Inform, Inspire, Embolden. Reconcile!

US Ambassador: Eritrea Arrested 48 of Our Staff

Between 2001 and 2010, Eritrea arrested 48 Eritrean employees of the US embassy in Eritrea, according to former US ambassador to Eritrea, Ronald McMullen.

In an interview with Global Journalist on August 6,  Ambassador McMullen, who appeared on the show with representatives of Human Rights Watch (HRW) and Committee to Protect Journalists (CPJ),  disclosed “Forty eight of our Eritrean employees have been arrested from 2001 to 2010. Some have been arrested for many years; others were arrested for several weeks or months and kept in horrible conditions.”

Mr. Ronald McMullen served as ambassador from 2007-2010.

The ambassador went on to shed light on why the United States and Eritrea no longer have relationship at the ambassador level:

“It is very tough,” he explained, “Everyday was a challenge and we looked for small victories and in keeping the embassy open, and maintaining a platform for American values talking about human rights and democratization, and trying to promote regional stability in a very volatile part of the world.”

The ambassador said that his office had to give a 10-day notice to Eritrean officials to get a permit to leave the capital city, Asmara, and that of his 65 requests, only 14 were approved.

While using glowing terms to describe Asmara and the people of Eritrea, Ambassador McMullen said that the country “is very, very, repressed and the government of President Isaias [Afwerki] is highly centralized and very authoritarian and attempts to control all aspects of life.”

In Eritrea, diplomats are also prevented from having access to the local population. Ambassador McMullen explained, “For example, at one point, we were having a public lecture series in an auditorium; the Ministry of Communication prohibited us from having one evening’s lecture, actually physically locked.. chained the gates shut on the auditorium.”

Asked by the host, what the lecture was about, Ambassador McMullen said  “it was about anthropology, and how Eritrea had been the bridge for early homo sapiens to go from Africa across the Red Sea…”

The government of Isaias Afwerki tried  “to get the names of all the 150 Eritreans who were attending this lecture. They roughed up one of my junior officers, an American foreign services officer. In the end, we moved this lecture into the patio of the embassy and continued. But the Ministry of Communications didn’t want 150 Eritreans to listen to this lecture.”

“… we had a lot of Eritreans who were willing to talk with us, ministers of the government came to my house for dinner; we had regular discussions with the president’s political and economic advisers. We had relatively good access, but bad relations. I mean they closed down the defense attaché’s office; the peace corps has been closed, USAid kicked out, they seized diplomatic pouches in contravention of the Vienna convention. So it is really a tough place to be an American diplomat.”

In June 26, 2001, Gedab News contacted the Public Relations Officer at the American Embassy in Asmara, Ms. Colette Christian
, who dismissed the reports saying, “there has been no problem between USAid and the government since 1996.”

In 2001, the Eritrean Government detained two employees of the American embassy. Relations between the Eritrean government and the USA has been bumpy since the government of Isaias Afwerki arrested Mr Ali Alamin and Mr Kiflom Gebremichael. The two have not been officially charged with any crimes but they were rumored to have translated for the embassy the documents of Eritrean opposition groups.

In the same year, the government arrested Mr Fitwi Gezae, who was the webmaster of the US embassy in Eritrea and Mr Biniam Girmay, who was its Facility Management Assistant, were detained by Eritrean security officials.

Amassador McMullen is now a visiting professor at the University of Iowa.

Each year, the US Department of State provides country reports and while its annual reports on Eritrea have always been negative, the ambassador is the first official to disclose that as many as forty eight Eritrean employees of the US embassy have been arrested and the case of only two embassy employees, Ali Alamin and Kiflom Gebremichael, had always been presented as an obstacle to normalizing relationship between the two countries.

Here is the audio of the interview:

Pinterest
  • Michaelinlondon1234

    US ambassador….looked for small victories and in keeping the embassy open, and maintaining a platform to invade and take over the government of Eritrea….Nothing democratic to your imperialism.
    I have seen the devious ways you slaughter your way in to countries…A good example is Somalia.
    There is just nothing good I can say about the USA.
    By the way…The USA does arrest spies……Years of torture and abuse if they catch you. Some of the most sadistic evil people I know.

  • Ahmed Idris

    The relationship with America would have improved as the regime is trying. .but the trouble is the president of Eritrea is so unsecured and paranoid. .

  • አዲስ

    Hi Fanti,

    Your argument is like “chika wust yemetenbocharek tija” 🙂 adds nothing just a whole lot of distraction. I don’t make assumptions about you. You are the one who is doing that. You talk about how one can be “true Ethiopian”, you talk about we tigreans as if I am standing against tigreans. You talk about showing me how tigreans feel as if I need a blind EPRDF supporter to tell me what my country men are going through. You talk about how tigreans are constantly threatened hence the legitimacy of the name Tigray Libration …The dishonest way you approached everything doesn’t encourage me to discuss the ethnic relation in our country cause obviously that’s what you want to discuss about specifcaly how tigreans are badly treated. And one of the reason why I am so worried about Tigrean people’s relation with the rest of the country is people like you who pretend to advocate for Tigreans but equate what it means to the interests of TPLF. So again I am not engaging about it with you for the reasons I mentioned above.

    Finally you said “if you reply with anything other than ‘thank you’ I am simply changing the name…” now that’s straight from EPRDF book. You want me to say thank you and accept what you saying otherwise…. It’s just silly really. “Wey mealti” !!!

    Anyway I am tired of this back and forth with you for nothing, so shall we put it to rest?

    Thanks,
    Addis

    • Fanti Ghana

      Hello Addis,
      Agreed!

  • አዲስ

    Hi House of Stark,

    That’s a tall order. But to be clear, what are the language and cultural issues in Ethiopia that you think need to be solved?

    Thanks,
    Addis

  • saay7

    Hey House of Stark:

    I believe your recollection is wrong because AHbash were never an issue in Eritrea. I had never even heard of them until the Ethiopian government imported them from Lebanon.

    You are also mistaken if you think I am advocating wahabism (they like to call themselves Salafists) and in fact one of my favorite pastimes is making fun of their obsession with rituals and their race to call anyone who deviates minutely from their dogma a “kaffer.”

    So you are wrong on both ends:) The issue here is when something terrible happened in Ethiopia in March 2011, the ideologues of EPRDF borrowed a phrase once used by Obamas chief of staff (“Never let a crisis go to waste”) miscalculated, overreached and figured this is our chance to arrest wahabi extremism once and for all. The Saudis wahabbization campaign took a generation and billions of dollars. EPRDF was trying to reverse that on the cheap.

    In short, the cure was worse than the illness. I am counting on Abi to give u a perfect Amharic proverb for that.

    saay

  • Nitricc

    Hi Abi your saying out dated. what is wrong with ice-coffee? so, instead of using coffee, use French-fries. what is cooled French-fries?

    • Abi

      Hi Nitricc
      What is ice coffee?
      If it is not hot, it is not coffee. Coffee should be hot, black, no sugar.
      You keep your woman and your coffee hot. Don’t you ever get them cold.
      Nitricc, I don’t know what cooled French fries is. please tell me.
      I’ll tell you how to keep a woman hot.

      • Dear Abi,
        And if you add to the above, a fast car and your beer always cold, be sure, any guy with all these blessings will be the talk of the town.

        • Abi

          Hi Horizon
          That applies to only us, Ethiopians. If you are from Eritrea and know how to cook the most traditional food using spaghetti and macaroni, you are the one. Have you tried humbuchbuch ? Ask Saay. He is the expert in that particular traditional food. He has a documentary sponsored by national geography showing his skill in cooking humbuchbuch.
          You and me , let’s keep our women hot , our beer cold, stay in the passing lane.
          Let Saay and Nitricc keep their coffee cold, their beer hot and ride their cuccineta on godana harnet. If you ask what happened to their women? They ditched them and came to us. Losers!

          • Dear Abi,

            This is the first time I ever heard of Hbuchbuch. Here is an Eritrean guy who gives us a detailed description of how to prepare Hbuchbuch. He also tells us of the medical values of white onion. The only problem is that he forgot to add berbere to the Hbuchbuch, and I do not know how much that has affected the final result.

            I do not think that it is a bad idea if we Ethiopians also adopt Hbuchbuch, because it looks nutritious and most probably tasty.

            https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VrzFtVcF1Ro

          • Abi

            Hi Horizon
            The reason you never heard of hubuchbuch is because it is Italian. Hibuchbuchi is its Tigrigna equivalent. Buchriqriq is in Amharic.

          • Kim Hanna

            Selam Horizon,
            .
            I saw this video posted by SAAY a couple of years ago. He just did it again somewhere, here. I still talk about it to friends. To me the punch line was he forgot the berbere.
            I started laughing when he started to put things in for taste. Now, I know where is located.
            .
            K.H

  • Fanti Ghana

    Hello Princess (I almost touched the ground with my forehead),

    I know. He spoiled it for both of us. I was waiting for mine or Abi’s eminent distraction.

    PS:
    I had to post here, because It would be ‘ungentlemanly’ to get between you and the Rose.

    Still on 17th. It is just ‘khonei menei’ now that the Lion is back.

  • Fanti Ghana

    Hello ወቸጉድ,
    Unless you missed my point about Teddy, it in fact makes a perfect sense. He is too shallow for me grasp.

    Just for the record; I did not claim I like or I love anyone. There are many people I don’t like (it was tempting to add especially the Am.., but I can’t do that to Abi).

  • Rahwa T

    Dear Dr Fanti,

    አንቢበዮ ደብዳቤኻ,

    Thank you very much for the personal letter. Very interesting reply with great lessons to take. I like it very much. What a character! I wish I had some of your behavior and join your camp, it is not as simple as saying ሓዲኣ’ላ ሎሚ. It is too late to change my character; hopefully I will crawl few inches towards you. So you better stay where you belong. I can see you would make a good ሓኪም፥ a nice husband and father and the best leader but not fit enough to PM as you are so kind. After reading, I tried to remember friends and colleagues and contemplate their behavior and most were very humble, sociable and kind. I never remember any of them for their odd character. So ከውሃው ነው ማለት ነው። I never heard about the short term memory loss and nor do I remember meeting a person with that sign of illness. I wonder if you had prior knowledge of this illness before you met the guy. I believe you have eased this gentleman’s life afterwards by telling other people and adding few more friends to him.

    I began with Yemane Barya, and finish with Helen Meles ::

    ንበር !

    • Abi

      Rahwa sistu
      You crawling towards Fanti and you want him to stay put? You don’t know who you dealing with. He will pull your legs very soon.
      Anget defi ager aTfi.

      • Rahwa T

        Hi Abi,

        I am short-tempered. Imagine how I would have been delighted, have I had a grain of his qualities. That is what I mean. Otherwise, my stand on the importation of an alien language to my land is still intact. ግመል አንገቷን በደሳሳ ጎጆ በር ካስገባች አስበው።

        • Abi

          Rahwa sistu
          I see you are short tempered. I also see you are short in the joke department. try again and get back to me. I bet you Fanti is laughing at you. Is your last name Hidrat?

          • Fanti Ghana

            Hello Again,
            That was funny, I was about to reply to Rahwa while I was laughing, and you were writing ‘Fanti is laughing.’ That was amazing coincidence.

          • Amanuel Hidrat

            Dear Abi,

            Is that your way of provoking? Since I wrote about the Never-land children, everything my take and my engagement is different. I left you alone when you guys are in the humor world. By the way I mailed you the Geeze micro soft and you might get it in two to three days.

            regards,
            Amanuel Hidrat

          • Abi

            Ato Amanuel
            If you send it using my old address it will come back to you as ” return to sender ” . My new address is 1600 Pennsylvania AV , Washington,DC.
            Send it overnight. I don’t accept slug Mail .

            Mahmud, Rahwa, Fanti
            I love you all.

          • Kokhob Selam

            Dear Abi,

            Abo, ለምን ኣስቀየምከኝ?

          • Abi

            Kokobe
            Telatih, kifu asabih, yemaybejih yiqeyem.
            What did I do wrong?

          • Kokhob Selam

            Abo,

            ጥፋትክን ኣለማወቅህ ይብልጥ ኣናደደኝ :: ተበሳጨሁኝ በቃ!!! ስለምወድህ እኮ ነው ::
            ተው ተው ኣረ ተው የኣማርኛን ፊደል ተጠቀም !

          • Abi

            Kokobe
            Ahun gena gebagn. Neger beselstu new yemigebagn.

          • Rahwa T

            አቢ
            ሰምና ወርቅ ሆኖኛል ጨዋታህ ልጄ። ፋንቲ የሳቀበት ምክንያት አልገባኝም ። እስኪ ባገርኛው ንገረኝና ልሞክር።

          • Abi

            Rahwa Sistu
            You have to be extremely careful when you deal with Fanti . He is multilingual, multicultural, multiracial, multi citizen, multiplayer etc.
            Min alefash melti new Fanti .

          • Ted

            Hi Abi, If it’s any consolation to Rahwa, even growing up in ቄራ doesn’t help figuring out multifaceted Fanti:-)

          • Abi

            Ted
            Just beautiful!
            You killed him once and for all . It works for both of you . Talk about aTfto meTfat !
            I was kind enough to call him ” melti” .
            For those Amharic challenged melti means shroud.
            Saay, you welcome again.

          • saay7

            Abi.net:

            melti means melt in Tinglish (English as spoken by Tigrinya speakers, preferably asmarinos) who feel compelled to add a vowel, Italian style, to every English word.

            For example: It is April 15! I must pay my taxi!
            Why would you pay your taxi?
            Because it is the law! You know! Taxi!

            For example: I saw this beautiful girlie! And my heart melti!

            Now you and Fanti are struggling with your pick-up skills; you need to learn how to cook. Here’s an Eritrean cooking show (by an Asmarino guy who can’t cook and knows it). Be patient, Abi, he switches to Englishi and explaini thingisi

            https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XvORJvwMXAc

            You are most welcome.

            saay

          • Abi

            Saay
            What do you mean by cooking? Cooking like ” meTbes”?
            I’m good at meTbes ,Fant is good at masarer. He over cooks it. Specially when he cooks intestine he is terrible. Anjet yasariral.
            Thank me!

          • Abi

            Saay
            I watch the documentary. I learned couple of things.
            1)I saw The Great LT in action
            2) spaghetti is eritrean cultural food.
            3) Assab and Massawa are the two biggest ports in the world
            4) LT is genuinely enthusiastic
            5) eat white onion, close hospitals
            6) can I win Hayat ‘s heart if I make her hibuchbuchi ?

            One day I will show LT how to make silsi . A Real eritrean cultural food.
            You owe me 20 minutes.
            Is hibuchbuch Italian word? Can we say hibuchbuchi to make it eritrean?

          • Hayat Adem

            This is so funnnny!

          • Amanuel Hidrat

            Hey Fantina,

            A fearful person never win, even in the irony of the irony situation. Come on Fanti.

            regards,
            Amanuel Hidrat

          • Fanti Ghana

            Hello Saay,
            Alah yerHamek ember intay kinblelu. wey gud, FeraH aysArka!

          • Mahmud Saleh

            Salam abi
            Ebakh be Amanuel atmTabegn. That’s the correct Amargna, OK, ye Gonder aydelem.

      • Fanti Ghana

        Hello Abisha,
        ebakih be Rahwa atmTabign. enedegagef, and we will both be happy.

        • Hayat Adem

          18 and counting…Why does Semere have to say “it was a joke”? Good thing my nighst are reserved for someone special. Our guys should try the magic power of “emebete”:)

    • Fanti Ghana

      Hello Rahwani,

      As I said, you have a good grasp of my personality already. There will be a lot more clues as we go on, and you will eventually have a clear vision of me.

      I did make a good Hakim when I was in the Sudan; many examples to give: some day.

      Me, as a PM? We wouldn’t even last one week. In fact, in most areas any leadership by me is a disaster. I am the manager of my department at work, and half of the staff don’t even know I am their supervisor during the first 6 or so months unless of course, I was present when they get hired.

      By the way, my profession itself is a perfect fit for me, and you will know why when it is time.

      My daughter is one of my best friends mainly because she is a lot like me. I missed most of her childhood, but we understand each other completely, and we never had any sort of disagreement let alone a fight.

      Yes, I was more than familiar with ‘short term memory loss’ before I met him, but his condition is a weird one. By definition, his condition is the ultimate ‘anti’ short term memory loss.’ Once he stores anything meaningful, like a sentence, he would be using all his resources to maintain that information active; discarded everything else.

      PS 1:
      ‘Short/long term memories’ it is psychology 101, and it should be very google-able. It will be worth your time.

      PS 2:
      Addressing your response to Abi below: I am great with short-tempered souls! It is a proven fact.

      • Rahwa T

        Dear Fanti,

        I have been following you since your arrival at Awate with that funny name. I thought you were Kunama. I have read all most all of your posts.

        So the “short/long memories” are in Psych. 101? I will google and read about it. I never took that course. I took Developmental Psychology. But I never remember that phrase. Thank you.

  • AMAN

    Dear Awates
    I want to send this short radio message to you today
    at 07:43:01:59
    We are in full control of the skies and the Air war !
    All woyane are off the Air and nowhere to be seen
    because they know they will be shot down by us
    immediately.
    So it looks like they already know and have accepted
    the fact that they are no match to us. All those we have
    been given basic training and lessons by us are made
    to be dysfunctional and off the air.
    So our Air force is in full control of the Air and Skies
    after it made the woyane Airforce dysfunctional and
    off the Air.

    • Kim Hanna

      Selam AMAN,
      .
      WAKE UP, AMAN, WAKE UP…. I think you are having a wet dream. Wake up, oh my God.
      .
      K.H

  • Ted

    Hi, Tedi,
    To be fair to the “PFDJ supporters”(“went to Geneva and support the regime”) let’s start from “the supporters” point of view. Right after liberation, Eritreans unanimously voted for independence. This was accepted by all groups including most ELF veterans. The only political opposition we had in diaspora were ELF groups demanding their rightful place in Eritrean politics. that is understandable. You “I knew” knew the thinking of PFDJ since 1992. Do you care to elaborate PLEASE. That aside, the opposition multiplied right after Ethio-Eritrea war. They came in different shapes and forms: unionist, separatist, human right activist, jihadist, justice seekers…… It became a race to the top/bottom, you can take it as you like. Most of them went for help to Ethiopia and others prefer UN/US/EU. They all encircled PFDJ like a wounded animal in a wild. What you see the “injustice movement”[plural] now is the extension of those opposition created right after the war plus a few new ones. Many bridges have been broken among Eritrea how about bring changes and to make it short, we are looking for a fixer to mend those bridges. The right place to start is your question, WHY? i will no go witch hunting for answers, the reason they(most)” support” PFDJ is not about money or power but about protecting Eritrea. They could be wrong but it is what it is. Here in awate, some call them plain “heartless”, i find it not be helpful. In retrospect, there is a fine line can help us understand each other if we try harder; the fact that, we can say PFDJ is bad but they can’t say PFDJ is all good. It all comes to, if we can go for a win-win; to all fight for justice and a rule of law. If you have a fix for our problem, my ears are all yours. For now “Weed out” PFDJ is reserved only for Ethiopia and UN?US?EU?;-(

  • Abraham Hanibal

    Dear citizen;

    Sorry if I’ve misunderstood your formulation “as if Muslim Eritrea and/or Arab countries trying to influence Ethiopia”. But still would it be fair to come up with such a generalization towards the Muslim-section of Eritrea based on the comments of one person, Semere A.? Why would Eritrean muslims wish to influence or “arabize” Ethiopia? Weren’t they (the Eritrean muslims) the ones who initiated the struggle for independence of Eritrea from Ethiopia? And where does this bogus assumption of Eritrean muslims think of themselves as arabs come from, when we know the reality is they’ve their own languages cultures and traditions?

