Inform, Inspire, Embolden. Reconcile!

Yemane Gebreab, Number 7, Can’t Host Meetings In The US

On April 12, 2010, President Barack Obama signed an executive order, declaring, among other things, the following:

I, BARACK OBAMA, President of the United States of America, find that the deterioration of the security situation and the persistence of violence in Somalia, and acts of piracy and armed robbery at sea off the coast of Somalia, which have repeatedly been the subject of United Nations Security Council resolutions (including Resolution 1844 of November 20, 2008; Resolution 1846 of December 2, 2008; Resolution 1851 of December 16, 2008; and Resolution 1897 of November 30, 2009), and iolations of the arms embargo imposed by the United Nations Security Council in Resolution 733 of January 23, 1992, and elaborated upon and amended by subsequent resolutions (including Resolution 1356 of June 19, 2001; Resolution 1725 of December 6, 2006; Resolution 1744 of February 20, 2007; Resolution 1772 of August 20, 2007; Resolution 1816 of June 2, 2008; and Resolution 1872 of May 26, 2009), constitute an unusual and extraordinary threat to the national security and foreign policy of the United States, and I hereby declare a national emergency to deal with that threat.

The list of the individuals who contributed to the “unusual and extraordinary threat to the national security and foreign policy of the United States” was provided as an annex:

1. Abshir ABDILLAHI [born circa 1966]
2. Hassan Abdullah Hersi AL-TURKI [born circa 1944]
3. Hassan Dahir AWEYS [born 1935]
4. Ahmed Abdi AW-MOHAMED [born 10 July 1977]
5. Yasin Ali BAYNAH [born circa 1966]
6. Mohamed Abdi GARAAD [born circa 1973]
7. Yemane GHEBREAB [born 21 July 1951]
8. Fuad Mohamed KHALAF [born circa 1965]
9. Bashir Mohamed MAHAMOUD [born circa 1979-1982]
10. Fares Mohammed MANA’A [born 8 February 1965]
11. Mohamed SA’ID [born circa 1966]

With the exception of #7, all are Somali citizens. # 7, Yemane Gebreab, is the political director of Eritrea’s ruling party, PFDJ, as well as the adviser to the President of the State of Eritrea. Whenever Mr. Yemane Gebreab has visited the United States, Awate Foundation, along with many activists in the Eritrean opposition, has reminded the Government of the United States of President Obama’s Executive Order: sometimes in an editorial; sometimes via phone calls and emails. Sometimes, our concerns were addressed, and sometimes they were ignored, and #7 was allowed to roam freely in the United States and indoctrinate Eritreans.

This week, Yemane Gebreab had two meetings scheduled. One, along with Foreign Minister Osman Saleh, was a much-publicized “public seminar” in the Washington, DC area for today. Another, unpublicized, was a meeting with The Atlantic Council on Wednesday, October 5.

Both meetings are now cancelled, following intense lobbying by Eritrean activists in the United States.

It is unclear why Foreign Minister Osman Saleh, who was also scheduled to present at the “public seminar” (but not at The Atlantic Council) is unable to do so.

The meeting at the Atlantic Council is cancelled.

-//- END

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  • Abraham H.

    Selam All,
    The TPLF leaders need to understand they can’t have their cake and eat it too; if they really believe on the idea of ethnic based politics and ethnic federalism, then they have to genuinely live upto the spirit of the Ethiopian Constitution they brought to Ethiopia. Upto this point the TPLF has been at the helm of power by enlisting servant organizations in the various Ethiopian kilils. But as we have witnessed in recent years this type of administration and control of the other major Ethiopian Ethnic constituents by extension is untenable and cannot be tolerated any longer by the people who are at the recieving end of this injustice. I think Ethiopia is at a critical juncture in its history, and let’s hope mature and far-sighted minds come together to find a fair and workable power sharing system among all Ethiopians.

    • Peace!

      Selam Abraham H,

      There is an interesting saying in Amharic: it goes “Hulet Felagi Andun Y’atal” And the result is: unlikely to install puppet regime in Asmara, can’t maintain control over Ethiopia and its people, and can’t keep donors satisfied as the invasion of Somalis is now officially in reverse motion. In other words the far stretched empire is now shrinking and about to retreat to its back up base. X’embelalie Adenas Ma’akora Keikedenet Meriet Kedenet.

      Speaking of solution to the ongoing unrest, so far no genuine effort has been made; in contrary, the killing of protesters and blaming EGYPT still going; sending arsonist and blaming on peaceful protesters remains the dirty tactic for creating division between Muslims and Christians and Oromos and Amharas, and at the same time, not surprising, TPLF elites are arming Somalis in an effort to form a minority coalition to help keep floating in the hope the current Amharas and Oromos friendship will fall apart some where down the road. But what the elites do not seem to understand is that unless the killing of peaceful protesters stops and the insisting on staying in power for indefinitly abandoned, the mounting resentment and hate toward TPLF and its supporters is going to continue building which likely to make things extremely complicated in restoring the stability anytime soon.

      Peace!

  • MS

    Selam All
    I think the only head of state that delivered speech in the “Ethiopian Pariament” was the Israeli PM, a PM known for his racist administeration, known for his land-grabbing policies, known for massacring innocent Palestinians in Ghaza.. The ardent wayane soldier, Susan Rice, laughed at the claim of wayane winning 100% of the last Ethiopian election. Angela Markel of Germany refused to address an Ethiopian parliament that is 100% wayane. I think electoral changes may be a step towards the right direction, but it won’t solve the problem of the attitude of the people towards the government. EPRDF is seen as TPLF and TPLF is seen as a deformed foreign entity, not because people question its Ethiopian identity, but because they question its sick ideologies of divide and rule; its predatory nature where the means of production are owned by few cronies; where the “miracle of economic growth” has resulted in many native tribes losing their land to foreign land-grabbers, and TPLF lackeys. Imagine 1000 Tigreans are given the license of prospecting for gold in Benishangul region by displacing the native inhabitants!!
    I think for the situation to resolve peacefully, TPLF should resign to the reality, that a national peace conference should be called for. OLF and other opposition political organizations need to be part of it. As I read it, the current political discourse of Ethiopia is developing into three easily identifiable political stripes.
    a/ The Unitarians: all groups who believe in unitary government.
    b/ Forces that see merits and benefits in federal arrangement, but want a balanced equation where the the propensity of federal authorities to override State/region’s powers; and, on the other hand, where the propensity of States/regions to secede is discouraged/delimited by choice, encouraged to stay within the bigger family by the benefits they could gain from the federal arrangement. Of course, the catch 22 is: how do you design a structure that maintains this equilibrium? The electoral system and systems of representation (election laws, party formation laws…representation quotas…) in the states and the federal will need to be revised.
    c/ opinons and discourses leaning towards weaker federal government; more powers to and regional states/peoples
    d/ attitudes leaning strongly towards ethnonationalism; where secession is made easy.
    I think “b” is the best option for Ethiopia. However, that will be possible only if each state/people will be allowed to be represented by political parties of THEIR OWN CREATION, which will inevitably end the monopoly of TPLF of “autonomous regions/states” through its satellite parties. Stability will come only when regional states have the power to send representatives they ELECT (who represent the interests of the peoples of the states who have sent them to the parliaments (regional and federal).
    Generally, Ethiopians are emboldened. They have seen that organized popular resistance pays off. Every time, the government pushed the bar higher, the resistance’s demand even went higher.
    With the the state of Emergency, when ENDF members are deployed to administer civil unrests (something an army is not good at), they will see how their villages and their people are treated by TPLF commanders. At some point, their conscience will knock their being; they will have to make a decision. They will see, innocent people being beaten up and shot at; they will see how Ethiopians describe the REGIONAL GOVERNMENTS as a trojan horse for TPLF.
    All in all: wayanay experience of deceitfulness and treachery is on its way out. Peacefully, or not, the unfettered lording of TPLF is over. State of emergency is appropriate when you are fighting groups while you have the backing of the people, but when the population has made its mind about the very nature of the system, a radical overhauling is needed. All stakeholders need to be part of the overhauling. Then, may be, Angela Markel may be able to address an Ethiopian parliament that is truly representative of the Ethiopian people. Wayane may foul cry blaming Eritrea and Egypt, but the people of Ethiopia are saying it loud and clerar that it is the wayane which is the true enemy of Ethiopians. The fight is between wayane and the people of Ethiopia that it has bled for the last 25 years.

    • Hameed Al-Arabi

      Kemay Amsikha Ato / Mahmud Saleh,

      Firstly, your comment portrays dreams of the militia leader who craves to observe it materialized in Ethiopia against TPLF. Secondly, do you recognize you are a TROJAN HORSE for the Tig tribe in Eritrea.

      Dehan Hidar Jigna Mahmud Saleh

      • MS

        Selam ayte Alarabi
        I’m afraid more painful news and analysis is to come from the den of your master wayane. Ethiopians are awakened and determined more than ever. And they seem to have an effective opposition leadership and strategy. Brace for it my friend, expect even more painful stories .

        • Hameed Al-Arabi

          Jigna Mahmud Saleh,

          Primarily, we thank the Tegrai people and EPRDF parties for their stand on the side of the Eritrean people. Secondly, Orromians are not alien to the people of Eritrea. They know very well the meaning of oppression and tyranny and they were friends of the Eritrean revolution, but you don’t know it, it is not included in your politicawi timhirti. When you were in love with those you call today Wayane, Orromians were on the side of the Eitrean people. Eritreans are not afraid from the shift of power to the people of Orromo, they are not less understandable than EPRDF about the dilemma of Eritrean people. For sure they will stand on the side of our people. Have you understood Jigna Mahmud Saleh?

          • MS

            Selam ayte Alarabi
            It’s a sort of ughghhh; when a wayane Trojan horse tries to lecture about the relation of Oromo and Eritrean revolution!!!!!!!!!!! ayteKaelen.

          • Hameed Al-Arabi

            Senai Me’alti Jigna Ato / Mahmud Saleh,

            Why are you infuriated? I am just calling same as your master tSAtSE does “Mow “The Best” Mow, NOw” beesss.

          • MS

            Selam Ayte alarabi
            the “best Mo” says bees ya khabeess to the wayanay Trojan horse, or is it a cat?

          • Hameed Al-Arabi

            Dear Moderator,

            Please, delete message above also, my reply was to the message above. Thanks.

          • Hameed Al-Arabi

            Greetings Jigna MO-B-MO,

            Mahmud attempts to give us the impression of being from the highest calibre when he casts expressions like “It’s a sort of ughghhh; ……………… tries to lecture …………….. ayteKaelen.” In fact he is in a mission in this forum to recite what he has learned before 25 years in his politicawi timhirti. The school he is proud about only deepens complexities that makes a person’s whole life mentally crippled even if he lived in America for more than fifteen years. I think you far very low to the stage of Immanuel Kant, Jean-Jacques-Rousseau, etc. scholars who theorized and advocated for change of their societies to equality, development and prosperity. They illustrated to humanity the meaning and benefits of equality and well-protected human rights. You are not even student of such scientists, you are just student of half-baked minds who inaugurated a fool to be a king and rule a country.

            The comments you write on this forum are just a repeated monotonous ideas that don’t exceed the number of our fingers, the rest of the composition can be done by a fifth grade pupil. It is better for you to benefit from your presence in America and learn the true meaning of freedom and co-existence among different cultures.

        • sara

          Dear MS
          if allowed let me interrupt you for a while, you know Donald Trump is inciting violence, is a serial liar,rampant xenophobe,racist,misogynist and a birther who has repeatedly pledged to ban Muslims 1.6 million of them entering the US. then
          one day some one asked a lady if what Trump says is hurtful? she said maybe yes, but that is the beauty of the First Amendment, we should be able to say things no matter what. when i heard this i said .. mashallah to the first amendment, our heroes came through decamare to asmara and we lived happy after..

        • tes

          Selam MS,

          Seeing you defending PFDJ policies and its national slavery program has put my view on you in its right place. But I didn’t expected you to be a mouth-piece of ESAT, the terrorist group who is works with your x-bosses and now a proxy-bosses.

          Of course it is shame but not a surprise to see people like you.

          In my article I put that PFDJ works under one banner: “let Ethiopia be divided”. The thing is anything that will happen in Ethiopia will be a disaster for Eritrea too. You failed to understand this and you became a house speaker of Anti-Ethiopian government*.

          Shame for you!

          tes

          *I put my views on current Ethiopian government and I am speaking from that perspective.

          • Solomon

            Selamat tes,

            Recognizing your current time constraints, I just want to say that I am glad to see your brief commentary.

            bZaEba MaHmuuday bzuH aytsekeff. The common denominator we all agree on is the spread of the dangers you pointed out.
            Regards,

            tSAtSE

    • Amde

      Selam MS,

      I don’t think Unitarists have much of a political constituency nowadays. Maybe I am wrong. Almost all the opposition parties strongly endorse Federalism. The question is what kind? Ethnic vs Regional.

      Ethiopians never had a chance to discuss the merits or demerits of either one. There are definitely winners and losers in any arrangement. But just like the land issue that triggered the Oromo protests, this was one of the dogmatic impositions from TPLF. And now the country is paying the price for it.

      Amde

      • Amanuel Hidrat

        selam Amde,

        If “there are defintely winners and losers in any arrangement”, in your case whether it is Ethnic or regional federalism (your advocation), how could be a realistic solution for all Ethiopian social groups? If switching from ethnic to regional federalism, is only switching winners and losers, what kind of justice are you going to adjudicate to bring peace and stability to Ethiopia with regional arrangement?

        My argument will be then, yes there are arrangements that gives equitable power sharing be it ethnic or regional federalism. It is a matter of representation. The equitable power sharing could only be pactical in a bicameral parliament

        • Amde

          Selam Aman,

          Thank you for engaging me on this issue and forcing me to think things through.

          It is really important for our discussion if you clarify what you mean by “social groups”. You use this phrase quite often, and I have been responding with the assumption that you mean it to stand for “ethnic group” as EPRDF defines it.

          Is that correct?

          Thanks,
          Amde

          • Amanuel Hidrat

            Selam Amde,

            Yes Amde, I use “social groups” in lieu of “ethnic groups” for two obvious reasons (a) it gives less iritation than ethnic for less versed people b/c they see ethnic only as tribe and tribalism (b) social groups is more appropriate term by sociologists and psycho-sociologist.

            Because I am always intetested on “diversity politics” you could refer my articles that I often use social groups to refer ethnics.

            Regards

      • Dear Amde,

        May be i have said this in the past, nevertheless, i would like to repeat it. Ethnic federalism is the pandora’s box that was opened by tplf and olf, each for their own special reason, and closing it at this point will send many to the bushes again. When the oromo people are ready to die, because they are against the metropolitan city expanding to their land, and the fate of addis ababa is to grow upwards, like new york, hong kong and some oil rich arab cities (and ethiopia is none of the above), one can imagine what it would look like if ethnic federalism is annulled. Most ethiopian ethnic groups seem to be satisfied with this arrangement, and therefore, it is better to leave the status quo of ethnic federalism as it is and give it a democratic face.

        Robust economic development that affects all regions and railway – road – electricity – internet etc interconnections, the free movement of people and goods, the right to live anywhere in ethiopia with freedom and security, and creating an attractive situations where an amhara or oromo opens business in the periphery, for example in tigray, and not only tigrayans coming to the center, etc. will annul internal borders with time. Any political decision to replace ethnic federalism with an other system of government at this point, will open another pandora’s box, which ethiopia might not be able to bear.

      • MS

        Selam amde and Horizon;

        I think both of you have a good grasp of the situation. As an observer, I think the root cause is not the nature of the federal structure, per se, but its enforcing mechanisms, the constitution, and the bylaws and regulations that are derived from it, and how those laws are applied throughout the nation. I think we can pinpoint the current popular unrest to the genesis of the idea itself and how that idea evolved to fruition.

        1. The agent: a minority ethnic organization, TPLF, which struggled for the liberation of Tigray was suddenly catapulted to rule Ethiopia. The idea of ethnic federalism fitted its fight for the liberation of the Tigray province, and for possible secession if it could no long rule the whole of Ethiopia. If you look at the past 25 years, TPLF, while claiming it was assuming the powers of the nation, diverting wealth and power towards Tigray; including building military power (particularly air force; ground force has already been controlled by it, anyway). Ruling Ethiopia would also require that you divide it along ethnic fault lines, basically reducing it into manageable ethnic chunks where Ethiopians are fighting against each other rather than against the central authorities (TPLF). Here they failed miserably. Compared to other social unrests in Africa, Ethiopians have so far shown magnanimity. They are reaching out to each other. Without going to far, just compare the solidarity of Ethiopians towards each other with how neighboring peoples had behaved in similar situations in Ethiopia’s neighbor countries, Sudan, and Kenya during the election). It’s a lesson for Africans. This doesn’t mean Ethiopia is immune to ethnic conflicts, but so far, the people and their leaders have held up well under difficult situation.

        2. The second issue is the constitution itself and the process through which it was adopted. Today, the many agree that it was TPLF brainchild, and the process was controlled solely by TPLF (obviously, for the reasons mentioned in #1).

        3. The third issue concerns application: When you have a rubberstamp parliament, and rubber stamp judicial system, even the most sophisticated constitution has no guarantee in enduring the encroachment of the executive branch (TPLF, in this case). Empowered Citizens, and free civil societies are the primary guarantees of a constitution. In countries where these sectors are severely suppressed/restricted, the next guarantee is a strong opposition. In Ethiopia all of the above were made to disappear.

        I think the right way is not necessarily dismantling ethnic federalism, but allowing all stakeholders to have a hard look at it and then charting out the best course: it will most probably be a mater of amending and enhancing it. This time, hopefully, the document will be an Ethiopian rather than a TPLF one.

        Regards.

        • Hameed Al-Arabi

          Jigna Ato Mahmud Saleh,

          Ethiopians have put a road map under which they can practice, protest, amend and practice again what they have amended. They have freedom to do all that. I think it is wise to direct our attention about our own country where the mafia that suffocates and vacates a country from its people. A country where crimes against humanity is perpetrated.

