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Ethiopia Kills 13 Rebels Near Assosa and The Renaissance Dam

Tsadeq Hagos, the Ethiopian State Minister for communication stated that security forces clashed with a the Benshangul rebel organization killing 13 rebels.

The clashes happened near Assosa in the Benshangul region, close to the Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam (GERD). The region around the dam is a secure area where access by land or air is restricted.

An unknown number of rebels fled to the Sudanese territories after their operation failed. Sudanese security forces apprehended seven of them and some of them and handed them over to the Ethiopian security forces.

Ethiopia accused Eritrea for training and arming the rebels and providing them logistical support to reach the region through the Sudanese border.

Sudan has strong relations with the regime in Eritrea and the incident might cause friction between the two governments.

The chaotic security situation in South Sudan is causing a security crisis between Eritrea, Sudan, Ethiopia, and South Sudan

Several years ago, the Ethiopian government has negotiated a settlement with most of the rebels of the region but some of them, mainly the Benishangul People Liberation Front, remained in hiding or joined their colleagues in Eritrea.

Reports from Ethiopia indicate the rebels were carrying explosives and were armed with Rocket Propelled Grenades, and light arms. It is suspected the rebels were planning a sabotage attack on the GERD.

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  • Nitricc

    hi moda, can you explain your reasoning; you are becoming a dictator and a toothless one at that. i know i am not supposed to talk back to the king. what is wrong with you people? what is the goal of this web site anyways. take it easy dude. you are way out of the norm.

  • Simon Kaleab

    Selam all,

    Barry Obozobama in 2015:

    “Certainly, it wasn’t easy for those of African heritage who had not come here voluntarily and yet in their own way were
    immigrants themselves. There was discrimination and hardship and poverty. But, like you, they no doubt found inspiration in all those who had come before them. And they were able to muster faith that, here in America, they might build a better life and give their children something more.”
    [Remarks at a Naturalization Ceremony at the National Archives and Records Administration December 15, 2015]

    Dr Ben Carson in 2017:

    “That’s what America is about, a land of dreams and opportunity. There were other immigrants who came here in the bottom of slave ships, worked even longer, even harder for less. But they too had a dream that one day their sons, daughters, grandsons, granddaughters, great-grandsons, great-granddaughters, might pursue prosperity and happiness in this land.”

  • blink

    Dear Awate forumers

    I guess most of you have life that has some thing to do with Arbeji (the ugly picture on this article)if you say no , i can speak only for myself that i do have some thing to do . What we all see is a weapon that is perfectly made to eliminate an enemy (Human being in tanks or what ever he is not alien) from this Earth . Yes we human being made weapon before medicine, which is very sad truth. We have been eliminating one another for so long ” none other like us (Eritrean and Ethiopians) ” so why are we begging to have it again ? are we looking for truth or ideals ? We have been in the habit of looking to cancel each other for such long time . Some of us are hell bent to kill the truth just for the sake of our own ideals, on the other side most poor humble men has no the proper gifts to mislead or even lie but stay there and cheated , again a sad one but truth. Most of you feel that you are in the right mind to judge people and your conscious is very clean that you admit before hand, again this is open for debate . The implication of such article with such picture needs a tiny question , very very tiny one . I give you credit for casting shadow to the inconvenient truth but the duty you own to your respective people must be questioned , but what ever it is ,The real issue remains like a ghost. So sit down and reply to each other but first sit down and make yourself comfortable because as i have seen you for years , i mean for years .