    Regarding Arabic as one of the official languages in Eritrea, I think it follows out of the fact that the non-tigringa speakers in Eritrea are mostly muslims, and hence Arabic is a common denomiator among this section of our society. It is impractical, and uneconomical to offer all languages the official status. Remmembering most of our neighbor countries have Arabic as their offical language, plus the fact that Arabic is the third most widely used official language in the world supports Arabic as one of the officiial languages in Eritrea. But this doesn’t mean other languages do not have the right to exist. Anyone should have the possibility of learning primary or even middle school in their mother tongue. People should not be forced to relinquish their mother tongue for the sake of other dominant languages.

  • Saleh Johar

    Hi Citizen,
    Your argument is tired, not original. You say “explain to me why?” As if you truly want an explanation. It has been answered a million times but you do not want to know. What to do?…as the Indians would say, what to do mr citizen who doesn’t know the choiceof citizens. Awqo tetegna our southern neighbors say, Abi can finish the rest for you… Please do not call me Amhara won be for that 🙂 but you wouldn’t. That is reserved for another language.

  • Tedi

    Hello Eritreans

    KEM SEB NIHSEB

    Isaiase Afewerki is a Tigray origin both his parents are [ his mother from Adwa and [his father from Hwzen] this is quit sure! men!. Currently, the wider population of Eritrea is under extremely difficult situation to get their basic needs such as water, food, energy, medicine and shelter etc but the Mafia’s boss Isaias Afewerki funds our resources (Gold and other revenues of Eritrea) to Ginbot 7 Ethiopian opposition, Alshebab Somalia oppositions and others. Some of the Eritreans they simply support and go after the regime and even they don’t know what they are doing *Sik -elka tiray -MITIKAE; are they a human being or wild animals and it is so difficult to classify them because they are playing a game by the suffering and blooding of their families and relatives as they don’t feel as HUMAN BIENG. What makes me to feel sad is that we all Eritreans know about the reality of the Human Right Report in person in our country what happens to our community (Eritreans) and the report is absolutely true and un deniable but I wander that why the regime supporters went to Geneva and support the regime I can’t understand it. They don’t know the consequences of it, If they supported the regime it does mean that they also involved and participated in all the allegations committed by the regime, therefore those who participated at the strike will be responsible and accountable for all the allegations commuted by the Brutal Regime because they themselves witnessed and agreed by their signatures on Geneva for their guilty.
    Those supporters might get some incentives from the regime but how they can sell “their families and relatives blood and hardships for the sake of an incentive” Eritreans need to aware and think well about their people and where we are heading too. Let me ask some questions: Why the regime involves in different issues with the neighbours like supporting Alshebab and Gibot 7 and destabilising the countries? Where are our natural resources [GOLD] revenues gone? What is the reason our faineance is controlled by one man which is the relative of Isaias
    Afewrki’s – Ato HAGOS KISHA! Time will come because it is an evitable – All those serving for the Mafia Group and its followers will receive their consequences/WAGESwhen the time …
    Finally, believe or not no one will escape from the truth.

    • T..T.

      Dear Tedi,

      According to most Eritreans, no doubt, Isayas is past the question of Eritrawinet. Otherwise, Eritreans should have not claimed that the Eritrean struggle for national independence ended in 1991. Secondly, Eritreans are no more in direct confrontation against un-Eritrean colonialism.

      The hot question of the day is: how was Isayas able to mute and silence all those who oppose him inside Eritrea? Is it because they are experiencing struggle fatigue due to the numerous problems they are facing under the rule of Isayas. I remember during the ELF siege of Asmara with each night attacks, the Asmarinos used to say: non c’e niente da fare, solo beve, beve e dormire. Do you think, the Eritreans are tired of Isayas’s caused countless problems and have gone into deep sleep.

      Anyway, under Isayas’s brutal dictatorship, some are waiting for opportunities to safely flee the country and some are on the business of advancing their interests by putting themselves at the service of the dictator. But for sure, most are waiting for God to come to their rescue.

      It is the Eritrean Diaspora conviction that Isayas has no support of the people and the military. And, he does not have the support of the neighboring countries, Africa and the world. However, he might have hidden support from outside the country, which we are trying to find out. In any case, he is for sure prepared to fight back with all his force even if that results in making Eritrea the second Somalia in the region.

    • Ted

      Hi, Tedi
      ” I wander that why the regime supporters went to Geneva and support the regime I can’t understand it.’
      That is a million dollar question. Clearly you are on brainstorming stage as WHY people do things they do. Please don’t let it go until you get to the bottom of it. It will do you good.

  • Nitricc

    Hi Awatewian

    here is a news that belongs to Sunday. who says honesty is dead.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kxAWB0usSPw

    • Kokhob Selam

      Dear Nitricc,

      That is nice one. I hope PFDJ leadership got a lesson from this young girl. you know what I mean – where are our heroes ?where is Eritrean people gold? ስራቒት ጉጅለ ህግደፍ ብመን እያ ከተሽካዕልል?

    • Kokhob Selam

      Dear Nitricc,

      To whom are PFDJ trying to cheat? are they still cheating their own self? they have stolen every thing my friend. l

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0vLnsY-l1sg

  • eritrea

    KeihKsad, its actually the other way round. You need common sense. You sound like you are a bit sensitive. North Korea, giant prison blah blah…its called psychological war. Unless you are blinded by hatred, you should be able to see clearly what the US is doing in our region. No body said the US has to sort out our border issue, but they should stop interfering in the work of the UN and leave it alone to conclude the war by any means necessary. You said we have to be nice to the ambassador so he could put good words for us. Are you kidding? We are people on our own right and dont need anyone to do us favour.

  • Fanti Ghana

    Hello Pass the salt,
    You know, it is really sad to see ‘presumption of innocence’ getting less and less attention by being replaced with ‘suspicion’ of everything and anything about everything we say and do. We have stopped paying attention to the ‘intent’ of a statement any more; it seems. On this very example, just imagine what the overall message is verses in how many ways it can be interpreted. He advocated for tolerance by using his only experience of some Eritrean Muslim’s demand for Arabic language as a sign of equal acceptance in their land and as a respect for their religion. So, normally it would have been easy to see his assumption of Ethiopians having the same dilemma. In a ‘normal’ atmosphere we could just politely remind Semere that there is no need for it as it would seem in Eritrea, and discus about devising other ways to make our people feel equally represented and that would have been the end of it. But alas! We are all in a tight rope my friend.

  • Peace!

    Dear All,

    I doubt the U.S. has high moral ground to critsize counties while itself is notoriously known for overthrowing democratically elected governments: Haiti, Venezuela, and Hundra are recent examples. It is all about business as usual: The mining companies call the shot.

    What’s more unfair is the U.S. Policy toward Europe and Africa is different and racist. Look what’s happening in our region: the Ethiopian military has been receiving millions of dollars from US just to buy weapons and kill fellow Africans (Al-Shabab lol) and in contrary, the U.S. is actively promoting Unity and economic integration in Europe.

    However, this doesn’t mean the U.S. is responsible for African problems. The responsibility lies primarily on our corrupted leaders and dictators.

    Regards

    • Amanuel

      Hi Peace
      You are stating the obvious, that is, American interest comes first. So what choice do other countries have. To aline their interest with American or pay the price like Cuba and now Eritrea. There fore, until someone somewhere brings change play the game. Don’t be that sacrificed lamb.

      Regards
      Amanuel

  • Senai

    I don’t have a problem when Mr. McMullen is so mean with PFDJ. But in his wikileaks reports he trashed the city of Asmara and the culture of its people, especially when it comes to the traditional beer of the highlanders (s’wa). As far as I am concerned he doesn’t seem to be an honest person. Regardless of the that PFDJ is very envious and cruel and should release all the prisoners who has arrested them without any due process of the law.

    • saay7

      Hi Senai:

      Welcome back. I understand your point: in a few cases (I can think of only two, really: how swa is made and he once ate sheep innards), McMullen’s cables read like a man on a safari trip writing his wife what the natives are up to. But for the most part, I thought his cables well were-written and precise. What am I missing? In fact, in the interview here he goes out of his way to praise Asmara and Eritreans.

      saay

      • Ted

        Hi, Saay, it is more like a diary of a man about his unfaithful wife. We know we are not suppose to read it, now we have: we say,( we understand your pain but it is bit harsh and mean spirited. After all, you could be all wrong about her and, what if…… we know you have still feeling for her. Talk it over please.)

  • Semere Andom

    Eritreans Should Envy the Recent Sentencing of the Muslims Activists in Ethiopia: Verdict vs. Justice
    Hi compatriots:
    Ethiopia boasts about 30 million Muslims, but the country that prides itself of its 3000 year civilization has only managed to showcase mostly its Christian and Amhraa culture, repressing Muslims so much so that the Eritrea Christians were charmed by HS and initially wanted a Union with Ethiopia, before the wrath of their Christian “brothers” made them think twice and shunned Union by overwhelmingly voting for separation or liberation depending from which side of the Merb sand is your glass made of. The Eritrean Muslims partly spooked by the domination by the Christian in the South wanted nothing with the Union, with clarity of the hindsight for the Muslims a Union would have benefited them given the sizeable demography of Muslims in Ethiopia, but that is a different story. Now we have a country Eritrea made up almost of 50% Muslims, who are also the pioneers of Eritrean liberation movement that eventually produced Eritrea.

    The first order of business of the EPL government was to round up Muslims, disappear them, murdered and bury them in mass graves. Back then there was no ISIS, no Al-Quaida, except a good old Jihad, even Jihad was not created equally, and many Islamic Jihad supporters I knew only wanted to protect their culture, religion and the Arabic language as their sacred language.

    EPLF security guards drove Land Cruisers without plates to the city of Keren, they partook in a binge drinking and whoring all night and when darkness fell on Keren as per nature`s predictable cycle, in the dead of the night the security agents picked up those who suspected as Jihadist and disappeared them to the ether, until Yohanes Mehari, the guard and security agent who helped Semere Kesete escape revealed that all were executed, EPLF`s whimsical verdict towards the pathfinders of Eritreanism.

    It makes hypocrites of Eritreans of any political stripes to shed crocodile tears on the plight of the Ethiopian Muslims activists, who were recently sentenced. The sentences are harsh and although trails were held and the accused denied the charges, and they are not in under unknown dungeon, but innately the due process could not have been scrutinized as there are no independent think-tanks, independent pundits who can shed light on if even the evidence against the accused was constitutionally admissible or was obtained illegally. Ethiopia has not yet attained this level to claim that the due process was not tainted. But we as Eritrean should accept mirror that Amde offered to buy for Field Marshal Nitricc of Humbriti,

    Our Muslims were not even activist, they were community leaders, who read and studied the Quran, grew their beards as sunna and went about their daily lives as citizens, attended Mosques and taught Friday Madrass to the kids.

    Ethiopia to its credit, accused the activists, charged them and tried them. Their loved ones know where they are held and I suspect that they have visitation rights.

    In my opinion Ethiopia is talking the talk but it is not walking the walk, instead it is crawling the walk towards embracing its diversity to achieve equal opportunity between Christians and Muslims. Ethiopia must not be scared to embrace Arabic as an official national language, it will please the 30 million people to wit and it will show that it is serious to move on from its Habesha Christian centric to reflect Ethiopia`s diverse nature.

    Amb. Andebrhan of Eritrea has written en a book titled Eritrea at Cross Roads, Eritrea is not at cross roads, it is on the edge of Cliff. Ethiopia is at cross roads and it has to .decide which path to follow. Given the complex nature of the country and its history of injustices the longer it lingers at the cross road, the sooner the road will change to a cliff. The Muslims in Ethiopia has their work cut for them, they have to use the tiny right they have to demonstrate and express their grievances to assert their rightful honor, these activists have paid the sacrifices

    • Abi

      Hi Sem
      I think you need a better coffee than that cheap thing you are gulping all day long.
      Why do we need Arabic as a national language? Our Muslim brothers and sisters use different languages to communicate. Arabic is foreign and remains foreign.
      You said “ethiopia’s 3000 year civilization managed to showcase only Christian and Amhara culture.”
      You see how you are dividing the people?
      You can be Christian and at the same time an Amhara, Tigre, Oromo , gurage, etc, etc, etc,…..
      Your problem is only with the Amhara Christians.
      You are still in the 60’s where the Amharas were the uniting force of your struggle.
      Amhara meTabih, Amhara yibelahal…..
      Your hatred to Amhara is beyond sickness. You need help ASAP.
      Wake up and smell that cheap coffee.
      God save us from someone like you who still spewing poison.

    • Desdes

      Eritreans Christian ,Muslim we are one
      That’s why we throw ur savage king
      Hailslas and we librate u from mongustu, don’t mess with Eritreans
      Listen to ur self 3000 years of fable!!!

      • Dayphi

        hi desdes.
        semere is now an ethiopian of 3000 years of fable? double checking doesn’t hurt bro/ sis.

    • Dear Semere Andom,
      Arabic is a non-issue for Ethiopians. It has never been the demand of 30m Ethiopian Muslims. Ethiopia is a secular country where the two major religions are equal before the law. Beyond its importance in religious studies, Arabic has never acquired
      importance in the day-to-day activities of our Muslims. Unlike Eritrean Muslims, they never fought or died for the implementation of Arabic as a national language. Ethiopian Muslims are proud of their ethnic languages; be it Afar, Somali, Oromo, Amharic etc., and they are using them with pride in their schools and courts.

      The Habesha Christian centric Ethiopia is gone with the last
      emperor, and people should understand that Christianity and the Muslim religion manifest themselves in Ethiopia without any impediment within the limits of the law. Who said that only Christians are Habeshas?

      Ethiopian Muslims have never been under a major Arab influence unlike Eritrean Muslims. Unlike the seventh century and later on, when the expansion of Arabs through conquest and the
      adaptation of the Arabic language was at its peak, there is no reason whatsoever for today’s Ethiopia to adopt Arabic as its official national language. If there is such a demand by any group in Ethiopia, it is that of people who are paid to muddy the tranquil waters of peaceful coexistence of Christians and Muslims in Ethiopia.

      Please, leave Ethiopia out of the Arabic language issue. It is an issue in Eritrea, not in Ethiopia. To Ethiopians, Arabic is an alien language. Millions of Ethiopians speak the English language, but nobody ever asked English to be Ethiopia’s official national
      language, let alone Arabic.

      • Abi

        Selam Horizon
        There is nothing you can do if someone purposely stuck in the 50’s .
        Anyway, I took this opportunity to say hello.
        Minew Tefah?

        • Dear Abi,
          Summertime makes me passive, as much as the internet is concerned, and I choose to spend less time connected to the internet. I like to spend more time outside of home. Nevertheless, believe me, I did not miss any of you smart comments. In addition, it is impossible to stay far from awate.com, even if one does not post a comment.
          Happy to hear from you.

    • Eyob Medhane

      Semere,

      What is it with you guys and your incessant demand that Ethiopian Muslims need to speak Arabic? I will tell you BLUNTLY here. Ethiopia has it’s own languages, and as a national working language, it uses a language with its own alphabet. Ethiopian Muslims are so knowledgable and so comfortable of who they are, they don’t equate Islam with being an Arab or speaking Arabic. (Please save the copout argument that, because I am not a Muslim, I can’t speak about Ethiopian Muslims. I GUARANTEE you, I know Ethiopian Muslims WAY much more than you do) There will be NO WAY you’ll make Abeed out of them. Give it up. Jesus!!!!! Please, while you’re at it, pass this massage for me to Mohamed Kheir, who once told us, “had he been a minister of education of Ethiopia, he would mandate Arabic to be taught in schools”. Keep you’re desire of being Arabized to yourself. I and my fellow people Muslim or Christian are very much comfortable of our skin and who we are. We are not interested in getting Abeedized…

      • Fanti Ghana

        Hello Eyoba,
        Ouch!
        I do relate to what you and Horizon below are saying about the lack of a clear separation of Pan Arabism movement vs. Islam, the religion, and how it could affect our harmony, but I am a little concerned about using the very association we are trying to avoid. What I mean is that when we say ‘no Arabic please’ aren’t we basing our fear because we are associating Islam with Arabic language in the first place? Otherwise what would be wrong with learning the most civilized language with which we have undeniable cultural and historical kinship with? I swear to God I didn’t know somebody already said it before, but I was telling Memhir Saleh the other day how I would like to see Arabic as one of our school curriculums.

        Let’s think of it this way: would you have felt and commented about this the way you did if the language in topic was Swahili instead? May be not. So, if the need arises, how can we make Arabic the neighborhood commercial language without necessarily associating it to any religion? I hope you understand me. I fear that we are condemning the language because we are unable to see it apart from Islam in the first place.

        • Dear Fanti Ghana,
          Thank you for seeing the subject in a different light in your response to Semere Andom, contrary to your first response to Eyob. I had to change my response after reading your second comment.

          · I think that one cannot separate Islam from Arabic or Arabic from Islam, wherever they happen to exist
          together.
          · Ethiopia does have her own civilized language with its alphabet that dates back to thousands of years. If we are looking for another civilized language, English and French, can serve perfectly well. Many Arab
          countries use English or French in their universities, Ethiopia is doing the same, and there is no reason why Ethiopia should go around searching for another
          alien language.
          · As much as commerce is concerned, we need their oil as long as it lasts, and they need our agricultural products. In this globalized world, I think that Arabic is not the right language to learn. For international trade we can use English, French and even Chinese, because it the new language people are learning all over the world.
          · Any Ethiopian who wants to learn Arabic on an individual basis is free to do so; but demanding to make it the national language of Ethiopia goes too far. In the future, somebody could come and tell us to make Christianity or Islam our national religion. The distance between religion and language, especially as much as Arabic is concerned, is not far.

          Therefore, there is no reason, whatsoever, to impose a foreign language (Arabic) on our people.

          This link I think is somewhat relevant.
          http://www.meforum.org/276/does-the-arabic-language-encourage-radical-islam

          • Fanti Ghana

            Hello Horizon,
            As usual, well said and thank you for the thoughtful response my friend. This is one of those times when we can say the topic itself is the problem not necessarily the participants. Awful timing too.

            PS:
            So, summer is your nesting season as September is mine. Please do visit more often until then!

          • Fnote Selam

            Hi Horizon,

            Islam and Arab dont go together in Turkey and Indonesia…

            FS.

          • Saleh Johar

            Hi Fnote Selam
            The argument that Eritrean Muslims can’t be themselves but have to be a copy of Turkey or Indonesia is an old tired argument. You have to see the issue from an Eritrean perspective and an unrelated foreign one. The information on the following link might help you see it from an Eritrean Muslim perspective. Forget Turkey or Afghanistan 🙂
            http://awate.com/language-and-religion-in-eritrean-politics-2/

          • Eyob Medhane

            Gash Saleh,

            May be you’d right…

            This Pakistani satiate agrees….

            http://albakistan.com/2015/01/13/saudi-king-requests-indian-pakistani-muslims-to-stop-pretending-to-be-arabs/

            (Please, lighten up a bit… 🙂 )

          • Saleh Johar

            Haha Eyob,
            I like you because you do not even try to hide your prejudice. In your view, we are all wanna-be Arabs, sellouts, pretentious people. That was the attitude that took us to thirty-years of bloodshed. Very identical and very typical Abyssinian arrogance.

            Dear Eyob, you are not living in your time, you should have lived in the time of the bigoted kings. Maybe they would have assigned you the Minister of Race purity 🙂 Of course that has an English equivalent, but I am not saying it.

          • Mahmud Saleh

            Dear Ustazna
            Just to let you know how much I appreciate your knowledge-based comments, always to the point, always unperturbed. Thanks.