          If TPLF made a mistake that concerns Ethiopians who will rectify what has gone wrong. TPLF is a renewable party contrary to the so called mafia party which is totally incapable to any changes. It is a group built on piracy program which robbed freedom and resources of our people. This group of criminals think that change in Ethiopia will give them the upper hand and move freely to rob the people of Ethiopia. They abhor tplf because it unmasked their games of robbery from the beginning.

        • Solomon

          Selamat Mo-B-Mo,

          Searching for sediments, gravel, and other matters for filtration system, in pursuit of the ideal if you will, the fundamental but its enforcing mechanisms, the constitution “…(and how it is interpreted,…” Yes, the absence of The Judiciary for interpretation of is felt in this manner. It is imperative for, Mr. Amde, Horizion or anyone, to share cases where the constitutionality of specific cases since 1991 and forward, are heard in front of highest courts of the Federal Republic of Ethiopia. It serves not only as a rebuttal of the, for lack of a better word, allegation of non existence, but also a means to continue building on further of all extining foundations present. From afar by the readers and commenters in our from–, for beginners.

          While I am at it, (and unless we are experiencing a “wag the dig” phenomenon) allow me to introduce a current potential case that can serve as a litmus, per se, and more. It is a refusal, by the Amhara Killils/Regions of a certain Military Officer, to be handed to Ethiopia’s Federal government–a call by demonstrators. The details we can all fill in as we proceed forth.
          In all honesty, signal analysis and fluid dynamics is my current preoccupation.

          Horizon has commented above with regards to the TPLF and OLF sponsorship or being the architects of the current Federal system of governance for Ethiopians. I took notice of it as well and the undeniable correlation of this new statement with the several days Six Month State of Emergency in Ethiopia. It is worying as well as… No spin doctoring will excuse it should it be left to trend unharnessed. My humbled opinion and duty as a neighbor to Ethiopia.

          MoMo, on to my preoccupation and Frateli tes…. Fifteen Rds with you is pending. By the way, TarTarr Akkatt was the first nick name my classmate pinned on me long ago… I danced Sahho Kuda to a Tigrigna koborro.., Glad now to have been stuck with this one:)
          tSAtSE

      • Ismail AA

        Selam Amde,
        I concur with your view that the old system of governing from the center through monopolization of state tools of coercion is not more sustainable. Even the established nation-state for example in Western Europe are devolving governmental authorities to the peripheries. When it involves multi-national societies, especially the post-colonial once in Africa, unitary rule has been increasingly proving unsustainable.
        In regard to Ethiopia, I understand that a page has been turned. Unitary system of governance does not seem to have appeal any more to nationalities that experienced the pressure and heavy handed rule from Addis-Ababa under the imperial order or its successors. What ever the shortcomings, the arrangement the EPRDF (ethnic federalism) introduced had, probably arguably, served as new experience from which many social groups and nationalities tested. It can even be argued that the country was from probable post-Derg crises and turmoil by quickly adopting a constitution and governmental arrangement that mitigated trouble that attempt to impose unitary rule under the winner (TPLF) might have triggered.
        After more than twenty-five years of experience, it’s understandable that stakeholders need to question the efficacy of the system and demanding reappraisal and introducing a system that responds to the needs and aspirations of the segments that constitute the multi-national state.
        Thus, one would hope that the Ethiopian people (elite) shall have the needed awareness and resort to meaningful broad and all-embracing dialogue design a system that responds to the aspiration of the peoples of the nation and sets the promising progress the nation has been making on sustainable track, which Unitarianism might not be the right preposition as opposed to meaningful federalism or similar framework.
        Regards,
        Ismail

    • Hayat Adem

      Dear Amde and Mahmuday
      I guess no body seems to be missing me this time. Mahmuday used to but I may have gambled with that status because of the rough exchanges related to the Tigre/Mahmuday stuff. Everyone, please excuse my intermittent absence for a short while, and then I will report back as a full time forumer soon….
      Amde,
      I have a question for you as usual. My questions to you always come in a sense of learning something and you never failed to teach me a new stuff or perspective. I really think Federalism is about a difference and not unity at all.It is first about managing diversity within a unity, and not the other way…it never occurred to me federalism as a system is preferred for efficiency purposes. Decentralization may serve governance efficiency but federalism is not chosen to achieve that as a primary purpose but to enable differences to coexist in a healthy and compatible way within an umbrella of a shared system. In other words, it is picked to honor differences within the same polity. Now, if so, what is the problem of doing it using language and ethnic identity identifiers so long as a fair and equitable formula is applied? Advocating regional federalism in Ethiopia would never appear different than advancing a mere decentralized administrative system for me. Kindly reflect on this as a theory as well as in relation to Ethiopian reality..
      MS,
      I think I would advise you for your own sake to refrain from jumping guns at every opportunity because of much ax to grind. You are destroying yourself for no return. With the tone and thoughts you are pushing, you may be able to carry some folks here like peace and Nitircc and SemreT. But what is the use? They are already your wingers and there are no signs of dropping you any time, that means you don’t need any effort to pocket them. If you are trying to out-think the other thinkers here, that will be futile. But that propaganda urge is forcing you to make bad errors on facts as well. Example of that is: how you characterized the Israeli PM. I am not sure if Natanyahu is more racist than some countries in the Middle East. Certainly, as a head of state, he is not more cruel than IA. Israeli political system is by far more civilized and democratic than many in the neighborhood. And he is not the only head of state who addressed the Ethiopian parliament. Only of recent times, you have the Egyptian president and the Djibouti president that did the same.
      Hayat

      • MS

        Ahlan Hayat
        Firstly, you will verily be missed. Come back soon. You know I mean it.
        Secondly, Come on, Hayat. You know I don’t do this for recruiting purpose. The individuals you mentioned are well versed, confident and more opinionated than me. They don’t need my chaperoning, and I don’t need the crowd-effect you may think I need. Actually, those individuals are more independent and diversified than your camp, and its cheerleaders. Ironically, it is the Ethiopians who have been up to the task educating us about the situation. I have no idea why some Eritreans would feel more obligated than the Ethiopians to defend the government that is menacing innocent people. So, no, I don’t see those individuals in that fashion.
        Thirdly, I want to take you into a logical enlightenment. Let’s assume Ethiopia is a mere neighbor country to both of us. The question is: why is it wrong for me to criticize a TPLF that Ethiopians are criticizing and, in some cases, chasing it away while it’s right for you to defend it? In other words, if you feel privileged to defend the atrocities of TPLF, why would not I feel compelled to criticize TPLF for those same atrocities?
        At any rate, as always, I enjoy your exchanges.
        Regards.

        • Kim Hanna

          Selm MS,
          .
          Wow, you are still at it.
          “…why is it wrong for me to criticize a TPLF that Ethiopians are criticizing…”
          .
          Well, my friend, let me make it crystal clear for you.
          .
          It is for the exact same reason, when and if President Abdel Fattah el-Sisi of Egypt is critical of TPLF.
          .
          Mr. K.H

      • Saleh Johar

        Selam Hayat,
        Usually when a person I like is absent I wonder if they are doing fine. It is like sebeytkha tHasbo and Adekha tHasbo type of thing. But honestly, I miss your composed arguments and when people like you are absent, I miss them . When Others who are fond of bickering and disruption are absent, I wish they spend their time to reflect and come back reformed.

        I just felt like saying that

        • Nitricc

          Hey SG; your remark is disrespectful. I understand you have to make her wanted and missed; I get that she needs it but you don’t have to trash other people who are your fourum participants. God knows you missed about her but that is what you feel to say and that is
          Just what I feel saying it.

          • Saleh Johar

            Hi Nitricc,
            I think you need a few days to reflect on your combative approach. It is not informative, not engaging, not anything at all. You need to reflect, serious reflection, and hopefully, realize the difference between serious debate (and occasional entertainment) and perpetual combat.

            One more thing: this is not my forum, it is awate.com’s forum, in case you missed that.And if you read the name, it is my individual name and a picture–it’s me!

          • Nitricc

            Hey SJ you are missing the point. If you really miss Hayat’s take and considering it informative, engaging and a debat, well let, there is nothing I can say. True, the Ethiopians are free to talk all subjects while we are limited in what to say and express it does not mean it is not informative or boring. What ever we say about Ethiopia and Tplf is deleted. In addition when I say what I have to say; even though you are commenting on your name; by the vertu of the name you carry and the where you stand; it is very unfair in to what you have said. You can say all you want and awate is SG the end of the story. Anyway I will take your advice and I will reflect. And I hope you do the same.

      • Peace!

        Selam Hayat,

        Of course you were missed aren’t you the queen of the house except that every thing you have preached, defended and bragged is going down into toilet. What’s next? withdraw from Badme, evict Eritrean opposition groups, and appease DIA? Let’s wait and see what the next script has to say, but in the meantime keep us entertained with your saga of Natnayahu, Al-sisi, Markella Angela Merkel…remember things have changed for good just to give heads up:)

        Peace!

  • Amde

    Some good news..

    The Ethiopian President, Dr. Mulatu Teshome, apparently announced the governments intent to introduce proportional representation as the election system for the Parliament.

    I hate the current First-Past-The-Post system and have been a huge fan of PR, especially for a diverse country like ours. Honest PR allows us to have a parliament that is more representative of the nation as a whole. It gives minorities a better chance of being represented. And, by its very nature, tends to reward politicians that promote policies of accommodation rather than extremism.

    Of course, without removing much of the repressive burden on opposition parties, this would mean close to nothing. EPRDF can still game a PR based system by setting up fake parties and candidates (which it has). So an element of goodwill has to be there for it to work.

    But, good news on the fundamental change course in an otherwise dismal few months. Good job EPRDF.

    Amde

    • Amde

      Hello Awatistas…

      So, the website of the Ethiopian National Election Board reports that (http://www.electionethiopia.org/am/) in the 2015 election, EPRDF parties received over 82% of the votes cast. In a perfect world, that would mean they should win 82% of the seats. But using First-Past-The-Post, they won 100% of the parliamentary seats. This means, 18% of the voters are theoretically unrepresented.

      On Monday, the Ethiopian President announces that the government will be evaluating the election system and the institution of Proportional Representation. to bring a little bit of parity between the numbers of votes and the number of parliamentary seats.

      On Tuesday and Wednesday, Prime Minister Hailemariam is busy telling the world that “49%” of the voters are not represented in parliament. There is a huge gap between 49% and 18%.

      Obviously somebody is lying. The public believes the “official” original 82% is a lie, as well as the 49%. PM Hailemariam could not say that more than 49% of the voters were unrepresented. That would be rather embarrasing. So he got as close as he could say that the choices of MOST Ethiopians (>50%) was not represented in parliament without becoming immediately illegitimate.

      But why say anything at this point?

      Well, Angela Merkel is visiting Addis, and she made it a point to tell everyone that she has no intention of addressing a one party parliament. This whole business of addressing the Ethiopian parliament is rather new to me – I don’t know of a foreign leader that has done that. At the same time there was an announcement that the government was going to make 10 Billion ETB, ($500 Million USD) available for job creation for the youth.

      Coincidence?

      Making vague statements in public about some possible changes to the electoral system seems like a good way to get some cold cash in hand.

      Amde

      • Nitricc

        Hey Amde: Say what you will but the government of Ethiopia is in an absolute disarray. One thing is clear; there is a leadership vacuum. I hope you are not believing on PMDH as being a true prime minster and who can lead the country. He is simply a spoken person to somebody. I have no idea who that somebody is but he contradicts every time he opens his mouth. I very much suspect that there is a division in TPLF guns. their silence is something suspicious, after all they are the once who are leading Ethiopia. why are they letting the messengers do the talking? Even more troubling is when they announced the state of emergency; they applied it in retrospect. any state rules and new laws are active the day they have been announced and from that day and moment they become the rule of the state but on this case PMHD stated the rules are active since “Yesterday”. the question is how come an state of emergency can be active the day in which didn’t informed the people? what are they hiding? is there any crime they have committed the day before and the want to cover it through this state of emergency? to my understanding any new law it becomes a law the day it is announced but this case that is not the point; why? I think they could have fixed this thing for the sake of the country and for the well being of the people but they have chosen to play with fire and screwing around in the wrong way. the longer they play the game the worst for the country. but Dedebit is always dedebit.

      • Dear Amde,

        The electoral system, First-Past-The-Post takes all, was scandalous, and it was meant to keep tplf/eprdf in power forever. It seems that the time has come when they cannot dupe the people anymore. If indeed they gained 82% (and it is not the result of vote rigging), i would have theoretically accepted their meto-be-meto, but it is not so. If it was not true (49% of the population are not represented in the ethiopian parliament), the pm would not have dared say it in front of Chancellor Merkel and the world community.

        Proportional Representation could make the small parties kingmakers, for no party (ethnic or otherwise), is going to have the majority in parliament to form a government. Just imagine these small parties withdrawing their support and bringing down governments. I hope that it will not be at the expense of stability of a government to be able to rule. Any way, it is much better than the infamous meto-be-meto.

        The pm of Israel, Netenyahu, addressed the ethiopian parliament few months ago, when he visited ethiopia. On the contrary, Chancellor Merkel, did not want to address the ethiopian parliament, because she saw no difference between telling it to the pm, whatever she had to say, and telling it to the ethiopian parliament (a tplf/eprdf club). They are going to learn everything anyway from the pm. Their is no opposition mp who could miss what has been said.

        The west wants a powerful, friendly and a pro-west country in the region. It is none other than ethiopia that could fulfill these criteria, and therefore, they want her to be around. The ethiopian government has no choice but to cut the bs, and behave as a normal government ruling a normal country, which is to the taste of western powers. Ethiopia needs China as the engine that helps move the ethiopian economy, and the West for its political clout in the region and the world community. It seems that the West and China have minor conflict of interest in ethiopia, because each one of them concentrate their spotlight either on the economy or the political feild, which helps ethiopia to manouver successfully between the two.

        • Amde

          Horizon,

          What is rather frustrating is that these things we are talking about… Proportional Representation, politics through elections rather than guerilla or street blood sport, issue resolutions through temporary parliamentary coalition majorities etc.. are system features that would really help the smaller communities. You would think TPLF would be at the forefront of making political system features that would maximize the leverage of the smaller constituencies so as to build some systemic guarantees for the day they are no longer in power. But they wasted 25 years. I still do not think they get it.

          Amde

  • Abraham H.

    Greetings,
    The Ethiopian gov has declared an unprecedented six month long state of emergency. Will this be the last straw that would break the camel’s back as Beyene Petros, chairman of the Medrek opposition coalition stated? Well, remains to be seen. Very unchartered territorries in the history of Ethiopia, indeed.

    • Peace!

      Selam Abraham H,

      The state of emergency declared by TPLF legalizes its genocidal war against innocent Oromo people and marks Oromia region a killing field.

      Peace!

      • Abraham H.

        Selamat Peace,
        The gov has sited the Ethiopian Constitution as a basis for declaring this emergency state; but the obvious question that comes to mind is whether it has the credibility and legal basis to do so, at a time when revolts agaist it are raging accross Ethiopia. This state of emergency is just a continuation of the so called anti-terror law that allows the gov to crackdown on its opponents with impunity. Under the cover of emergency situation, the ruling EPRDF coalition is going to cleance the political atmosphere of those unwanted troublemakers, in hope of continuing the TPLF domination of Ethiopia. But will this desperate measure work? I strongly doubt it.

        • Peace!

          Selam Abraham H,

          The country has been in a state of emergency for the last eleven months for God sake. The new official declaration is neither a strategy nor a plan rather it is a plain desperation. Now the situation is deteriorating in a shocking speed to the extent a TPLF commander, Atsbaha Asghedom, has been killed in Awaday by Oromo soldier under his command, perhaps that could be the turning point that left the government with no option but to make the empty declaration.

          The government has been enjoying a green light from its western sugar daddies to kill, jail, and torture decendants, journalists and Muslim scholars, and if you add invading Somalia, igniting civil war in South Sudan, unresolved situation with Eritrea, and Dam construction issue with Egypt, the calculus becomes very complicated and scary.

          The good news is though the Ethiopian opposition groups seem to have learned from the past and taking a very matured steps to unite the people and ultimately make this painful stage short.

          Peace!

    • Dear Abraham H.,

      Unfortunately, the legitimate uprising of the Ethiopian people for justice and democracy is being highjacked by anti-Ethiopian forces, thus giving the tplf/eprdf government the excuse to declare a state of emergency and carry out a crackdown and thus commit more atrocities. With their actions they gave an excuse to the government, which can call upon the protection of peace and order as the reason for the state of emergency.

      When the peaceful demonstrations of the Oromo people who came out in large numbers to demand for justice and democracy is infiltrated by forces who target the economy and they destroy infrastructures, which are the property of the poor people of Ethiopia, factories and businesses are torched to drive away foreign investors, and Addis Ababans cannot dare drive outside of the city, because their cars are attacked by rock throwing mobs and people are in danger of losing their lives like the American lady, then, it becomes difficult to support such practices.

      Yes, the Oromo people are extremely angry, and they have every right to be so. Nevertheless, when law and order is disrupted and ends up in chaos, they lose their moral high ground and the support they deserve so that they achieve their goal. Sinister forces are driving them into a trap, and already we saw one of the consequences, i.e. declaration of state of emergency, which will restrict demonstrations and other activities and puts citizens in danger. The government will have time by controlling the situation with the use of force.

      The Oromo people should reject such anti-Ethiopian forces that infiltrate their movement and target the economy and create chaos. The problem is the tplf/eprdf government and not the economy of the country and its economic development. Governments come and go, nevertheless, developmental infrastructures will remain the property of the people, and should not be destroyed. Justice will not come through chaos and destructions. On the contrary, it brings more injustice.

      • Abraham H.

        Selam Horizon,
        We’ve heard non-stop accusations and blames towards “foreign anti Ethiopian forces” by the gov., but we have yet to know who exactly these forces are. In the past the Ethiopian gov was putting the blame on the Eritrean regime for almost every negative development in the country, often threatening to take measured counter-actions. But during these last bouts of unrest, the ruling regime didn’t mention by name any such foreign forces, I wonder whether this is the familiar ploy of suppressing opposing view by authoritarian regimes; outsourcing internal problems to outside interference.