  • said

    Greetings,
    Libertarians are at it again Despite a Once Failing Doctrine
    Donald Trump’s sudden surfacing as the latest product of once thought of a dying breed of Neoliberalism, Libertarians, is the indelible truth of the vanishing façade of a Myth of Liberal Democracy founded on the principle of all men born equal, and of the notion of egalitarianism of equal opportunities for all.
    Trumpism, in matter of truth, is the reinvigoration of Neoliberalism in its most flagrant come back of unfettered demonstrative grab of wealth and power. It is the coming back in vengeance of the once thought extinct Libertarianism.
    Trumpism is not a novelty. Trumpism is what America is and what America had always been except for a brief hiatus of all exceptional economic prosperous four decades post the Second World War. It happened by default as the increased and expanding economic activity dictated bringing to the fold new factors of production, temporarily accommodate collective bargaining, giving in the process rise to the Middle Class and greatly economically benefiting the hanging on the side, the fringes of the general public, the none elite majority.
    Interestingly, in the four centuries long history of America of the new age, America’s brand Wild Capitalism was the indelible hallmark of a nation founded on the concept of the perennial conquests and grab of territories, as everyone was left on their own, in the “Survival of the Fittest.” American brand of unfettered wild Capitalism, very much finding expression in the surviving ethos of Libertarianism and Neoliberalism, was controlled, ever since America’s inception, ever since the date of the first landing of the early pilgrims in the early 17th century on its Eastern shores, on the concept of unfettered wild grab of territories and the riches of the land, of all its consistencies, all that lies above and beneath the surface.
    However, to better appreciate the background of the rise of Trumpism and its wide appeal to the White American Supremacists and to their kin of the Christian Rights, one needs to appreciate its immense nostalgic appeal to the ethos of unbridled long shared by the American enterprise that was increasingly been glossed over by the necessities of accommodating the requisites of changing demographics and the maintained appearances of civility of shared values with the emerging more egalitarian new European economic and political experiences.
    For one to better grasp a better understanding of Trumpism brandishing much of the Unfettered Wild Capitalism ethos of a recent past, one need to correctly judge Trumpism as the normal outgrowth of its immediate kin of Libertarianism and Neoliberalism. Trumpism is an elitist doctrine much belied in this time of age of changing realities of changing demographics and the imminent global and universal challenges of a converging world and fast deteriorating environment.
    Trumpism’ Libertarian ethos, openly professed and widely shared by the American wild Capitalist class, predicate on the following theses:
    • The privatization and containment of Government institutions, i.e. the Fredrik Hayek and Milton Friedman’s schools of thought. This includes essential public services in Healthcare such as Medicare & Medicaid, as well as Social Security.
    • Reduction and even abolition of all forms of taxes, foremost corporate taxes; capital gain taxes and estate taxes.
    • The Scraping of regulations and the ultimate annulation of institutions such as the Securities and Exchange Commission and the Environmental Protection Agency.
    • The abolition of all laws impeding employment by which it meant abolition of minimum wages and the disbanding of Labor Unions intent on collective bargaining.
    • Abolition of all signs of a Welfare State including scrapping programs of social spending.
    • The platform, in short, intends to repeal all reforms passed in the Twentieth century including Franklin Roosevelt’s “New Deal” and Lyndon Johnson’s “Great Society” programs.
    Interestingly, and despite all the niceties attached to smartly crafted wordings of the Declaration of Independence and the Bill of Rights back two and a half centuries ago, the newly stitched together 13 colonies of 1776 growing to the current 50 states in the span of less than one and a half centuries, all that did not happen by accident or natural growth. American Prosperity was that of the exploiting white man on the sweat of enslaved labor, extermination of the indigenous populations and a freehand to prove one’s worth and mettle before a vast territory open for grab with the sole qualification to catapulting to the elitist club of adherence to that supreme race of the White Anglo-Saxon Protestants “(“WASPs”) race.
    In short, Donald Trump’s program is out there to abolish the twentieth century reforms and bring to life once again what was once long thought a relinquishing of an outmoded Libertarianism and its neo-nomer Free-Market Neoliberalism.

  • Paulos

    Selam Amde,

    I am sure you’ve run onto certain things which refuse to go away at least in this forum. We are at it again but of course I am not complaining–far from it. Vox* my fav website run an interesting story about it yesterday and thought to share it with the rest of Awatistas. Yes, you guessed right, it is about UBI. The story it seems is not written by a staff member or a freelancer but by a guy who has given his heart to it where one is not tempted to squeeze out conspiracy or cynical feelings of it.

