here is where small countries like Eritrea are rendered as casualty of a Super Power’s foreign policies.

      • Bayan Nagash

        merHaba Gheteb,

        My intuition was right in that the clip was going to attract all levels of hitters of Awate mold, who possess this organically keen analytic capability, which is second to none. I was going to describe the awate analysts in residence as inimitable bunch, but then I was afraid those who are of your caliber may end up analyzing my language using the
        three heavy hitters in critical discourse analysis a la James Gee’s (“big D & small d”) or that of Fairclough’s Marxist influenced sociolinguistic and social theories of discourse analysis or that of Kress’s social semiotic based meanings, meanings derived through multi-modal methodologies.

        I was going to go into microethnographic discourse analysis, courtesy of David Bloome & Stephanie Power Carter, as a perspective as well, lest other readers think I am doing
        this as a grandstand of swaggering proportions. Heaven forbid that I show some erroneous dispensation to hubris as I firmly believe that its antonym (humility) is one characterization that I mostly attribute to Eritreans in general and Habesha culture in particular, and by disposition that includes, yours truly.

        • ‘Gheteb

          Ahlan Beyan,
          A beaucoup of thanks for the rejoinder. I am telling you that could only be penned by an inimitably nonesuch writer like you Beyan.

          Anent the issue of humility that you attribute particularly to the soi-disant Habesha culture, allow me to take you in a short drive down the memory lane. Some a decade and half ago, a young brainiac brimming with witticism and intellect, yarned a snippet of a story. From the top of my head, here is my seat-of-the-pants recollection of that snippet.

          It was about those Eritreans ( Habeshas?) who were members of the EPLF mass organizations who toiled and slaved to support the EPLF from their meager resources. And, on the other hand, there were these Eritreans ( again, Habeshas?) who mainly concentrated and put all their energies in pursuit of their education that will eventually earn them some degrees and academic credentials up to Ph.Ds and hence end up joining the “Habesha” club of clerisy. The coruscating mind of this person, wondered how all those “Habesha” intellectuals who have provided a bubkes of financial support to the EPLF’s war efforts, end up sitting in the front rows, while those who supported the Eritrean revolution munificently were relegated to sit on the back seats in all the EPLF sponsored community events.

          By my lights, this captures the status consciousness of the soi-disant Habesha culture and the young mind afforded us an apercu into a culture in which humility merely exists in the realm of ” Word of Wolrldness” — Qal Alem.
          Now, do you recognize that person who trenchantly rendered those incisive observation about humility v hubris/arrogance in what you describe as “Habesha culture”?

          • Bayan Nagash

            Ahlan Gheteb,

            As I pen this note, there is ominous news about yet another boat capsizing in the Mediterranean Sea, which reportedly is carrying over 700 refugees who are in grave danger, who may end up losing their lives – God forbid another tragedy of Lampedusa proportions might be in the offing. I write with a pounding heart, but the story you tell, indeed, is connected to the tragedy that has befallen Eritreans and continues to befall them as we speak. Since our dialogue is veering to the realms of narrations and stories, perhaps citing Henry Louis Gates at length could furnish us with some semblance of hope and redemption:

            “The Black slave narrators sought to indict both those who enslaved them and the metaphysical system drawn upon to justify their enslavement. Each slave author, in writing about his or personal life experiences, simultaneously wrote on behalf of the millions of silent slaves still held captive throughout the South. Each author, then, knew that all Black slaves would be judged – on their characters, integrity, intelligence, manners and morals, and their claims to warrant emancipation – on this published evidence provided by one of their number. The slave authors therefore had to satisfy the dual expectations of shaping the random events of their lives into a meaningful and compelling pattern, while also making the narrative of their odyssey from slavery to freedom an emblem of every Black person’s potential for higher education and the desire to be free (Gates, 2002).

            And I couldn’t help feeling these feeling of our young Eritreans leaving their country in droves and thousands of whom are perishing in the high seas and the story I tell below is prompted by the desire to register as the snippet of which you shared here. It is in that spirit I am penning today’s note.