          • Fnote Selam

            Hi Saleh,

            That was kind of an FYI to Horizon…..But, trust me, I have read that article and many other arguments (and discussed the issue of Arabic in Eritrea with many many ppl). Safe to say, I am your allay on this….

            Best,

            FS.

          • Abi

            Ato Saleh
            I read the article twice. Extremely well done. I’m disappointed there were only 2 comments at that time . One was from kokobe.
            Is it possible if you post it again and let the great awatyan discuss it .
            I call it article of the year.
            Yeqenyeley

          • Saleh Johar

            Abi,
            Glad you liked it. It was written in time we used a host of different comment platforms and some were lost during migration. Will try to repost in one of those slow days.

          • Fanti Ghana

            Hello Memhir,
            Great article. It is a library by itself. I just had a moment of brilliance (making up for last week), and that is: when I retire, I want to hire you to hire me as your assistant! Before you say ‘no thanks,’ let me share my secret. I have a body that is refusing to get old, so I am not retiring for another 15 years, and you are slightly older than me, so 15 plus [S – F] == you will surely need all the assistants you can get. The difference is that this assistant shows up to work caring grocery bag every day. What say you?

          • Amde

            Hello Ato Saleh,

            I think I got my question to Saay answered. Very informative Thank you. I second Abi’s proposal.

            Amde

        • Mahmud Saleh

          Dear Fanti Ghama
          kamaKa ente zbezHu eza Alem salam mKonet (please translate it for my friend abi, he’s going to call me in the middle of my napping)
          I think the issue is one of an exposure. It’s all about exposure. There are many Ethiopian and Eritrean Christians who passed through the Sudan and they talk about it in no more negative terms than the Muslim counterparts. They have good impression.
          My dear friend Amanuel Hidrat told me once that he, like many other hihgland intellectuals, did have acute reservations regarding Arabic language and Islamic culture whenhe joined ghedli. Early days ghedli was composed overwhelmingly from the MetaHt, hence, Arabic was a common language. But as time went on, he said, he started feeling better. Now, of course, we know he is an advocate for ensuring equitable sharing between the social groups (Ted, please keep listening). Everyone of us has similar experiences.
          The point is: Why do you (FG), Semere Andom, Amanuel Hidrat, Semere Habtemariam…feel comfortable WITH aRABIC lANGUAGE AND aRAB CULTURES mORE THAN THOSE WHO HAVE NOT BEEN EXPOSED TO IT? At least you want to tackle it from the “necessity side (if it could be utilized by our social segments and if they demand it, why don’t we support it, commerce…culture….). You guys treat the question from a neutral basis. But look to our Horizon, abi…Eyobay: A total “fight it off” mode.
          I think it’s all about exposure. It’s all about modernity. I hope booming Ethiopia will be a bastion of many labguages and cultures where these folks feel comfortable (out of necessity). Hey the Arabs will come there investing!!!!!!!!!!!
          Do I feel it should be a national language, or one of? No. Amharic is enough, and I don’t see the push from my Muslim Ethiopian friends.

          • Amanuel Hidrat

            Dear Mahmuday,

            I like to correct you to put it as ” he had acute reservation on Arabic language when he joined the front, which eventually changed his position as recognition to the collective demand of our “social group ” other than the christian highland. It takes an experience to understand our society and their grievances before reacting to any question related to socio-political relation of Eritrean politics. Actually I have written about my transformation (call it minisah) may be our “fihira” Saay or our archive builder SGJ can pull it from the archive. If half population of our society demand Arabic, we have to accommodate them. That is the rational conclusion I came up after two years of my struggle in the armed struggle and more so at this time.

            Regards,
            Amanuel Hidrat

          • Mahmud Saleh

            Dear Emma;
            Sorry for the error Emma. I corrected it.
            Thanks.

          • Amanuel Hidrat

            Thank you Mahmuday for understanding and correcting.

          • Ted

            Hi, the Greatest MS. We are labeled already “የአረብ ቅጥረኟ ” we might as well own it.-:) As long as we don’t loose our own, more is better. About Ethiopians view of Arabic……Tsssss. i don’t want to get in trouble with “the Eritrean lady”. Lesson learned.
            انها لغتنا الرسمية بالفعل . لغة لا . . .قتل ، والناس

          • Mahmud Saleh

            Hello the great

            Hey Ted I think Ethiopians have made progress since the time abi run you out of Addis (I forgot the neighborhood); well, for whatever reason, but I suspect it has to do with the color of your eye…a bit bluish…ምናባታቸው፡ ኢጣልያኖች ናቸው ወይስ ዓረቦች የኣይንህን ቀለም የቀየሩት? Let me get over with this while abi is snoring. Anyway:

            – During Janhoy, there was no Arabic program (correct me Amanuel/Gadi)

            – During Derg, there was an Arabic program: Sot Ethiobia Athawra (The voice of revolutionary Ethiopia)

            – During wayanewoch: http://arabic.waltainfo.com/

            And may be many more. So you see the tolerance is growing. Of course you will have pockets of diehards who see the world in a “we versus them.”By the way:
            ماذا تقصد ب”لغة القتل والناس٠٠٠

          • Abi

            Hi Mahmud
            Abi never sleeps like some napping old veterans . He is on the watchtower always alert.
            I kicked Ted out of Qera because he was caught stealing cows.

            You see Mahmud, during the king we had eritrea no Arabic
            During derg, we had some eritre and some Arabic
            During weyanewoch, we have no eritrea and more Arabic
            It looks like eritrea and Arabic are mutually exclusive in ethiopia.
            Now you see why we like to keep Eritrea not Arabic .

          • Fanti Ghana

            Hello Gen. Ted,
            Arabs are not hiring these days. arfeh tekemeT.

          • Fanti Ghana

            Hello Ustaz,
            Very correct; “exposure” is the key word Mahmuday. I am just glad Semere saved my neck by posting that comment before me. better him than me. haha.

            I know for sure Abi, Eyob, nor Horizon have any ill will toward Islam, but the combination of our (Muslims and Christians alike) unrealistic association of the language with the religion plus our experiences with Egypt in the immediate past plus the world wide terrorism issues having the Arab world in the center is clouding our thinking to neutrally explore what more we could do to build a warm and friendly neighborhood.

            By the way, this problem needs to be addressed by the Arabs themselves too. The Christians of Iraq are almost no more. The Christians in Egypt are shrinking to extinction, and Christians of Lebanon, once the majority are about 50% or less now. The one factor that seems to slow down the shrinkage in Lebanon is the relatively higher level of education of the society as a whole.

            The more we learn the better we will be. We will talk some more about this in 25 years Mahmuday!

        • Amanuel Hidrat

          Selam Fanti Ghana,

          Yes Fantina, they are “unable to see it apart from Islam.” They can see it as independent language. You know and I know the language “Arabic” existed before the birth of Islam like any other languages.

          regards,
          Amanuel Hidrat

          • Abi

            Selam Ato Amanuel
            I think you missed the whole point. Scroll down a bit and read more. Actually, read Fant’s second comment. you will find Fanti on autocorrect.
            About a year ago you raised the same issue and we had a heated debate including the burning of the Tigre books. T.Kifle, Eyobe and I were furious at you in prescribing Arabic for Muslim Ethiopians . Please don’t start it now. We have so many issues to tackle. This is not one of them.
            Thank you for understanding.

          • Amanuel Hidrat

            Yes Abi our Debtera,

            I did not prescribe Arabic for Ethiopia Abiye. What I did at that time is simply like the comment I did above. I tried to disentangle the language from the religion, in order to see the language as language only. That is all. Let alone for Ethiopia, I couldn’t attempt to prescribe even to my own country Eritrea. The position I took on Eritrea is simply from accommodation point of view and conflict resolution basis.
            So Abye, I will never do that, even if it comes as an issue in Ethiopia, it solely belong to you the case. Nah Abi.

            regards,
            Amanuel Hidrat

          • Abi

            Ato Amanuel
            I feel better now . Thanks.
            You call me debtera?
            you are not being fair. I appointed you as a minister and I get debtera in return?
            Minew sishomih sharkegn?

          • Amanuel Hidrat

            Dear Abi,

            Endie, Ye Ethiopian Languages anthropologist Ayedlehm endie. I am learning from semENa WerQ yemti-zefew, though I am not happy that you are still unable to use the Amharic font. Anyway I am not here to discomfort people, I am here to narrow our differences.

            regards,
            Amanuel Hidrat

          • saay7

            Hi Emma:

            Ummm…. language is not just a “means of communication.” In fact, that’s not why those who call for Arabic as co-official language in Eritrea demand for it. The best way to think of language is to think of money which, according to World Economic Forum has 3 functions: a medium of exchange, a store of value, and a standard of deferred payments.

            Arabic’s strength in Eritrea is not as medium of exchange but as a store of value.

            saay

          • Amanuel Hidrat

            Hey Saay,

            Is this a new explanation from anthropological studies? I am not aware of that. In Eritrean political context, it had and still has a uniting factor for a political leverage to challenge against any dominating forces. It took me two years to understand it in the Ghedli era, and it hasn’t lost its uniting factor for some of our social groups as we speak. That is fact on the ground, and it doesn’t bother me at all. From my prospect it is resolvable political challenge. Pointblank, to borrow the word from my friend Ismail Omer.

            regards,
            Amanuel Hidrat
            .

          • saay7

            Hey Emma:

            Language is not just about communications: the lady in this interview understands Tigrinya; and the bully in this interview understands Arabic.

            http://www.tubechop.com/watch/6561439

            saay

          • Amde

            Hi Saay,

            This phase is interesting to me. “Arabic’s strength in Eritrea is not as medium of exchange but as a store of value.”

            I have always assumed the primary interest in the adoption of Arabic in Eritrean politics was as a lingua franca medium of exchange for the Muslim demographic/political “minorities”. I mean “minorities” on the outside of the Christian+Tigrinya demographic bloc which by itself constitutes a huge chunk of the population. (@ 50% yes?)

            What do you mean by it as a store of value? Are you referring to its obvious religious role (in which case what would make that uniquely Eritrean)? Is it something tied with the political history of the past almost century? Or is it something more cultural, predating the colonial era?

            Amde

    • Fanti Ghana

      Hello Semere Andom,

      The first time I read your post it didn’t affect me the way it did to three of my favorites, Abi, Horizon, and Eyoba below. I had to reread it (it is official; I am slow this week), and I think the following may be the uncomfortable line. “Ethiopia must not be scared to embrace Arabic as an official national language, it will please the 30 million people to wit and it will show that it is serious to move on from its Habesha Christian centric to reflect Ethiopia`s diverse nature.”

      1) It does not need to be our official language because it is not necessary at this time and it is not a native language.
      2) Why do we think that it should make Ethiopian Muslims ‘happier?’
      3) The ‘Habesha Christian centric’ culture and tendency, believe it or not it was brought to our attention for the first time by Walelign Mekonnen, an Amhara and a Christian, decades ago, but how does making Arabic a national language tilt the scale to equality?

      Semere, these are rhetorical question and I believe I understand what you were trying to convey, and I am sorry to say that your intention of trying to make ‘let’s be fair to one another’ point got missed for the very reason why we have the problem in first place. This topic is so riddled with pitfalls that there is no easy way of discussing it.

    • Saleh Johar

      Ahlan Semere,

      If not for the one mistake you fell into, I agree with everything you wrote.

      1. Why do we have to tell the Ethiopians what language to use? If Ethiopian Muslims have that demand, they should make it–though I never run across any Ethiopian who makes that demand. It is just not there.

      2. Indeed, Ethiopia has come a long way from the bigotry of the ages. But that doesn’t mean it is totally cleansed, there remains residual bigotry–some subtle, others not so subtle.

      3. Many Ethiopians associate Arabic with Islam–and they do not want to unlearn that, they hold to it like a religious doctrine. I think, since they equate Arabic with Islam, then anything they say against Arabic should be understood to be anti-Islam–isn’t that fair?

      4. Indeed, many Ethiopians, and Western Ethiophiles, want to keep Ethiopia isolated from its immediate neighbors, they hammer on “Christian Ethiopia” that is surrounded by “A Sea of Muslims.” That has inflicted a serious damage on Abyssinia.

      5. Just like Eyob mentioned in response to you, the moment that the name of the Arabs is raised, it’s is associated with Slavery–he always forgets there are slaves with him the “chewa” do not intermarry to this day in Ethiopia. Slavery was officially abolished by a proclamation under duress by the liberating British.

      6. There are serious racial and sectarian inequalities in the wealthy Arab countries, and there are appalling human rights violations. Eyob tries to equate, (implies) that Abyssinian culture is similar to that of Scandinavia on issues of human rights. And we all know how, for example, maids are treated in the “Great Abyssinia of Eyob”–they are treated like visiting princesses 🙂

      7. Islamopohobia is prevalent in Abyssinia and no explanation can erase it. It is there and people should find a way to remedy it instead of trying to explain it away. To its credit, the government has come a long way in correcting that situation though there remains a long way to go.

      8. I will skip some abrasive insults to Eritrea, that we want to be Abeed of the Arabs, etc, etc. It doesn’t warrant a reply.

      • citizen

        ISemere
        The way I see your commentaries is as if Muslim Eritrea and/or Arab countries trying to influence Ethiopia. I don’t know how well that sits with Ethiopians? I don’t think it is realistic either. SO, Isemere you are trying to garner attention from your cyber Eritrean Muslim friends and I guarantee you “you got it” as evidenced by the 8 pointers of Saleh Johar. however, let me say this, we Ethiopians may have ninety nine problems but not the one you mentioned. Our plan is to be political, economically, and military formidable and thereby expand our own native languages( including your language Tigrigna, Amharic, Oromifa, Guragigna, Somaligna, Kunama etc.) to other worlds including the Arab world. We have the responsibility to develop our own language, Man. Our native languages have been dying as a result of not paying enough attention, not using the languages and paying attention to international languages and that has to stop. Priority has to be given to our own. The idea of suggesting arabic language to Ethiopians is to bring Ethiopians down to their knees. Once we expand our own languages to the neighbouring countries including countries across the red sea, may be? Gib EmaYawoukut ager hido kurBet antufulign Ale, new negeru.

        • Abraham Hanibal

          Hi citizen;

          You see citizen, in the same way your successive rulers have sent the wrong message to the world that Ethiopia is a Christian country, despite a sizable number of your population being muslims; you’re telling us here that Eritrea is a Muslim country. For your info, Eritrea is divided roughlly in the middle between Christians and Muslims, and we never dream of portraying ourselves as being ONLY Christians or Muslims.

          • Rahwa T

            Selam Abraham,

            We know that it is unrealistic to say that we are “Christian Island”, while over 30 million men and women of our population are followers of Islam. If your comment is implying that we have to adopt Arabic in Ethiopia to show the Arab world that we are not a christian country, you are suggesting a weird recommendation. By the way, reading this comment of yours and that of Fanti’s and Semere’s suggestion of using of sacred languages, I asked myself if any of you could tell me whether there are (or ever existed) unholy languages in the world. As far as my understanding, language is not the GATE to heaven.
            Can you or anyone in support of this idea prescribe a single sacred language for the Christians as well?

          • Fanti Ghana

            Hello Rahwani,
            Should I start getting used to this way of your saying hello to me? I am extremely clear on what I was saying about not to associate the Religion with the Language. Understanding when the religion ends and when the language begin has been a hot topic even for prominent scholars of the Arab/Muslim world for decades. However, everything I said and would like to say amounts to this:

            Case 1:
            The Arabic language is a beautiful language to learn. It is a language of our neighbors, with a good chance of being our cousins, and it would help to make us closer to one another. There is absolutely no down side in learning the language.

            Case 2:
            Many Muslims of the world study Arabic for the sheer understanding of their religion in its original language, the language of the Prophets, that way nothing is missing in translation or omitted for lack of proper translation (It is like reading ‘Dawit’ in Geez).

            Case 3:
            For several reasons we (Muslims and Christians alike) have associated Arabic to Islam so much so that we are quite unclear on identifying which is which.

            Case 4:
            Those of us non Muslims can decide to whether study Arabic or not as we would any language, and that should be totally fine. So if I ask my government to make Arabic one of the curriculums like those of Spanish, English, French, Germany (this always amazed me by the way), that would be still okay too, I hope.

            Now, with Case 4 in mind, and let’s promote ourselves for a minute to board of directors of AAU, and then let’s study the case:

            1) Is there a demand for the Arabic language to warrant its inclusion?
            2) What are the advantages and disadvantages of learning the language?
            3) What are the possible costs of stuffing?

            If we answer positively to all three for instance, why can’t we learn/teach Arabic?
            That was the background that lead to my reply to Eyob, then Semere, and so on.

            Now, you must admit I am okay!

          • Saleh Johar

            Dear Fanti,
            A few years ago I read about a request by Ethiopian Muslims that the AAU should have some sort of Islamic studies institute. Many universities have that, why can’t a country with ten
            Tens of millions of Muslims, and surrounded by Muslm countries, and has strong cultural and historical ties not have one? I believe it’s vital for the cultural development of Ethiopia and important in eradicating religious and cultural ignorance. I am not sure if the suggestion was accepted or what was decided. I hope the university considers this if it hasn’t so far.

          • Fanti Ghana

            Hello Memhir,

            Not only do I agree, but I totally agree to the point of being biased. During my first few years in the Sudan, I lived with a group of 10-15 friends, all of them from Tigray – Wollo border areas. Almost all of them travelled to the Sudan mostly on foot until they reached JamiE el Kebir in Umdurman. All of them were my ‘Hosh-mates’ (we lived in the same compound), and about 8 of them were my roommates; the only way we could afford rent.They were devoted Muslims with impeccable personality and I have to say I really learned the true meaning of ‘Islam’ through their daily character and dignity.

            So, whenever I think about them traveling that far to study their religion in such a young age, and knowing that that beautiful religion produces these kinds of ‘honest to a fault’ young men, I can’t help it but to think the unfairness of it not to have their own school in their own country. Mostly what they needed was a solid understanding of Arabic to be able to interpret and understand some of the great works of Islamic Texts.

            Now, the irony:

            Someone (Mahmud?) posted earlier about the addition of Arabic programs on Ethiopian media during EPRDF early years, and one of the early programmers of that Arabic Radio Program was one of these students above who had continued his study in Egypt. We were especially close in the Sudan because we were from the same Wereda, about the same age, and we knew the same of many people, events, and areas back home.

            Even with this single incident as an example which I happened to witness, I could come up with a laundry list of benefits of having an Islamic Studies Department at AAU university. It is shameful enough to have to wait to be asked, but if the government delays it until forced that would be a more serious threat to our coexistence than the fear of how a few hardliners might misuse it.

          • Abi

            Fantish
            First of all there is no board of directors at AAU . It Is The Senet of AAU .
            Fanti, I think you have been away from ethiopia for soooooooo long , you have no clue what ethiopians think about Arabs .
            If you get a chance to be the president of AAU, how many religious studies would you establish in that secular institution? What is your requirement ? Do you blieve all religions are equal?
            There is a church attached to AAU. Would you build a mosque on the other side if given a chance? How about a synagogue on the other side? How about a Kingdom Hall for Jehovah witnesses on the other side?
            AAU is over 65 years old. There is no institute of Christian studies. Do you call that a shame?
            You need a crush course in ethiopian studies.
            BTW, there is institute of ethiopian studies at AAU (IES).

          • Fanti Ghana

            Hello Abisha,

            You are correct on several points about me. And thank you for giving me a chance to say what I was contemplating to say or not to say to Eyoba but stopped because I am terrified of him right now.

            This is undoubtedly a very uncomfortable subject, and we made it worst by starting it in the middle.
            It is good to know that there is the Awelia College.