    The writer claims rightly and proudly I might add to have been donating to a charity organization–GiveDirectly since 2012 whose sole motto is not only to eradicate absolute poverty but to bust and debunk the age old myth where the poor are taken for folks who can not be trusted. UBI, he says, has morphed from a sarcastic response as in “Are you smoking crack” when the wealthy saw the proposal a decade ago to a mainstream idea with serious consideration. Consider they did and they have already started the project in a small village in Kenya where the average household lives off on 3 to 5 dollars a week. GiveDirectly will give every household 22 US dollars every week for the next 12 years. That is the longest “experiment” on UBI since the idea started flying a couple of decades ago. Obviously critics have spread their concerns from giving a lump-sum to giving material support as in cattle and plows instead of monthly payments. Moreover, one of the talking points if in fact UBI carries negative consequences seems to have been defeated when heavy guns as in economists from MIT and Princeton found that UBI to the contrary reduces alcohol consumption and drug use including resorting to criminal activities as well. However, I might say, he didn’t give the reason why GiveDirectly chose Kenya not any other country in the region.

    *I encourage Awatistas to make a habit of getting their news feed from Vox where truly news is not only channeled but explained as well. And if you’re at ease with a print instead as in magazine, I say, The New Yorker.

    • Amde

      Selam Paulos,

      Yes thank you for the heads up. Vox is great. So is The New Yorker. There is at least one subreddit (check out r/BasicIncome) where people are constantly posting questions, critiques, suggesions and links to new articles. I am constantly surprised where this comes up.

      Yes, UBI is a done deal – at least conceptually – it looks like. It is telling that a few weeks ago I saw a news item where Elon Musk spoke about UBI in terms of an economic reality for which there is elite consensus (at least of the lefty billionaire and economist kind), but that what he finds more concerning is what people will do with their time. Charity/Welfare has stigma associated to it all over the world. Plus, it is not for nothing that the saying “Idle hands are the devil’s workshop” came about. So interestingly, the question is morphing to “Well, after UBI, then what?”

      The Kenya experiment (GiveDirectly) will probably be seen more as an experiment on the most effective ways to inject money into a poor community, in this case cutting out the middle man. I tend to see it along the FoodAid -> DevelopmentAid -> BudgetSupport -> MicroFinancing -> UBI. If only because of the nature of injection of external cash into an economy. What was remarkable about the Economist article I posted a few weeks ago was the profound effect that what we consider pittance on the really poor in India. The proposed Indian program (I think it was something along the lines of @ $200US per year per person), would reduce absolute poverty by 80% and more.

      But a study as long as the 12 years on a “universal” basis has the potential to tell so much as to how people would (could be guided to) act if the fear of missing basic needs is removed from them in perpetuity. Not to propose to make our Kenyan brothers and sisters into guinea pigs, but I hope there are a lot of good studies out of it.

      What I would like to see in this forum for example, is some ideas or questions on what our neck of the woods would be like in such a future where even for the industrialized countries, employment is a minority activity. We are perhaps about 20-25 yeara out from that, as Ethiopian/Eritrean labor would still be cheaper than automation, but that gap is narrowing real fast. In 2050, there would be 174MLN Ethiopians. The current economic plan is to try and be the African version of the Asian Tiger. Driven by cheap labor, clean energy and infrastructure. It is a great plan and so far it is working real well. But, is there an expiration date on the assumptions behind this plan?

      We will see, but I have a feeling this is an area our economists have not really startes looking into.

      Amde

      PS.. You Rock!

      • Paulos

        Selam Amde,

        First time I heard about UBI was when the proposal to implement it was defeated in Switzerland via referendum. But of course thanks to you we are drawn to it for it seems the West at long last is redeeming itself from the specter of the “Berlin Conference” as in “The Scramble for Africa.” Whether moral compunction is at play or not, UBI sure will define the future where the reverse of Malthusian holds true as automation increases faster than the productive segment of society.

        If scarcity takes the center stage in any economic theory or model, the question then is, what kind of society is awaiting when everyone at least in principle has income to dispense. I wouldn’t dare say Thomas Moore revisited for it runs contrary to human nature. But of course the minute we are certain of what the future holds, it ceases to be a future and life becomes incredibly mundane and unbearably boring as well. We will see.