            Dear Gheteb, your narrative triggered a heart wrenching story that a dear friend, actually one who I consider a brother with whom we’ve had similar life journeys into the realms of refugee life as young men in the middle school in Cairo, who when occasion calls for it he never shies away for telling this personal story, which goes something like this: His older brother who was tera tegadaly with EPLF had ample opportunity to leave gedli but was adamant in staying the course. His mother once went searching for her son to finally give him a chance for a way out; after so many hji abzi terayu neiru; tmali kheidu; bAddi ekelle eyyu zello, and variations thereof, his mother bless her soul wouldn’t give up and was able to finally locate him.

            At long last, when her tegadaly son refused to leave, she in her foresighted moment bluntly told him this: “if and when Eritrea becomes independent you should never be despondent and/or downhearted about how you might be the one who will be holding the gates of the government office to your younger brother, who would be armed with the necessary education to deserve the higher office that he will hold.” The son understood that that was going to be the price he would have to pay should he live to see independence of the country and the people for whom he would end up paying the ultimate price for – and he did it willingly and knowingly. One would have to admire a young man’s dogged determination to bring freedom to his people and thousand upon thousands more like him.

            Unfortunately, that is in the nature of things in that some will pay the ultimate price and others will have the necessary technical know to help move a nation forward and onward. Indeed, there will be those who are status conscious individuals, but, of course, along the way if they end up putting the wellbeing of their people and the nation ahead of their self-interest, the country and its people will still need them to contribute toward nation building efforts.

  • sara

    well, the election favour is blowing around africa, the Nigerians last month, now Sudan and maybe soon Ethiobia.
    i think the time table is set by the think tanks in washington and NGO’S who run those countries from behind the curtain..
    if you want legitimacy from the international community (not your people) elections games are a must, actually it is a precondition to get -aid, assistance,grant,donation,loan,credit,etc

    • Peace!

      Dear Sara,

      Obviously Beshir is not smart enough to follow late Zenawi’s formula which is first exhaust the presidency with limited terms then switch the presidency to prime minister for unlimited term. He ruled Ethiopia till he died.

      Regards

      • S.Tesfa

        Dears,
        How about focusing on our insane dictator at home who refuse to give power to Eritrean people- the people who sacrifices their beloved parents, sons and daughters.
        BR

        • Peace!

          Dear S.Tesfa,

          Agreed! Do you want me to pass your message to awate team?

          Regards

          • S.Tesfa

            Dear Peace,

            If you insist, please pass my message to Sara:)

            BR

          • Hayat Adem

            Peace,
            Awate Team has been at it since birth but since you are commenting on other countries, why don’t you share your own views about the dictator?

      • sara

        Dear Peace,
        Beshir, meskeen- you know he has been cornered and he is doing what he can to go out of his sanctions
        even his nemesis do advise him to follow what the neighbors are doing, nothing to lose as long as winning is assured, what did change in ethiobia,uganda,nigeria,kenya etc. nothing, same same for the people.
        i see here many reacting to what i scribed and allow me to tell you kind of a joke i heard from someone from west african lady who happen to be casual friend i meet some time in a grocery i do visit often.
        , i said .. woow congra.. for your election out come
        she said..naa, it is nothing same..same
        i said.. but better than many under D..
        she .. no, i think you do not know why we do election in our part of the world
        i said -wow, i am not sure but , you know elections are a sign of progress of country etc
        she said no.. no my friend, they do that because that is the only way they could amass wealth
        we don’t agree few people to be on those jobs and have every thing, there must be
        a chance for others to have the same opportunity, even when i go home one day
        i hope some how to be in politics so that i could live comfortably. few millions and am off
        to retirement . you see how rational thinking it is election in our part of the world.
        even she gave me examples of the wealthy africans from ethiobia to nigeria are, how they made their wealth hey, i forgot she also mentioned those who conive with those politicians , in splitting the money they get from loans , grants, credits, aids, assistances etc. are the Donners.

        • Hayat Adem

          Sara,
          All these talk in a grocery?! Fantastic! But let me ask you one quick question: 4 years ago, President Isaias publicly said Eritrea needs 30-40 years, or more time, to conduct an election. Do you agree with him?