        • Dear Abraham H.,

          The ambassador of Egypt in Addis was summoned by the Ethiopian Foreign Ministry due to a video that circulated online. It might not look important, nevertheless, it gives the impression that something fishy is going on and the Ethiopian government did not want to ignore it, when it saw OLF officials and an Egyptian (most probably a government official) standing together on stage. In addition, the actions of some demonstrators speak volumes as to the existence of anti-Ethiopian forces.

          The great majority of Oromos and its intellectuals, excluding OLF members and its supporters, now stand for a pro democratic Ethiopia, where they want the Oromo ethnic group to play a central role. They are saying to themselves, why should they be the periphery while they are the center, stand alone while they could change Ethiopia for the better together with other ethnic groups, and abandon Ethiopia for which they have shed their blood defending her throughout centuries. Ethiopia belongs equally to the Oromo people as it belongs to any other Ethiopian. They have dumped the secessionist ambitions of OLF, and they are opting for a democratic Ethiopia, where peace, security, equality and prosperity of its people are guaranteed.

          If I may use my limited knowledge about computers in order to represent Oromia in the political map of Ethiopia; due to its central position, it is like a motherboard to which almost all nations and nationalities are attached. Oromos and Oromia are the epicenter of Ethiopia. They come in contact with all ethnic groups, and the majority of Ethiopians have some Oromo blood, one way or other. Therefore, they are the center and not the periphery, the backbone and not the limb and the trunk and not the branch of the Ethiopian nation.

          With time OLF will be disproved by the Oromo people for its secessionist and anti-Ethiopian sentiment. Ethiopians will stand together to fight the injustice that emanates from bad governance by tplf/eprdf.

          • Amde

            Horizon,

            OLF is claiming to be in charge of the disturbances in Oromiya. I think they are giving themselves too much credit, but it does appear to be the case that they have some organization, planning and money to make use of the grievances and the public outbursts that came from that. (They claim this has been in the works since 2012, and was supposed to start in 2016, but the farmer land crisis that was sparked in November last year forced them to start executing the plan a few months early). My sense is the Oromo consensus on secession is what you explained – namely no. The threat of secession is to be used as a leverage.

            So what does the OLF want? If you ask some of their fans, basically they want to be the new TPLF. Otherwise, they want to keep the EPRDF formula of ethnic regions and self appointed “leading organizations” who will just negotiate among each other on issues and they will call that politics. Keep in mind they don’t care about the public either. If you ask them what mechanism they will have to resolve differences between social groups (even within the Oromo), they don’t have a convincing answer, except to say they will need a pan-Oromo army, so that there won’t be an inter-Oromo civil war.

            Amde

      • Michael Tesfamariam

        Hi Abraham
        I agree,but this is what happens to a country which is in searching a better and stronger democracy. Ethiopians can no longer afford to lose their hard worked economic momentum to a bunch of obnoxious street thugs, who are now using freedom of speech as a mask to cause maximum damage on the lives and properties of individuals and businesses. I don’t think this mob is all about justice; the Oromo people may well have some legitimate concerns which could lead them to take to the street and express their outrage peacefully, but the real issue behind the scene has got do much with the fact that both Oromo and Amhara people do not just want to be ruled by Tigray minority irrespective of their leadership performance.
        I was listening one guy from Oromo, living in the US trying to justify the destruction and looting of properties owned by foreign investors as excellent tactic to generate media attention.
        Well, this is why the gov of Ethiopia is now forced to respond this very delicate situation with the right approach by declaring six-month state of emergency until those hate driven racist elements are picked and punished. I believe it is perfectly rational to use proportional force to protect the peace and safety of the majority, especially in ethnic diverse countries like Ethiopia, where it is always difficult to exercise functional democracy.

        • Amanuel Hidrat

          selam Michael,

          Yes attacking the infra-structure of economy of the nation is vandalism. Regimes go and come. The the supra-strucure of governments can be changed with change of circumstances and relationship of production. But the infra-structures of production and the mode of production will stay to serve the public at large to sustain the life of the population. Organizations which attack the infra-structure of economy and mode of production are anti development and do not represent the interest of the people. The government has to focus on five important thing at this juncture: (a) to protect the the econmy infra-strucures and the mode of production that exist (b) maintain peace and stability to protect the life of innocent people (c) open the democratic infra-strucures and relax their grip for open engagements of Ethiopian people to detetmine the fate of their nation collectively (d) Observe the rule of law as depicted in their constitution (e) chart any possible reformism.

          regards
          Amanuel Hidrat

          • Michael Tesfamariam

            Dear Amanuel
            Well, I agree with all five points the gov has to do in relation to the current situation except with point (c) which always appears to be less pragmatic at least in the short-run for people and society like in Ethiopia who have never been exposed to any form domocratic poltical envirnment

          • Peace!

            Selam Emma,

            Could you be a bit specifi as to what do you mean by infrastructure? Because what the world witnessing is unprecedented popular uprising by oppressed people whom their identity and wealth have been confiscated, and their sons and daughters either languishing in prisons or executed by a minority regime hiding behind a curtain of federalism. what infrastructure?

            The point I am trying to make is that it is a matter of time before Eritreans break the long held fear, fill the streets of Asmara and demand justice and freedom. with that in mind, would you object to angry Eritrean justice seekers confiscating assets belong to 07,08,09, corporations that are feeding PFDJ with hard currency?

            Peace!

          • Thomas

            Hey Peace,

            As an Eritrean, Emma’s focus is Eritrea and Eritreans. I am sure you are sleepless because the announcement of state emergency will stop the chaos you desperately have been waiting on to see in that country. It is so clear to why you are so focused for your mama Ethiopia and have nothing to say or relate to when it comes to our mama Eritrea:)

          • Peace!

            Hi Thomi,

            Leave Eritrean issue to Eritreans and stop pretending, Kei S’beneka. Your TPLF needs your help as it has started to retreating to MEKELE. seriously though you really need a recycling bin in your brain before the verbal diarrhea goes from bad to worse. ouch!

            Peace!

          • Hameed Al-Arabi

            Greetings Peace,

            What 07/08/09 own are Eritrean people corporations, they should return to their real owners not burned down. Mr. Peace, you really need to consult a psychotherapist, the sooner better.

          • Peace!

            Hamid Al-Arabi,

            It is not fair to take things out out context and demonize people. I asked Emma if he would object to angry Eritrean justice seekers go out in the streets of Asmara and confiscate assets belong to PFDJ in protest for justice and freedom. I myself wouldn’t blame them in fact the sooner they do it the better.

            *** On a separate note, it is really disappointing to see you chasing comments and acting like Negram Sebeyti, what happen to Hammed who used to teach us about the origin of our language? You are better than that, Man!

            Peace!

          • Hameed Al-Arabi

            Greetings Peace,

            A sane person doesn’t encourage destruction of peoples properties, specially in a country where is a margin of freedom and law, like Ethiopia. The rest try to understand them from the comment of brother Ismail AA above.

          • Peace!

            Selam Hameed,

            There is no peaceful uprising, for everything there is a price to pay including defeating PFDJ.

            Prace!

          • Ismail AA

            Dear Peace,
            You are right in opining that angry popular rebellions (uprisings) can be difficult to control, and things can go wrong. But the assets that are destroyed on the way belong to the people because their resources and capital has been spent on them. In a word they are peoples’ property, regardles what ever the state of corruption might be.
            Thus, confiscating assets belonging to corrupt officials and their surrogates is one thing, and destroying them is totally another. Destroying water supply, medical facility or means of transport hurt the general public that rises up to effect change; and the so called corrupt individuals and official lose nothing.
            Therefore, it is the duty of governments and authorities should protect public properties, and that is their obligation. The question is what means should they use, blanket repression or respecting the right of the people to express they views in peacefull way, responding to their demands in reponsible way. This what the government in Ethiopia should be doing by way of respecting its own law enshrined the present constitution. The peoples’ uprising should streamlined to unfold in peaceful way rather than confronting angry demonstration with violence and bloodletting.
            Regards,
            Ismail

          • Peace!

            Selam Ismail AA,

            Allow me to put it this way: there is a concesnus that PFDJ will not go away through a peaceful means, and that leads into the next best and less risky alternative, which, in my opinion, is “organized popular uprising,” assuming sustainable change is the ultimate goal:

            1 It helps avoids civil war, and
            2 It helps avoid disasterous interventions; example Iraq, Syria, Libya, and not Yemen.

            Now, to me, popular uprising is just another form of war: unarmed people versus fully armed and equipped brutal regime, and at some point in the process, people face a choice either to die or defend themselves and their villages by crippling regime’s economic infrastructure.

            Let’s say: an uprising breaks out in Keren or Dekemhare, and the regime is about to send reinforcement, don’t you think it is fair to say any property, regardless public, corporation, or government owned, that facilitates the renforcement is a legitimate target?

            Peace!

          • Ismail AA

            Ahlen Peace,
            Looked from general perspective, your line of thinking does make sense. But what we have been
            debating is context specific, which must be kept in focus if we need to have our exchange of views meaningful. The issue of the debate in this case is the developments in Ethiopia, and this should not be juxtaposed with the existing status quo in Eritrea.

            The two starkly contrast rather being analogous. In Ethiopia we have a federal republic with working constitution and its by-laws, parliament, government and Judicial system regardless of what merits one may attach to them. In Eritrea we have a system in whose helm sits a despot that rules in accordance to his whims without any constitution or legal state organs.

            Having said that, therefore, the situation in Ethiopia is popular civil protest movement, which the government should, managed in the framework of the rights the constitution grants to the public. Here, the hurdle on the way for the people are the extraordinary bills the government uses such the anti-terrorism or the so called national security related arrangements. Otherwise, the constitution and affiliated statutes do grant the public to express their grievances peacefully, which the government should respect if it is committed to upholding of keeping its side of the bargain of abiding by rule of law under the constitution.

            Thus, under such circumstances there is no logic in the public resorting to destroy its own properties in the form of public assets. Of course given the anger and cumulative pressure, controlling preventing the masses of people on street could be difficult. In that case, it is the responsibility of the government to guide the people and desist from provocation by erratic measures its security forces may undertake. One of the problems is that when there would not be an organized reference or leadership centre which the protesting masses trust and obey. This
            can act as safeguard in not letting activities taking violent trend.

            Now, coming back to the situation in Eritrea, there is no sane thinking that would condone internal civil war .However, given that the despotic system there allows no way to the public to express grievances, and is incorrigible, the approach to effecting change could be different when looked at through the prism of the situation in Ethiopia. Advanced forms for dismantling the lawless regime legitimate, including targeted armed operations.

            But, if I were to respond to your example of Eritreans protesting in Keren or Eritrea, I would say, yes indeed, the tools of violence the despot use should be targeted and disabled. But one should still make allowance for differentiating between the assets of repression such as spying facilities and prison dungeons and so called law and order apparatuses and small poultry and milk producing firms for children for example.
            Ismail

          • Amanuel Hidrat

            Selam Peace,

            Vandalizing businesses and industries is not the same with confiscating them. Of course the PFDJ corporations are the products of sweat and blood of Eritrean people and should be confiscated by a legitimated ekected democratic governments of Eritrea. I can not condon vandalizing the properties of citizens and corporations. Besides Ismail gave you a sound and appropriate response.

            Regards

          • Peace!

            Selam Emma,

            First of all I don’t know why you avoid to address the main issue and jump to minors things that are totally immaterial in fixing the problem. There is no such a peaceful uprising given it is a result of excessive anger and emotion that built for a long time, and when it bursts, almost impossible to control it unless otherwise.

            Peace!

          • Amanuel Hidrat

            Dear Peace,

            Isn ‘t the context of our argument is nonviolence movement vs mob movement? I abhor the destruction of economic infrastrucures and private sector businesses. I gave you my rationality to it.You condon it. I registered position difference between you and myself. What is the unanswered question? If it is the meaning of “economic infra-structure” I assume you know it when I saw you using it in your comment.

            Regards

          • Peace!

            Selam Emma,

            Nah Nah that’s not the point….I am just trying to explain the nature of popular uprising. It is not about me accepting or you rejecting although I am not sure what economic infrastracture or private sector you are talking about. The context of the argument is pretty much straight forward: it is about the risk of popular uprising, and I made my position clear that in popular uprising “regime’s” economic infrastructures are ligitmate targets to save the country, people’s lives, and ultimately to force change.

            Now since have been advocating for weeding out PFDJ for a long time, would you mind sharing whatever strategy you have in mind and the risk attribute to it? War, Intervention, popular uprising…..thank you!

            Peace!

          • Amanuel Hidrat

            Selam Peace,

            I prefer an armed Eritreans to fight EPFDJ than unarmed uprising to be killed wothout killing the guardian of the oppressors. That is why we are worh different oppinions. Remember a regime that shoots war disabled veterans, will smash any kind of uprisings with machine guns and tanks. Any attempt of uprising in our Eritrea is simply self sucide without any positive. So it is not my call.

            Second where ever peaceful demonistrations are allowed, I do not support a voilent target to economic infra-structures and to private sector businesses. We have different position on this issue also. How clear could I be? I am repeating myself by tweeting some phrases. If this can help you my position I can not help you.

            Third, for obvious reasons I do not use “weedout “. It is not my preference. My preference is to dismantle the system and not “PFDJ party ” per se.

            Regards

          • Peace!

            Selam Emma,

            Good, Kurub Daa shefef shefef Teb’zih Aleka.

            You said: ” an armed Eritreans to fight PFDJ.” In practical terms, you are obviously calling for a “civil war” which means armed Eritreans, likely from Ethiopia, I can’t think of other country for practical reason or you can substitute with any country you wish, against PFDJ forces, mostly 11th grade teenagers who are forced to attend Sawa and remain hostages or tired of trying to escape. I mean we are talking about kids, literally. Not fair at all.

            My understanding is you have no problem with Eritreans killing each other to topple PFDJ, but you are not ok with vandalizing PFDJ’s economic infrastructures should a popular uprising breaks out tomorrow.

            Well, I beg to differ. It sounds Zei Snikas Huxa Kortumelu.

            Peace!

          • Hameed Al-Arabi

            Greetings Peace,

            Accumulation of injustices leads at the end of the day to drastic burst that will extend to all. Perception precedes action. ًWhat you sow today, you will harvest it tomorrow, for sure.

          • Peace!

            Selam Hameed,

            Anta Hawna K’mue Do Aykonan N’bel Zelena “Accumulation of injustices leads at the end of the day to drastic burst that will extend to all.” it is the same thing to what have been saying; the only difference is the “The drastic BURST” will not come from Eritreans in New York or Paris rather the decisive Burst will only come from within. And again, it is not a risk free scenario whether you call it insane or else.

            As for the reverse of circumstances 180 degree, you may need to reach out and explain to those who are abandoning their arms and fleeing the country left and right, who knows may be they would change their mind and fight back against the regime forcing them to an exile.

            Peace!

          • Hameed Al-Arabi

            Greetings Peace,

            Of course, it is not a risk free scenario, we are to deal with criminals against humanity. The youth who abandon their arms and fleeing the country need leadership with some force on the ground, and that force should come from outside Eritrea. Isaias didn’t leave inside Eritrea a capable person or group that can lead from inside. The youth you speak about require leadership which is not available inside Eritrea at present. The entire militias of Isaias are controlled by his cohorts, no way to revolt against him from within. The call that change will materialize 100% from inside is a propaganda of the regime who controls and suffocates everything inside the country.

            Reminder: The beginning of our revolution almost prepared outside Eritrea, Freedom Movement and the ELF are vivid examples.

          • Solomon

            Selamat Ays,

            Let us not put the horse before the cart.

            As I have previously put in my shopping cart, Amiche brand, this statement you have quoted: “Enda TebelalaEna inns metSina” **
            Enda Tekholalesna knQuitSil, perhaps, I will ask a rhetorical question or two here:

            1. If you quote a quoted statement, does the outer most bracket cancel out? Example: ‘TarTTarr Akkatt’. The double negation rule of sorts.

            2. My punctuation differing than the other’s, where in the world is CCJ HTG?
            I just want to point out to him, it is not a vocation you submit an application for. By appointment only…Birthir! I would have to check the constitution.

            ….

            Bicameral as in The Congress and The Senate is it?

            tSAtSE

          • Amanuel Hidrat

            Hi Seleye,

            There is no such “double negation” rather instead there is “negation of negation” or “ወጊድ ወጊድነት” ተርእዮ መስርሕ ዘንተመጎታዊ ምዕባለ::

            Second, put your questions in a way normal of questioning to understand them.

            Regards

          • Hameed Al-Arabi

            Greetings Amanuel Hidrat,

            tSAtSE is in a monologue than dialogue. In a short cut, he is in the process of memorizing what he has watched in films and dramas.

  • Abraham H.

    Selamat Awatistas,
    If the system in Ethiopia was truly democratic it was very simple to end the so-called domination of the affairs of the country by the TPLF, just by ending the coalition of the EPRDF. The parties of the Amaras and the Oromos, as well as those representing the South Ethiopian peoples would simply pull out of the EPRDF, leaving the oppressive TPLF elites out in the cold. That way the domination and abuse of power by the TPLF could be history in a matter of days. But, as everybody knows these so-called peoples’ representative organizations are in fact TPLF sattellite organizations set up to portray the false narrative of Ethnic Federal government; they do not represent the interests of the people whom they are meant to represent, rather they are the servants of TPLF, this is the root cause of the current unrest in Ethiopia.

  • Ismail AA

    Selam iSem,
    The loathing by the individuals you mentioned of the late A. Idris and other pioneer fighter in the ELF was rooted in the hate propaganda that poisoned the attitudes of many fighters from joined the ELF. Many of them were not aware much about the reasons why Esayas and his narrow circle at the time were disseminating. From early on Esayas was frightened from individuals who had the potential to stand an obstacle on his way to dominance. This propensity continued even when he split and his first strategy was to get rid of or liquidate any person who seemed to him better qualified to challenge his ascent. For him no group or organization was good enough that has not a sure place for him at the top. We know why brilliant Eritrean like Yohannes (Brain) and many other fell victims to his killer squads.
    The other reason that rendered the ELF target to many enemies like Esayas was not only that they loathed for being Moslem based, but also the National Democratic Program it adopted, especially since 1971, scared them because it was mass organization oriented and therefore blocked their path towards creating ethnic based power based which they eventually succeeded to established. The proof of that could be detected in their refusal to introduce mass organizations based on sector interest based formations like Student, Women, Worker and peasants. Instead Esayas adamantly worked to block that way through opportunistic insistence on question of nationalities on organizational realm and United Front political gimmick as opposed to cross national democratic front that the ELF proposed since 1971 and formally endorsed after 1975.
    Regards,
    Ismail

  • Berhe Y

    Hi iSem and AH,

    You got it wrong. The “dissolve the parliament and call for snap election” was in fact a suggestion by Horizon, it’s not from Semere T.