        • Abrehet Yosief

          Selam Paulos and Amde
          Thank you for the article. As bad as extreme poverty sounds, it gets worse when combined with conflict/post conflict conditions and absence of some semblance of rule of law. For this reason, I tend to go with Amde’s suggestion that it works better as a continuum from Food Aid to UBI. The concept of UBI is gaining traction partly because the areas it is being considered on are peaceful with government that functions. The advent of mobile banking has also made it more practical and cost effective.

          • Paulos

            Selam Haftey,

            You have pointed out an important aspect of the whole experiment if you will for lack of a better term.

            Where do we draw the line between the role of the government and the particular NGOs who are mandated to provide UBI. Is the latter supplanting the role of the former where it is mandated to provide basic services as in electricity, water supplies and health facilities among others. Moreover, as much as an investor with a specific interest in a business venture first questions political stability and government accountability of any nation, what guarantees do the citizens have if the intended income will follow through. I understand that, a “clean” mechanism is in place where mobile banking is expected to do the job but again when corruption is at its peak particularly in Africa, the classic argument seems to surface should a strong and autocratic state preceed the liberalization of independent foundations as in NGOs without regulatory mechanisms.

          • Amde

            Selam Paulos, Abrehet,

            I have a suspicion that the effect of UBI on states in general and “developing world” states in particular would be a very fertile area for investigation/research.

            The way I understand it, UBI is a state function, linked to the idea of citizenship. The Kenya experiment (through NGOs) is technically not UBI. It is just outside money given “un-conditionally”. But for experimental/research purposes, it can be a good proxy.

            I guess, if we look at it the right way, there have been “Unconditional Incomes” all around us for many years. An example is the payments some Native Americans hand out depending on how much “Indian” blood you have. Alaska every year used to send out cash to its state residents/citizens some of the oil money. And speaking of oil money, I suspect a number of the Gulf oil states also do something like that except they don’t quite call it that. In all these examples, the only condition one has to fulfill is to meet a test of citizenship/residency/kinship. That’s it.

            This trend of economic benefit as a right without working is completely antithetical to the conservative point of view. It will definitely strengthen the State – so for it to work in a way that it is not a controlling mechanism, it as to be legally and politically considered almost as a Human Right that the State has no right deny or take away from a citizen.

            For people in Africa, I can see how this could be used as a mechanism to engender obedience to the state, so perhaps it may lessen some civil strife. But then, where is the State going to get this money? I think this will become the critical question. If automation means your people cannot be gainfully employed, and worse the nature of the technology is such that production can be tightly controlled elsewhere, what will be the revenue basis of the state? I can imagine that the kinds of stuff that robots can’t produce, i.e. minerals and agricultural outputs, will increasingly become more valued. On the flip side, when you look at things like 3D/Additive Manufacturing, the while idea of making stuff far away and shipping over oceans for sale is turned upside down. So perhaps there is potential for small scale (almost one off) kinds of products.

            It will be challenging for sure.

            Amde

          • Paulos

            Selam Amde,

            Great points as usual. I think the key adjective if you will is “Unconditional” where the string attached say in the Gulf States is citizenship and welfare stipends in the Socialist countries where you have to be unemployed to get benefits. Again, what is so unique about UBI is that its aim is to eliminate absolute poverty in developing nations and to salvage the people in developed countries who are in the lowest economic ladder from the onslaught of automation. The way I see it, it will be more challenging in developing countries for there are no institutions in place if not they are nascent at best where the creation of a state with in a state will undermine the very idea of sovereignty.

            If I have to digress, I say, it would be great if one could come up with UBK as in Universal Basic Knowledge where ignorance becomes a thing of the past. Methinks. What say you?

          • Amde

            Selam Paulos,

            Ah UBK… Three Rs. The Latin Trivium. The Classics. It looks like every culture everywhere has tried to come up with a list of basic knowledge.

            I have a fond wish that what used to be taught in the Orthodox church may be upgraded and modernized, and taught as an Abesha form of the Trivium. It would accomplish three things.