            In Ethiopia, we only have two historically and culturally significant religions; Christianity and Islam. The rest are denominations which can be studied under the umbrella of their respective parents. Yes we should also have a Christian studies department, because our identity and heritage cannot be explained let alone understood without having a through knowledge of these two religions.

            I don’t even know what the arts and crafts, sociology, history, and humanities departments teach at AAU (are there any?), but I strongly believe fear of knowledge, any knowledge, is the ultimate sign of backwardness.

            One of my 7th grade relative in Addis tried to impress me recently by telling me “the history of the United States: Engineers, Doctors, Teachers, Lawyers, and many more professionals from England migrated to America because they were unhappy with their government. That is why Americans are smarter than everybody else.”

            Is your teacher an Ethiopian, I asked: No, she is American.

            My 7th grade (now 9th) relative is a 4.0 student.

            I wish to God she spend those hours studying Arabic and learning about how our languages are related, our historical relationship with the Arab world, how our two prominent religions are similar and/or different.
            At least she would have a good start of understanding herself, her people, and her country a gazillion times better. Now, she has been carefully primed to buy Rihanna or Je-lo make ups, fashions, and CDs perfectly well.

            “If you get a chance to be the president of AAU…” For old times sake I will give you a head start:
            Alph
            Ba’e
            Ta’e
            Sa’e…
            You see, it doesn’t hurt at all!

          • Eyob Medhane

            Fanti,

            First of all, you shouldn’t be terrified of me..You can’t..I am just adorable to terrify anyone.. 🙂

            * Awelia used to be a highschool opened by Haileselassie and it now was elevated to collage some I believe fifteen years ago. The whole saga of ‘Dimtsachin Yesema’ started, because of the ownership dispute of Awelia between the government and bunch of self appointed individuals wanted to take it over and run it. I am telling you this, because it is very important and very much related to what we are talking about. There is always Arabic teaching at Awelia. Even, when it was a highschool, during Haileselassie, During derg and now. When these Dimtsachin Yesema self appointed individuals came to the picture, they managed to conspire to push out the former Ethiopian Arabic teachers to be replaced by a largely gulf state “Arabic Teachers”. After a little while, the ‘Mejlis’ (Ethiopian Islamic Supreme Council) noticed that this new “Arabic teachers” were not teaching Arabic, but something else…Wahabizm, in the name of teaching Arabic. Therefore, it requested to take over the school from the NGO’s, who were running it at that time. When they refused, since the Mejlis is the only legal body that represented Ethiopian muslims, it requested the government to get involved. The government, per the request of the Mejlis kicked the gulf Arab NGOs, who were running the school out of the country and took over Awelia as a care taker to eventually return the administration to the Mejlis. Then, the ‘Dimtsachin Yesema’ people decided that the Mejlis itself need to be removed, because it did not let them to bring the Wahabis from the gulf states and teach wahabism in the name of Arabic. they wanted to take over the Mejlis, by holding election in Moaques, instead of public places. The government woken up to their plans, and held the election in a public place, instead and rounded up the agitators. Now, here is the point I want to make. Usually, education is a weapon to those who want to spread an imported alien culture and brand of sects. People like gash Saleh and you fail to understand this sinster plan, which many Ethiopians really do understand. Because no matter how Gash Saleh dismisses it, Gragn’s invasion and many other subsequent events have taught us how to protect ourselves. It’s embroiled in us….Our culture, our language, who we are is ALWAYS under threat. we learned from Egyptian Copts. People, who had their own language, culture and alphabet were destroyed, their language was made to disappear and they now cower to preserve what little they have left. Their faith….We need to be vigilant not to be them and swept away…..

          • Saleh Johar

            Eyob,
            Your information about Awelia is totally wrong. Check and correct please. Awelia was financed by Saudis and the corruption accusation was at the heart of it in the nineties. Where did Haile Sellasie come in Awelia? That is news to me!

          • Eyob Medhane

            Gash Saleh.

            it is not.. Awolia has incorporated with a smaller school called Oumer Semater Quranic school a small “Madreassa” that was opened and resourced by the government, later on by Mejlis, since the fifties. The Saudis came later on in the early ninties and expanded it. Oumer Samatar also had an elemntary school, which did not incorporate with the later Awolia…You check that yourself, sir… 🙂

          • Hayat Adem

            Dear Eyob,
            I am learning a bit from the bacground info you provided. I’m trying to get a handle to the entire issue and you seem to have a lot of relevant information. If you don’t mind please, answer some of my question that help me understand the matter, when your time allows, of course.
            -What exactly are the charges against those Dimtsachin Yissema?
            -which part of the charge is related to terrorism?
            -were there any violence related to their movement and campaign?
            -for trying to control Awoliya?
            -for trying to out seat the Mejlis?
            -for trying to promote wahabists and selafists?
            -what is the role of ahbesh in the saga, and how?
            Thanks in advance,
            Hayat

          • Eyob Medhane

            Hi Hayat,

            Sorry for the late reply. I was a bit busy..

            The Demtsachin Yesema leaders were charged at first on “outrage against the constitution” and later on other charged were piled on including terrorism. I will come to that, but let me start with their arrest first.

            *When they start their protest at Awolia and the countries (Sub Saharan Africa’s, for that matter) largest Mosque, Anwar Mosque, the government decided to speak with them, believing that they have a legitimate concern. They all met the then Prime Minister Meles Zenawi and addressed their concern. Even though they were told that their question about 1) Awolia’s administration 2)The election of Mejlis leaders 3) Their concern about a religious sect called Al Ahbash being imposed on them were discussed and responded, as such. 1) According to the country’s law all schools private, religious based and public have governing laws that says they can not be administered by a foreign entity (in Awolia’s case Saudi religious clerics NGO) Therefore, whether a board that is elected by Mejlis (Ethiopian Islamic Supreme council) or Ministry of education that have a legitimate right to administer them. 2) They are free to elect their own leaders for Mejlis. The government does not get involved in a religious leaders election. 3) There is foreign religious sect that is being imposed on them. The current Mujlis has given training for religious leaders throughout the country, by bringing scholars from Lebanon, as it sees fit. (The irony is, when they lament about religious scholars from Lebanon, they want to bring their own “religious scholars” from Saudi Arabia and Kuwait) After they left the Prime minister’s office getting these responses, they continued with their agitation at Anwar Mosque, to laser extent in other Mosques. They now shifted one of their original question that is about election to where the election should be held. They wanted to hold the election in mosques. In Mosques, where there can’t be police or anyone that protects the safety and security of people, who are voting. Where they can start agitating and intimidate people. How do I know they would do that? Because in previous weeks, they have been entering mosques and driving out the administrators of the mosques and taking over by appointing their own people. In other words, they have already started to take control of the mosques. The excuse they give to drive out the Administrators of those Mosques was “they have taken the Al Ahbash training, therefore, they were Qafir”. Now they want the elections to be held in these mosques to guarantee their election to take over Mejlis. The Mejlis requested the government, knowing this full well decided the elections to be held in Kebeles, instead. Between this back and forth, Meles Zenawi fell ill. Their arrest came, when Malawi threatened to arrest Omar Hassan Al Bashir, if he went to their country to attend the AU bi-annual meeting. They have announced this only 2days before the meeting is held, and AU panicked and decided to hold the meeting in its headquarters. The Ethiopian government at the time was in a bit distress, because it was trying to find a way to inform the public about Meles Zenawi. The government informed the AU leaders that his illness to be mentioned at the NEPAD gathering, an institution he helped to found. Senegalese President Maki Sal is the one, who broke the news and ended the rumor of Meles Zenawi’s illness. Why am I telling you this? Because it is related. The Demtsachin Yesema thugs, believed that this would be a perfect opportunity to wreck havoc and go violent. That very night, they contacted their thugs around Kolfe and Addis Ketema area, believing that people would be panicked, because of the official news of Meles Zenawi illness and decided to show that the country is unstable, while fifty two African heads of state in town by starting a riot, after few hours Maki Sal told everyone that Meles Zenawi was ill, they went to the Mosque AT NIGHT, called on for prayers, which many Islamic scholars say irregular and unheard of. The federal police was alarmed with the developments, and made its move to contain the riots in Kolfe, Addis Ketema and Mercato areas with out a single problem to the visiting dignitaries. Sadly about ten people died and many injured. That very night, all leaders of Demtsachin Yesema were arrested. After that, their supporters continue with escalation of their agitation and they ended up assassinating a very well respected Imam in Dessie. This particular imam was their target for so long and it wasn’t difficult to figure out that they wanted to scare other Muslims and religious leaders by assassinating some among them. After their arrest, the Mejlis election was held in Kebeles and new leaders were elected without any problem..

            Al Ahbash, is as they made it out to be a foreign sect. Al Ahbash is an Islamic school of thought that was formed and taught by an Ethiopian Islamic scholar. It has largely a Sufi Islam point of view. The founder Sheik Abdulahi was exiled to Lebanon and he found a great deal acceptance and popularity in there and Syria. Hence, they called his followers and teachings, Al Ahbashi, or the Habasha’s. Sheik Abdulahi is a Harari and, when Demtsachin Yesema, tried to spew its venom and Dire Dawa and Harar, the people didn’t even let them stay for more than one Friday. They were chased out of both cities. (You can read their humiliation in Dire Dawa and Harar in the Wilkileakes cable. If you want it I will be more than happy to get it for you) Anyway, while they want to bring the Whabi teachings from Saudi, they are persecuting Ethiopians for trying to know the teachings of an Ethiopian scholar….I will be linking more information and videos, if you would like to know more about it…

          • Kim Hanna

            Selam Eyob,
            .
            That is enough!
            .
            Don’t waste your time and breath. I am sure we will hear more about our ignorance, intolerance, residual bigotry, anti-Islam and Islamophobia from the same preacher of ignorance and insults.
            .
            May God/Allah give all of us wisdom, such an over used disclaimer. I said God/Allah deliberately to irritate somebody who irritated me all day, the least I could do without getting into the sewer.
            .
            As for you Eyob, all I can say is thank you from the bottom of my heart.
            .
            K.H

          • Eyob Medhane

            KH,

            Thank you so much.. Egziabher yakbirilign,

            That was just a response to Hayat’s question and she didn’t seem to have any motive to asking it so I went to great length to explain it to her…As for the usual insult and put down of Ethiopians as “ignorant, stupid, Islamophobe ant Islam….” We should get used to it by now, shouldn’t we? Getting insulted the same way for decades even centuries, to prove them wrong at the end is what we do.. 😉

            Than you so much again..

          • Music Novice

            Hi K.H.,

            Don’t you think that the EPRDF are at fault, at the beginning – two decades ago, in this matter? They allowed crazy cults into the country for one reason or another.

            I think Isaias deals with such issues in a wise way.

          • Kim Hanna

            Selam Music Novice,
            .
            The simple answer is, I don’t know. They had so much on their plate at the time and all this was new.
            .
            However, now after 100,000.00 plus of our citizens were deported recently at one time for maximum impact and message, Egyptian threats and others, we need to be quite about it but resolute in our dealings with these people.
            When they come with a large delegation wanting to invest in Ethiopia to make money, you have to wonder and look at everything carefully. These people have corrupted even European countries for Christ’s sake.
            .
            From now on however, any damage that is visited upon us by these people and their agents will be the fault of our Government.
            .
            K.H

          • saay7

            Hi Eyob:

            I know in the US they name hurricanes…. but do they name tornadoes? You spin like one and your postings should come with a pole: to help people steady themselves from your spinning. Three questions:

            1. In the US, the word is used only against African-American victims of excessive police force and its intent is: please don’t feel any sympathy for them: they are thugs. Why do you insist on calling a group which has stubbornly held on to a “non-violent resistance” a bunch of “thugs”?

            2. Notwithstanding all the merits (from your standpoint) of Ahbash, where does their doctrine fall within traditional, mainstream Islamic doctrine in Ethiopia? Survey 20 Ethiopian Muslims (not including your government sources.)

            3. It is customary for people who consider themselves oppressed by their government to tell the world. The great Martin Luther King gave an address in front of the United Nations in New York. The handicapped Eritrean fighters who were mowed down by the PFDJ were heading to Western embassies in Asmara to help publicize their grievance. Why, then, is dimtsachn yisemma’s attempt to publicize its grievance to the African Union such a scandal?

            4. Does the college of electors of the Tewahdo Church hold elections in a Kebele? Why then would the government (which has a fine, fine record of conducting free, fair, transparent elections) demand that the Muslims hold theirs in the Kebele and why are elections held inside a mosque considered ominous. Is there even a precedent for Kebele-based election?

            saay

          • Rahwa T

            selam saay,

            As usual, your information on the Dimtsachin Yissema and Tewahdo is biased and ሸፋፋ. I kindly ask you to stop meddling in religious issues of Ethiopia.

          • saay7

            Selamat Rahwa:

            Please refer to the attached description of awate.com: “fearless news, opinion, analysis on Eritrea and beyond.” So, I am commenting and don’t worry Eyob (who is never shy about “meddling” and is more than a match) will comment back and correct whatever bias there is. Actually tha surprise is not that this issue is being addressed in 2015 but why it wasn’t address 2012-2014 because we (Eritrean and Ethiopian awatistas) discuss everything here.

            saay

          • Peace!

            Dear Rahwa,

            What about the economic injustice? It is not a secret that one-third of total government spending has been awarded to Tewahdo Christians.

            Regards

          • Rahwa T

            Dear Peace,

            Are you referring to the era of the kings, brother? ብዘበን ኢኒ ኢኒ ዝተገብረ ፍፃሜ። Otherwise, TPLF leaders are a bunch of atheists, whose prime focus was money like street harlots. There is/was no way they could subsidize the Orthodox Church despite the facts that they and many of the martyrs had that religious background. On the contrary, they were turning their eyes while thousands of Mosques was mushrooming in every corner of the country. They worked and still working against the church. The number of Orthodox followers have declined in millions the Protestants and other sects were increasing in the last 20 years. That is the reality my dear.

          • Peace!

            Dear Rahel,

            M’new Rahel’ye Terror Lekek’kulish w’ey!

            I wish you came with facts or compelling evidence to prove the claim was wrong. I mean why would anyone be surprised by economic injustice if the country grossly violates the separation of church and state? Trust me I didn’t made that up; it is a hot topic in all Ethiopian communities in diaspora.

            Regards

          • Rahwa T

            Dear Peace, What are you talking about? are you a terrorist? Your comments are short and vague. So I just had to guess and write based on the way understood your comment? Still I couldn’t find your point. I have to guess again and throw few. I wish you included the link for your hot topic if you are busy to elaborate it more.

          • Kim Hanna

            Selam Rahwa,
            .
            You are not that far off in your suspicion of this “peace”. He is a warmed up AMAN In his comments and logic…no need to waist valuable time there.
            .
            K.H

          • Peace!

            Dear Rahwa,

            Not surprised at all, I was jihadist a couples days ago, and now, a terrorist. Well, let me try to reply in Arabic to scare you even more:):)
            أنا بعرف ومتأكد انك عارفة كل كلمة أنا بقلها بس
            انت بتعملي لف ودوران وتغيري الموضوع لان ماعندك جواب واضح من كل الكلام الي قلتيه ما شفت فيه شيء يفيد غير طول لسان في المرات الجاية لمان تجي تتناقشي لازم تجي ومعاكي موضع ذو فاءدة لا أنا ما أبغى أضيع وقتي على الفاضي.

            Ohhh Yes…He is a terrorist!

            *** LIES, FEAR, and INJUSTICE never last long! Justice For All!

            Regards

          • Semere Andom

            Hi peace:
            Rahwa responds to Peace
            Awellen Sedeq Allah al-azim, wo baad nahnu alhabesh akthera Urubeten bklu miEya: seqqafeten, fessahaten wo thumma belaqqeten!!
            Hal tedrri ya selam ena qeryeti Dedebit aqreb ellia Meddina min Nakfa, hal tedri ya Aki/ ya ukkta?
            eza eneka tiftekkir b’erubetec, arjjuka an taerbe al-atti:
            ena al-nissaE qowamuna alla al-rujjal”
            SGJ is assigned to translate this for Rahwa

          • Eyob Medhane

            Sal,

            Oh boy, you really make it easy for me to tear apart your arguments don’t you?

            1) in American, British, or. Finnish dictionary, those, who threaten, beat people and encourage others also to do the same are thugs. Dimtsachin Yesema does all that. Go to their hundreds of FB page, their youtube accounts, and listen to their sermons, you will see them how “non violent” they are. It is true that they have a facade of a public face theatrics that is ready for media and public consumption and tricking some naive followers and bleeding hearts that says they are “non violent”. However, make an effort a little bit and scratch the surface, you will get to see how “non violent” they are. (For further information, on a Video that I have provided to Hayat, please forward to 28:46 minutes, about their violent and thuggish activities) Also please look at 16:00 minutes..

            2) I am not an Islamic scholar, so. I can’t delve into analysis of the differences of Ahbash and wahabism. However, those who are experts can. It is actually on the first few minutes on the video that I provided to Hayat and they will tell you exactly what you want to know.. (Please refer to the video I have linked to Hayat at 1:32 minutes)

            3) There is a law in the country. When one wants to protest, they need to obtain or even notify a government. What they did in July 2012 was spontaneous RIOT, going door to door, intimidating people to get out to go to AU and disrupt the meeting..They not only violated the law of the country, but the norm of Islamic tradition by breaking into Mosques AT NIGHT and call people for prayer (violence) at odd hours. Again, I refer you to the same video about what they did that day..It is aptly explained… In fact, one of the imams on the video put it in rather very good way. He said “You don’t quarrel with your wife, while there is a guest in the house. You wait, until the guest leaves” 🙂

            4) Sorry for the referring to this video a lot, but it has all of my answers.. 🙂 Watch 22:00 minutes of the video. The young Imam explains it perfectly. As far as Tewahido church patriarchate election is concerned, it is not the people, who elect the patriarch, but the bishops. Therefore for bishops, who in most cases are less than 50 the office of the patriarch “Menbere tsebaot” is the place the hold the election.

            5) This particular Imam in Desse was targeted by them. He was being threatened, a propaganda campaign was opened at him. His Mosque in Kemise was looted..therefore, their final action of assassinating him was not “a lone Wolfe act, but an orchestrated attack. Before he died for the longest time, he was being chastised by the now in jail members themselves. I can chop a youtube video, if you want one of the leaders of the Demtsachin Yesema thugs talking about him, calling him a cadre and all sort of names, if you want..

            6) Yes. Yassin Nuru has wrote a book about how to found an Islamic government in Ethiopia. (Yassin Nuru is the second thug that was named in the charge) They have been propagating for that and executing methods for it…

            7) Did you just call Yonathan Tesfaye a “kid”? I don’t think he would be pleased with that.. 🙂 Demtsachin Yesema, despite its thuggish behavior and hidden violent nature, it is one of the most organized with very much far reaching web in Ethiopia, with a possible exception of EPRP..Given their fierce advocacy on behalf of the thugs, it is not surprising that the government believes that the blue party is infiltrated by them….

          • saay7

            Hey Eyobai:

            Now, Rahwa can sleep and all the ones who feel that the Ethiopian government just has a PR problem otherwise it has handled this matter with prudence and care can be oh-so-grateful for your spin. Well done.

            Well, we can do video-back-and-forth that support our cases but, it is best to rely on those who are judged to be neutral and authoritative. I won’t cite Amnesty International or Human Rights Watch because you will tell me they are bought by Soros or Wahabis (The worlds two bad guys in the Book of Eyob:) Let me try another source: as a very well read person, you do know that the United States Commission on International Religious Freedom (USCIRF) has been writing on this subject since 2012. And, sorry Eyobay, but USCIRF faults not the “thugs” at Dimtsachn Yisemma but the “thugs” at the Ethiopian government for the dangerous provocation. Pick and choose any link from the following:

            http://www.uscirf.gov/search/site/ethiopia

            Second, I think you are being diingenous when you say “I can’t delve into the differences of Ahbash and Wahabism” as if I asked you to do so and as if those are the only two strains known to Ethiopian Muslims. What I asked you was to speak to Ethiopian Muslims and to ask them if the Ahbash sect who were imported to Ethiopia with the active encouragement of the Ethiopian government (here, note, the vanguard government is choosing which ‘version’ of Islam is acceptable for Ethiopian Muslims to follow) vary from the traditional Islam as practiced in Ethiopia.