    Believe it or not he is annually does not seem to be in favor of that either…for him nothing except the distraction / disintegration of weyane.

    Berhe

    • Amanuel Hidrat

      Dear Berhe,

      You are right. It is my mistake. Thank you.

  • Abraham H.

    Selamat All,
    One of the staunch servants of the Isayas regime, Girma Asmerom has passed away in New York. Imagine who is next, the capo himself?, yigberelna gidi.

    • Thomas

      Hi Abraham,

      The supporters of the regime must remember that their leaders cannot cheat death. Most importantly, history will remember them like it remembers Idi Amin, Hitler, M. Hailemariam (he will die to), Stalin and cruel leaders.

  • Brhan

    I salute Awate. This is journalism in action….the Watergate scandal type…where pens and now keyboards made the powerful accountable AWATE keep going on…

  • Amde

    Of Demons and Dogmas

    When I was a child, it used to be rumored that there was a demon called “qoriT” that lived in the lake known as Hora outside of Debre Zeyit. It was said that every year Haile Sellassie would offer a good looking unibrow youth as a sacrifice and tribute to qoriT. Years later I was told a story of Lij Eyass and Teferi Mekonnen (the future Haile Sellasie). Young Teferi – having become an orphan – was called from Harar to Addis Ababa so that he could grow in the Menelik imperial household among the princelings of the era. Teferi was slight of build, quiet, parentless. Lij Eyassu was the handsome cocksure prince – Son of a King and Grandson of an Emperor, who had the sure knowledge of the Imperial Crown most assuredly gracing his head one day. The two were contemporaries but Lij Eyassu used to delight in tormenting the slight Teferi. Perhaps it was youthful exuberance – perhaps it was an early inkling of their rivalry. In any case, one of these “torments” was a supposed attempt at drowning the young Teferi, who had apparently gone out on a fishing trip on this lake with Lij Eyassu and his entourage. Perhaps it was an accident, but in any case this – probably more than anything else – set the young Teferi into the extreme paranoia which saw him defeat his rival, and have him in literal chains the rest of the Lij’s life. But it also made him incapable of handing power over to his own son, with whom he had been feuding during the last decades of his rule.

    If qoriT was real, then this was probably the time when HaileSellasie made his deal of annual sacrifice to him. And if qoriT had long hungered for human tribute that was discontinued ever since the 1974 revolution, he has most assuredly feasted on the uncounted many who perished during this past weekend’s Irrechaa.

    Irrechaa is one of the many Ethiopian festivals born of our geography, a festival of gratitude for surviving the floods and hunger of the rainy season, and of the celebration of prospective harvest. Banned for years for its obvious potential to be a political flashpoint, and frowned upon for its “pagan” roots by the orthodox Christian and Muslim establishment, in these decidedly secular recent times, it has gained huge currency and popularity as a cultural festival of the Oromo people. It has also become THE Oromo event on the yearly calendar, to which politicians and aspirants are most assuredly drawn.

    Whether metaphysical demons are real or not, there are powerful political forces that have been unleashed due to the long cherished and staunchly upheld dogmas of TPLF. Dogmas, as in “a principle or set of principles laid down by an authority as incontrovertibly true.” as Wikipedia puts it.

    It imposed the dogma of land policy without discussion (arat neTib!!) , which – a generation later – is on the cusp of dispossessing millions out of meaningfully sized plots they can farm with some kind of security.
    It imposed the dogma of a democracy not of persons, but of abstract entities called “nations” or “nationalities”, who would supposedly be represented by a franchise system of political monopolies, magnanimously imposed on the populace who would be eternally grateful for it.
    It imposed the dogma of the core problem of Ethiopia as being ethnic oppression, thereby instituting an ethnic lens through which every problem is to be seen and explained.
    And finally, it imposed the dogmatic view that political competitors are existential enemies whose very words must be snuffed out, becoming a government that produces one of the largest number of “terrorists” whose only crime was peaceful expression and contest for the vote.

    Having lived by dogmas, and having arrogantly stopped listening, TPLF now finds itself mute. It has nothing to say. (It just congratulated itself on some hiccups but otherwise good job done.) Nothing that anybody cares to hear anyway. It’s mouthpieces OPDO and ANDM have been rendered mute – nobody cares what they have to say. (ANDM likewise congratulated itself. The eternally re-engineered OPDO dismissed its Chair and Vice Chair, put in new Chair and Vice Chair who effectively became the new President and Vice-President of Oromiya. It was the attempt by the new heads to take over the ceremonies to introduce themselves that triggered the crowd.) And the ultimate irony is TPLF doesn’t know who to speak to anyway, and about what. What would it say to the firebrand that chanted “Down Down Weyane!” and electrified the crowd? Who is that guy?

    I fear qoriT is still hungry.

    Amde

    • MS

      Selam made
      Brilliantly written, educational and informative. With little tweaking, this could and would stand among the best essays that held the FrontPage prestige.
      Thanks.

    • Ismail AA

      Selam Amde,
      Thanks you for these brief and well-thought core points that sum-up the unfolding events in Ethiopia. It is seems undisputable that the governing coalition and the structural set up under which it has been operating have come to a crossroad.
      After more than two decades the system that had been crafted to supplant the centuries old feudal-imperial order – with interregnum of the 16 years of military rule – which perhaps was an only viable option that could preserve the territorial and demographic intergrity of the former empire-state, has brought the coalition as well as the elite of the country to a point of either re-think the best options that can put the country on save path to the future, or risk sliding towards more crises whose end could be catastrophic.
      Awareness of the dangers failure to negotiate realistic and long term roadmap makes all claims of achievements on the part of the ruling elite and the grievances of the opposing sides reduceable to secondary priorities when the cataclysmic consequences of disintegration of a huge Multi-religious, national and ethnic entity such as Ethiopia happen to be are considered. The impact of how things would develop there should transcend its borders across the general region due to the pivotal geopolitical location of the country.
      If we Eritrean had responsible ruling authorities in our country, we would be most concerned party among the neighboring nations. Perhaps the thugs at seat of power in Asmara think what is happening in Ethiopia put them in position of scoring points against the Woyane. But hard realities of geography and politics indicate that at the end of the day problems in Ethiopia or any other country in our neighborhood would not be in the interest of our young, poor and fragile polity and its inhabitants.
      Regards,
      Ismail

    • Saleh Johar

      Hi Amde,

      The story was also popular in Eritrea where your qoriT demon was known as qorich. The unibrow story was also popular, and I heard some mothers would shave the middle of the unibrow to divide it into two and misled the people, motly Tor Serawit squads, who were looking for such children.

      Incidentally, a few days ago I was reading about the 44 agaanint, can you share any info about that legend?

      thank you

      • Amde

        Selam Saleh J.

        Well this is interesting. I have heard of the 44 aganint, but I always dismissed it as one of those supposedly numerologically significant expressions of legends, but I have never heard of any stories. I will ask around and let you know. I am not being flippant – I am a little curious about pre-Christian/Islam or non-Christian/Islam theologies in our region, and I suspect such “Gods” were transformed into demons by the time Christianity and Islam made themselves the dominant religions.

        The qoriT legend in Eritrea is new to me.

        • Saleh Johar

          Amde,
          I have heard a lot about it and a few from reputable scholars. It is briefly explained in a book (Ethiopian History textbook) by the famous scholar, Sergew Hablesselasie. I can’t remember it exactly but it has to do with a king who absconded and went to live in the monastery, etc, etc

    • Hayat Adem

      Dearest Amde,
      I will say a couple of points regarding recent developments in Ethiopia. Please consider them as only opinion of good intention for the well being of your beautiful country and its proud people, and the rest in the region- by no means to claim I know the best. I am worried by the events.
      I clearly see there are enough grievances and dissatisfaction over the political system and governance in Ethiopia and I only see issues like the Addis Master Plan, Wolkayt, Irecha and other related deadly disturbances and violences are manifest expressions that count towards those grievances. But I also see a lot of good things, some of them precious and source of envy, have been achieved in the last decade or two. That is a clear contrast to the stagnation and in some cases, relapse of other countries in the region. But that shouldn’t be an excuse for Ethiopians to demand less and forgive the ruling party over its malpractices and failure.
      Say that as an entry, there must be a responsible way of solving political and governance problems. i want you to reflect on the following:
      A-Questions to Ethiopians at large, 1) how could Ethiopians demand a better governance without risking the unity of the country and what have been achieved so far? 2) how could Ethiopians seek reform or change without risking their country to be exposed to strategic enemies and other opportunistic predators hovering around?
      B-Questions to the ruling party: 1) Can it make reforms fast and deep and satisfying enough without pushing Ethiopians desperate to go very dangerous and violent? Can it really assure Ethiopians that it is still competent enough to bring the changes and reforms that are being demanded by the citizens while maintaining law and order?
      C-Questions to Ethiopians in diaspora: 1) if you are really for a better Ethiopia and a better political system, why do you really want to partner with Egypt and the GCCs, which are known strategic slackers of Ethiopia, and with PFDJ which is a force of the antithesis for all the values you claim to stand for: freedom, democracy and rule of law? It is a force who made Eritrea fast emptying nation of its citizens. How would diaspora Ethiopians think they can gain from partnering with Egypt and PFDJ, and all forces that are hired by them? 2) Excuse me for bringing AG again….AG says the diaspora Ethiopians have got all their mouths from the US and all their hands from PFDJ/Eritrea, and all their minds from Shoa, their hearts from Ethiopia. That is to say, all they speak is democracy, all they do is anti-democracy and all they think is ShoaAmhara = Ethiopia; they love Ethiopia but they end up loving their narrower origins rather than in totality. He believes, the intelligentsia of Ethiopian origin in diaspora need to do more to steer Ethiopia’s political narrative in a positive and constructive direction. I want you to say few things on this.
      Of course, I have selfish concerns too. A weak or disturbed Ethiopia would mean an embolden PFDJ and a prolonged suffering of Eritreans. CS and JS Eritreans must analyse the situation carefully in light of their missions. Some ardent PFDJ supporters seem in festive mood. I am receiving emails bragging about the invincibility of PFDJ and how they have now come to be completely controlling TPLF through controlling the Ethiopian people.
      ————
      PS: I have been shown a video and a pic Egypt intelligence guys were at a rally together with OLF and PFDJ officials in Cairo. The intelligence guy who shared the demo stage with OLF in Cairo flew to Ethiopia without even changing his attires and showed up at the Irecha festival doing things for his country.

      • Nitricc

        Hi Hayat; I know your question is for the Ethiopians but I know better than them about their country in this particular point in time. I have no biased opinion I can tell it straight up.

        “1) how could Ethiopians demand a better governance without risking the unity of the country and what have been achieved so far?”

        First; this government is gone! it is a matter of time. once the farmers are collect their corps and the students are back to school; it is over. secondly; there is no unity. your TPLF worked for the last 25 years to break the unity of Ethiopians and job well done. All I hear is Tigre,Amara and Oromo. the name Ethiopia is going to gone.if anyone is left in TPLF circle with a shared of thinking; then it is time to exit before everything is destroyed whatever your government thinks accomplished. TIME is up.

        “2) how could Ethiopians seek reform or change without risking their country to be exposed to strategic enemies and other opportunistic predators hovering around?”
        There is no reform and it is impossible your TPLF can be reformed. once you have the blood on your hand; game over! before it is too late. all Ethiopians must work to save their country. I don’t think the leaders understood the magnitude of the danger. the more TPLF hangs around the more the external forces will involve and complicate the already complicated situation.so, the sooner TPLF realizes it is over the better and the safer the change is.
        Your TPLF is gone but what I want you to pray is won’t take the people of Tigray with it.

        • Berhan Mesfin

          Hi Nitricc
          Here comes Mr Trumph
          “I know better than them about their country ” Are you on your right mind or are you taking something weird??
          Let alone to know better about Ethiopia you don’t know yourself at all you are a lost soul in the wilderness woundering around with no idea and no clue at all of what you are writing. Please know your limits and try to learn from those who are trying to advice you .
          Cheers

        • Hayat Adem

          Dear Nitricc,
          Let’s say you are a KG teacher. So, explain like a KG teacher would explain. Nothing should be assumed, and everything is spelled out.
          1) Are you seeing a disturbance and protest for the first time in your life or you are telling us all disturbances and violence you saw ended up finishing every existing government? It is true there are disturbances, violence and confrontation in Oromo state. And TPLF/EPRDF had some really bad days that will definitely take away some political capital from their legitimacy bank. But how are they gone while they are not gone?
          2) Get a hint from your crazy master, aka IA: the time EPRDF shows signs of cracks, you will see him rolling down tanks to reoccupy Badime. The purpose? Just to sooth up his wounded ego. But he knows well that it is not the case.
          3) You are running ahead of yourself craving for evil things to happen in the country. How many times did you invite the Egyptians to come and burn Ethiopia? Some people remember well what you have been saying before. You don’t care only capitalizing on the fact nobody considers you seriously what you blubber.
          4) My take is, the events in Ethiopia were sad as much as the lives they consume and the damages caused. From this, Ethiopians will come out more free and stronger and consolidate their transition more, and continue to be suppliers of hope for the region. And that is a good thing for Eritrea as well.

          • Nitricc

            Hayat; when you ask your follow Ethiopians the questions; I just tried to be generous to give you the real time take. because your follow Ethiopians on this forum are TPLF’s apologists. You see, I have predicted two years ago that the Welqait issue would cause the end of TPLF. Go ahead dig it out. you are good at it. again just few weeks ago I told you not be fooled by the current gap it was simply a calm before the storm; well here is your storm. the point is; any one with shared of commonsense and minimal thinking person can see where your greedy TPLF was taking Ethiopia. I know I understand your pain but it is what it is. there is few things you can do to save your nation. get rid off your Dedeb prime minster. let him announce his resignation; this will calm greatly the current situation. Establish new and all inclusive emergency government. in short TPLF has cease to exist, simple. there is a great speech by an Ethiopian professor at the AAU university go listen to him. I could have linked it for you but the moda will delete it. anyway; I am sorry for your pain and I am sorry TPLF is gone. And I am sorry all the evil things you wished for Eritrea came back right to bite you right azz.
            oh on more prediction. in a short time you will hear a massive military personals defection. and the END! bye TPLF!

          • Gecho Ze Great

            Hi Nitricc,
            Thats my wish as well. A change owned by the people and not by a bunch of thugs with guns. History will be kind to Tplf if they choose to handover power to the people by setting up a transitional government that represents the people properly or they can choose to cling to their last vestiges of power and embroil the country into further chaosand turmoil only to abdicate power by force. Either way, their regime has ended and only a naive Tplfite would think that it would go back to the status quo after this. So they better start to think about what kind of legacy they would like to leave.

          • Gecho Ze Great

            Hi Hayat,

            Point #2 is an incorrect analysis. The last thing Issayas would do is give woyane a much needed lifeline by giving them an excuse to divert the attention towards an external aggressor. Issayas is way smarter than that. He’s just going to sit and watch from the comfort of his couch how the rotten tplf government fall apart by itself.

            Point #4 is on point. We are going to come out free from the clutches of woyane oppression after this. Even though woyane would like to pit the nation into ethnic war before they give up power, the Ethiopian people are decent enough not to fall for their evil trap. Woyane want to take down the whole Tigraian people into the fire conflagration but when the moment comes it will be the Tigraian people that will be pushing them into the fire.

          • Nitricc

            Hey Gecho; regarding point #4; I have said it before; if somehow Ethiopia gets out of this with minimal damage, depending how TPLF plays it but this is a good thing for Ethiopia and her future. this change is owned by the people and no gun happy rebel brought it i.e. you just ended the brutal culture of ” come with gun gone by the gun.” so, there is no more blood shading and no gun fairing. the rules of political engagement will change for ever for the better. And the best part is that now the people know they have the power. no one like TPLF can came and ride them like the donkey. so, I agree it is very good for Ethiopia’s future. the question is how and in what way does TPLF leave Ethiopia and the Ethiopian people?

          • Hameed Al-Arabi

            Greetings Nitricc,

            It is better to request from your uncle to create for you platform from where you exercise your power struggle against TPLF. It is understood you work for the benefit of your master, this has nothing to do with people of Eritrea. You are either robbers or parasites.

      • Dear Hayat Adem,

        Forgive me for intruding.

        There is a sign that anti-Ethiopian forces are already exploiting the situation. On top of the instability to which the Ethiopian government is a partner, and besides the rightful grievances of the people, attacking foreign developmental investments, such as flower plantation in Amhara, cement and textile factories in Oromia, and the killing of an innocent American citizen at the outskirts of Addis Ababa, show that the country is targeted by its strategic enemies through proxies.

        I still continue to give the benefit of the doubt to tplf/eprdf government, but time is running against it. TPLF caught the tiger by the tail when it thought it was strong and invincible, and now it finds it difficult to leave the tail free, because it is afraid that the tiger will devour it. Unless both are tamed and approach half way for the sake of the country, things are going to end up in a zero-sum game for all.

        As you pointed out, it is difficult to explain the political stand of the diaspora Ethiopia unless one uses “power by all means” as the sole purpose, with no worry if Ethiopia’s economic development and territorial integrity are compromised or not. We all love Ethiopia; but when we ask ourselves what exactly does loving Ethiopia means, many of us have stereotypic answers. Nevertheless, if you dig deeper, political hegemony pops up as the ultimate goal, and not finding a democratic sustainable solution for the people. We can give examples of the Derg and TPLF. Both came with democratic slogans. Where did the Derg end up and where is TPLF going?