            -> Literacy ’nuff said.
            -> Exercise/expand the brain – if you look at the volume and type of material a classically well trained Abesha child has to go through, vs someone of equivalent age going through western education, the younger Abesha brain is exposed to more material and more adult material earlier. The problem with ours is that we don’t continue with it.
            -> Values/Content .. ’nuff said

            I have a funny anecdote to tell. I used to teach meserete timihirt during the derg years. For whatever reason, the batch I got were not the sharpest, but no matter. They are mostly very low income mothers who are forced to be there, (usually threatened with not being able to get qebele rations etc…) so they usually bring their young children with them because they have nobody to leave the kids with. And sometimes, if the child is old enough, they end up picking up more and coaching mom. In any case, I gave an exam once, and I look around, and this mom (let’s call her Mom#1) is having her child fill out her exam. Then I look closer, and this kid was actually copying from Mom#2 at the next desk. Now, Mom#2 is known as one of the bright ones, so Mom#1 and child have got themselves a good source. So I watch this unfold, not make any scene about it, and as I pass by Mom#1’s desk I glance at the paper. And that is when I see that the kid has been good – I mean really really good at copying from Mom#2. Where it asked for Name and House Number, he had faithfully copied Mom#2’s name and house number. I didn’t penalize Mom#1, but pulled her aside and told her that this is not proper. I asked her to write her own name down as correction, and that was the gist of the punishment. The kid helped in the punishment phase.

            Amde

          • Paulos

            Selam Amde,

            That’s really wicked. You really made my day. Thanks for the laugh.

            You know, part of me says, unexamined life is not worth living and part of me says ignorance is a bliss. If I can find a way out of my contradiction, I settle for basic knowledge without knowing too much and without completely going bust either.

            Enter smart phones: I don’t know the statistics but I would assume that more than half of the world population owns smart phones. Now consider this: Wiki alone claims to have 38 million articles in 250 languages in its store. And you can imagine the volume of knowledge in it. It is just enormous. Accessibility of knowledge is reduced into the tip of a finger.

            Let me put it in a perspective: In 1905 when Albert Einstein came up with the Theory of Relativity, it is said that only 12 people understood the concept clearly. It is easy to imagine the kind of power the 12 people assumed not only with in the general population but within the academia as well. Now, you can learn and understand the theory where it is incredibly simplified when it is a matter of searching for it on line. So is the structure and mechanism of DNA double helix among other great discoveries. Today, Knowledge has become so “cheap” that top of the line or cutting edge ideas can be bought for just $9.99 if you’re interested that is. Gone are the days when Professors were venerated and looked upon where anyone can be acquainted with practically any branch of knowledge.

          • Dis Donc

            Dear Awete, Paulus, Amde

            Awete: I had a plan of donating $50/month but as you all know, I only show-up when possible. Thus, I showed-up today for few minutes. To make my, supposedly, monthly payments; do I still do the very same way?

            I have seen you, two, mixing up philosophy with physics; especially modern physics. Let me clarify certain things while leaving your philosophy as yours.

            Einsten: to begin with he never had uncertainity principle, to which you later auto-corrected it to Heisenberg. In 1905 Einstein published his general theory of relativity with many missing components. Ten years later he was to publish his special relativity theory along with the fundamental postulate of the speed of light being an absolute; for an energy transference. Fundamental because without this postulate no relativity theory would work or would be understandable. Let alone the unaccetability of an absolute speed, true to this date. That is why folks of the day, as well as now, do not accept it. Having said that, scientists are still trying to disprove his postulate by trying to find sub-particles at the CERN. Sadly, from that theory the only one thing that worked is E=mc^2…..