            Of course Dimtsachin Yisema is very well organized…and, in the end, it is that it is organized and could pose a threat to EPRDF that was of primary concern to EPRDF.

            saay

          • Saleh Johar

            Hi Eyob,

            I had an enlightening moment: A few months ago you were worked up about a gedab news item that mentioned the Blue party. I didn’t understand your reaction then, but now that you stated the allegation that they were infiltrated by Dimrsachin Yssema, I understand. I never knew or thought about that. Is it an infiltration or a sort of alliance or coalition? If that is the case, is it against the law?

          • Eyob Medhane

            Gash Saleh,

            I wasn’t the one, who stated the “allegation”. Sal did with the NPR link…Nevertheless, it was obvious for many that the was close “working relationship” between Semayawi and Demtsachin Yesema. Demtsachin Yesema campaign, recruit members and fund their Blue party, and in return Blue party champions their cause and gives them political cover. I guess that is more of an alliance than infiltration. But, blue also had some candidates that were known to be Demtsachin Yesema’s activists. I think that led some people to suspect that the party was infiltrated by the jihadists..I refer you to election debate between Redwan Hussain (Govt. Spokesperson) and Yonathan Tesfaye (Blue party spokesperson, ultra liberal, very smart and articulate and I still can’t believe Sal called him a “kid”.. 🙂 ) If you want I can give you the link.. Is it legal? I don’t know, but what I know is that the election board was set to investigate Blue Party’s 92 million birr campaign budget for a party that says it has only less than two thousand numbers. EPRDF has seven million members and it’s campaign budget was not that much bigger than Blue..Actually Sal did tweet about it at the time….

          • saay7

            Hey Eyobai:

            I invite readers to check out the pics attached Yonathan is a young man, a kid compared to the alligators of EPRDF 🙂 He is not quite as young as Sammy Awoke, Blue Party’s candidate in Gojjam who was allegedly assassinated by EPRDF. (So said Yonathan who is probably a closet Islamist (using Eyob logic.) Also using Eyob logic about the imam in Dessie allegedly assassinated by dimtsachn, I expect u to call the EPRDF “thugs”

            I think I tweeted that the election board would find some reason to disqualify the party. But the EPRDF said nah that’s too heavy handed: we will just disqualify candidates from running and when necessary liquidate them.

            saay

          • አዲስ

            Hi Saay, Eyob

            It’s my position that EPRDF don’t really hate or love Muslims and the current sentencing of ‘Dimstachin Yisema’ movement leaders is just part of the “Control All forms of dissent” policy that is being implemented after the 2005 election.

            Just to add to your discussions, I attached an interview(in Amharic) by Wazemaradio on the issue at hand. The interviewees are Dr. Abadir Ibrahim, a law scholar and Akmel Negash a journalist and the interviewer is Argaw Ashine.

            This interview more or less support

            http://wazemaradio.com/?p=933

            Thanks,
            Addis

          • saay7

            Thanks Addis:

            I invite Eyobai to fast forward to 19:20 so he can get a glimpse into how boneheaded the EPRDFs decision was to not only import but prescribe the “Ahbash” sect to Ethiopian Muslims. Dr Abadir has a few choice words to describe it: “unprecedented in Ethiopia, in Africa, anywhere in the world…it’s akin to a theocracy: extreme and radical. Because not only are you telling people the religion they are now following is unconstitutional, not only are you telling them they might be terrorists…but if they keep believing their current non-AHbash religion, they chance of going to heaven is also in doubt.”

            This kind of extreme experimentation can only come from…well I don’t want to say communists because Derg was a communist and he did no such crazy thing and in fact he opened the majlis…it comes from ideologues who grew up in an environment that had not even a passing knowledge of Islam because the region is 95% orthodox Christian. Yep, this can only come from the mind of the TPLF.

            saay

          • አዲስ

            Hi Saay,

            About the judges, in EPRDF’s Ethiopia court system every now and then you see some judges refusing to implement political sentencing passed from the top. Those that refuse, either will be removed from the case or in the extreme be forced to flee the country. I have no information that the repeated change of judges in the “Dimstachin Yisema” case is because of that but we have seen so many similar incidents that one may not be far from the truth if one assume that as the reason.

            Thanks,
            Addis

          • Rahwa T

            Dear Addis,

            No sane individual would deny the limitations of the court procedures and justice in EPRDF Ethiopia. I can understand if Saleh Abdu Younus works day and night to magnify every weakness of the government. He has many reasons. He did it 17 years ago and of course he is expected to continue his routine job. But, it is very sad to see citizens such as you pretending to-see-no-danger of the so-called DY because of your boundless hatred to Woyane. For those of us who witnessed how few thousand shop owners in northern Ethiopia paralyzed the day to day lives of over 200, 000 inhabitants some seven or eight years ago and another incidence on the approval of the speech delivered by a notorious Muslim Oromo religious and political activist named Jawar Mohamed in New York by the Director of First Hijra Foundation would choose life under a brutal dictatorship rather than supporting the cause of a group who advocate for liberation of the “subjugated” Muslim population in northern Ethiopia using “machete” as we were told by Jawar Mohamed a year ago. Come to you sense.

          • አዲስ

            Hi Rahwa,

            Right no sane individual deny the limitations of the court system. I am a sane person. So yeah I don’t deny that 🙂 But limitations are different from dysfunction. Limitation is different from being a tool for political agenda. So let’s not mix the two.

            Saay’s position on many topics are public knowledge including the 17 years old ones you mentioned, particularly those regarding Ethiopia I disagree on. So what does that have to do with the issue we are discussing? What’s the need to try to correlate my positions with those of Saay’s and act like you are sad that an Ethiopian would think like that. Is it such a bad thing that an Ethiopian agree on some points with an Eritrean(in this case saay)? Most importantly my position on the issue is not a unique one in Ethiopia, in fact it’s a widely held view by those that are not indoctrinated by EPRDF and those who don’t get all their information from ETV. I don’t understand your attempt to try to find parallel with my point and those of Saay’s by bringing his positions of 17 years ago. Just because you show your indifference with an Eritrean, doesn’t make you a patriot or the opposite doesn’t make one less patriotic.

            I also don’t hate woyane as you referred to them. I don’t know where you get that from. You realize that our country is more than 90 million strong and people( may I boldly say most of us)hold different opinion than that of EPRDF and that doesn’t necessarily make them a hater right? Don’t be a cookie cutter thinker.

            You brought Jawar Mohammed’s speech which I disagree on so many levels but also can say a lot about. You also told me to come to my senses. If that means fall in line with EPRDF thinking, trust me you are doing a good job on that and you wont’ find me there. So I suggest you try be the sane one and look into more of how the court system is being an instrument of silencing dissent by EPRDF. Don’t think that disagreeing with EPRDF is hating woyane or hating Ethiopia. There’s not hate in my vocabulary or political thinking.

            Thanks,
            Addis

          • Rahwa T

            Hi Addis,

            My main message was the danger of foreigners interfering on religious issue of Ethiopia. I didn’t attempt to correlate your position with that of Saay’s two-decades-old position. I was simply trying to put the potential motives behind him. I don’t care if your hate towards the woyanes go beyond the boiling point. Good luck with your fight.

          • Rahwa T

            Hi Addis,

            My main message was the danger of foreigners interfering on religious issue of Ethiopia. I didn’t attempt to correlate your position with that of Saay’s two-decades-old position. I was simply trying to put the potential motives behind him. I don’t care if your hate towards the woyanes go beyond the boiling point. Good luck with your fight.

          • አዲስ

            Hi Rahwa,

            Again I don’t hate woyanes. Stop your hate talk.

            Thanks,
            Addis

          • Fanti Ghana

            Hello Addis,

            I am back, and this time I am on my own volition.

            This talk of ‘hate’ is kind of important. Let me start with an example/background. During the 2005 election, a very special and a good friend of mine started campaigning in my home town for Kinijit. She is very well respected in the community (she is second cousin to Tilahun Gizaw), and also one of our high schools in the area is named after her brother who was killed by Derg in the middle of town “for looking threatening.” She didn’t have any ill-will toward EPRDF, but her reasoning had been that if Kinijit wins democracy will have a good foothold in Ethiopia for good. She is the quintessential Ethiopian in everything she says and does. However, sometime near election date Birhanu Nega spoke on national TV!

            She couldn’t believe what she heard. She got up, furious, and seriously concerned and went full time anti Kinijit for the remainder of the campaign, to use her own words, “to save Ethiopia from these kinds of dead souls.” I felt vindicated, because I used to argue with her that these bunches of ‘oppositions’ don’t have any other agenda except ‘revenge.’ Everything they say pointed towards their hate driven dream of to ‘get rid of all Tigreans from Ethiopia.’

            Now, I want you to put your self in Tigrean’s shoes and tell me if the following are statements you would expect from people concerned about the well being of Ethiopia and Ethiopians or the laughable ‘lack of democracy’:

            Abay ye Tigre kimal meragefia ayhonim (before EPRDF even reached Addis Ababa)
            Weyane Amaran liyaTefa yemeTa naw (nobody says to what end)
            EPRDF Amaran beTigre eyeteka naw (ignoring the details of who is replaced by whom)
            Tigre werk kebdwat zekeTech (by those who complain about ‘abet abet kefafelun’)
            Tigre wede Mekele nibret wede Kebele (by the ‘true Ethiopians”)
            Mekele lay international airport tesera. ligeneTelu naw (instead of ager eyasadegu naw)
            Tigre ageritun kefafelat (as if self preservation and awareness causes secession)

            Of course these mentalities are not every Amhara’s, far from it, but in the last two decades, these and many more like it are the themes of our so called opposition’s ‘concern for democracy.’ Can you possibly blame any Tigrean for not listening to the opposition let alone support or relate to them? In fact, shouldn’t you be grateful for Tigreans not responding in kind?

            For what it is worth, although Lidetu Ayalew started his political career with “be Tigre anigezam” he at least kept improving and changing his opinions as he discovered EPRDF was not what it seemed at first.

            Granted, the sentiment “Abay ye Tigre kimal meragefia ayhonim” is totally forgivable, because TPLF’s “Tigray Adey” was still fresh on everyone’s mind, and granted that the “Mekele lay international airport tesera ligeneTelu naw,” is also forgivable, because when EPRDF arrived at addis Ababa, they had Eritrea in tow, but everything that is going on now and what was going on since day one is based on this same theme of “hate,” and it has nothing to do with democracy. That is the Tigrean perspective.

            Now, Mr. Addis, if we are to build democracy we need to start to listen to one another. We have a host of formidable problems to deal with without having to chew each other’s foot.

            PS:
            Where is that ‘truth’ about ‘awko yetegna’ I was expecting from you?

          • አዲስ

            Hi Fanti,

            You started your argument with so many wrong assumptions that it’s just sad to even respond to you because of the direction you wanted to take the discussion. But I will try to indulge you.

            1. About the Kinijit lady from your home town, I don’t know who she’s and which remark of Dr. Birhanu that got her to abandon Kinijit. So how do you expect me to comment on that? You attempted to emphasize her credibility by invoking her relatives so are you expecting me to take her words without knowing what got her all worked up?

            2. You asked me to put my self in Tigrean shoes. Now that implicitly assumes that I am not a Tigre. How do you know that? It’a a bit weird to be honest. Another important point is does one need to put themselves in Tigrean shoes in order to understand the point of view of their country men? especially to understand the points you raised? I don’t think so. One needs to be level headed. That’s all.
            Now to go back to the remarks you mentioned, I think of myself as a level headed person and judge those remarks as divisive and hateful. But to characterize every opposition by those remarks is dishonest and lazy to the very least. Were there(or still are) oppositions that hates Tigre? am sure. Does every opposition hate Tigres. Simple No. If it’s hard for you to differentiate between the two then you need more time polishing your politics but I doubt that’s the case so comes the “awko yetegna…”
            To add to that if one’s to list the hateful remarks by EPRDF people( mind you they are not just party people but are governing the entire country), that list would be much longer than yours. But that for me is just useless. I don’t engage in that. I can filter through that. I advice you to do the same. I also have a lot to be grateful for Tigreans but not in the way you characterize it.

            3. You tried to show me a Tigrean perspective. I was a bit confused first when I read it but I am guessing you are responding to Rahwa’s comment of someone hating woyane? correct me if I am wrong. And there are more than 90 million people in Ethiopia so why specifically are we talking about a Tigrean perspective here?

            4. What baffles me is how my comment about the “Dimstachin Yisema” group turned into me defending myself that I don’t hate woyane(a word I don’t even like to use because many TPLF haters use it as a slang word) to Rahwa and you trying to show me a Tigrean perspective(even pushing it far mind you) as if I somehow showed you that I don’t understand it. When in my comments have you seen such opinions? Or in your book, anybody who does not blindly support TPLF is a TPLF hater or is someone who don’t understand Tigre?
            Isn’t it sad for you that I am defending myself of something I am not? Do you believe this elevates our discourse or may be you do know that already and this is all a distraction? I leave that to you and the readers here.

            5. What’s with the party name TPLF anyway? It’s a leading party that has been governing the entire country for 25 years. Isn’t it time to retire “Tigrean People Libration” from its name? not a major issue but are we still liberating Tigrean people? from who? wait may be we are, so never mind 🙂

            Finally, Fanti I have a new rule here now for engaging people. It’s very simple. Stop assuming stuff about me. Be on topic or at least try to be. I’ll always try to clarify if my statements aren’t clear but won’t defend myself repeatedly of something that I am not. It’s just waste of time for me.

            Thanks,
            Addis

          • Pass the salt

            Dear Rahwa,
            These days you are sounding more and more like Selam*. You’re not debating, you’re lamenting.
            *Selam is under sanction by our intolerant mini-security council over here.

          • Fanti Ghana

            Hello Addis,

            EPRDF does not hand down sentencing. However, from time to time, EPRDF does remove some remnants of Derg, hate based opposition elements, seriously unqualified judges, and corrupt officials who fail to exercise the law as written.

            PS:
            Take Saay in small doses, and remember he is only closet Ethiopian.

          • አዲስ

            Hi Fanti,

            This kind of comments makes me laugh. I don’t consider you a gullible person so I am understanding your position as “awko yetegna…”

            Regarding saay, don’t’ worry I am a grown man I can hold my own in face of different opinions but what’s surprising to me is getting your comment right after Rahwa’s. Is somebody giving you a marching order or is the EPRDF cookie cutter thinking working its magic here ?

            Thanks,
            Addis

          • saay7

            Hey Addis:

            I think His Fantiness attempt to keep everybody happy is going to give him whiplash:)

            As for Rahwa, well, you notice whatever she said is not argument at all; there is not a single substantive rebuttal to what you wrote or what I wrote but the usual blackmail of fear: she is trying to warn you off me because apparently, when I am not working “day and night” to engineer regime change in Eritrea I am working “day and night” to engineer regime change in Ethiopia. In my spare time, I have a full time job, a family and the usual hobbies:)

            When people run out of arguments and they can’t defend their position, they accuse people of “hate.” Then, apparently, the burden of proof is on the accused that he is not hateful. The last person to accuse me of hating Ethiopia was Hayat and you saw her contribution to this debate: she did an Oppo Research on Peace (now accused as terrorist by Rahwa lol), then when Peace challenged her, “umm…why aren’t you curious about this subject: the railroading of Ethiopian Muslims?”, she did the perfunctory asking then when Eyob did his spinning, she did her, “oh, ok, I get it: nothing to see here! Case closed.” Laughable, actually.

            When the DY guys (who, of course, could have gotten out of jail by signing confession letters under torture but refused to) where asked by the just-in-time judges if they had anything to say, they replied, no, judges, we have nothing to say because we know that even you don’t believe in what you are doing: you are just doing what you are told. In much different time, and era, they would be seen as heroes for their courage…but not in EPRDF-Ethiopia and the EPRDF cadres who are incapable of reading past the script they are given.

            And, Addis, yeah, I agree with you: this has nothing to do with EPRDF liking or disliking Muslims. It is entirely indifferent: but it is obsessed of maintaining 100% power 100% of the time. Bekele Gerba, Medrek Vice chair is out of jail (just in time to placate Obama): was that somebody who should have ever been in jail had it not been for EPRDF total obsession with control every square inch of political power in Ethiopia?

            saay

          • Rahwa T

            saay,

            You do not want to talk on the points I raised above; on Jawar Mohamed’s talk, and your man, the Director of FHF. To you what they said are very normal and Ethiopians should follow without fear. To you, what they said at the NY conference were in search of justice. You think you would convince Ethiopians (except the woyane cadres who wanted rule the country for many years to come) that everything your men cooked is the way to the “sebategnaw semay”, peace and prosperity will prevail all over Ethiopia and the region. Whatever comments posted against your DY by few woyane cadres have no substance. Again I wish you all the best “mengedun cherQ yargilh”.

            It is funny that you don’t feel a shame when you dare say that Bekele Gerba was released to please Obama and you think we would not ask you if he was the only BIG Figure behind the bar in Ethiopian prison.
            Sir, to be great writer is one thing, to be honest is different.

          • saay7

            Hey Rahwa:

            What is this with “your man” and “your men”? They are YOUR compatriots: deal with it. And they have as much right to call themselves Ethiopians as YOU do so, again, deal with it.

            Bekele Gerba, and others, were released on the eve of Obama’s visit. He was in prison for 5 years. You have all the right to believe that his release on the eve of Obama’s visit was coincidental, but you also have a right to believe in unicorns. I think Bekele Gerba “hates” Ethiopia because he was sentenced to 7 years:)

            saay

          • Rahwa T

            Hi saay,

            I will consider them as my compatriots when foreigners such as you and other intellectuals, political , religious and Human right activists from Near East and the West stop interfering in our affairs Remember, you are talking religion, which is much hazardous than nuclear rays. You are talking to much of it. You are acting as if you owned it. As I said it in earlier comments, you told us Eritreans and Ethiopian Muslims in the US pray together. We know what that means. That implies they are being your men and your comrades.

            There are dozens of other prisoners, who went to jail way before Bekele Gerba. They are still where they have been, before and after Obama visit. The US Embassy, The State Department, the White House and Obama know this. So your logic that Bekele was released to please Mr Barack Hussien Obama, is another lame logic.

          • saay7

            Hey Rahwa:

            So Ethiopian Muslims are your compatriots conditionally? If…. then?

            What we are discussing is politics, not religion. When a government tells a civil society whom to elect, what to believe, that is not religion but politics.

            Since this is the second time you are mentioning it, let me tell you a typical Eritrean Muslim and Ethiopian Muslim post-Friday-prayer discussion:

            Ethiopian Muslim: so, Isaias is still as crazy as ever.
            Eritrean Muslim: I am afraid so.
            Ethiopian Muslim: May Allah bring you relief.
            Eritrean Muslim: Amen. So how are the Weyane doing.
            Ethiopian Muslim: Oh, not so good.
            Eritrean Muslim: Oh?
            Ethiopian Muslim: yeah…this Ahbash thing…. (more details)…
            Eritrean Muslim: May Allah bring you relief.

            Its two powerless people doing what all powerless people do: delegating all their problems to God. But, Rahwa, if you are going to lose sleep, it is your attitude of questioning the loyalty of your own citizens–which, incidentally, is one of the things Ethiopian Muslims often complain about: that their loyalty to Ethiopia is always under question and they are seen as “the other”– is what you have to worry about.