        Give me power and I will love you Ethiopia, has become the norm, or I love you Ethiopia as long as I have the upper hand. The narrow origin of any ethnic group will not satisfy the voracious appetite of diaspora Ethiopians and TPLF as well. In this way both will end up with their miserable and unsustainable self. As much as OLF is concerned, even if impractical, there is no way to cure it from the vision of achieving an independent Oromia. Now, if it is going to end up a predator by swallowing the other smaller ethnic groups or not, nobody would tell.

        Ethiopia’s long history and her diverse ethnicity makeup are both a blessing and a curse at the same time. Both will either save or destroy Ethiopia. Unfortunately, the majority of us, whatever title we may carry, we are uneducated politically, socially and on international relations. We remain eternal servants of our biased beliefs and world view, which we acquired when we were in our villages (country). We might have left behind our villages but not our village mentality. It lives in our subconscious and affects our way of thinking. This could be another explanation among many for your question, why our diaspora elites sleep with the eternal strategic enemies of Ethiopia.

        In conclusion, unless both parties change asap for the sake of law and order and to safeguard the sovereignty of the country, they will be known in history as the people with no country, because out of their foolishness they destroyed the only country they had. Ethiopians should look around and see that the vultures are ready and waiting.
        Regards.

        • Hayat Adem

          Hi Horizon,
          Very good points. You are one of the few who can ably give a reasonable explanation on every issue of our region. Thanks for batting in.
          But, I think I am detecting a tone of resignation in your note. Please, launch the rage that is needed to save the nation. This is not a matter of mediating two sides. If you have to crush the lesser evil to stand in defense of the survival of your country, so be it. Somethings always override others.

          • Dear Hayat Adem,

            Ethiopia is at a crossroad and her fate is on the balance. Unless Ethiopians wise up, which way things will go we really do not know. Our major undertaking should be to save the day, and give Ethiopia a chance to move forward, and not go back to her past or even worse.
            We all know that it is very easy to do evil, but difficult to do good. Individuals can bring major catastrophes, and no power is small enough not to do major damages. The balance of power is such that a spark can set Ethiopia on fire. That is why we should be extremely cautious, and try to appease the demons. Ethiopia should belong to all, and it is better that her fate is the business of every Ethiopian.
            Thank you.

        • Amanuel Hidrat

          Dear Horizon,

          Do not be pessimist. Ethiopia will survive. No ethnic will survive without observing unity of all the social groups that makes modern Ethiopia. Cool heads will prevail and the equilibrium of its parts will be maintained. The solution is to sit in a round table and address all the grievances that existed within the society. Be from the solution seekers without being terrified with the current situation. It is not easy to govern a multi-ethnic society. Seek a solution through equitable sharing – which is the only out to all kind of grievances for a diversified society as Ethiopia. We wish you good luck for those who cares the unity and stability of the country.

          Regards
          Amanuel Hidrat

        • Semere Tesfai

          Selam Horizon

          1. – There is a sign that anti-Ethiopian forces (Egypt, Eritrea, Ethiopian opposition forces….) are already exploiting the situation.”

          That is given. What do you expect them to do? The Woyanes were torn in the flesh to the people of the Horn Region and beyond – to Ethiopians, to Eritreans, to Somalis, to South Sudanese, to Egyptians…. for twenty five long years.

          If I were you, Hayat or the Woyanes, I wouldn’t waste my time thinking and talking about what Ethiopian “enemies” are saying or doing – as doing so would distract Ethiopians from focusing on the real issue: Ethiopian issue. Make no mistake, the current problems that are challenging Ethiopia and Ethiopians are all MADE IN ETHIOPIA by the WOYANE ETHNOCENTRIC REGIME. And at the end of the day, if these problems are going to find fundamental solutions in which every Ethiopian wins, it is going to be only by the wisdom of the Ethiopian elite – looking inside, not looking outside.

          2. – “I still continue to give the benefit of the doubt to tplf/eprdf government”

          Please don’t. It is over. The era of Wayane is gone for good. Woyane has lost the confidence of the Ethiopian people. Any time or effort spent to salvage the Woyanes, is time and effort wasted reviving a stinking dead body.

          3. – “TPLF caught the tiger by the tail when it thought it was strong and invincible, and now it finds it difficult to leave the tail free, because it is afraid that the tiger will devour it. Unless both are tamed and approach half way for the sake of the country, things are going to end up in a zero-sum game for all.”

          Buckle-up. There is a long treacherous road ahead of you that would last for a decade if not longer. in this endeavor, there is no meeting “HALF WAY” for the sake of Ethiopia – only a zero sum game. All you got is, winner takes all political set-up based on ethnic political parties. NO COMPROMISE. Either your ethnic wins it all, or it loses it all. And in this game, NO ETHNIC WANTS TO LOSE – especialy the Oromos and the Amaras – even the Tigreans.

          You see: in a normal nation, when the ruling party (that look like the nation itself) loses public confidence an opposing political party that looks like the nation takes over, and the nation is spared from chaos. Again in a normal nation, in the absence of a political party that looks like the nation itself, there is a military that looks like the nation. And the military takes over, make few promises, govern the nation and spares the nation from chaos. The Woyanes, not only refused to compromise when they felt they were powerful (in 1991), they made their objective an ethnic objective: to defeat the Amaras – which they will regret forever.

          In Woyanes Ethiopia, there are no political parties that look like Ethiopia. There are only Tigray party, Amara party, Oromo party, Sidama party, Afar party, Ogaden party….. In Woyanes Ethiopia there is no army that look like Ethiopia. There is Woyane dominated army that guard the interest of Tigray above and beyond anything else.

          Now tell me: how do you defeat the Woyane system of governing without civil war? How could the army and security forces be seen by the Ethiopian public as neutral body from the Woyane baggage, if they intervene to save the nation? How could the army and security forces claim neutrality when the whole nation is divided into ethnic Killils and ethnic political parties?

          Ethiopia is going to take at least a decade if not longer, to get itself out of its current predicament. And the longer stay in this mess the poorer it will get, and the poorer Ethiopians get, the angrier they will be. And the angrier they get, the more violent they will be and the more Ethiopian sovereignty and territorial integrity will be at risk. And when Ethiopia is not doing good, no one in the region will.

          Semere Tesfai

          • Dear Semere Tesfai,

            Should I call your comment a genuine advice or a malevolent one? I better leave it there. Let everyone draw their own conclusions.

            You people are ready to go to any length to demonize tplf/woyane. They are burdened with your curse since 1998, and you will not be satisfied even if you burn, kill and throw them into the deep ocean. Remember, once upon a time it was the Amharas.

            You say, no compromise is possible in Ethiopia, winner should take all, and no ethnic group is ready to lose. The normal procedure in a normal nation (like that of pfdj), in such situation, would have been a political party or the military that looks like the nation, to take over government and save the country (pfdj style).

            Wow! You are telling Ethiopians to move from one dictatorial authoritarian regime to another, even then if possible, as no ethnic group will put up being a loser, and there shall be no win-win situation. You are telling them to go from the frying pan into the fire. They are saying, thanks, but no thanks. The army is a federal army made up of all ethnic groups, and united only against an external enemy, but not against what any governing party would call an internal enemy; and if it looks like anything, it looks like a tplf army superficially. Let me ask you a question. Are you not worried of such a government if it ever comes to Ethiopia? Your hate for tplf has blinded you.

            As much as you are concerned, Ethiopians do not have even this luxury (i.e. a party and an army that looks like the nation, unlike the pfdj and the EDF), and her fate is to go directly to a civil war. Pfdj is salivating and cannot wait to see chaos and mayhem in Ethiopia. The die is cast and there is no going back, as they think.

            Unlike you, I am not talking of winners and losers, but a new political order, where democracy will shine. Unfortunately for the pfdj, it will wait and wait and never see the day when Ethiopia is in chaos. There is a simple solution, my friend. That is, to “Dissolve parliament and call snap elections and carry out free and fair elections under the auspices of the UN and the international community, and form a true representative parliamentarian democracy that will bring equality and good governance to the nation.” This will bring the diverse political powers to their equilibrium, and it will save tplf and extricate it out of the quagmire it has found itself. The solution is far and out of reach only for people with ulterior motives.

          • Ismail AA

            Hi Horizon,
            Your line of thought is sane; that is what the Ethiopians and well-wishers in the neighborhood would like to prevail. This shall disappoint those who see benefit in the hardship they hope Ethiopia would descend. Especially those who peddle doomsday in the shadow of the despot’s fiefdom in Asmara seem to putting their bet on the ERDF’s aspired misfortune, and thereby the turmoil in to which they country would slide. Good neighbors should at the minimum help patriotic Ethiopians, the Elite in general, to uplift their moral and optimism, and look at the bigger picture and postpone secondary issues in the interest of the supreme goals – unity and integrity of the country.
            As to doomsday wishers, they must understand that Ethiopia has turned page long ago. The days of domination, including relapse to monster centralization of the imperial era, is over. The peoples of the country have tested what the order they lived through during the last few decades despite the shortcomings. Thus, imagining the Ethiopians will settle for less than genuine and justice-based federalism is simply wading in illusion. Ethiopians shall strife with envy for democracy, and against any attempt to stir the country to domination by any group whatever the demographic count would amount.
            A final word int this regard for a concerned Eritrean should be expressing solidarity with Ethiopians of good will who genuinely struggle with determination to opt for sober and meaningful national dialogue. Successful emergence of Ethiopia shall be an asset for us Eritreans, and how things will unfold shall impact us. Let us hope the dictators in our country would not celebrate in the miseries they aspire to befall Ethiopia.
            Regards,
            Ismail

          • Semere Tesfai

            Selam Horizon

            “There is a simple solution, my friend. That is, to “Dissolve parliament and call snap elections and carry out free and fair elections under the auspices of the UN and the international community, and form a true representative parliamentarian democracy that will bring equality and good governance to the nation.” This will bring the diverse political powers to their equilibrium, and it will save tplf and extricate it out of the quagmire it has found itself”

            Carry out free and fair elections UNDER THE AUSPICES OF THE UN and the international community? Are you serious? You mean like what the UN and the “international community” are trying to do in Somalia? I hope you’re kidding. But if you’re not, GOOD LUCK!!!

            But there is one point I want make it clear to you. We Eritreans want the Woyanes gone for good because:
            1. – We want to breath freely
            2. – We want to sleep at night with both our eyes closed
            2. – We want live life outside trenches and foxholes
            3. – We want to spend our meager resources investing in the future of of our children
            4. – We want a government in Ethiopia that respect us as a people, that respect our choice to chart our destiny, that respect our sovereignty and our territorial integrity.

            Until then, what choice do we have but to fight for our very survival?

            Semere Tesfai

          • Hameed Al-Arabi

            Greetings Semere Tesfai,

            First of all do your own business, Ethiopia have many responsible tank thinkers who will manage each and every problem concerns Ethiopians. You want to breath and sleep freely at the time the very reason that sent you to war with Ethiopia is an escape from your own home problems. You are the source of stability in the region and the international community at large. Believe me, you will not breath or sleep freely, because a mafia guy always thinks that he is chased by the ghosts of those who killed or abused. Your master has no even an atom of courage to free G15 or even show their whereabouts, he is a fear driven machine. You are insane individuals who require treatment and not rule the patriotic people of Eritrea.

          • Berhe Y

            Dear Horizon,

            “Dissolve parliament and call snap elections and carry out free and fair elections under the auspices of the UN and the international community, and form a true representative parliamentarian democracy that will bring equality and good governance to the nation.”

            I think this is a sound and fair solution to move forward. The people need to gain the trust they have lost with the TPLF led government, and dissolving the current parliament is the best way forward.

            The opposition needs to realize that, I think they do, for example, I don’t see / follow much but when I hear the comedian from ESAT (Tamagn), he is arguments sound really reasonable to me, the constitution, the future of people of Tigray, the future of the country etc.

            I even heard there is a letter from Ginbot 7 response to EPRDF request for dialog (which is good from both EPRDF and Ginbot 7) point of view, that they are entertaining the idea of peaceful dialog.

            I think the difficult task the opposition / who ever comes next will have is the RESET that will happen in terms of the huge economic gains that happened.

            All these investment from the world bank, the EU, the US, the Chinese will NOT come back the day after if there is doubt of unsuitability, which is a key for Ethiopia economic growth if it’s able to satisfy the growing young population.

            And removing the current government by force, torching business etc..will not necessary grantee

          • Amanuel Hidrat

            Dear Horizon,

            Just read the rediclous advice of Semere Tesfay below “dissolve the parliament ” to run the state like PFDJ who are ruling their subjects without a parliament and rule law. Do you think individuals like him are good wishers of Ethiopian people? This kind of minds are strangulating our dear country and are wishing and exporting this faulty idea to Ethiopia and others in the horn. Keep your eyes on them. One who can not read the image of his country can not read the image of his neighbors. Semere T. is the surrogate voice of PFDJ.

            Regards

          • Semere Tesfai

            Selam Amanuel Hidrat

            “Just read the rediclous advice of Semere Tesfay below “dissolve the parliament ” to run the state of Ethiopia like the PFDJ”

            Aman: I understand your unwavering love for the Woyanes, but do yourself a favor:

            Look and aim, before emptying your machine-gun, you may need your ammunition for later time.

          • Nitricc

            Hi Semere; I agree with Idea of dissolving the parliaments. In fact the TPLF could have used it to calm down the poplar uprising. I will even go one step further and I let Hailemariam Desalgn to step down. But for people like Aman-H, Semere Andom and the likes are in deep paranoia and panic. They never thought this day will come and their god TPLF will rule for ever. Why do you think I never bought their fake justice seekers bull crap. They didn’t even came out and once sympathized with people of Ethiopia who are massacred on daily bases. They are what they are Weyane Ashkers and they will die as such. So my friend, don’t waste your time with such morally bankrupt people. Again they never came out and condemned Weyane for the killing. It should be known
            Aman-H dubbing the cold blooded killer and dead dictator Melles Zenawi as a moral leader and cried for three weeks. What do you expect from such hypocrites?

          • Thomas

            Hi Nitricc,

            Who are you to choice what is good for the Ethiopian people? Time and again the Ethiopian forumers are trying to ignore you as they can see your true colors/motive. You are against the weyane because your own hatred with them, the Ethiopians can see that on you, as they say, “If it looks like a duck, swims like a duck, and quacks like a duck, then it probably is a duck.”

          • Hameed Al-Arabi

            Greetings Nitricc,

            Nitricc says:

            “It should be known ….. the cold blooded killer and dead dictator Melles Zenawi as a moral leader and cried for three weeks. What do you expect from such hypocrites?”

            I think the Prime Minster you label him today as “the cold blooded killer” accompanied him to occupy Addis Abbiba and the whole of Ethiopia. You are the source of catastrophe for Ethiopia since forties of the last century. Now you harbor hard to create hatred among the people of Ethiopia. You attempt to make all Ethiopian ethnic groups to have malice against the people of Tigrai, and tomorrow if you get chance you will be against Orommo labeling them as cold blooded killers, and the rest of insults you are expert at. At this moment of time the entire people of Ethiopia specially elites perceive these thugs well. The mafia in Asmara doesn’t make any good for the people of Eritrea except prison cells and killing outside the law. Such criminals will never hold good for any of our neighbors peoples.

            I wish Ethiopians to solve their problems peacefully through dialogue and prove to the world their 3000 years old civilization.

          • Semere Tesfai

            Selem Nitricc

            Hey Nitricc: please go easy on them. They need our understanding and our support on this difficult times. Poor guys, they invested all their life savings on Meqle Stock Market. And all their hopes, all their dreams, and all their life-savings crashed in front of their very eyes.

            I told them – don’t put all your eggs in one basket; but if you choose to do so – please, please, please…. put it in the White man’s basket – COI.

            But them guys didn’t listen my advice. And you know what happened. But Nitricc: you know me; I’m not one of them guys who say I TOLD YOU SO!!!!! Why? Because I care.

          • Peace!

            Hi Emma,
            You just made an innocent mistake and you still get an up-vote, lucky you: When I am in a time constrain I usually read comments with high up vote, I guess not any more. My point is what happen to correcting and helping each other instead?
            Peace!

          • Nitricc

            Hey peace hahahhaah that tells you the depth of the readers. I caught it earlier but I just ignored in disgust. I can understand Ismail, he just upvoted because Aman-H is his cat but how do you explain when Horizon’s upvoting? Just to not offend or correct Aman-H, he chose the worst path.

          • Peace!

            s’up Nitric,

            Ya that was funny to see Horizon deupvoting his own idea hahaha….perhaps him and Hayat are in a sever panic mode. Well, regrettably things are not looking good for TPLF that it has declared STATE OF EMERGENCY for six month as Do-Or-Die stage is approaching faster than they thought. Victory for Ethiopian people.

            Peace!

          • Amanuel Hidrat

            Hi Peace,

            Do not be overtaken by upvote or downvote. Just have confidence on your ideas. If you have recievable and magnetic idea, people will be on your side without giving voice of confidence. Big deal, when people debate on your ideas.

            Regards,

      • Amde

        Dear Hayat,

        Good and thought provoking questions, but I am afraid they are too late.. maybe even as short as three months too late, but too late nonetheless. The die is cast. We are irrevocably sliding out of a TPLF hegemonic era into an unknown. I used to joke with people that post 1991 could have been called Pax-Tigreana seeing the triumph of the political forces that had their main social basis as Tigrinya speaking communities on both side of the Mereb. From that point of view, the Badme War could be called a civil war between the two to determine who sits higher in the perch.

        I don’t know what to call what we are getting into.. it has the elements of a Pax Oromiyana, in other words, a political order imposed by or according to the dictates of the various forces struggling within the Oromo political continuum. But that by itself is a strange undefined kettle of fish, containing within it streams of old school Ethiopian nationalists/unitarists, to straightforward/liberal Federalists, to ethnic Federalists, to separatists, to Islamic fundamentalists. And that continuum is a layer on top of preexisting social lines: i.e. clan, historical and religious divisions etc.