            Heisenberg: in quantum theory there two observables operators, distance x, and momentum p while there are two measables scalars; time t and energy E. An x observable is to be attached to t ; i.e. four dimension (x,y,z,ict) and (px,py,pz, iE). Never x with p! The theory says that considering the fact that no object is stationery (especially as quantums particles move faster), observables can only be observed if you have already done the measurable quantity ready. But that cannot be so, because while you do your math the particle has already gone out of observational sight. In a simple language; to observe x you either have to be ħ/2 seconds ahead or ħ/2 delayed; ħ being Planks constant. But nobody or no man-made object can move that fast. Hence, the principle
            ΔtΔE≈ΔxΔp≈ħ
            Special note: before you all gang up me being CIA, let me explain how I came to know all this. As a black dog; when I first went to the US to study, I had to work at physics departments to make a living. I started out as a code writer (in fortran, C, C++ and later java) and later to become investigator at Howard, GWU, US government lab, college park, etc….

          • Paulos

            Dis Donc,

            Not sure what you’re trying to say except the donation part. First of I didn’t say Uncertainty Principle is attributed to Einstein and even if I say that, it doesn’t really matter for the issue at hand was not who said what.

          • Dis Donc

            Dear Paulus,
            check your writings and you will see where you have been mixing up….

          • Paulos

            Dis Donc,

            It is you who is mixing things up. You said Einstein in 1905 published General Theory of Relativity. In 1905 he published Special Theory of Relativity not General. And it was ten years later in 1915 that he published General Theory of Relativity.

          • Dis Donc

            Dear Paulus,
            thank you and you are right!

          • Paulos

            NP Dis Donc.

          • Charles Rotter

            Hello Dis Donc,

            Nice to “see” you and welcome back!

            I had to read Amde & Paulos’s posts twice looking for the mix up you mentioned and I couldn’t find it. Should I worry?

          • Dis Donc

            Dear Charles,
            good to be back; however short it may be. Nothing to worry about, I only thought that it will be good to know facts from its source. I had seen many philosophers trying to exploit the general populace ignorance to justify their theory accepted by mixing it with physics, especially quantum. I am not saying Amde or Paulus but I know the books that they read had flawed connection to the quantum theory. But then again it is just philosophy and nothing to worry about….

        • Dear Paulos,
          We have been geared up to believe that life without work has no meaning. It is mundane and boring, and nobody knows what idle minds and hands may do. I think that human beings will start to give new meaning to life. For example, when was the last time we stood under the boughs and stated as long as as sheep or cows, as the poem says. That was when we were small children. When was the last time we walked in the feilds, picked flowers, crossed creeks on foot, gazed at the night sky, paid attention to the singing birds, etc, etc…… That was again when we were small children. Imagine if human beings could continue to do these and more as adults and as old men and women. Where can you find a life without economic, health and security worries, unless it is in an earthly paradise? Then the new human being will inhabit the planet earth.
          Human beings will be more interest and enjoy literature , philosophy, sports, etc,.. things that will comfort their inner-self and fulfill their human nature. They will have no reason to go to wars, hate eachother for petite reasons, and people may even start to love their neighbors, because they will have less conflict of interest.

          Now, what are you going to do when human beings start to over-produce their kind, because they have less worries and ample time? Just for a smile.

          • Amde

            Selam Horizon.

            “Now, what are you going to do when human beings start to over-produce their kind, because they have less worries and ample time? Just for a smile.”

            Have you seen the movie Idiocracy? Highly recommended.

          • saay7

            Amde:

            Remember Idiocracy envisioned a future America where a wrestler would become president, there was no shame associated with pornography, and people would use Gatorade to water their seeds and wonder why they didn’t grow.

            We are at two-out-of-three (Trump was at WWE and named its CEO to chamber of commerce and porn is everywhere) and with EPA defended, can Gatorade be far away?

            That was one terrible soul-crushing movie. Everybody, don’t listen to Amde.

            saay

          • Amde

            Saay,

            Wait a minute now. This is like the second time you used the phrase “soul crushing” on a movie I suggested. Well, i object and furthermore I will let you know that I have hereby empouted for 45 seconds in protest. ( Yes – I made up the word – what of it?)

            Seriously, “soul crushing” and Terry Crews do not go together. እግዚዮ.. ይቅር ይበልካ።

            The movie Idiocracy was positively critiqued last year during the primaries as being a considerable step up from what Trump was promising. President Dwayne Camacho knew he had to find somebody smart to fix problems ( he didn’t say he knew more than anybody). His cabinet was multiracial .. even if all imbecile.