            Sure there are dozens of prisoners in Ethiopia, maybe hundreds, and there are those where I say, “I can’t believe they imprisoned HIM?” and Bekele Gerba is one of them. You and I have a disagreement on whether the timing of the release of the Zone9 Bloggers, for example, and the sentencing of DY had something to do with Barack Obama’s visit (what’s up with you mentioning his middle name? Stayed up late watching Fox News?) or it doesn’t. I think it does; you think it doesn’t. The end.

            saay

          • Rahwa T

            Dear Saay,

            and… and that is all? ንስኻ ብዙዙ ከተዛርበኒ ኢኻ ደሊኻ። You don’t seem to listen. I would rather stop it. I hope I will not provoke. Thank you

          • Rahwa T

            ብዙሕ ከተዛርበኒ ኢኻ ደሊኻ ንኽብል ‘የ

          • Semere Andom

            Saay:
            Two things, a correction and a thought
            The Eritrean Muslim will say “Ameen”, the Ethiopian will say Amen:-)
            If I am not mistaken Rahwa is metioning his middle name because he (Barak) used it during his in inaugural l speech;-)

          • Rahwa T

            Dearest Sem,
            Thank you very much being positive, although I had no reason as to why I scribbled his full name. I was angered at Saay’s repeated comments on this topic.

          • Kim Hanna

            Selam Rahwa,
            .
            I did like your response to Mr. SAAY. As you know he is very very good, in fact supremely gifted in what I call……Maximizing the minimum and Minimizing the maximum…. when it comes to Ethiopia. Not only does he have the smarts but he has an extensive experience and background on the subject.
            .
            Item 1.
            The potentially fruitful strategy and tactic of isolating Tigreans from the rest of Ethiopia by turning former enemies to allies has failed. They have given up on that for the most part.
            Now they are looking for a fertile new approach, a new strategy.
            .
            Item 2.
            In my opinion, Mr. SAAY in particular (but true to others as well) is short in credit balances from his Mosque crowd and the fundamentalists. This is his project to develop that credit balance. I am sure he is getting few gold stars and pats on the back for the effort.
            Otherwise, nothing else makes sense that you can point to as to why they are coming on so strong. (BTW: these are the same folks who want reconciliation and economic integration)
            .
            Therefore, we have to fight him as a guerrilla debater; we hit and run until final victory, so to speak.
            .
            .
            The idea they advance, that they are concerned about the fire that might start in our side of the border and spread to theirs is ludicrous, to say the least. It is but a canard. It is similar to the canard they used, the cancellation of federation, as the cause of their revolution. We all know the reasons, and it is out of our hands now. (let SAAY and Y.G debate about that forever)
            .
            Why would they fear fire at our house that might get started and move to their home when they see, all of us see, smoke billowing out of their kitchen window? Would it not be reasonable to expect they work hard to get that grease fire in their kitchen under control before it gets out of hand? Frankly, I am more legitimately concerned it is the other way around.
            .
            What can we do other than point the error of their ways and withdraw? Let other reasonable people be the judge. Time is on our side when and where to make our crystal clear points. However, after everything is said and done don’t expect too much change in their behavior, they are on a mission.
            .
            You know the silver lining of all their meddling in our affairs helped us to come closer and become a nation to reckon with.
            .
            K.H

          • Rahwa T

            እግዜር ይስጥህ ኪም ሀና። ማለት ያልቻልኩትን፣ ነገር ግን እምፈልገውን ነው የተናገርከው።

            I wish this topic was closed two days ago. The other day, when I asked Saay to stop it, he referred me to the guidelines of awate.com: “fearless news, opinion, analysis on Eritrea and beyond.” We have read him over the years that he is against outsiders in bringing political change in Eritrea. Above all, he would never resist changes that would come to his country through the involvement of Ethiopia. To me this is a very good stand. But…But…when it comes to the movement of Muslims in Ethiopia, he brings a second card to play. In the name of fearless news, opinion, and analysis, he works hard to lecture us as if we were his undergrad students on the ABC of DEMOCRACY and HUMAN RIGHT. They think that we are that stupid. To be honest, the image that I had of him was that he was very entertaining, free, cautious gentle-man who worships Allah/God without going to the end of the corner. This is changed in the last 48 hours. It is so cruel to say that one is making “fearless news”, while sitting in his comfort zone. I understand why many of the forumers want to stay away from discussing this topic. I wish he feels the feeling of the others.

            Thank you very much

          • saay7

            Hey K.H:

            .
            Maximizing the minimum and minimizing the maximum is a strategy in game theory and I am not a game theorist because that’s a zero sum game. (Also, I am not smart enough for game theory.)

            .
            You could believe that I am a part of some conspiracy, a new strategy, that I am trying to win the allegiance of the “mosque crowd and fundamentalists”, that I am “meddling”, that I am looking for some cracks that you have to devise a strategy of hit-and-run.

            .
            Or:

            .
            You could just say, saay wrote something that some awatistas agree with, some dont, and most don’t even want to discuss because it makes them uncomfortable and they don’t think it is relevant.

            .
            I think the latter would cause you less stress and you seem to be stressed by this subject:)

            saay

          • Kim Hanna

            Selam SAAY,
            .
            Oh, well, now you gave me the choice I will say, saay wrote something some Awatistas agree with and most don’t. I am just as uncomfortable as the rest.
            Just to be on the safe side I will keep my strategy.
            Now the “modality” agreement is signed, I will look forward for a good weekend and wish you the same.
            .
            K.H

          • saay7

            Hey KH:

            .
            So, what you are saying is that the agreement is not final and binding?:)Cheer up: u practically begged for that one:)
            .
            Saay

          • Rahwa T

            Hi Saay,

            ዝብኢ ዝውዕሎ ኣይንውዓሎ !!

            You reminded a story of a donkey that killed its attacker. A hyena approached a donkey for an attack, but instead the donkey reacted instinctively against its attacker and did a bloody fight, bitten right on its enemy’s neck. The hyena could not move and its life ended on the teeth of the donkey. The sad part was that the donkey could not convince itself that her enemy had gone forever. The owner of the donkey and villagers came to tell him (the donkey) that the hyena was dead and that he was the winner. Despite their effort, the donkey was so frightened to release its predator, but so tired as it was spent several hours with hyena on its teeth. The incidence was culminated with the donkey releasing the dead donkey and rushed for escape, at a speed of sound. Finally, the villagers found the donkey deep down in a gorge.

            እቲ ኣድጊእውን መወዳአታኡ ኣይፀበቐን እምበር››

            Do not ask me about the moral of the story. I brought it here because I wanted to say to you please release the topic you have bitten since the last three days. It is already dead.

          • saay7

            Hey Rahwa:

            I don’t pay attention to stories unless they are preceded with ካብ ዕለታት ሓደ መዓልቲ/ ክእለታት አንድ ቀን…. specially when you won’t give up the moral of the story:) Specially since there are like 20 Amharic proverbs dealing with donkeys and dula and jib and kicking and biting and even passing gas…

            I get it: you are saying let go. Rahwa, it may not appear like it now, but this subject will boil over and within days we won’t even remember we had it: it will move to the ether.

            About my persistence? A woman I greatly admire gave me an advice years ago. Well, not me specifically but all her readers: Here’s the story:

            Once, a man shot an eagle out of the sky. He examined the eagle and found the dry skull of a weasel fixed by the jaws to his throat. The supposition is that the eagle had pounced on the weasel and the weasel swiveled and bit as instinct taught him, tooth to neck, and nearly won. I would like to have seen that eagle from the air a few weeks or months before he was shot: was the whole weasel still attached to his feathered throat, a fur pendant? Or did the eagle eat what he could reach, gutting the living weasel with his talons before his breast, bending his beak, cleaning the beautiful airborne bones?

            From this, the author, Annie Dillard, gives us this advice which not only happens to be one of the best prose in the English language but is really part of my DNA now:

            I think it would be well, and proper, and obedient, and pure, to grasp your one necessity and not let it go, to dangle from it limp wherever it takes you. Then even death, where you’re going no matter how you live, cannot you part. Seize it and let it seize you up aloft even, till your eyes burn out and drop; let your musky flesh fall off in shreds, and let your very bones unhinge and scatter, loosened over fields, over fields and woods, lightly, thoughtless, from any height at all, from as high as eagles.

            And the “it” for me is justice. The rest is just details.

            saay

          • አዲስ

            Hi Saay, Rahwa T

            I understand that tensions run high when we discussed internal matters of each other and different people approach the discussions from different angle. I think what matters the most is the idea they bring. If there’s some truth in it whatever their angle is I wouldn’t mind listening to that idea. Whatever I do with that Idea is up to me. I could try to shout and cry foul because it’s coming from somebody I suspect means no good or I could examine the idea and if there are untrue or malice in it I try to expose it. Besides, we’ve a very long history between us that we probably know to some extent what each other’s intentions are, so that’s there to shield us I guess.

            Suspicion is not a bad thing but trying to silence somebody because they may have bad intentions is a bit useless to me. For example, PFDJ always talks about how woyane did this and that…like imprisoned people illegally….now I agree with that, EPRDF do imprison people illegally but I don’t deny it just because PFDJ shouts about it. So in the same way, the Ethiopian Muslims and Ethiopians in large are in the driver seat of these discussions not foreigners. Everywhere I go, in person or on the internet, Ethiopian Muslims and none Muslims are discussing about this issue and how terribly EPRDF is handling the situation so I am not worried if Saay or any foreigner for that matter shares the same feeling, whatever his intentions are because he’s not the driving force in this discussion as I mentioned above.

            So Rahwa keep your suspicion but try not to make this case as if it’s championed by some foreigners. It’s a problem for us Ethiopians and we are the ones suffering from it. The least you can do is try to examine if there’s some truth in what we are saying.

            Thanks,
            Addis

            p.s I thought the release of Bekele Gerba was actually delayed because they ignored his “good behavior” while in prison which would’ve let him released a bit earlier. no?

          • saay7

            Hey Addis:

            Here are some rules to live by:

            If you are an Ethiopian and you are a critic of the EPRDF, you are probably a chauvinist, a neftegna or a Derg rifraff and either way you are driven by hate of TPLF;

            If you are an Eritrean and you are a critic of EPRDF, you are probably a closet PFDJ or openly PFDJ and either way this means you hate Ethiopia or at least Tigray. Also, you are distracting “the people” from the single thing they should focus on: how to defeat PFDJ.

            On Bekele Gerba, please correct but I thought he was sentenced to 7 years and released after 5 due to good behavior?

            saay

          • Rahwa T

            Hi saay,

            here is a link on Bekele Gerba.

            http://www.awrambatimes.com/?p=5089

          • saay7

            Thanks Rahwa:

            Here’s another link on Bekele Gerba:

            http://www.opride.com/oromsis/news/3735-us-slams-ethiopia-s-human-rights-abuse

            saay

          • አዲስ

            Hi Saay,

            Yeah. It’s a quagmire indeed.

            About Bekele Gerba, am not sure what the difference is between parole and good behavior but I read somewhere that he was suppose to be released on January 19, 2014 on parole not March 30, 2015.

            Thanks,
            Addis

          • Peace!

            Dear SAAY,

            You said “If you are an Eritrean and you are a critic of EPRDF, you are probably a closet PFDJ or openly PFDJ and either way this means you hate Ethiopia or at least Tigray. Also, you are distracting “the people” from the single thing they should focus on: how to defeat PFDJ.”

            Thank you for the big relief after a hectic day!

            regards

          • Fanti Ghana

            Hello Addis,

            I saw the ‘gullible’ part, but I didn’t see the ‘Rahwa’ part coming. Notice the time I posted. It was in the wee hours of the night, because I was on a long distance phone call that took forever. I was too tired to read every post, but it is true that I responded to you when I saw her name, she got my attention, which caused me to see who she was responding to, which caused me to read your post, which caused me to use the last ounce of energy I had left to respond to you. So, you are right about Rahwa to an extent.

            Thank you for reminding me, because I am supposed to follow her wherever she goes, but I will follow her from a distance to avoid giveaway like this from now on. There is more than your ‘awakening’ at stake here.

            Now, it is your turn to tell the truth. Just this once and in the name of all the Sheikhs of the land please tell me the truth whether you added ‘awko yetegna’ because you knew I was going to say it to you or not? Be honest!

          • Abi

            Fantisha
            Addis is laughing at your comment, I’m crying because of the same comment.
            You are equating EPRDF to The Almighty.
            You are better than ” chifin degafi ” or blind supporter in Tigrigna.
            After 25 years in power, why do you bring derg as an excuse is below your caliber unless you think our intelligence is nonexistent.
            I’m still crying.

          • Fanti Ghana

            Hello ABisha,

            chifin Tilacha begots chifin digaf. It is the law of nature. However, the crying part we must explored for root cause. Let me remind you that it is not all bad. you got neTela chama yesterday thanks for emebete + Rose + Rahwa. Be grateful or I am going to use my super gun on you.

          • Abi

            Fantish
            Thank a lot . NeTela ( single) is always good. Keep the ones with the baggage. Yasqugnalesh !
            Fantish, you don’t find chifin Tilacha from Abi only chifin fiqir ( sayayu mafqer).

          • Fanti Ghana

            Hello Abi,
            Addisin yegoriT memtate neber.

          • Rahwa T

            Dear Abi,

            “ሳያዩ ማፍቀር” እንዴት ደስ የሚል አገላለፅ ነው። ግን አደጋ የለውም ትላለህ

          • Ted

            Abi, i feel your pain. You tried እያዩ ማፍቀር with us, you got burned after 30 yrs of trying. Now you are in to “ሳያዩ ማፍቀር”. You need all the assurance you can get from Rahwa and Fanti,….. How is it coming:-) On different note, Don’t give up on us, at least we know you loved us.

          • Rahwa T

            Dear Fanti,

            እኔ ልሰደብልህ፣ እኔ ልቕለልህ የኔ ጌታ። I coudn’t make it «raya» style. I know there was some problem with your comment early this morning. I thought you were making fun of it. Because even I will not dare to write that kind of comment in defense of EPRDF, although to many of the readers, I am one of the “many” core cadres of woyane. I hope they will understand your excuse in your second comment (above).
            Thank you for being my angel who takes care of me, ግርማ ዓዲ.

          • Fanti Ghana

            Hello Queen of my Princesses

            Rahwani,
            You made my day. I am going to sign out now to enjoy this incredible moment the rest of the day.

            Princess Hayat Adem,
            You better come up with something better (I don’t see how), or start watering that Rose.

          • Hayat Adem

            His highness,
            Rahwa raised the bar too high. She had in her wings without a distant 2nd to compete with her. I’m not saying I gave up but a girl has to know her limitations.
            Hayat

          • Fanti Ghana

            Hello Princess,

            Ouch your eminence! I was expecting something mind blowing like ‘over my dead body’ or similar. I think I am having a very high view of my self. All this fall from grace is for ‘lam alechign kesemai.’

            By the way, can you psychoanalyze this one for me: why do I keep thinking you are very tall?

            If you get this one right I will share someone’s wonderful complement to you. It is too good to give it away for free.

          • Hayat Adem

            Hello Fantiness,
            Okay, I’m not tall, nor short, nor average.
            Did I sound Monkey?
            ——————–
            Helping Houthi?
            No.
            Helping the Saudi coalition?
            Not at all.
            Neutral then?
            Not really.
            (What a crook!)
            —————–
            I’m 5′ 5.9″ inches (slightly taller than average)
            But meeting your expectation or not, fitting or not, deserving or not, you can’t hold back on that complement. Already craving.

          • Fanti Ghana

            Hello Princess Chakan,
            Slightly taller? That is amazonite where I come from Princess!

            The class:
            You get a “B” and I get a “C-”
            You got B instead of A because you did not include why or how was your tallness put into my head.
            I got C- because I had invisioned 5.5 – 5.10 range.

            The complement:
            Way before there was an email and way way before there a rose was planted, I made an honest confesion and I politely asked to be forgiven ahead in case I shout some name at night.

            ሓያት ድያ?

            Startled by how obvious I must have been I simply said ‘yes’ as a mater of fact.

            እሳስ ኣነ ባዕለይለ ከይሓልመላ ተፍርሕያዋ ሱቕኢልኻ ሃርስ
            (exact quote).

          • Semere Andom

            Hi Fanti:
            and for your wicked sense humor, I dedicate this song to you 🙂
            https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OT9uhuS-v4A

          • Fanti Ghana

            Hello Texas Ranger,

            Nice try! ጎንደር ከይድካ ሃሳስኻ ድለበር አውዙይስ ተሸንኪርና ኢና፤፤

          • Hayat Adem

            Indeed, I can’t pray for a better complement. This will remain encrypted in me forever. In the time such events are inevitably reciprocated from my side, there will be nobody on my bedside to witness it.

          • Hayat Adem

            Thanks a lot. That was priceless. I don’t the prosecutor is speaking enough about its side of the story. Also, journalists are not reporting with enough context and details. from the explanation you gave us: 1) there was violence involved; 2) there was a case of assassination, 3) they are supported and financed by foreingners, 4) they are against the mejlis, 5) they are against traditional/sufi, main stream ethiopian muslims…
            thanks

          • Kokhob Selam

            Dear Eyob,
            it strange to see some one at this era try to play the religious card. I have been following from the beginning and I found out that is political game. I don’t have objection on Wahibe nor do I support it. But the bad thing here is their method in forcing others. where is the God that permits crime over others ? thank you for fallowing the story.

          • Eyob Medhane

            Kokhob,

            That is exactly what I am saying. Thank you for understanding…

          • saay7

            Hi Kokhob:

            I agree: it’s wrong to play the religious card and to force people and demand they follow religious leaders you have chosen for them, whether those leaders are Wahabi or AHbash. That’s why I expect you to condemn the EPRDF for doing that.

            Saay

          • Kokhob Selam

            Dear Saay7,
            any group can choose his leaders but he can’t force others as if that choice represents all Muslims – as far as there were not representatives on that particular meeting. again, EPRDF was wise enough to see from where that kind of movement starts and what the aim is. they almost were creating civil war from nothing.

          • saay7

            Selamat Kokhob:

            I think one of the abiding lessons we learned from our experience with the EPLF now PFDJ is that if the active members and those who love the Front don’t speak up and criticize it when it is headed the wrong way, it will continue to head the wrong way and it will take its members and fans for granted and never consult them. I feel that those who love the EPRDF are in the same predicament: they always begin with “the EPRDF is right, now how do I twist, ignore the story so that I can validate my beliefs.”

            The case of “Dimtsachen yisemma” is now 4 years old and those who make it their specialty to follow this, either because they have expertise or passion for it, have been reporting on it.

            Now, this goes back to March 2011. There were reports of “Quran desecration” and the Ethiopian Muslims in Jimma burned 60 churches. The EPRDF and the Ethiopian Islamic Affairs Supreme Cousil (EIASC: ALL OF WHOM WERE APPOINTED BY THE GOVERNMENT) did something really excellent: they conducted “religious tolerance” training in Addis Ababa, Amhara, Harar and Oromiya. Again, excellent.

            Here’s where things felt apart: the trainers were Ahbash* directly imported from Lebanon. So a noble project (teach people religious tolerance) was tainted by bringing trainers who are considered an extreme sect in Ethiopia. It is like bringing “Pente” training to teach “Tewahdo” priests how to be tolerant: regardless how noble the curriculum is, the instructors are going to get in the way. (This is one of the few areas, education/training, that I can speak with some expertise about so excuse my air of certitude.)

            Was this a case of the EPRDF not know what it is doing because, golly, we are just ex-Marxist what do know about relgions, aw shucks? No. The EPRDF equated extremism with wahabism and it figured the antidote to wahabism are Ahbash.