        There is saying in Amharic that I dread – “kadeferese ayTeram” (It won’t clear up until it gets agitated). Whenever I express my disquiet about how things are going, there are many who shrug their shoulder and say “kaldeferese ayTeram”. There are many yedeferesu negeroch that have not been clarified.

        You asked “…. there must be a responsible way of solving political and governance problems…”. Yes of course there are… “ke lib kaleqesu emba aygeddim” in Amharic (Real tears will flow for real sorrow). In other words, if one is genuine the solutions are not too far.

        But I am going to sound like a broken record and say TPLF blew the opportunities it had for 25 years. There were many many willing partners. Hailu Shawul (past leader of AAPO, AEPO and Kinijit), passed away today. During the 2005 elections, Berhanu Nega (campaign head for Kinijit at the time) and Bereket Simon (his counterpart in the EPRDF) used to discuss campaign issues on the phone all the time. Berhanu, a PhD economist, has been reduced to a guerilla leader answering to Isayyas. Dr. Merera Gudina has for 25 years now been carrying the torch of a loyal and peaceful opposition under constant harrassment and mocking. There were thousands of intellectuals, journalists and peaceful activists who were willing to struggle the system within its own rules

        Today, when the Oromo and Amara youth are dying and defiantly destroying, completely impervious to the entreaties of the traditional, legal, or opposition authorities, deaf to the soul-crushing one sided government media, I bet you there are thousands of Weyane up and the down the ranks who must be thinking to themselves how the Hailu Shawuls, Berhanu Negas or Merera Guddinas would have been veritable angels, compared to the now insidious mushrooming of many shadowy groups with frightening and extremist rhetoric and goals.

        There are many things that don’t have solutions per se, they cannot be “solved” – they can only be “managed” within the context and time period they are raised. Figuring out the optimum distribution of justice, power and opportunity is something that will always change based on the prevailing conditions. I always thought that was the point of regular free elections so that this distribution can change based on the circumstances. And I always thought we were extremely blessed to be a nation of minorities, so that no permanent majority is possible, majorities only to be formed on an ad hoc coalition basis. In my view, in retrospect, we didn’t need to do too much experimenting beyond implementing true “land to the tiller”, bringing in liberal one man one vote systems and making a true federation of the old 14 provinces or the Derg’s 20odd astedaders. That would have been sufficient to start the processes of addressing many language and ethnic right issues, land ownership issues etc etc….

        Ethiopia’s main problem leading to today is TPLF’s problem. And TPLF’s biggest problem is not knowing Tigray and its people within the realities of the Ethiopian context. (Yes, I know how crazy that sounds and detractors are welcome to insult me for it) But it seems to me the main people that formed and led the TPLF in the early years were children of aristocrats, raised with the idea of Tigray as a power contending political unit, wronged by Shoa. They conflated Tigray the political unit with the Tigrayan ethnic group (which it wasn’t). They conflated the Shoa political unit with the Amara ethnic group. And I think catastrophically, they conflated competing with Shoa with competing with the Amara. The politics they played since 1991 (despite the rhetoric of revolution and democracy) is reminiscent of the reactionary warlord politics of the 19th century. When you win militarily you take everything. And thus they took over predominance in military, political and economic powers. I don’t say that in a cavalier fashion. When I was growing up in Addis during the Derg years, the average Abebe on the street would have told you that he thinks the Amara were in charge of politics, the military was Oromo and Amara, and the economic power was held by the Eritreans and Gurages. It may even be the case that there were more Eritrean Generals in the Derg’s army than there are Amara or Oromo generals in the current Ethiopian armed forces.

        But now we are in a different era. Politics is expected to be a demographics game rather than a military one. And within the Ethiopian (ethnic) context, depending on the metrics one uses, Tigray’s number put it in the middling group among the Somalis, Sidamas and Gurages. And like much of the especially northern highlands, there is overcrowding on exhausted farmlands. To me these point out that the way forward should have been establishing a political culture and institutions that favor ad hoc coalition forming, while at the same time maximizing the opportunities for any Tigrayan throughout the whole country.

        But what they have succeeded in doing is the exact opposite. All constitutional institutions are dead – even now the dead meto be meto parliament has not been called for an emergency meeting, statements are given by the various organs of the EPRDF parties rather than the Prime Minister or a Minister of such and such, and having made it law for people to have to identify their ethnicity, Tigrayans are now being targetted throughout the land.

        Can the TPLF change? I think it is too late for this question, but even if it did, it knows the way forward means giving up political, military and economic hegemonic status (I am not even talking about losing it all mind you – just its hegemonic status), even within the system it has set up, so it is stuck. And stuck means no progress within the system it has created. No movement means irrelevance. And thus the youth are going around it and torching what they perceive to be Weyane property.

        How to get Weyane to gently transition out is now becoming the issue senior figures and elders are getting involved in. People like Professor Mesfin have started detailing out conciliatory pathways out. The two former TPLF Generals have come out for free elections, even knowing very well it would be the end of TPLFs hegemonic status.

        The public so far does not really believe the EPRDF is sincere in its promise to bring about change. And I have written here before that whatever the EPRDF greybeards might believe, I think it is structurally impossible for EPRDF to make any meaningful changes, let alone make them in a short enough time. The non-TPLF parties within EPRDF are operating under the burden of being Weyane lackeys, so they have very little legitimacy. To my knowledge, neither the OPDO or ANDM have come out officially to mourn the hundreds of young kids cut down by soldiers, to send out conciliatory messages to the public at large, to seek the establishment of independent bodies to study the issues, etc.. And of course, the regional parliaments, just like the Federal ones, have nothing to say as well. Now, if they (OPDO or ANDM) were to announce their freedom from EPRDF, or show some other way they are free from TPLF domination, I think they will have instant legitimacy that might calm things – at least for a while. But then you have just sown the seeds of further problems, from four co-operating one party states (killils) to four competing one-party states (killils). It is a disgustingly fine pickle we got ourselves in.

        Your point about Egypt fishing in these waters is well taken, but i have to take issue with your blanket accusation of “the diaspora”. I am one, and I have been out of Ethiopia over 20 years, and I have lived in at least four different states in the US, and the picture of a diaspora that will carry water for Egyptian interests is simply not true. Yes there are groups that believe the situation is so dire that they will take any help from anybody. These justify themselves partly by pointing out that TPLF was only too happy to get arms, finances, training and support from Egypt and Somalia in their heyday. This is not a logic I can support of course, but it is there. In any case, it is literally in these past couple of days where I have seen another taboo break, where people feel it is OK to come out publicly and start arguing away Egyptian interference. It is a jaw dropper that people hate the current system so much they are willing to show themselves as willing accomplices to Egypt and not feel they will pay any consequences for it.

        Amde

        • Nitricc

          Hey Amde I happened to agree with your assessments; however, i do remember you saying you appreciate the hard work TPLF done and marveling how they changed the country. And now you are making a complete U turn. Don’t you think you are contradicting yourself?

          • Amde

            Nitricc,

            Where is the contradiction?

            They did a lot economically, infrastructure wise, pushing pro poor policies. We need some of that to continue, But those are not necessarily policies specific to Tigray. They can genuinely be advocated by another generic non-ethnically constituted party. My model is something like the Brazilian Workers Party.

            Where they blew it is in their stifling the development of political institutions and practices which will also work for Tigray the political unit, and Tigrayans the people once they are no longer on top. Now it looks like the window has closed.

          • sara

            Dear Nit
            Hi, please stay cool when elders are talking, at that when it comes to neighbors
            are squabbling. that was what our parents used to tell us when we were kids.

        • Amanuel Hidrat

          Selam Amde,

          I have to questions to you and I hope you will answer them.

          (a) In your comment you have said that Ethiopia is “a nation of minorities “. When we talk the issue of minority/majority is always relative. If all the Ethiopian social groups are minorities, in relative to what are they become minorities. For instance what I know is, the gurages are minorities in relative to the amharas and the oromos. We can not speak about minoroties without the existence of majority at least conceptually. Minority and majority are antithesis to each other, and do not exist conceptually one without the other. The idea of equitable sharing will not be applicable in your argument rather it sound on equal basis, if I am not wrong. Please clarify it if we have to learn from that argument.

          (b) What I know and sure you too, that there is a deep mistrust among the major social groups (Amhara, Oromo, and tigray). If you do not believe the current administrative structure can not address the grievances of the social groups, how does the old administrative provinces mitigate the existing mistrust, b/c it become your recommendation in your comnent? Is there a justfaible study to it? Do Ethiopians recognize the old provinces as their identities – the building blocks of Ethiopian identity?

          regards
          Amanuel Hidrat

          • Amde

            Selam Amanuel

            A) Statistically speaking, a majority is defined as anything 50% and above. Between majorities and minorities, there are pluralities. For example, in Ethiopia, since more than 50% of the population are Christians, we can say it is a Christian Majority country. Now let us take the issue of language speakers. 35 – 40% of the population speaks Oromiffa. But this number is not 50% and above. So Oromiffa is not a majority. But they represent the most spoken mother tongue, so they are defined a plurality – in this case a strong plurality.

            The current killils were designed to make specific ethnic groups the absolute majorities, so Tigray, Oromia, Amhara all have over 90% Tigrayans, Oromos and Amharas repectivelys. In these cases, they are both majorities and pluralities.

            But take a look at the Southern Region (SNNPR). Religiously, it is a strong Christian majority state (over 75%). But ethnically, the Sidama are the largest group, constituting about 20% of the region’s population. So within the SNNPR, Sidamas constitute a plurality. SNNPR has no ethnic majorities, just pluralities. So assuming things are to be decided in a “democratic majority” manner, no issues can be decided in the region unless there is a coalition among enough components. Obviously the Sidama have an advantage being closer to the magic 50% than anybody else. But they would need support from others.

            B) You challenged me on a couple of points. I would like to separate them.

            On your question of “Do Ethiopians recognize the old provinces as their identities – the building blocks of Ethiopian identity?”, my answer is roughly they still do. It is definitely the case for Tigray or Gonder. I would just like to ask you what you think of the perennial Eritrean complaint of “Regionalism” (I have heard the joke of the Akele merchant whose donkey dies in Hamassien, and he decides to drag its corpse back to Akele so that the Akele hyenas get to feast on it rather than the Hammasien ones.) I don’t think Regionalism by itself is wrong: people feel strongly about it over many generations, therefore it is a historically grounded legitimate identity.

            The second component is on justice and mutual mistrust. My answer is simple. We have never tried democracy based on one man one vote. In such a scenario, I absolutely fail to see how the Oromo or Amhara get to lose. But since neither can form a majority by themselves, they are bound to have to look for coalition partners. And this is where the opportunity for the smaller groups comes. They can be kingmakers. Imagine the sort of demographics I described to you in the SNNPR applied through the whole country.

            I think it is a fantastic basis for a functioning democracy. Compare this to the Eritrean case, where the Tigrinya speakers constitute a plurality AND a majority. An ethnicity based one man one vote system spells permanent disenfranchisement for the smaller groups. They have legitimate reason to fear one man one vote.

            Hope this helps.

            Amde

          • Amanuel Hidrat

            Dear Amde,

            I am not convinced by the concept “nation of minorities”. Ethiopia has big and small social groups, and hence the relevance of the socio-explantion of minorities and majority to address the existing grienvances through equitable sharing. Second on the old provinces – if your assessment is correct that the Ethiopian people took them as their geographic identity I do not see it as a problem. In our case the Eritrean provinces are the geographic identity of our society. That is why I advocate to retain them.Third, if you want one man one vote in electing a national leader, are you looking a constitutional change from primeministerial to presidential? Fourth, in multiethinic society democracy does not build trust but equitable power and economic sharing does, unless equitable sharing is an element democracy in your view. Fifith, if you believe on coalition then why are you against the coalition of EPRDF? Sixith, why do you want the small social groups to be king makers of the oromo snd Amhara king

          • Amde

            Aman,

            What do you mean by “social group”?

            I am assuming you mean “ethnic or language group”. Otherwise, adding more variables to further identify social groups will create even more fragmentation (create more minorities). I can argue the largest “social group” could be defined as highland subsistence farmers, for whom at the end of the day the politics of “land to the tiller” is far more meaningful than the abstract ethnic politics. We would not be having the discussion on the Master Plan and the deaths associated with that if the farmers were owners of their land, free to sell it or rent it, rather than being forced out.

            The one-man-one-vote was not in reference to a Presidential system which I don’t think is a good idea for a diverse nation like ours. I am very strongly an advocate for a parliamentary system, and when I talk about coalitions, I am thinking within the model of the parliamentary systems.

            EPRDFs system is not a democracy of persons. It is planned to be – as they explicitly state in the constitution – a “democracy of nations and nationalities”. There is a problem at the heart of this. In these days, when we mean democracy we mean direct popular participation through voting. Persons vote. But nations/nationalities don’t. Well how do you put that into practice?

            The EPRDF system seems to be that Nations/Nationalities have many and in fact more rights that we living in the west think should rightly accrue to individuals and persons. It reminds me of Mitt Romney from the last election, when he argued “Corporations are people.” He meant that in the legal sense they have many of the attributes persons have – they are born, they pay taxes, they die, they form coalitions, they are represented by lobbyists in the political space and by lawyers in the legal space, they own assets and hold debt, they can be punished by the law, even being executed by the order of judges when they are ordered to be dissolved…etc etc….

            The way they have gone around it is to institute one political party that supposedly represents everyone in a particular “nation or nationality”, and then having such a party be component of a political coalition. When I say that politics is a luxury denied to the average person, and only to the member of the EPRDF, it is not hyperbole. According to the EPRDF system, their job is done once exclusive ethnic regions have been created and these have been made into one party states. Then politics become an inter-party and and intra-coalition affair, operating according to rules that are opaque to those of us on the outside. I have read pro EPRDF people say a number of times, “Well you are wrong – that is not how EPRDF really works.” OK fair enough – but the point is that the average person does not know how it works because it is a closed system.

            When you say “Fourth, in multiethinic society, democracy does not build trust but equitable power and economic sharing does – unless equitable sharing is an element of democracy in your view.”, I have to ask what you mean by “democracy”. I think if people and communities are sufficiently represented, it is up to them to make use of the powers available to them to constantly struggle to maximize the benefits they get. If that works out to an accommodation of equitable sharing, then its great. If not, then people should be represented by others who can do a better job representing them.

            “Fifith, if you believe on coalition, then why are you against the coalition of EPRDF? Why don ‘t argue the other existing parties to do the same coalition? ”
            Most of the legal opposition has formed coalitions as well. The problem is monopoly of power. I see this in the context of a meaningfully diverse parliament. EPRDF uses Winner-Take-All, jailing and intimidation of legal oppositions to deny them entry into the parliament. The coalition I am really talking about is for those that have made it into parliament.

            This is not a trivial point. EPRDF has made it impossible for legal opposition to have any parliamentary presence, let alone power. Thus the paradox that by taking all the seats they have effectively killed parliament. Since they took the trouble to effectively kill it, I have to assume that they think they have a lot more to lose from a free parliament than what they gain from it. I think they have a binary view – that if they are not on top, then that must mean they are dead. But that is not so. Between winning and dying, there is living among others with all your strengths and weaknesses. And that is the point of coalitions.

            “Sixith, why do you want the small social groups to be “king makers” of the oromo and Amhara rather than “shareholders” in the power circles?”. I guess the phrase “King maker” is a figure of speech. I don’t mean that the small social groups should play king makers for the Oromo and Amara. Firstly there are no such Amara or Oromo kings. Secondly, I meant “King maker” in the total Ethiopian context, as in leadership at the national level. And third, it just means being in a position to influence the election of those that best represent their interests at the national level.

            Amde

      • Kim Hanna

        Selam Hayat Adem,
        .
        The questions and the notes are on point. The legitimate concerns and demands of portion of the population is openly encouraged and exploited by the usual suspects.
        There are folks who salivate at the thought and prospect of the disintegration of Ethiopia. You add money to this project, it gets hyper.
        .
        I have concerns and worry of internal divisions. Even at that level, you cannot dismiss the participation of Ethiopia’s mortal enemies using their corrupt practices to create havoc. They are corrupting Europeans, aren’t they?
        .
        However, the degree of my concern does not rise to the level of yours, even though close enough for comfort. That is not because I have any more information or knowledge than you or Amde,
        It is because I believe, based on past performance, that there are enough intelligent patriotic Ethiopians of every ethnic group in Government to decipher the problems and mitigate the current situation. After all taking a nation from the edge of a cliff of certain disintegration to the current position of development in every sphere in just a little over 20 years is not a task for a faint hearted. It required guts and determination.
        .
        The majority of diaspora group who are in their 60s, 70s and 80s live in a different world. Obviously not all of them because I am one of them. ( I suspect the majority wear dentures..toothless…their bite doesn’t hurt)
        Imbedded in this group are activist and people of old world views. The ones to watch are those activists cooperating with foreign interests, like Eritrea and Egypt partnerships. We have seen that history before.
        .
        The current media saturation where every Tom and Harry is a broadcast house, it is a little loud and concerning to see all hurtful insults to cultivate hatred among people. The making up of stories and exaggerations of events to fit their narrative is a full time job for some of these folks. Sometimes the main stream media pick up some of these stories which can only exasperate the information war to further their evil goal.
        .
        Remember,, 25 years ago Libya, Syria and Iraq Governments in support of Egypt’s lead were working day and night to bring about chaos in Ethiopia.
        For the rest of Ethiopians who are hopeful for the future of Ethiopia must never forget that hard lesson written in blood just few generations ago.
        .
        Mr. K.H
        .
        P.S:
        I think I have to take issue with AG who thinks ShoaAmara= Ethiopia concept. He must belong to the same era old group, from the opposite side. It is a dead horse. In case he is not aware, Mengistu Haile Mariam did the main job. EPLF and TPLF did the moping up…so let us not go there. It is better to look forward.

      • Solomon

        Selamat Hyatt, Amde, Kim Hanna, Horizon KndiShiH and All,

        My equal concern for as Hyatt towards your country and Eritrea’s neighbor and an inevitable partner with in peacetime.