            I think the GatoreAde at Mar-a-Lago might be a bit different, so we may already be there. Word is people are measuring Trump’s orange suit, so there is that movie detail to look forward to.

            Amde

          • saay7

            Hey Amde

            Fine fine. Would you agree that it had the world’s worst time machine–ever?

            Saay

          • Paulos

            Selam Horizon,

            They say, the reason philosophy was born in the mediterranean nations is because of the favorable weather where people had ample time for leisure. In a sharp contrast, Northern Europe particularly Scandinavian countries gave us Nordic mythology replete with the dark side of life, death and heroism in the face of inevitable defeat where again that kind of macabre reflection of life could as well has to do with the harsh weather.

            That said, certainly money doesn’t have intrinsic value for its power rests in its legality as in it is legal tender. Moreover, money doesn’t solve human’s fundamental problems; what it does is, it makes our life easier and manageable. As such, it doesn’t have the power to bring about paradise on Earth if you will. Thinkers over generations wrestled with the idea if civilization is the cause of our misery where Rousseau pressed for Romanticism as in going back to the village life to be in touch with nature and Schopenhauer on the other hand thought it is the Will that is the source of all misery where he said, human beings ought to give up the Will to liberate and free themselves. What seems to be the fundamental core of our existence is the power of uncertainty. Uncertainty ironically gives us meaning to live as we restlessly seek for answers as in where we came from and what really happens to us when we cross over as in when we die. In the meantime to escape from the nagging existential angst, we find refugee and solace, in religion, sex (read: the reason we make more children), politics and other nasty addictions. The moment we find an answer to our fundamental quest or the moment uncertainty becomes certainty, life ceases to become life as we know it.

  • said

    Selam moderater
    I think something is wrong with my disqus account.any way to fix it

  • Good morning Awatista,

    As an African American, I believe, Dr. Ben Carson’s statement has weighed in contexts much broader that should indeed be explored. I particularly would like to focus on a deservedly favorite status that the OAU should give serious consideration to.

    An aggressive international exchange students for all American Youth could be a start of an investment by African Governments. An official, based on fair trade, initiative in these early days of the current USA Administration us much wiser. Escape goating, from headliners and an attempt to highlight division is counter productive. The African American is a sturdy bridge worthy for detailed a Scholarly strategy f
    and better utility to benefit the African Continent and the USA as partners towards numerous gains as partners.
    ..
    A lot more to come.