        • Peace!

          Dear Sara,

          Good one! I often travel to Addis, and the only differece I witness all the time is same old same except the number of oppressed Oromo in the Amhara region is shrinking. If the U.S. gives you a green light, you can win as many elections as you wish.

          Regards

          • Abel

            Peace!
            “oppressed Oromos in the Amhara region is shrinking”.

            Can you elaborate further what you mean?

          • Peace!

            Hi Abel,

            Actually I said ” The number of oppressed Oromos in Amhara region is shrinking”

            With that in mind, in today’s Ethiopian democracy “There are currently an estimated 20,000 Oromo political prisoners in Ethiopia, lending an urgency to the political situation. The arrest and treatment of these prisoners has been strongly criticised by international human rights organisations like Amnesty International and Human Rights Watch.”

            http://thisisafrica.me/the-oromo-people-and-ethiopia/

          • Abel

            Dear Peace!

            Oromo’s in Ethiopia are owners and masters of their own fate.Hiding behind the Oromo’s skirt is an old failed formula.I am sure The president of Ethiopia Dr Mulatu, the speaker of the house of Ethiopian parliament Abba Dulla, The president of Oromia Muktar Keddir, the deputy PM Almaz Meko, the mayor of Addis Kumma, the defense minister Fergissa, and even Lencho letta, the founding member of the OLF would agree with my above statement.

          • selam

            Dear Abel
            IA supporters use the same mechanisms as yours , and now you want to paint the oromo using the handfull thievs and weyane cronies to justify for your own .who will trust your world . How about the 30 million ethiopian oroms who are suffering from your blined leaders. Time will change and you need to stand for the right of the people. There were so many tigari peopleand eritrean people under dergi too.

          • Abel

            Dear Selam,
            I know for sure you have some deep rooted hatred for Weyane/Tigray/ .for that matter.anything Ethiopian,You are practically insane,so I don’t expect any fruitful, debate with you.
            In general your comments are an Insult to the intelligence of The Great People of Oromo who are and have been masters of their destiny long before you discovered your Eritrean Identity..
            .

          • selam

            Dear abel
            Just stop making up things , no one believe what ever you are crying for. It is not up to you to tell about oromo, they are making their voice so I do not need your weyane propaganda. By the way the weyane you are trying to make engels are well washed by blood of innocent people.

          • Abel

            Dear Selam,
            1-You hypocrite, first take the plank out of your own eye, and then you will see clearly to remove the speck from your brother’s eye.Matthew 7:5.

            2- Yeraswa Eyarerebat,YesewTamasilalech.
            3- Kohalo Mesilen si Menkoro ….
            Please choose one or all of the above,they are meant for delusional people like you.

          • Peace!

            Dear Abel,

            I quoted from an article written by one of the “Oromo’s in Ethiopia are owners and masters of their own fat.” And obviously, it is not about an Eritrean hiding behind nick name advocating for Oromo’s freedom; it is about freedom and democracy for all Eritreans and Ethiopians at least as far as this forum concerned. Now, if you deny the ongoing oppression and cleansing of Oromo’s by TPLF lead government, the truth shall set you free.

            regards

          • sara

            Dear Peace
            you know my elder bro read my comment (my meeting with the west african lady) yesterday and he was furious that i wrote it in english he said why don’t you tell it in tigrinya or arabic, that would have been funny to read than in english. i said i don’t have tig/ara font on my comp.
            now about the elections in addis, another joke(by my ethio neighbor who visits addis frequently), one of the ethiobian parties is under scrutiny and pressure by the gov, simply because their party flag is blue-semayawe, you know why, apart from the parties program related to unity of ethiobia and others, the blue colored flag is seen as a threat because of past history of that blue colored flag from up north.
            on serious note, you know here in the south the people are bombarded through the global media
            about democratic virtues only through the prism of election, and most tend to believe them and of course the abusers of democracy have taken the stand that if you cant beat them join them,
            hey they do it now and then up north why not us… as long as we are sure we will be back in power and this is what the creditors,donors want us and we play it their way and we live happily after.