            So what happened to the Imams who just equated “religious tolerance” with “Ahbash orthodoxy”? They were fired and arrested. The Aweliya Islamic school in Addis was close in December 2011 (still closed.)

            After the closing, for the whole year of 2012, the Ethiopian Muslims held PEACEFUL protests at their mosques–to protest government intervention in their affiars, to protest the closing of Aweliya school. This went on until October 2012 when the EPRDF charged about 30 people with terrorism. Here’s the thing: of the 30, nine were those WHO WERE ELECTED AS ARBITRATORS TO DEAL WITH THE GOVERNMENT. They were, according to their lawyers, tortured in prison.

            In October 2012, also, the government agreed to allow the EIASC to have its own elections–after they convinced it that it was unconstitutional for it to interfere in Muslims affairs and appoint their leaders–but then it did what it always does: it ensured that only its guys were elected. How do we know this? Well, because the USCIRF interviewed them and it noted: “EIASC members almost word for word reiterated the government’s talking points about the Ethiopian government’s respect for separation of religion and state. Some EIASC members also used charged language, referring to protesters against the government’s interference as ‘terrorists’ despite the fact that some of the new EIASC members themselves participated in the protests before being elected to the Council.”

            Now all this, oh, there were was due process and the defendants had lawyers…well, yes, compared to the police state of Eritrea everything looks better. But in 2012, Ethiopian State Television–which is the only television in the country–aired “Jihadawai Hareka” (Holy War Movement) which called the protesters “terrorists.” Doesn’t that prejudice the outcome when you run every Eyob and every Rahwa scared of their own compatriots?

            saay

            * EPRDF is no longer promoting Ahbash probably because it came to realize, belatedly, after it cause so much harm, that the antithesis to extreme wahabism is NOT importing some alien sect to the country. It learned this, not because you, its supporters, told it of the error of its ways, but because it was destabilizing to its own power monopoly.

          • Fanti Ghana

            Hello Eyoba,

            Your adorableness was what worried me from taking a chance earlier. haha.

            Thank you so much for the background. That was really beyond the call of duty.

            If you noticed the second half of everyone’s comments regarding Semere’s post they are much more informative and useful than the first half. Why, because we are getting closer and closer to where the topic should been started in the first place. For example my discovery of Awelia college calmed my nerves down by ten fold from where I started. That is really a very good start. Then religious leaders and community leaders can build on that to improve the quality of education as we grow.

          • Abi

            Fantish
            When I was at elementary school, my Hadere friends used to go to Awelya school. Now that school is serving as Islamic studies. This is progress.
            There is also a theological school at Arat Killo in the old science faculty. Derg closed it , weyanewoch opened it back. Religious freedom meto bemeto.
            As you said, some things are sensitive to mess with. This one is at the top of the list.

          • AOsman

            Dear Abi,

            There is a church attached to AAU. Would you build a mosque on the other side if given a chance?

            Pardon my interjection

            I see dedicated prayer halls in many UK universities, airports provide prayer rooms. I hope if the Muslim students made a request for a prayer room, you will not consider it too much to accommodate. A Muslim can pray anywhere, refusal wont be a big deal, but I wonder sometimes if we have to see the West practicing something to feel it is alright to do.

            Regards
            AOsman

          • አዲስ

            Hi AOsman,

            I believe there are prayer rooms at AAU. There are also prayer rooms at Bole airport.

            Thanks,
            Addis

          • Dear Abi,
            Please, correct me if I am wrong. I think that the church at AAU (Sidist Kilo) predates the university. It was built to serve the royal family, before the palace was turned into a university. I do not know if another church has been built since
            then.

          • Abi

            Hi Horizon
            You are right. It is the same church. it is called Kidus Markos.

          • Rahwa T

            Dear Abi,

            Though the Kidus Markos church is part of the main “Gibi”, there is another fence that separate the church with a small door that lead to the compass.Church goer students may use that door. So it is totally different, and as you said it was constructed many years before the King turned his Pallas into University. No reason to complain.

          • Abi

            Rahwa sistu
            You know the campus very well .

          • Nitricc

            Fantiiiii; I normally agree with you say, like 99%, which is unusual for me to agree with some one that high. but this time around, i disagree. From my research of Ethiopia, the one Ethiopians are so proud is they are Christians and if i am not mistaken the mother christianity. so, Introducing Arabic will be like introducing poison substance to the human body. just Yesterday; i was telling SAAY, that for Ethio-Eritrea a normalization to work in a peaceful manner, then one, Eritrea or Ethiopia has to be weaker than the other. the only reason there is relatively there is peace and harmony between Muslims and Christians in Ethiopia is because the Christians are stronger the Muslims. So, introducing Arabic for Ethiopia will be disastrous. this is just my opinion, Arabic and Ethiopia will never mix. Although, i see your point from pure school of thinking that every person and every individual deserves the dignity of life and the unalienable right of freedom of religion, sadly we are not there yet. I think when my good friend Semere Andom suggested the idea, i have it from good authority that was smoking a joint in Toronto’s Huhka bar.

          • Fanti Ghana

            Hello Nitricc,
            You are totally safe on this brother. You are faring much better than my self, because I disagree with my self about 30% of the time.

            Learning a language cannot be a threat to one’s existence. It goes against basic logic. We can isolate whatever influences us to behave unfairly, we can identify the pros and cons of learning Arabic and deal with it accordingly, but to outright deny ourselves a knowledge because it leads to another knowledge is as far away from logic as any philosophy can be.

            To be honest Nitricc, I wouldn’t want to live in a world where my existence can only be guaranteed as long as I remain stronger than my own brother. It goes against everything I believe in.

          • Semere Andom

            Nitricc:
            I was not even in Toronto, I was smoking coffee some where:-)

          • Nitricc

            Hi Semere. why do i have this feeling that you are in Ethiopia? are you? at least i sense you are in Africa.

          • Saleh Johar

            Nitricc,
            Even if he denies it, I am here to expose him. Yes, he is in Adi Grat, I just had coffee with him. He shamelessly admitted to me that he has visited Dedebit, and that he flew to Ethiopia on the enemy’s airplane. That shameless, toothless traitor. Me? I just bumped into him when I was taking my connection flight to Chicago–American conspiracy, they now national flights connect in Adi Grat. Can you believe that!

          • Nitricc

            SJ, i have no doubt. he is making it out with the president of the University of Dedebit. no names, please! lol they have been hooked all the way, once Semere was told, she will tight the knot with him. so, you are right, no doubt.

          • saay7

            Hi Nitricc:

            iSem already gave u a clue with “I was smoking coffee.” He is talking about the coffee houses in Amsterdam that wave the arengwade bcha qey flag outside and allow you to order “special cigarettes” from their menu. Don’t you hear the reggae music in the background?

            saay

          • Nitricc

            Hi SAAY ; you think? But the other day he said the Internet was slow where ever he was. So that and the coffee gave me a clue to conclude Ethiopia as the destination.

          • Eyob Medhane

            Gash Saleh,

            I really was trying to shut up and just listen, but always there is someone, who pull me to say something…

            Addis Ababa University is a secular university. Should someone want to learn Islam, there is a college now, formerly high School called Awelia that is devoted to teach Islamic studies. There are many others now, it’s not even alone anymore. Other than that, there are plenty of Mosques in the country, where one can worship and as well as learn about Islam for FREE. Why should a secular government institution have an Institute that is devoted to a particular religion? Could there be ‘An Orthodox Christianity Studies Institute’ at AAU? How about Catholic or Protestant, Adventist, Later day Saints Institutes? You know those religions also have millions of followers..Or it is only Muslims that are chosen to have a special privillage to have their own religious institute in a state University to be suggested? If so, don’t others have a legitimate right to have their own “institutes” or will they be told to ‘buzz off, you are not chosen’? I remember, when Mohammed Kheir’s wish to have Arabic imposed and FORCED on us through education, when he lamented with regret about what he would do, had he been an Education Minister of Ethiopia.

            I really think that this is alarm bell for many of us what is to come and what to watch for to preserve who we are, our language, our identity, our heritage.

          • Semere Andom

            Dear Ayubay:
            First this is the other Semere:-)
            Second, I think some of you took my comment, whose larger point was why Eritreans should be envious about the sentencing of Muslims who were accused of trying to create ISIS chapter. I commented in passing how Ethiopia given its sizable Muslim population must not fear Arabic and I said as I did several time before that it should transcend its history to embrace its unique asset, its complex diversity. The larger message of my comment was: that Eritreans should envy Ethiopia s ignored and to my surprise no Eritrean went bananas on my assertion to envy the “backward” Ethiopia.
            Rahwa revoked my honorary Dedebit status and lamented that she does not understand why Arabic is the only sacred a language. Horiizon complained, Abi advised me to drink a better coffee, but unbeknownst to him for two weeks I have been drinking a coffee that is equally good to the Siddamo coffee and I will let him figure which country it is. Hint: it is not Eritrea. All of you ignored my compliments and focused on the Arabic that his Fantiness called, tiny and microscopic.
            Fanti was his usual and I forgave him for disappearing me as wild life minister. Fanti, not even a cultural attaché in Dedebit, come on, I speak Tigriiniya”-)
            But about the Islamic studies at your alma-mater, it is precisely because it is secular institution that it should have Islamic studies. Your dicing it to Othodox and Pent etc is typical Eyobay hyperbole, Christian studies suffices:-)
            Islamic studies does not merely mean the theological aspect of it, that is a minute part. Sal once had a conjecture that went along these lines: if the Palestine had spokes persons who spoke better English, they could have gotten better deals. He continued the Israelis also have their heavy “Rs”, but they were better communicators. My conjecture why the 6 million Jews defeat the 300 million Arab is because they study them, their spokes people speak fluent Arabic, on the other hand the 300 million people would mostly say “la hawla wo la quwata” when they hear a Hebrew word.
            So the department of Islamic studies in a country that has a city called Harar
            that contains about 100 mosques bodes well for it, I think
            I do not remember ustaz M Kheir’s comment, but my passing comment was made because of this: although Arabic is not demanded in Ethiopia and although it is not the only sacred language. the Negashs and Lemlems I grew up with spoke and loved Tigriniya but they did not say “amlak ymesg”. they said “alhamdu Allah”, they did not say “anbibe” they said “Qerie”, these facts make Arabic uniquely woven to the culture of Muslims even if they love and prefer to speak their own mother tongue. The Tesfalidets and Andemariams I grew up with also spoke Tigriniya, but they never said “shalom” or they did not say “itecha elohim”. I suspect the same goes in Ethiopia.

          • Amde

            Hi Semere,

            Perhaps you could have fared better with this post if you had started us off slowly and gently with Gebre Egziabher (in Ge’ez) means Abd Allah in Arabic.. haha…

            A couple of years ago, I ran across a book on Arabic language written in Amharic for the Amharic speaker carried by one of those wandering book sellers in Addis. When you consider the number of Ethiopians travelling to-and-from Arabic speaking lands, it seems to me that fluent Arabic speaking Ethiopians may quite be in the millions. But a national language? I am pretty sure Afan-Oromo will be one way before Arabic is even brought up as an issue. I actually think it will be a heck a of a lot more divisive issue in fact.

            This honestly makes me question if you have ever visited Ethiopia? Do you have family there? I think your family were refugees in Sudan and that is where you grew up and got your education yes?

            Amde

          • Semere Andom

            Selam Amde
            Yes, I do have family in Ethiopia, or more accurately I had very close relatives in Ethiopia and yes I also have visited Ethiopia and Yes I spent some years in Sudan. I

            My passing comment about the Arabic language for Ethiopia was based on this fact ” the Negashs and Lemlems I grew up with spoke and loved Tigriniya but they did not say “amlak ymesg”. they said “alhamdu Allah”, they did not say “anbibe” they said “Qerie”, these facts make Arabic uniquely woven to the culture of Muslims even if they love and prefer to speak their own mother tongue. The Tesfalidets and Andemariams I grew up with also spoke Tigriniya, but they never said “shalom” or they did not say “itecha elohim”. I suspect the same goes in Ethiopia.”
            But I am cognizant about the difference between Erititrean and Ethiopians regarding the Arabic language that Abi, Saleh and others made, but when it comes to opposing the language from the Eritrean Christians is not better than that of Ethiopia. In Eritrea we just supress it, we have our on political correctness, the Ghedli correctness. But I also note that the fallacy of some that Eritrea was more influenced by Arabs and Islam than Ethiopia.
            Where is the mirror that you donated? 🙂

          • Eyob Medhane

            Sem,

            First thing is first…

            * Drop Sidama coffee and start Harar. It’s the best. Starbucks makes their best Espresso with Harar…

            *Semeres there are too many of you. I guess I thought you were not one of the mean ones… 🙂

            * As I tried to explain to Fanti, in Ethiopia, there is already a COLLAGE called Awelia that teaches and researched Islamic studies, and it is not alone. There are so many and even many more to come. Hence, a State owned institution does not need to be a religion studies institution.

            *The names Tesfalidet and Andemariam do not sound Jewish to me. Therefore, they wouldn’t have no business to adopt Jewish words in their day to day language. 🙂 There are enough Tigrigna words to use for that..

            *I hope I don’t need to repeat to you that with its sizable Muslim population, Ethiopia has colleges of islamic studies and will have more without a need to embade these Islamic studies departments in State owned colleges, no matter what city has 100 or more mosques….

          • አዲስ

            Hi Eyob,

            Come on Yirga Cheffe is THE coffee. Try that 🙂

            I thought the closure of Awolia college escalated or ignited the “dimstachin yisema” movement. Is the college open now?

            Thanks,
            Addis

          • Eyob Medhane

            Addis,

            Yirgachefe is fine. But Sidama coffee..to me is a bit bitter…Harar is very refined…believe me. Try it..I am an absolute coffee addict… 🙂

            Awolia, as far as I know is not open..it’s still changing hands between the government and Mejlis..I hope it will open, once the Demtsachin Yesema thing is settled….

          • አዲስ

            Hi Eyob,

            Yirgacheffe is not just fine it’s Fineeee 🙂 It’s my poison.

            That’s my knowledge too regarding Awolia at this time.

            Thanks,
            Addis

          • Abi

            Shalom, Sem
            I know what coffee you have been drinking. If it is not ethiopian, it should be eritrean coffee smuggled from ethiopia.
            Enjoy it black, no sugar.

          • Fanti Ghana

            Hello Minister of wild life…,
            እዙይ’ኳ ኣነ ኾይነ

            That ‘check your email’ statement hurt like hell. I haven’t told Abi about it to save him the excruciating pain I went through. You have been gone for a while and you probably are not aware of what I and Abi are going through, but if you knew you wouldn’t be that cruel by telling us you got an email address in public.

          • Semere Andom

            Your Fantiness:
            you need to return the favo, remember how I briefed you when you were away. Now your turn,
            Check your email to Hayat was a joke, when she said she did not approve my absence

          • Fanti Ghana

            Hello Sem,
            I gathered that much, but I had a reason for saying that, but it won’t work any more. it is already passed midnight for Abi, but we will see if he catches up in the morning or if the trap is still potent.

          • Abi

            Hi Fantish, Sem
            What did I miss ? I was busy on the phone talking to Hayat. You know those midnight calls are long and relaxed. She was in her pajamas…….hold on I think she is calling again. Damn! It is my wife telling me to take out the trash and walk the dog.

          • Fanti Ghana

            Hello Sem Worki,

            Sorry for the delay; too many chamas to account for.

            The Princess merely said EHHmm
            Abi fell in love lezel-alem.

            I too realized I was in love all along
            I didn’t know it, it has been too long.

            Abi shouted please I am better for you!
            I have so many ’emebetes’; lets meet by the bayou.

            The princess, confident of her hook, kept quiet
            Abi pleaded; where are you yene’mebet?

            Like you, I almost disappeared
            ‘Fanti had 16 chamas’ when Abi tried.

            I won’t mind as 17th The Princess replied
            17 vs 0; that is not fair; Abi cried.

            ‘The first 16 must have a good reason
            Said the Princess; in her poisonous season.

            I then knew Abi was in trouble
            He started to have nightmares and dream bubble.

            I tried ‘sacrifice’ for him but failed
            But, then, you came back from the dead!

            ———- The less important is below ———-

            Selam shukor got quarantined
            This time she couldn’t be bailed.

            SGJ made his hate of the Saxaphone public
            He confessed he listens to Wedi Tukabo in a panic.

            I started a fight with Saay and I hired myself as his lawyer.
            It was down, down, all the way down from there.

            Peace broke the law of don’t divide and don’t rule
            The Princess sentenced him harsh and cruel.

            Anybody sane out there
            Add to this list some more.

            Regarding what happened last month
            Before Sem flies back like a moth.

          • Semere Andom

            Hi Fanti:
            tHisho, tHisho
            Now we are “habayib” (even).
            This explains why Hayat is ignoring me:-)

          • Hayat Adem

            Ignoring you?
            As if I can
            I’m a caged bird

          • Pass the salt

            Dear Negedras Fanti,
            It is a beautiful Tinglish poem. I say Tinglish because whearas in Tigrigna the last words are expected to rhyme, that is not so in English. Someone pointed that out to me. He even showed me what he said was a poem, and he is right they didn’t rhyme.
            But you are good at it. I assume your Tigrigna poem is superp. It must be.

          • Fanti Ghana

            Hello Pass the salt,

            Although I am no where near calling my self a poet, I know that it can be both. In the English world, they don’t ‘necessarily’ have to rhyme, but in most cases they do, and there are several techniques of doing it. However, the rest of the world seems to prefer poems that rhyme.

            Notice this poem from “I know why the caged bird sings” by one of the greatest poets of our era: Maya Angelou.

            The caged bird sings

            with a fearful trill
            of things unknown

            but longed for still
            nd his tune is heard

            on the distant hill
            or the caged bird

            sings of freedom.

            Notice how most of every other line rhymes, and if you read the first line and the last together it tells you what the poem is about:

            The caged bird sings … sings of freedom.
            So, tell that ‘someone’ of yours it can be both before it is too late.

          • Rahwa T

            Dear Semere,

            Well come back and you started with great comment, with slight discomfort on the language part. We still see you as one of us-the Dedebitawian and we hope the time to visit this historical village is not that far. We will organize a direct flight from the Asmara International AP to Shire Int. Air Port. (Nitricc and Ted will get angry if they read the last words. It is a jock, guys.

            Cheers

            RT

          • saay7

            Yeah guys:

            Please stop making any suggestions to Eyob on how to improve the education system in Ethiopia since, clearly, it’s top of the class in Africa. Why mess with what works?

            saay

          • Eyob Medhane

            Sal,

            Ha.. 🙂 The place is 16th in a continent of over a Billion people and tens of thousands universities… I actually say..’not bad’…In next year ranking, you’ll see it in the top ten.. 🙂

          • Saleh Johar

            Dear Eyob,
            You are always on the defensive. Lay off your guard for any communication to flow seamlessly. And don’t read beyond what is written. I will quote a verse from the Kura’an just to irritate you 🙂 inama baAde ‘dzen ism. Immediately after suspicion lays sin. Don’t suspect everything you read, at least not from me because I can clarify it for you. And I don’t say something I do not believe in or I do not mean.