        I came across a peaceful demonstration by the Ethiopian opposition commencing on Lake Merit. Naturally the Ethiopian Flag and with the Qeyy, Bitcha, arenguadie netSelas and Tea Shirts drew me. I leaned my Bicycle against a Tree and read the placards that were temporarily resting against the same tree. Read everyone of them as well as the handout flyers. I contemplated to march along with them as I feel their grievances were as a just cause as Hamid Idris Awate’s standing up to first the British and later Haile Selassie’s Ethiopia. I decided to forgo showing my solidarity with with my fellow Oaklanders and Bay Area Ethiopians’ just cause by marching with them that early afternoon. I decided so for the same reason Hyatt Adam is mentioning above. The exploitation of the current Ethiopian predicament. Though I was sure of my sure stance against inequitable governance and against “second class citizenship of any nation” the conflict of interest thoughts won over. So, after quenching my thirst with the bottled water I received from a volunteer activist marcher, I walked my bike away splitting the gathered with numerous utterances of Selam and repeated slight bowing of the head, our cultural acknowledgement of respect for one another.
        About fifty yards away, I began to feel incomplete somehow as if I forgot something behind me. My reflexes of habit with such a feeling, involuntarily raised my both of my hands in search for a Key or something in my pocket. It was my hand set I first touched. So, I jumped of the my Bike leaving it on the middle of the side walk, in my rush to catch the demonstrators already marching in the opposite direction. I thought I can take a photo or two and maybe tweet my solidarity with with Ethiopia’s just cause. I was shocked to see the reactions by numerous marchers. They immediately started to cover their faces with anything in sight. Some, just turned their faces to the opposite side. After clicking once, I recalled an Eritrean Opposition march in Washington, DC, with Eritrean Veterans Degiga, Said SaliH, Ghadi, Men tSigge etc. were present. The Ethiopian marchers reaction, a few weeks ago in Oakland on a second and long thought was rendered no longer surprising. I remembered quite a few Eritreans that marched for justice in Eritrea with us in DC in 2002, covering and hiding their faces similarly. … I just want to reassure Hyatt Adam that our southern neighboring country and forever tied by our common history will overcome these difficulties with the just and honest within the rulling party making the necessary and right corrections of ruling and equitable sharing with justice. It does start with a peace bridge in the Mereb mlashh.

        Later that evening the march against unjust police shooting of North Carolina and the BaybArea Black Lives Matter was gathering in District 1 Oakland downtown. I could hear the helicopters hovering and rode straight into riot controlled thundering motor cycles and cordoned allies by very physical police officers in the hundreds. Oakland’s youth out numbered but ready to ignite rampage due to legitimate anger they needed to express. Well twice in one day. It was put up or shut up time. Money Dick of Mice and Men is it? (About internal American migrant workers) or is it Of Kings and Men by the Kerenite. Passed on my Ethiopian’s earlier march, but to path on Oakland’s youth and future… Needless to say it was only the initial butter flies of caution but to face the Black and White Officers of Peace and was indeed an emboldening and learning experience.

        I believe Mr. Kim Hanna spoke of hijackers and looters regarding the nation wide Black Lives Matter marches that week.
        Diplomacy and politicking or activism, with the American interest in mind.
        Freedom of speech…
        Well Mr. Amde, the Potomac River is swelling. And yes I do have a tune in my head for you Sir. “Ambush in The Knight” BMW
        One Love!
        tSAtSE

  • Berhe Y

    Dear AT,

    Well done. It’s nice of you to give him his name, but he only deserved to called number #7, a fitting name him and his cronies have to many of those who are kept in their rat hole prisoners.

    Berhe

  • Michael Tesfamariam

    Hi all, Well done! let him and his cronies now travel to Europe instead, that is where pfdj gangs love to hang around with the dead communities out there.

    • kogne

      HI all, I think it does not make cense, first of all #7 came all the way from Eritrea to USA with VISA issued to him from USA embassy in Eritrea,if he still #7 I don’t think they issued him a VISA unless they forgot he is in that ERITREA/ALSHABAB none sense thing

      • saay7

        Konge:

        Consider: #7 came to New York, site of the UN. The US gives wide latitude to its political enemies, including those it designated as terrorists –Muammar Kaddafi, Ahmedinejad–to come to New York.

        Then, Yemane tried to do openly what he succeeded in doing secretly in 2010 and 2012: travel to areas outside New York. He was arrogant enough to telegraph this via a widely publicized “public seminar” in DC, with not only the PFDJ celebrating it but mesherfet.net ( senef.net) playing telegram delivery boy in humiliating wedo geba-ism. More: a private event with the Atlantic Council, which has become an extension of Dimxi Hafash. The latter, by convention, invited NGOs, some of whom told the pro-justice Eritrean movement.

        This was a wake up call to all. Then all of us (yeah, beeaitches, we too are Americans) did all we could to remind the US of its own damn laws. Some called congress, some the State department, some the Treasury. Awakened, the US enforced its own laws. The opposition, mostly individuals on their own initiative, leaped: that is, right there, the making of a grassroots movement. All this on the eve of the most devastating catastrophe in post independent Eritrea: the drowning of hundreds of Eritreans in the Mediterrenean 3 years ago, still unmarked, still un-noted, still in-mourned by the arrogant regime. Anything less that a complete shut down of Yemane and his club would have been a defeat.

        None of this forbade Osman Saleh, the Eritrean Foreign Minister, from going on with this “public seminar” in DC. He, a nobody, was not a target. The PFDJ-Eritrean-Americans right to free assembly (indoctrination) was still respected. But the PFDJ is now entirely addicted to the culture of victimization: it calculated that it could get more political mileage by claiming that the US bullied us, boo boo: and the usual suspects are, like the brainwashed cult they are, are repeating it. And oh they will for generations to come.

        More to come.

        Saay

        • Nitricc

          Hey SAAY what up, my man? Long time! I hope all is good. I wasn’t going to comment but your
          uncharacteristicly toothless take forced me to say a word or two. All I hear from the so-called oppositions is that how the government of Eritrea is unresponsive, secretive and no one knows where this government is taking us. In some degree I agree that the government of Eritrea
          is too secretive and I would love to hear what the government of Eritrea has to say. I was very interested to know what they have to say and judge for myself. Unfortunately that opportunity was snatched by the so-called oppositions. For instances; who gave awate foundation or team or whatever the right to deny from Eritreans hearing what their government has to say? If any one have a problem with what the government has to say then don’t listen to what they have to say; ignore it, but because you don’t like to hear the government out, no opposition or foundation have the freaking right to deny others. Again who gave the awate foundation the right to deny others from hearing out what the government has to say? Opposition may have the right to oppose the government but it does have the right to deny others right. again, who gave the awate foundation the right to deny others right?

          • iSem

            Dear Nitricc
            I know you are addressing Saleh
            But let me tell you this, knowledge is liberating, but when it is little, it is debilitating and dangerous and enslaving.
            the Idea of free speech is in the context of some basic rule of law, there is a reason we put murderers behind bars, meaning, denying them the freedom of movement , we treat them humanely as possible, but deny most of their freedoms and by so doing we protect society
            Whoever lobbied USA to deny your criminal, mafia inspired PFDJ who have a track record of killing people by sledge hammer and knifes and buried people alive and raped underage girls, had done a good job and toothless does not apply these Eritreans.
            So stop lecturing us about your right to hear Yemane, think of the PFDJ supporters like a murderer that the free world denies freedom of movement, freedom of speech by caging them
            I can see your head swollen by the discovery of the knowledge you have written above obe, it is so little and it is dangerous for a protozoan

          • Nitricc

            Hi Semere I know you are slow as usual but when you but murderers behind bars; there was due process in which they are convicted in court of law. But being you and ignorant; you don’t even want to give the PFDJ the just of due process by hearing them out. How could you ask any justice while crushing it the very justice you are crying for? I know you are number one in screaming your lungs out about justice but in reality; you are the worst and corrupted mind there is to be. In a matter of justice; there are no preconditions. Justice is justice and justice is for all.

          • Saleh Johar

            Hi Nitricc,

            I won’t respond to your insightful comment on adding more rights to the PFDJ which ironically has all the power to rule with impunity and monopolize Eritrean voices. That is deep and I wil just learn from your rational.

            Defending the right of speech for our tormentor is a noble act. You are on the right track. However, since your heart is bleeding for justice, why don’t you defend the right of the thousands of Eritreans imprisoned by the poor PFDJ (whose freedom of speech is being violated) to be set free. That would be inline with your judicious rational

          • Nitricc

            Hey SG: You should have known by now what my stand is. I don’t oppose for any government who arrests its citizens; that what governments do but what I oppose is the arresting of people with out the due process. I have no problem the Eritrean government is arrested those people; including G-15 but to prevent from facing accusers and to not have a day in a court is not only wrong but painfully even to the ear. So, let me say this for the record. Yes I do oppose the government of Eritrea in a strongest term possible for holding people in prison with out due process. I don’t care what they have done or what kind of treason they may have committed; they have the right to defend themselves and they the right to face their accusers in fair and balance a court of law. The end of the story

          • Saleh Johar

            Hi Nitricc,

            I do know that stand since a long time. But when we see injustice for a week, two, three, a month, two three, a year, two, three, we are disgusted. However, when that injustice, in this case the imprisonment of people, takes years and decades, our reaction should not be a docile outrage, we have to act human and be outraged more and condemn whoever is causing that. At this point, and in this case, I am beyond outrage and can only use the harshest words to describe the mafia regime. I wish I could do more. I appeal to you to be more assertive, “I condemn it” is not sensible anymore.

          • Hameed Al-Arabi

            Greetings Nitricc,

            Waw, today you have become a law specialist lecturing us about penal code, a jack of all trades. How do you want people to hear you while you are at large? According to abs of justice first you should be behind bars as a notorious criminal, then only your defense can be heard against the bill of indictment.

            Law prosecutes criminals on facts on ground, red-handed. You prosecute people on suppositions, “you are the worst and corrupted mind there is to be.” You prosecute “minds”, a jungle law, might is right.

          • Hameed Al-Arabi

            Greetings Nitricc,

            The mafia in Asmara is secretive no one knows the amounts of money they accumulated, innocents killed in her operations of robbery and terror caused to the people of Eritrea. Nitricc “was very interested to know what they have to” tell him about his share from the robbed amounts. He says, “Unfortunately that opportunity was snatched by the so-called oppositions.”

            Did you or the people of Eritrea elected the mafia to be the government of Eritrea? Secrecy and the rest of the crimes are outcome usurpation rights of electing their government.

          • Berhe Y

            Hi Hameed,

            According to swiss leaked bank accounts. There are 23 accounts who have money up to 30 million, there is 1 account who has upto 90 million dollars and there is 1 account who has over 450 million. The the maximum amount associated with one individual for a total of 695.2M. In total there are 39 bank accounts and 32 clients for a total amount over 699 M. Eritrea ranked 53 of the top 200..

            https://www.icij.org/project/swiss-leaks/explore-swiss-leaks-data

            Just for comparison, look at Ethiopia.
            Total amount 10M
            Total number of accounts: 55
            total number of individuals: 29
            Maximum amount associated to 1 individual: 2 M

            And Ethiopia is ranked : 153.

            How hard is to guess who the owner of that account with 695 Million dollars….is.

            Talk about corruption…

            Berhe

          • Nitricc

            Hi Berhe: I hope you reread your own post. And you reviled your self very well for anyone else. wow!
            where do you live, man? Let me guess, Canada? God have mercy.

          • Hameed Al-Arabi

            Greetings Nitricc,

            Do you believe in God? I suspect it, because all what God forbids you perpetrate them. You lie openly, defend criminals and robbers. You see injustices, dare to say it is fairness. You are a person who forgot there is an end for him. Your life on this earth is limited, don’t dream that you will live forever. If your life concluded while you are in your present position definitely curses of your grandsons/daughters will follow you at your grave. By the way, have you visited a cemetery in your life? Have you seen a tomb where you will be shoved?

          • Nitricc

            Hi Arab man: what kind of question is this? I mean where are you trying to get to? You are an Arab why do you care about god? I don’t know about death and graves but I know Arabs; if there is a difference that is!

          • Hameed Al-Arabi

            Greetings Nitricc,

            Yes, I am an Eritrean Arab and proud of that. I know you don’t have God that Christians and Muslims believe on. Your religion and god is Isaias. The god you worship gives you “politiqawi timhirt” that says you will live forever, there is no graves or tombs that you will be shoved to. According to the teachings of you god Isaias it is permitted to lie, rob and kill. You are afraid to visit graves and tombs though your end will be there soon than you expect. One day you will be held on shoulders to your inevitable destination without any opposition from your side, that is the tomb. Sadly you will leave behind you a live legacy of shame that can’t be denied to your grandsons and daughters whose curses will chase at your grave.

          • Saleh Johar

            Nitricc,

            I thought I would save you some embarrassment. For your information, there are many people whose first name or family name is Arabi. Hameed’s name of family name could be Arabi or he might have picked it as a nick.

            I think that is a Fisarmonic moment.

          • Nitricc

            Hey SG; well i know my history and there is no Eritrean Arab. before one of your moda accuse me plagiarism as they did on Ethiopian issue; let me share this with you…..
            “Afar: Primarily pastoralists who inhabit areas of southern Red Sea. They are Muslims and organized in strong clans.

            Bilen: Traditionally farmers, populate Keren and its immediate surrounding. Their social structure is organized by kinship groups. There are equal numbers of Christians and Muslims.

            Hidarb: Cushtic Beja (T’bdawie) semi nomadic pastoralists specializing in raising camels and cattle. They are found in the western lowlands.

            Kunama: They are mainly found in villages between the Gash River and in Barentu. They are Nilotic and renowned dancers having developed more than 25 different dancing forms. They are mainly Christians and Muslims with some traditional believers.

            Nara: Nilotic, they live in the area east of the Gash River. They have mixed culture similar to that of the Kunama’s. They are Muslim.

            Rashaida: Most recent tribe to come to Eritrea from the Arabian Peninsula. They are predominantly nomadic people who live along the Northern Red Sea coast. They are Muslim.

            Saho: They occupy the territory on the south-eastern slopes of the highlands as far as the coastal plains south of Massawa. They are small scale farmers who emphasize in bee-keeping. They are Muslims and Christians.

            Tigre: They cover a large area of the northern, north-eastern and western Eritrea. Their oral literature consists of folklores, legendary war cries, riddles, etc. They are Muslims and Christians.

            Tigrina: Populate the highlands of Eritrea and are mostly farmers. They are mostly Coptic Christians, Catholics and Protestants. A small group of Muslims also form part of the ethnic group.

            Source: Tourism Information Booklet 2013”
            i don’t see Eritrean Arabi on the list. that was my point. However i have always appreciated your interest in enlightening dumb people like me. Thanks!

          • Saleh Johar

            Oh Nitricc,

            Have you come across the description, “Trraz NeTTeq”?

            You read on a page and you have no scholarly findings, experience, or actual life observation and you conclude it that way! That, I am fraid, is lazy dear Nitricc.

            For a started, try to read more about the subject and don’t come with such lame defense of a one-pager. I would have went on with this, to educate it on the matter, but I remembered the Wata, the violinist, whose story I told so many times I dare not repeat it here.

            But you seem to be challenging me that “Arabi” doesn’t exist as an Eritrean name , is that what you are saying? Then all the people named Arabi whom I know are ghosts. You now better Nitricc. …qulu salaman… in such cases, just say, Peace Out.

          • Nitricc

            Hey SG; i guess you missed the point. here is what Hammed Al-Arabi has to say.
            ” Yes, I am an Eritrean Arab and proud of that.” ARE you saying there is an Arab ethnic in Eritrea? come-on SG.

          • Saleh Johar

            Nitricc,
            Maybe he is! Would you be surprised if he told you he is an Oromo Eritrean, or a Tigraway Eritrean, or an Amhara Eritrean, or an American Eritrean? I don’t think so, you jumped because he said he is an Arab. Right?

            All right. I am not an Arab, but if you provoked me with similar question, I might wear our Forum Commander’s hat and reply: yes I am, what are you going to do about it. Leave people to cling to whatever they feel is their identity and live with it. No one has the right to prescribe tribal, racial, or ethnic identity to anyone.

          • Nitricc
          • Saleh Johar

            Dear Nitricc,
            Don’t be. I will always be around to offer my advise hoping you take it from your older brother.

            I like your candid stature. You don’t shy away from admitting you don’t know about something when you don’t. However, on some common sense issues, you throw that noble trait and sound so sure about your views even when the entire world believes otherwise. That is on established objective matters, not subjective ones.

            For example, the right of a human being is sacrosanct–everything from universal norms, to established protocols, religion (I know your views on that, just pass it) and common knowledge traditional and cultural norms consider it so. Above all, human decency requires we believe in that, the least accepted reason. Don’t waver when you are addressing rights of people; it is always nice to remember your authority over equal citizens, or human beings, when it comes to personal freedoms. Another example, a criminal has no right. Anyone who denies others their rights and freedoms is a criminal, by any measurement, except on partisan cheering requirements. Therefore, as a citizen and as a person enjoying all that freedom has to offer, you should not defend the rights of a criminal even in passing. You are not a judge but a conscious human being. As such, it is implied that you support rule of law and there is no need to assert that every time you comment. Criminals should be behind bars. The PFDJ is a criminal entity, and as such, we deal with it as a criminal entity because simply human decency and conscience requires it.

            It’s the small things (actually big things consciously and morally speaking) like that which make people grow or become tiny in our minds.

            I am done preaching before you get bored.

            Saleh

          • Hameed Al-Arabi

            Greetings Nitricc,

            The great majority of Eritreans are Arabs including highlanders. Tigre, Bilein, Saho, Asawirta, Jeberti, Afar, Hidarab, Nara, Tigrinia, Rashaida tribe are all Arabs. In the Arab world there are Muslims, Christians and Jewish. Your uncle, Isaias, divided Eritrea according to their languages. He named Tigre speakers tribes as Tigre, Saho speakers as Saho, Belein as Belein, to the end of the list, but when he came to Rashaida who speak Arabic language his watch stopped, confusion befell upon him and forced to drop language and sublimate a tribe to an ethnic group. I think you have acknowledged yourself in your comment above they are from “Rashaida: Most recent tribe to come to Eritrea from the Arabian Peninsula.” The works of your uncle is wonderful. Now I implore you to intercede to your uncle to sublimate my tribe to an Ethnic group, such as Habab ethnic group, Mansa’a ethnic group, Bin Amir ethnic group, Assawirta ethnic group, Jebertah ethnic group, etc. Our tribes are bigger than Rashaidah tribe, we deserve to be promoted to an ethnic group. Your uncle is allergic to the word Arabic, hahahahah.