        • Abel

          Sara,
          I think you consuming too much dose of the conspiracy theory syndrome. Be proud African, start appreciating the little African achievements.

          • sara

            Dear ato Abel,
            i think you are the one consuming something and dosing , where is the salutation? just joking!
            look, i am not going to tell you about conspiracies and all, you know this things are not serious
            and you being out living in your comfort has to at least be honest to tell the truth live with truth,
            those living that wretched life under those regimes could not afford to know the truth but live with that farce at least let us help them know the truth .
            btw, who told you i am not proud of being eritrean, african and arab.

      • Hayat Adem

        Hi Peace,
        Bashir and PIA became presidents before Meles did. They are still presidents three years after hsi departure. You don’t have to be smart and wise like Meles to keep hold of the power. But you might need part of that to use it for good purpose.
        Hahat

        • Kokhob Selam

          Dear Hayat,

          they came before him to the world and still are here. it is not how much you stay it is how much you work for betterment of human beings. Yet the more you stay alive the wider chance you get. is that like talking about quality and quantity? Lol, the man was full of wisdom and god need him earlier as people has to learn replacing such hero.

      • saay7

        Hey Peace:

        Happy Friday! Actually, I think people underestimate the wily nature of Omar Al Bashir and how he has already figured out an even trickier way to be president for life:

        1. Have a large constituency: in his case the military
        2. Defeat enemy by any means necessary: In Sudan’s history, the Darfuris were considered the warrior class. He killed, tortured, burned the people, and split and co-opted its leadership, and entered into long, long term “peace process” that buy him years; (there were no elections between 2005-2010 but a “transitional government’)
        3. Defeat Al-Turabi: Al-Turabi was considered a rising star and Islamic authority. He brought in another guy, of equal Islamic-Authority stature and made him his VP;
        4. While less sophisticated leaders like those in Eritrea and Ethiopia arrest journalists and close newspapers, he just buys the dissenting newspaper and the publishing house. Problem solved.
        5. Amend constitution as necessary.
        6. Be a broker and trade favors. (In the leaked minutes of his cabinet’s meeting, he brags about how he introduced Isaias to Ahmadinejad.)
        7. Have a massive national security apparatus: arrest, kill, disappear at will.
        8. Allow unlimited number of “independents” to run in the election.
        9. Intimidate, corrupt the UN so it doesn’t report on your atrocities.
        10. Repeat as necessary.

        saay

        • destaa

          Dear Saay7,
          Thank you. I come to read your views and always enjoy them. Today I am forced to let you know it 🙂

          • saay7

            Hey destaa:

            Thank you sir. You do know that this now makes you a self-hating Ethiopian 🙂

            saay

          • sara

            Dear sal
            always generous, you like to give destaa karamele, thats what my bro, your pal has told me. he even said he sal gives the destaa and nazreth but he keeps the Elaak to himself. what was special about Elaak he refused to tell me, he said i better ask you. why is that uncle sal ?

          • saay7

            Hey Sara:

            elaak was chewier and sweeter than desta and Nazreth. But the king of candies was “halewa sala” and the King of biscuits was “petite buerre”. Despite the massive candy consumption our teeth didn’t decay because we brushed them all day long. Ask your brother what “mewex” is.

            saay

        • Peace!

          Hi Saay,

          Happy Friday to you too! Didn’t see it that way. Well then the TPLFites must be doing good job in portraying Meles as democratically elected dictator, and for them, dictatorship and election fraud have no meanings when it comes to Ethiopian democracy.

          Regards

    • Hayat Adem

      Hi Sara,
      Few questions if you can:
      1) I thought Nigeria’s election last month was a good start. Nigeria’s is a huge country in sheer numbers, in diversity, in resources and even in problems. Last month their election was peaceful voting, and credible and people fired their boss and replaced him with another. Both the winner and the defeated shook hands. You don’t seem to be happy with Nigeria’s election and current trending. May I ask why?
      2) Do you believe Washington Think tanks are running countries like the Sudan Ethiopia from behind? How so?
      3) Do you believe countries that boast about fending off external influences like Eritrea are doing better in managing their national affairs? Doing better should mean doing greater for more; doing better today and tomorrow than yesterday; securing the future with more confidence and predictability. Reflect,
      hayat