            For your information, many reputable universities have religions studies, and branches that deal with different religions. Isalamic Studies is just like environmental studies, or college of music, etc. I don’t care if it is under the religious studies, Ethiopian studies, or theological college. It should just be there if Ethiopia wants to eradicate cultural ignorance–and there is much of that ignorance in the entire Abyssinian it is frustrating. In the setting that I have mentioned, issues will be handled in scholarly manner, not be left to politics and propaganda volunteers… and be a tool of bigots. Any scholar will laugh at the argument you made above, try it with any of your former professors and you will be considered anti-knowledge. Islamic Studies is not meant to be a competition tool, or a proselytizing project. I believe in that because our Abyssinian part in that region, having Islam within it for more than a millennium, is the most ignorant region about the topic. As if it is a rivalry, you line Orthodox studies, Pente studies, etc!!! It’s not a competition. We know that Orthodox was the official religion of Ethiopia for centuries; just go and check how many scholars went to Egypt to study it in the last 100 years as opposed to how many Muslims were sent to study Islam. There is no comparison. The vacuum left will certainly be filled by half educated minions. By the way, no sane Ethiopian would say there is shortage of Orthodox institutions that were sponsored by the government, so don’t whine for nothing.

            I brought the Islamic studies because the topic was Islam, you twisted it with what is in your heart when you wrote, “don’t others have a legitimate right to have their own institute” Of course they have, who said they don’t?

            Correct me if I am wrong, but I think there is an institute for Orthodox studies though it could be under a different name. Maybe you can check the Ethiopian library and see how many books, papers, etc are about each religion. That will give you an idea.

            Dear Eyob, if babies are born educated, there is no need for primary education. Conversly, if there is ignorance about Orthodox Christianity, you need a school for that. If there is no ignorance, then maybe you can focus on research, etc. But there is ignorance about Islam in Abyssinia, and that is why it becomes important. Think of its utility before you wave your Orthodox flag as if someone is assaulting it. See Eyob, I can go a step further, and I like readers and yourself to excuse me because I am forced to say what follows which might sound parternalist–you forced me 🙂

            I am hereby challenge you in your knowledge of Orthodox Tewahdo Christianity (forget the rituals for now)–can you do the same and challenge on my knowledge about Islam? I am sorry Eyobai. But if they start an Islamic studies institute, you should be the first one to enroll. Then I will accept you as my personal Sheikh and serve you for life 🙂

            For an otherwise bright person, your knowledge about Islam is lower than rudimentary, and your attitude towards Islam is, well, is a liability for Ethiopia–I mean for Abyssinians.

            Your Arabic this, Arabic that, is boring. If you think you are helping Ethiopia, or the EPRDF, with that attitude, you are doing damage. If you tell me the EPRDF depends on such messages of support, they are doomed, you are not carrying the right message, or the right attitude. Come down Eyob, and respect your countrymen–never mind us foreigners 🙂

          • Eyob Medhane

            Gash Saleh,

            First of all, when I am trying to read what you wrote me angry and serious, stop making me laugh.. 🙂

            Second, You know me better. I am not a bigot, but you imply to me that I am, I think just to get under my skin…I got your game..

            Third, I never had a contention that there should not be Islamic Studies in Ethiopia. My contention is that there is already an institution in the country that is ENTIRELY devoted to this purpose (Awolia) and there are some more, which their names escaped me and many more to come. So why should a state owned institution be targated for religious studies at all? (By the way, I also have an issue with you on your belief that ‘Awolia’ decision that was taken by Mejlis and the government was a wrong decision.)

            Fourth..Why me? Every single Ethiopian in this thread is opposed what Semere proposed and I objected, but you focused on me and reserved your wrath for me. why? i may have been more blunt than others, but we all were in the same boat with this.

            Fifth. No. Abyssinians or Ethiopians are not ignorant of Islam. That is the biggest fallacy that the demtsachin Yesema thugs had. They wanted to re-teach Islam to the “Ignorant” muslim ethiopians, because they believed, just like you seem to believe that they thought We both Christians and Muslims are “ignorant” and it is their duty to teach us. Frankly Gash saleh, that is an insult. Not to me only but to your entire habesha relatives….

            Sixth. Yes There is an Orthodox institute in Ethiopia It’s called Trinity Theological School…and many others…Just like Awolia and many others..I maintain that these institutions are enough to be institutions of religious studies. They don’t belong in State owned Universities…

            Seventh… I speak for myself. I don’t speak for Ethiopia and EPRDF..So they both (ethiopia and eprdf can stop getting embaressed by me or consider me, as just the drunk uncle on the thanksgiving dinner

          • saay7

            Eyobai:

            Good to know that you have learned from American politics on when to use the word “thugs” whenever the authorities are accused of using excessive force. How were “dimxachn yisemma” thugs, exactly?

            saay

          • Eyob Medhane

            Come on Sal,

            We discussed about those guys gizzilion times and you know exactly what I think of them. I don’t think you want me to repeat it all over again..

          • saay7

            Hey Eyob:

            In the U.S., calling someone a “thug” allows you to accept State violence against a Citizen and to condition others into accepting it. That’s what you are doing here otherwise Human Rights Watch and Amnesty International say you are wrong (they must be “thug lovers”) and it was the State which was acting thuggishly. Occasionally your own countrymen try to explain to u their side of the story but, u know, u can’t hear because they are “thugs.” Anyway this is from almost exactly a year before the harsh sentences of the “thugs”:

            http://ecadforum.com/2014/07/27/a-call-for-justice-dimtsachin-yisema-washington-d-c/

            Saay

          • Music Novice

            Hi Eyob,

            Come to think of it, having religious studies at Universities is not a bad idea. But religions must be studied with no make up applied, everything must be shown, warts and all.

            Then, when you start to relax and enjoy the show, in no time, you will see the same people who asked for it now demanding religious studies to be scrapped.

          • Abraham Hanibal

            Hi Eyob;

            I don’t understand why you feel the state owned AAU should not allow arabic, or islamic or other religious studies. Isn’t the state owned by the people, who’ve the right to study these fields, in the same manner as other fields of studies? Why should theological studies be reserved for private institutions? What sort of policy is this, isn’t it normal around the world that religious studies are offered in both public and private universities? And what harm could come out of allowing arabic or islamic, or other religious studies in AAU, other than a better understanding of these fields?

          • Rahwa T

            ahlen wosahlen Fanti wed’Abeyti,

            In my early teen, I used to envy my friends (from both Christians and Muslims) who one way or another had a chance to speak it. I tried all my best to speak Arabic but failed to “master” it as Tigrigna speakers were much higher where I came from. The interest was there even after that but you know life is too complicate and lots of priorities would come to the list. Now today you would either take me to your Utopian Camp or you would be dragged to the reality camp. Hadi’a’la lomi. But if this issue is discussed exhaustively, I do not want to take the forum back to where it was. I can’t catch you guys up.

            First, my apologies for not directly asking you. It is because I am tired of my short comments; whenever I post my comment the other side of my heart reminds me that Awate forumers may not be interested As usual you have put great points to support your argument. I like them all. My problem is that I see you as a too optimistic person. Our region (The Horn) would have been the land that we see in the pamphlets of the Jehovah Witness in the streets of Addis where, according to them, man would coexists rubbing his shoulder with the lions and the hyenas. Great dream. Unfortunately, it is ideal. Like I and many said it before, I see many rare personal qualities in you. I also see also a naivety, Fanti Ghana – the Ethiopian “Che Guevara” who never hesitates giving his life for the cause of others. The other day I read Amanuel Hidrat’s interesting comment that “…he don’t live on suspicion world”. I like that but how far it is true, I don’t know. Is it because of my twisted heart? I guess it is not. Otherwise, my other compatriots from the central Ethiopia (Eyob, Abi, Kim H., Amde) should be suspected for having the same heart as I am – here I couldn’t forgot Ghetem.

            Dear Fanti, I don’t have problem with the above points yours put. However, the bumpy roads we traversed in our past and recent history and current situation tells us to think not twice but 20 times before we reach at one decision. We are at a time where the Project “Dimtsachin Yesema (DY)” is heavily voiced not only by Saudi-trained Ethiopian Ustazs but by foreigners as well. They are telling us that diaspora Moslim Ethiopians and Eritreans area preys together and talk religious (and definitely politic s) together. It seems that this Project DY has regional and international interest and support. This is the real “Hade Hizbi hade libi” to me, my dear Fanti. I can say many more but it is better to leave it. It is to say our suspicion is not coming out of the blue as some people here tells us. The 50+ years old Ghedli and revolution in the region is culminated with a divided Christian people that “used to share” many common values. The two divided people have already established two different institutes and rarely prey together in the same church, but never talk the common issue, unlike their Muslim brothers from countries. Of course, recently thanks to Ginbot Sebat-Arbegnoch in some churches they may discuss how to remove the “backward” TPLF. And yet the 2000 yrs old Christian communities are irreparably divided into Catholics, many Pente branches, and others for good until the Judgment Day!.

            So Fanti nebsi, the issue is not a matter of hating the language.

            Selam,

            RT

          • Fanti Ghana

            Ahlen Wosahlan Rahwa merAt miskhuHlen,

            1) I am guilty as charged (my personality is a little off center)
            2) Kabakhi kab zifelyeni Arebigna gedel yigba
            3) As long as you are around, Utopian or Realist, I am in.
            4) For me this is one of the best comments/feedbacks/complements I ever received.
            5) I will write you a long response when I get home tonight (probably morning for you), because I have a few things to say, and I want you to know about my personality/condition a little more. You are inching toward getting it even without my input, but in respect of your incredible observation I want to save you time on your quest to ‘discover me.’

            Habesha koynki’mber I had something else to say too!

          • saay7

            His Fantiness:

            Speaking of “ahlen we sahlen”, check this out by an exceptionally talented musical prodigy from Oakland, Asennai:

            https://m.soundcloud.com/asennai/ahlen-wo-sahlen

            Please don’t go all Abi on me and say “what’s soundcloud? How do you download it? Do you have to have an account?” And other Habesha questions:). All I want is you saying well “ahlen wo sahlen
            We got so much love
            So why u silent?”

            saay

          • Fanti Ghana

            Hello Saay,
            I like it, and rest assured that I was cloud-anything ready way way before Abi was born my friend.

      • Kaddis

        Gash Saleh – I admire your reserved take on these loaded
        issues

        Regarding recent Ethiopian Muslim activists court decision;
        too bad it ended with heavy sentences. But its also unrealistic to argue there won’t
        be any radical elements in a +30 million Ethiopian Muslims.

        We can’t avoid associating language with religion – if one
        speaks Hebrew he is definitely a Jew. Maybe not. The question should be – are
        you discriminated based on your choice of language or religion. Things are
        changing I believe for the better. But it takes a lot of behavioural change to
        respect the minority rights when they are a minority in your region. Christians
        are a minority in many regions and Woredas in Ethiopia; Jimma, Balé, Harrar,
        Afar, Somali, Silté and many more. True for protestants and Jehovah. You focus
        a lot on the Kings era, government lead discriminations, which could be
        considered long gone.

        • Saleh Johar

          Dear Kaddis,

          Okay, you succeeded in pulling my leg 🙂 Actually you comended my reserved take on the Crisis at hand. That is wrong, I didn’t comment on it at all, not specifically. But we are here:

          I have observed what was going in Ethiopia since a long time. I agree, a fanatic strain was taking root as it is in many parts of the world. The early nineties I observed two things: the Wahabi and the Pente strain. Looking at how the two developed, any government would panic and take drastic measures. True, I believe the Muslim (Awaliya school, which I believe was legitimate) issue started as a normal grievance which might have been exasperated by certain elements. However, the open sponsoring of Ahbash by the government didn’t help the situation. Particularly because we all know who promoted that idea and wrote about it before it happened, a bigoted partisan westerner. That sect is as alien as Wahabism is to Ethiopia; I do not understand how one could choose one of the other! That being a brief (very brief) explanation of my take on the crisis, I hope there would be a better opportunity to elaborate on it. Until then, I hope the extreme court decision is reversed by the PM, the parliament, or the appeal courts if their appeal rights is not consumed yet.

          On the “bygone era” if seen honestly, Ethiopians need to be open about acknowledging historical grievances. You can’t tell me that the historical repression of Muslims went away with the wind in no time. There are lingering cultural stains still doing damage. People who are destined to excel do so by acknowledging the past, not by sweeping it under the carpet, as they say. The Germans did it with their Nazi past. Some honest Americans do it with the history of Slavery. I tend to believe that nothing is solved on its own. And I am not expecting a quick fix, there are many things on the priority list for Ethiopia. But it can start with the intellectual class, the university, etc–mainly with attitudes. Do you think some of the comments that we see here are helpful for the future, you tell me, but I think they are remnants of the “kings era” that you wish gone. And given the volatile region that we live in, we should not leave cracks on the wall for mayhem to penetrate. We are not talking about a few thousand people, but tens of millions. My advice to Ethiopians is to be farsighted, and treat history without bias. I say that because I have a vested interest in the stability of Ethiopia because fires spread beyond boundaries. May God give all of us wisdom.

    • Kim Hanna

      Selam Semere Andom,
      .
      Semere, Semere, you always talked about serious matter and your analysis was always superb. What happened?.
      .
      I knew you were away for a month or so. Where did you go?. WELL, don’t go there anymore. I prefer the old sensible Semere, not this one that appears to be impacted by tes’s Newtonian law or something else.
      .
      Talk to you soon.
      .
      K.H

      • Fanti Ghana

        Hello KH,

        I feel like I have exhausted this subject, but you made a point I cannot pass without appreciating. “…you always talked about serious matter and your analysis was always superb.” That was the very reason I did not scrutinize the detail at first read until the usual suspects jumped on him and I reread. I strongly believe he is still he, because it is clear to me that his intent was consolatory in nature and his message is ‘let’s be tolerant of each other.’ He just made that tiny, small, microscopic, very forgivable, and totally understandable because all our issues are similar, assumption of Ethiopian Muslims having the same issues as Eritreans in regard to language and you saw what happened. Anyway, let’s see the bright side: it brought Horizon back from vacation!!!

        • Kim Hanna

          Selam Fanti,
          .
          Yes, It brought Horizon from a long absence. I was wondering where he was on another subject few weeks ago. I think, someone should start a “where are they now” list once a month or so.
          .
          Anyway, my attitude towards this subject is addressed by Eyob for me. He speaks his mind and he speaks for many of us, he takes his lumps and stand to fight another day. He is a big man. What is strange is our friends keep on insisting we accept their recommendation even after we said no.
          .
          Somewhere, you mentioned Swahili language. I will tell you this if “Swahillians” keep knocking at our door and ask if they can teach us their language more than twice we would not be quite as polite to tell them to get the hell out our face. Poor Ethiopians, some of our people have to learn 3, 4 languages as it is before they get to English. Now we want to say surprise one more…..without any clear purpose.
          .
          K.H

          • Kim Hanna

            Selam Fanti,
            .
            Hello my friend Fanti. Last night my response to your response (the above) I thought was a little loud. I know, you should know, if we were sitting across from each other over coffee and discussing the same topic, the tone would be entirely different.
            .
            You see, I realize you have a much wider and deeper life experiences than I do. My recollection of your work at refugee camps and all the zig zag of life that brought you to this point give you a perspective that I can only imagine. Mine, though older, is somewhat different and narrower perch and outlook.
            .
            I am positive that after that coffee and talk both of us would have been a little more accommodating and appreciative of each other’s positions.
            .
            It is kinda of buying an old used car from your uncle or a downtown salesman. We listen and appreciate it differently. You are my young uncle.
            .
            K.H

          • Fanti Ghana

            Hello KH,
            Wow!
            What a contrast. Here I was having quite the opposite perception, envy, and jealousy combined about your collectedness, your maturity, your courtesy, your intelligence, always short but sweet and to the point personality, much, much more superior qualities, and here you are proving me right in a very twisted ironic way. I am honored to share this forum with you, my teacher.

          • Amanuel Hidrat

            Dear Kim and Fanti,

            I like your adult mind communications guided by courtesy and intelligence, always accommodating to each other. It is a good model of exemplary. Keep up.

            regards,
            Amanuel Hidrat

  • Nitricc

    Interesting! it is bad people are getting arrested but the bright side is that no one is immune, even your work for US embassy . in any African country, if you work for the US embassy, you are immune from the government of that country. for Instance; if i work for American embassy in Addis Abeba; i will get away with murder, let alone to be concern voicing my opinion. i just gave you an example of Ethiopia just raise the blood pressure of Hayat; but it is true in the rest of Africa. no one will touch you, so in this case, and reason; Eritrea showing her true poletical independence. i say it is good.

    • Amanuel

      Hi Nitricc
      Just to remind you IA is immune in Eritrea. He gets away with murder, I mean real murder.

  • Dayphi

    Hi Eritrea.
    Did you utter ” The Great Satan? ” Just this past month of Ramadan, i read in a shia website of shias around the world and stated of few shias live in Eritrea as well. I didnt believe the report at the time. With your above statement, you proved me wrong. Though a staunch conservative sunni, i have every love and respect to you and all shias. I just have one beg to you. The sunni ustaths of all the Ma3had Al-Dean Al-Islamies of Asmara, Keren, Aqordat, Massawa, Sen3afe, who are in the dangeons of Sha3biya Regime since 1993 are good muslims. They dont have ha e any animosity towards shias. They are prisoners of faith and conscious. As a shia brother/ sister, i beg you to intercess on theirbehalf to your Master, Esayas, to release them from the jail they have been for OVER TWENTY years. You can also rely in my support of your math’hab active presence in Eritrea.

    • Saleh Johar

      Hi Deyphi,
      When I was in Kuwait, a Shia acquaintance lamented at hoe the Shia are mistreated in Eritrea. In surprise I told him I do t know of any Shia in Eritrea. He accused me of being an accomplice. Later I discovered a wedini from Asmara tricked him and his friends into helping the oppressed Eritrean Shia and in good faith he collected funds and gave it to the man to go to Eritrea and help his Shia fellows. It took me a lot of explanation to co once him was hit by a con man.

      • Dayphi

        ههههههههه. الله يسامحك يا أستاذى. فقعت جبدي من الضحك. وصدق من قال: شر البلية ما يضحك. The worst misfortune is the one that makes you laugh. ( Colin Bryton ).
        Merhaba ya Ustath:
        And with words and phrases The Great Satan, sanctioned, America’s EVIL activities, blocking UN from doing its work, EVIL people like him [ the ambassador ], and the rest of the comment; if not written by someone screen named Eritrea, and the post been in comment to Ambassador McMullen’s speech, i would have sworn it was written by an Iranian Ayatollah/Mullah during the students’ occupation of the U.S. Embassy in Tehran in 1979-1980 era or soon after. Same words, same cussings, same tuff talk, EXCEPT the burning of U.S. flag.
        Now, i believe we have shias in Eritrea as well.

  • Hager

    Unbelievable! Continuesly the regime of Issias Afowaki tarnishes the United States and it’s values but then again he wants healthy relationship with them…..

  • Amanuel

    Hi Gedab news
    Thanks for the news. I have a question. Did Ambassador McMullen said the following or you are misquoting him? “they seized diplomatic pouches in contravention of the Geneva convention.” As far as I know it should have been Vienna convention. Geneva convention deals with human rights, specially during conflicts, and Vienna is all about diplomatic relations. Please review it.

The Smashed Eritrean Wristwatch

06 Sep 2017 Awate Team Comments (32)

[this was first published in May of 2015 in objection to an attempt by some hacks to revive old partisan rivalry, and…

Eritrea: The Constitution

04 Sep 2017 Ali Salim Comments (271)

Here is a follow-up on “gual mengedi” – the constitution. I will stick to word limit and make it short.…

Eritrea’s 150th Anniversary!

01 Sep 2017 Ismael Ibrahim Mukhtar Comments (140)

My adopted nation, Canada, recently celebrated its 150th anniversary on July 01, 2017. The celebration was huge, passionate and colorful.…

Water: Black Market Economy of Eritrea

29 Aug 2017 Gedab News Comments (16)

Four people were arrested on Monday in Asmara after they were caught selling water to citizens from a water tanker.…

Music

Cartoons

Links

Follow Us

Email
Print