          • Berhe Y

            Hi Nitricc,

            I don’t think you understood the post. I didn’t make up, based on this leak many governments around the world are going around collecting tax for the hidden money abroad and it’s real.

            How is it possible for a single Eritrean to have 695 Million dollars stashed in Swiss bank account.

            To me, it can only be the president. here is how he did it.

            Nevsun ships the concentrate (not the final product) out of Bisha in sealed containers to Massawa and it’s shipped around the world smelters. The final product (Gold, Copper etc) is sold in the open market.

            From the sale of these products, what ever portion belongs to the Eritrea is deposited into bank accounts in Swiss.

            Nothing is transferred to the Eritrean banks, to the Eritrean finance. ZERO. When Bisha asked to provide evidence that the Gold money is being transferred to Eritrea, it couldn’t.

            Berhe

          • saay7

            Hey Nitriccay:

            Top of the food chain, that’s what’s up:)

            1. It is easier to say “opposition” than “so-called opposition.” Man, if I can call that thing in Asmara a “government”, you should be able to call the opposition an opposition. Opposition is a normal, natural phenomenon: as SGJ wrote 15 years ago, even God has opposition: atheists, agnostics, etc.

            2. I take it the “government” of Eritrea is represented by its Foreign Minister? In most countries of the world with normal governments, the Foreign Minister is in the Top 3 of power hierarchy. Unless you are saying only Yemane Gebreab is the government, there was nothing stopping Osman Saleh from holding his “public seminar” in DC. Basically, the embassy cancelled the meeting; all we did is say, this Yemane Gebreab guy (Numero 7 per Obama), is not allowed to travel in the US, except New York on UN business.

            3. Awate foundation and dozens of Eritreans Americans, maybe hundreds, excercised their right as American citizens to hold their American government accountable to its own laws. That is what happens in countries with rule of law: you can’t selectively enforce your laws.

            4. The only one who denied you the “right” to listen to your government (your right to hear the same lies they have been telling you for over a dozen years) is the Eritrean Embassy in the US. Now, since you hate toothlessness, I recommend you call the Eritrean embassy and say, “hey, why did you cancel the meeting?” Remember, the US does not have Osman Saleh on any of its lists. The Canadians do but the Canadians, we both agree, are, um, unusual:) Don’t you have the right to hear that interesting response as well? 🙂

            saay

          • Nitricc

            Hey SAAY: okay let me say this quick….
            1) I would have referred them as simply Eritrean oppositions and it would have been much easier but I don’t really believe there any. And it is a little unfair to compare the government of Eritrea with the toothless oppositions. At least they kept the country relatively in peace while the region is about to set on fire. There is no question there are serious shortcomings about the government of Eritrea but to compare it with Eritrean opposition? Simply is miscarriage of justice.
            2) Well I have no knowledge of it, so, I accept your reasoning and your response.
            3) Well if that is the case and we can’t selectively enforce the laws; why is it then there no opposition or Awate foundation who calls for the rule of law to be enforced between Eritrea and Ethiopia? Why is it then no one is calling for the US to respect what they sign for? SAAY, do we really need to talk about selectivity? I don’t think so!

            4) Well, even better; let the people hear the lies and the more they will turn to opposition. i.e. it was a great opportunity for opposition. don’t you agree? the more the lies the better for the opposition. Although; say what you want but PFJD and PIA are not dummy. They are very much know when lies approache the limit; all they have to do is look to south of them. So I really believe this time around will do things differently. If anything they know time is not on their side. I really wanted to hear what they have to say but our brilliant and far sighted oppositions ruined it for me. Regarding the Eritrean embassy, well, I let Semere Andom call them.:-)

          • saay7

            Hey Nitrikay:

            I think virtually everything u have written is “GlbTish” and “Halewlew”. (Mahmouday will translate)

            1. The Eritrean opposition is an opposition because the dictionary says so. Adding a “so-called” prefix just shows the PFDJ obsession with monopoly: it even wants to define what opposition means:

            2. Thanks.

            3. The two Eritrean opposition members who testified in front of congress, the ones you called all sorts of names, did exactly that in their oral and written testimony. It’s on videotape and on this website so this is more Halewlew from you.

            4. Since you are quick to call everyone toothless, it shouldn’t be Semere but you who should call the Eritrean embassy in DC and ask “hey, why did you cancel the seminar? Is Osman Saleh, the Eritrean foreigner minister, incapable of speaking without his chaperone, Yemanr?” After all, you are the one who is all angry that the meeting was cancelled. I would appreciate you sharing your answers with us.

            Saay

          • Nitricc

            Hey SAAY: well if that was what is nonsense to you, it is what it is, you feel that way and I have no control over it but to respect while resenting it. But it worries me to no end if you think the two so-called witnesses did any service to the collective Eritrean case in the hearing. While I leave the definition of WITNESS to you, I doubt any fair minded and a just person qualify those people as witnesses. The one so-called priest was born and raised in Ethiopia and somehow he is qualified star witness while the other who left his country when he was 18 and only once 16 years ago was the last times he was in Eritrea. Again you can define it the way you want but it does not hold water in a fair and a just person.
            If you have listened to Beshir; his final comment was all it came down to. He said “even if the borders are demarcated and the problems with Ethiopia is settled; Isaias Aforki will find other excuse to stay in power” translation; don’t bother demarcating the border and settling the dispute with Ethiopia; instead; get rid of the Eritrean leader like you did in Libya. That is what he was advocating not the other way around and the way you have us to believe. So, please let’s call it for what it was a joke and an insult to sane people.
            No one even knows why and how those two people were selected to be the witnesses and are qualified to speak on Eritreans behalf. Who are they? Please don’t tell me opposition;
            an opposition may oppose to the government in power but it can’t oppose to what is the best interest of the people and the country.
            And finally I am not angry nor I give a flying hoot the meeting is canceled but what I am saying is who gave the right for awate-foundation to deny the people of Eritrea in Diaspora to listen to what their government have to say. It doesn’t matter if one is activist or an opposition; no one have the right to take the right of the other. No but no ifs. I hope you get my drift.

    • Amanuel

      Hi Michael Tesfamariam
      I don’t think it is wise to insult the whole community out there.

  • Dear all,

    Another government in the region is also suffering from old age and incompetence, and on the way to become irrelevant.

    The unfortunate event that took place in Ethiopia in which more than 50 people died due to stampede, caused by unprofessional dummies (security forces), is really heartbreaking. They used tear gas, live and plastic bullets to terrorize the people, which ended up in this tragedy. The TPLF/EPRDF government brought the usual suspects to the forefront, G7 and OLF, to cast away any responsibility from itself. Moreover, it declared three days of mourning; the very least it could do.

    Has anyone been to the place? If so, there were narrow roads that took you to the lake from the cliff edge, which is 50-100 meters deep, if not more. Just imagine hundreds of thousands of people trying to fit into this narrow space. On top of this, when people are terrorized by sounds of tear gas and bullets, one can imagine what the unfortunate outcome could look like; people trampled upon, falling into ditches and pushed in to the lake and get drowned. It is said that people were showing the x sign, some are said to have brought out OLF flags and bottles and stones were thrown against the security forces; nevertheless, it is not reason enough for them to act unprofessionally.

    Even in Mecca, hundreds and even thousands die from stampede every year, when there are too many people packed like sardines in a small place. Add to this tear gas and bullets, it is the worst combination.

    This shows that the safety of the people was not important to the TPLF/EPRDF government, but only how to curb any political dissent that may manifest itself. This government has become bankrupt. Time is running against the TPLF/EPRDF government, and it does not seem to be aware of it. There is no way it can absolve itself from the responsibility for these deaths. This government should have taken measures towards democracy, the rule of law, transparency and accountability a long time ago, unless its aim is to make itself irrelevant in Ethiopian politics.

    • MS

      Dear Horizon
      Call it TPLF or EPRDF, it is also the same. Had Gual Aden listened to my suggestion that the government needed to come up with a genuine solution, the situation would have long been de-escalated. This is a minority government that has lived shrouded by pretentious garments- constitutionalism, federalism…and many more -isms- for the last 25 years. Now it’s greedy and predatory nature has caught up with it. You can’t shoot yourself out of the mess. Promise nationalism is on the rise. That’s going to be the arrow that will decide the fate of the nation. What’s interesting is that Ethiopians have really showed the world who unified they stand. Despite the ruling clique’s attempts to characterising the uprising as targeting Tigress, Ethiopians are united against the system and not against any particular ethnic group. I have once said the Rubicon had already been crossed. Whether it is through peaceful or violent means (a matter that will depend on how the regime proceeds), TPLF’s opportunistic and predatory policies are naked to the bone. It’s circus will not be granted a renewal of a license to bleed Ethiopians. Get this: Up to this point TPLF has ruled at the expense of Eritrea. Today Ethiopians and Eritreans are getting more closer to each other than ever before. I wish Eritreans and Africans at large, learned from the coordinations Ethiopians are doing. I’m so optimistic that these two brotherly peoples will enjoy the same relations Eritreans have with their brotherly people of Sudan, a normalized situation.

      • Dear MS,

        Unfortunately, the more innocent blood the TPLF/EPRDF government spills, the less the chance a peaceful resolution of the political quagmire will exist. The government is working against its legitimacy and the possibility of being part of the solution. OPDO and ANDM have already become irrelevant as much as both ethnicities they represent are concerned. Ethiopians have become self-assertive and fearless. Nevertheless, the ruling elites do not seem capable of reading the signs.

        HS used to say that the sun will stop shining if he is deposed; the Derg also said that there will be no Ethiopia if it is gone; and now TPLF is scaremongering the Ethiopian people with the Rwanda-like genocide, as if it is not going to affect it. When they introduced ethnicity and religion to the Ethiopian ID card, purposely or unknowingly, most probably the first, they were distributing a death certificate to every Ethiopian, if a widespread uprising that gets out of control takes place, and ethnicities turn against ethnicities. It is said that genocide could occur in Rwanda within only a 100 days, because Rwandans had their ethnicity mentioned on their ID card. This made easy the mass murder of Tutsis. Therefore, when tplf officials use genocide to intimidate others, it shows their irresponsibility and their immaturity.

        Ethnic hegemony has failed in the past and it will fail again; no doubt about it. Unless TPLF/Woyane mends its ways and becomes an equal partner with all ethnic groups, and presents itself as part of the solution and not the problem, things are going to get ugly for everybody. Nobody is immune to the Armageddon that might follow. Therefore, every Ethiopian and political party should work for a peaceful resolution of the political problems. Ethiopian elites should not be allowed to mislead their ethnic groups for their own ulterior motives.

      • Hameed Al-Arabi

        Greetings Mahmud Saleh,

        The comment above is an example of clear diversion from the Eritrean people cause. He always likes to discuss about Ethiopia and issues that don’t concern Eritreans. This is the mission appointed to from his uncle. He feigns to be as a representative of peace and human rights advocate while in fact he is the enemy of both. The militias in Asmara and their leader are a source of unrest in the region.

    • Peace!

      Dear Horizon,

      It is really hard to even make an accurate diagnostic if the ongoing chaotic situation is a result of failed federalism system or, as many say, TPLF/EPRDF is grossly abusing the system to maintain control of the country. Sadly enough the government has ignored potential warning signs that might have contributed to the ongoing death and distraction, including arresting journalists unders false terrorism pretext, interfering in religion and torturing Muslim scholars, and shoving the demands of Oromo and Amhara. However, once the people figured out whether the system or the governing body to blame for taking the country off truck, then it won’t be that difficult to have the situation turned arround where it belongs for peace and prosperity.

      Peace!

      • Dear Peace,

        The days when tplf felt invincible, soon after it came to power, we remember what PMMZ said; if you want power, go to the bushes like us and fight for it, which is equivalent to saying power comes out of the barrel of a gun and not the ballot box. It seems that there are some tplf members who still believe that whoever has the gun, has political power too, and is not forced to share it.
        In my opinion, tplf must still be among the powers who should work to bring peaceful change in Ethiopia, unless it believes that it is Ethiopian only if power remains wholly in its hands.
        If TPLF wanted the system to function normally it could have achieved it. At the center of its world view, power and staying in power is the central thing. That is why it ended up standing alone against all.

        • MS

          Selam Peace and Horizon
          I think Ethiopians are in a better place in terms of diverting the energy towards a better result.
          1. There is organizational structures with known political organizations representing almost each of the major ethnic groups.
          2. There is enough of intellectual and leadership consensus as to what the main problem is and how to overcome it, and turn the situation the problem has created into a positive experience. Most organizations are calling for a national dialogue. I mean, very few lucky countries get this chance- calling for dialogue and peaceful resolution- when modern army is ordered to quash popular uprising.
          3. I really appreciate how Ethiopians have handled the situation so far despite the atrocities; they are still united, they are still showing off that famous sign of crossed the upheld crossed wrists.
          4. Wayane missed so many opportune chances before it spilt the blood of innocent Ethiopians.
          a/ It should have heard the Tigrean people who had revolted against it and condemned its inept and corrupt administration after the latest congress of the TPLF.
          b/ It should have paused and examined the identity questions of many minority groups, instead it chose gun to peaceful dialogue, hence you have the Kuamnt, welkait….Gondar uprisings
          c/ before those uprising the regime had the experience of Addis Ababa’s land-grabbing “Master Plan” which stoked the fire of the sleeping giant (Oromia)
          d/ For years national and international agencies have been complaining of the notorious “Terrorism Law” which made it easy for the government to label peaceful political leaders, activists, bloggers, human right watchers, etc., as G7, Shaebia, OLF….and have the parliament controlled 100% by lackey parties of the ruling junta and its tentacles…
          e/ it had a chance to listen to advices that came by way of some of the founders of TPLF who basically called for a reformation of Ethiopian politics, introducing real democracy
          It missed many more chances because Ethiopia is nothing to TPLF unless it’s subjugating it 100%; it has a plan B of the Republic of Tigray. TPLF is democrat only when addressing Amharic speaking audience; it’s Ethiopian only when it’s ruling Ethiopia. I’m so proud of Ethiopians for their organization, defiance and unity. Despite all these mayhem, Ethiopians are still able to differentiate between TPLF and the Tigrean people. That’s something Ethiopians need to be proud of.
          May peace get a chance in that part of the world.

          • Amanuel Hidrat

            Dear Mahmuday,

            Can you make the same arguments (not exact but similar arguments) against PFDJ regime, the regime that suffocated the life of our dear people? I haven ‘t seen you making any argument against the totalitarian regime of ours.

            Regards
            Amanuel Hidrat

          • Peace!

            Selam MS,

            Well, regrettably things are now approaching to a point where perhaps plan B seems the next try or face the reality and share the power with the rest of Ethiopian people otherwise It looks like TPLF is building a really bad legacy which is not good for its own ethnic group. The way to go forward is, given demonopolizing the economy, army, judiciary, and legislative is not going to be easy for TPLF to swallow, all concerned Ethiopians from all ethnic groups must unite and form a united transitional government to save the country from further deterioration and the region in general.

            Peace!

          • MS

            Selam Peace
            I think some retired and active top TPLF cadres understand how grave the situation is. The problem is that they have no power. PMMZ was able to balance the tug of interests of the top echelon in the civil administration against the powerful Generals in the military. The top positions of the military and the intelligence are manned almost 100% by folks who hail from the Tigray region, a 5-6% of the Ethiopian people. Now, this has come to haunt PMHD, a TPLF associated cadre but who lacks the experience and the sense of entitlement that comes with having been a member of the TPLF and its Dedebit Experience. PMHD was reported to have been frustrated with those top TPLF officials. However, as the situation gets worse, the top Generals will try to amass power under “Emergency Measures to save the State”. That is what they have been doing. The more unrest becomes the order of the day the more powerful they become. Soon, all the gimmicks of “rule of law” erode, and they reach a point where they have practically overthrown the “elected government”. At this point TPLF knows that any peaceful dialogue will result in stripping it off from its power and prestige. Generals “think” in terms of battle field formations; they will believe and behave that they will settle it through brute force; they lack patience for the farsightedness and sober assessment that politicians are known for; they don’t believe in compromise; it’s a zero-sum game world with Generals, and the only means they know is bulldozing the nation to rubble by their tanks. It’s the visionary politicians who prioritize dialogue to force, and unfortunately, most of those politicians are either in prisons, retired or are made to live in exile leaving PMHD to face the powerful army Generals of TPLF he has put in place while under the careful tutelage of the late PMMZ. The good thing is the opposition is much more organized and coordinated. Just last week a friend of mine said Ethiopians in my hometown had fund-raised about $50,000 for the democratic efforts inside the nation. You see a much more coordinated agendas, leadership and media efforts among the Ethiopian opposition inside the country and those in Diaspora. That will tilt the balance and hopefully lead to a soft transitioning by giving leverage to the moderates and truly patriot Ethiopians within the ruling junta.

    • Amde

      Horizon,

      Estimates are the number of dead Oromo youth killed by the government forces since protests ignited last year is about 700. In just about a year.

      OFC just issued an estimate that the number of confirmed dead from the Irrechaa are as of today about 675. In a day.

      Watching endless pictures of dead youth – groomed, made up and dressed in their finest – is heart wrenching. It was supposed to be a day of celebration.

      EPRDF as any kind of legitimate entity is finished in Oromia.

      Amde

  • Peace!

    Dear all,

    A great victory indeed, thank you for the hard work. A free and democratic country should not serve as a backyard for dictators and their worshippers to deceive and collect money.

    Peace!

  • tes

    Good News Gedab News!

    This is an action that we were looking for such long time. It is really fantastic. Great job and thank you for following up the acts of these criminals.

    I hope the UN Human Rights rule for the criminals will take in to effect sooner.

    I thank you again

    tes

    • Hameed Al-Arabi

      Good job Gedab news and Eritrean activists, this is the beginning of the end.

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