    • Guest

      There you go again Dr. Sara. What kind/more of proof do we need that you are not yet out of your pfdj thinking than to hear your illogical premise ‘Washington and NGO are behind the timetable of Sudan’s, Ethiopia’s, and Nigeria’s elections.’ Would you rather not have a timetable set by USA for Eritrea than to be the situation you are. I lose hope when a person like you [PhD holder] talks something that lacks common sense and is focused on Ashmour. YE Eritrea Diha gebere yestemaresh eco Ashmour lemgeber/lemawourat idelem. Bomb bomb yehone idea lemaflek enji. Goud Eco new.
      Please forward ideas that match your PhD level.

      • sarah ogbay

        Dear Guest,
        please don’t give stupid remarks without thinking twice. It just exposes how empty you are. The least you could do is read properly. I write my name with ‘h’ at the end. I also write my surname. Is that difficult to figure out?. Unlike you, I don’t hide behind pen names.

        • Nitricc

          Lol Hi Sarah. How do you know guest is not talking about Sara? She could be PhD holder too. Aren’t you assuming here? You should have known guest failed the attention to detailes; if not there is a difference between Sara and Sarah. and you are assuming I.e
          Both of you are wrong. It feels good to be a judge. Lol

          • sarah ogbay

            Dear Nitricc
            ‘It feel good to be a judge.’ ! Really??? it is not a good sign of personality, you know.

          • Amanuel Hidrat

            Dear Guest & Nitricc,

            Double check not to run addressing people with a “mistaken identity” before you start to reply. We have two Sara (Sarah) participating in this forum. One she uses “Sara” the other uses “Sarah Ogbay” who have different positions in their debate. Actually I believe Dr. Sarah Ogbay uses full name in order to avoid a “mistaken identity” with the other Sara. So we have to be careful to whom we are addressing. We should Address our reply to the proper person with the specific identified name in the comment.

            Second, It is not about whether they have both PHD or not, it is about misrepresenting the identity of the persons. If one chose to use “Sara” as her identity, address to her as “sara”. If Dr. Sarah Ogbay wanted to be identified as “Sarah Ogbay” address her as “Sarah Ogbay.” How difficult is this to you guys.

            regards,
            Amanuel Hidrat

          • Fanti Ghana

            Good Morning Mr. Amanuel,

            I made that mistake too a couple of days ago. I went back and corrected mine just now. I have been blubbering and making mistakes a lot lately. It is amazing the little things we don’t really see no mater how obvious. These are only the little details that get caught. Imagine those that did not get caught. All our opinions, observations, and conclusions must also be based on including these kind of little mistakes that sometimes don’t get caught. It makes you wonder how many wars must have been based on mistaken conclusions. The human mind is fragile indeed. Just saying hello Mr. Amanuel.

          • Peace!

            Dear Emma,

            “It is not about whether they have both PHD or not, it is about misrepresenting the identity of the persons.” Correct!

            But why would you use their political position to clarify the difference when you simply can spell their names? I mean are you sure the two Sara and Sarah have huge political differences???

            Regards

          • Amanuel Hidrat

            Dear Peace,

            Yes indeed when I scrutinized their comments. That is one of things my eyes are focused on. To identify the positions of the debaters from their comments. If I don’t do that, I will not know how to debate him/her to begin with. So brother there is a clear distinction between the two. Go back and put their comments side by side, it won’t take you time to identify one from the other. Don’t ask me to show you that is part of your homework when you engage in a political debate. In any case I brought to the attention of the forum to be more careful from and give a little time to the detail not to fall in to lazy mistaken of identity. And I don’t think you are one of them. I found you as a prudent individual to what he want to say. That is a little credit to you.

            regards,
            Amanuel Hidrat

          • Peace!

            Dearest Emma,

            Thank you for the credit regardless of its size. Well Br. Emma, when it comes to categorizing people based on political position, you might need to ignore immaterial differences. The way I see it, I hope I am not too naive, there are two groups in this forum as far as Eritrean solution is concerned, ideally speaking. One group advocates for change from within, and the other also through intervention. Now, I doubt Dr. Sarah opposes change from within which the other sara don’t seem to have problem with that. please correct me if I am wrong.

            regards

          • Amanuel Hidrat

            Dear Peace,

            No body will oppose change from within (from inside). The issue is (a) it is unrealistic in the current of Eritrea with one exception – the natural death of the despot (b) And if change comes from inside without the collaboration of the diaspora, no body will predict what kind of change will ensue from unorganized inside forces. The skepticism on the nature of the change is overwhelming to say the least. The so called change makers might be from the PFDJ echelon… which will be no real change. Otherwise no body will oppose changes from inside.

            regards,
            Amanuel Hidrat

          • Mahmud Saleh

            Dear Aman

            Change dynamic has its own laws. It will arrive when the factors align. Those laws are free of our desires. We can study and try to affect them; that’s if we are objective enough. Having said that, I see some fundamental flaws in your conceptualization of how change might come and who should bring about “real” change.

            a/ You admit change could come from inside only with the death of IA

            b/ No change from inside is good without the collaboration of diaspora

            c/ No way of predicting “what kind of change will ensue from unorganized inside forces” because the change could be steered by PFDJ echelon.

            Wrong in all.

            On A:

            a/ IA could die

            b/ IA could be imprisoned

            c/ IA could be forced to resign

            d/ I don’t rule out the possibility of IA opening up a space for transition. You may ridicule this idea, but I have seen the man doing unexpected acrobatics. It all depends on the dynamics of domestic forces, and pressures applied.

            Bottom line: as long as there is a genuine transitional process in motion; Eritreans are Eritreans; I don’t accept the notion that diaspora are more equipped to oversee a ‘genuine” transition. Diaspora has its own challenges and limitations; they should not impose a potpourri of political experimentations which they carry from all corners of the world. Eritreans inside the country should be the once steering the transition. Any change without their proper participation is an imported or an imposed change.

            On B &C:
            “No change from inside is good without the collaboration of diaspora”

            This underestimates the potential of Eritreans who live in their own land, and who keep life going. It’s unfortunate. It’s desirable that the participation of all Eritreans should be encouraged, but to say that there is no goo change without the blessing of diaspora takes me to my favorite line: This type of statements come from false self aggrandizement that “diaspora are more capable” of driving modern state machinery. In reality: most diaspora have lagged in active political discourses and practices because they are considered second class in their adapted countries. Think this: how many of us know how policies are set out in our local governments, save the Federal? How many of us participate in higher policy making positions? How many of us participate in local and national press forums…elections…parliaments/congress… how many of us pushed policies that affect our communities through legislative sessions; and over all: for how many years have we been away from our Eritrea? Why should the professional over there be seen as second rate waiting for our blessing? This sort of statements are false. Because the change is not for the diaspora, it’s mainly for Eritreans inside. Let’s not inflate our capacity. The people inside know what they need more than what we can tell them. Because they are close to “Ground-zero.” They are more apprehensive of their priorities than technocrats who have lived abroad for decades . You say that there is no way of predicting “what kind of change will ensue from unorganized inside forces” because the change could be steered by PFDJ echelon.
            Here, you continue repeating the same line of mistrusting domestic change. Well, the fact is Amanuel, no change will be a change unless it is blessed by Eritreans living in Eritrea. Therefore, regardless of where that spark comes from, it will still need a spark that Eritreans welcomes and participates in giving it full life. I trust the people inside, and the professionals inside. We can help in accelerating it if we know our limits and play it smart within that limit.

  • selam

    Dear All
    Do you think this is election , this is african sickness .what kind of time we live in ? Still better than IA .

    • Hayat Adem

      Selam,
      you see, even bad and predetermined elections are not always better than no-elections. But your last point is quite right. It shows how really bad our situation is.

      • selam

        Dear Hayat

        As artificial election is bad as it can be , but I guess we eritreans just need a very small crack in the system. How is this election ? It is madness. You know the mayor of new york michael blomberg was elected beyond his limit and he has been buying the election . Imagine a crooked politician in africa!!!.

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