    tSAtSE-Azilo40 Agniyeya

  • said

    Greetings,
    Libertarians are at it again Despite a Once Failing Doctrine
    Donald Trump’s sudden surfacing as the latest product of once thought of a dying breed of Neoliberalism, Libertarians, is the indelible truth of the vanishing façade of a Myth of Liberal Democracy founded on the principle of all men born equal, and of the notion of egalitarianism of equal opportunities for all.
    Trumpism, in matter of truth, is the reinvigoration of Neoliberalism in its most flagrant come back of unfettered demonstrative grab of wealth and power. It is the coming back in vengeance of the once thought extinct Libertarianism.
    Trumpism is not a novelty. Trumpism is what America is and what America had always been except for a brief hiatus of all exceptional economic prosperous four decades post the Second World War. It happened by default as the increased and expanding economic activity dictated bringing to the fold new factors of production, temporarily accommodate collective bargaining, giving in the process rise to the Middle Class and greatly economically benefiting the hanging on the side, the fringes of the general public, the none elite majority.
    Interestingly, in the four centuries long history of America of the new age, America’s brand Wild Capitalism was the indelible hallmark of a nation founded on the concept of the perennial conquests and grab of territories, as everyone was left on their own, in the “Survival of the Fittest.” American brand of unfettered wild Capitalism, very much finding expression in the surviving ethos of Libertarianism and Neoliberalism, was controlled, ever since America’s inception, ever since the date of the first landing of the early pilgrims in the early 17th century on its Eastern shores, on the concept of unfettered wild grab of territories and the riches of the land, of all its consistencies, all that lies above and beneath the surface.
    However, to better appreciate the background of the rise of Trumpism and its wide appeal to the White American Supremacists and to their kin of the Christian Rights, one needs to appreciate its immense nostalgic appeal to the ethos of unbridled long shared by the American enterprise that was increasingly been glossed over by the necessities of accommodating the requisites of changing demographics and the maintained appearances of civility of shared values with the emerging more egalitarian new European economic and political experiences.
    For one to better grasp a better understanding of Trumpism brandishing much of the Unfettered Wild Capitalism ethos of a recent past, one need to correctly judge Trumpism as the normal outgrowth of its immediate kin of Libertarianism and Neoliberalism. Trumpism is an elitist doctrine much belied in this time of age of changing realities of changing demographics and the imminent global and universal challenges of a converging world and fast deteriorating environment.
    Trumpism’ Libertarian ethos, openly professed and widely shared by the American wild Capitalist class, predicate on the following theses:
    • The privatization and containment of Government institutions, i.e. the Fredrik Hayek and Milton Friedman’s schools of thought. This includes essential public services in Healthcare such as Medicare & Medicaid, as well as Social Security.
    • Reduction and even abolition of all forms of taxes, foremost corporate taxes; capital gain taxes and estate taxes.
    • The Scraping of regulations and the ultimate annulation of institutions such as the Securities and Exchange Commission and the Environmental Protection Agency.
    • The abolition of all laws impeding employment by which it meant abolition of minimum wages and the disbanding of Labor Unions intent on collective bargaining.
    • Abolition of all signs of a Welfare State including scrapping programs of social spending.
    • The platform, in short, intends to repeal all reforms passed in the Twentieth century including Franklin Roosevelt’s “New Deal” and Lyndon Johnson’s “Great Society” programs.
    Interestingly, and despite all the niceties attached to smartly crafted wordings of the Declaration of Independence and the Bill of Rights back two and a half centuries ago, the newly stitched together 13 colonies of 1776 growing to the current 50 states in the span of less than one and a half centuries, all that did not happen by accident or natural growth. American Prosperity was that of the exploiting white man on the sweat of enslaved labor, extermination of the indigenous populations and a freehand to prove one’s worth and mettle before a vast territory open for grab with the sole qualification to catapulting to the elitist club of adherence to that supreme race of the White Anglo-Saxon Protestants “(“WASPs”) race.
    In short, Donald Trump’s program is out there to abolish the twentieth century reforms and bring to life once again what was once long thought a relinquishing of an outmoded Libertarianism and its neo-nomer Free-Market Neoliberalism.

  • said

    Greetings,

    Libertarians are at it again Despite a Once Failing Doctrine

    Donald Trump’s sudden surfacing as the latest product of once thought of a dying breed of Neoliberalism, Libertarians, is the indelible truth of the vanishing façade of a Myth of Liberal Democracy founded on the principle of all men born equal, and of the notion of egalitarianism of equal opportunities for all.

    Trumpism, in matter of truth, is the reinvigoration of Neoliberalism in its most flagrant come back of unfettered demonstrative grab of wealth and power. It is the coming back in vengeance of the once thought extinct Libertarianism.

    Trumpism is not a novelty. Trumpism is what America is and what America had always been except for a brief hiatus of all exceptional economic prosperous four decades post the Second World War. It happened by default as the increased and expanding economic activity dictated bringing to the fold new factors of production, temporarily accommodate collective bargaining, giving in the process rise to the Middle Class and greatly economically benefiting the hanging on the side, the fringes of the general public, the none elite majority.

    Interestingly, in the four centuries long history of America of the new age, America’s brand Wild Capitalism was the indelible hallmark of a nation founded on the concept of the perennial conquests and grab of territories, as everyone was left on their own, in the “Survival of the Fittest.” American brand of unfettered wild Capitalism, very much finding expression in the surviving ethos of Libertarianism and Neoliberalism, was controlled, ever since America’s inception, ever since the date of the first landing of the early pilgrims in the early 17th century on its Eastern shores, on the concept of unfettered wild grab of territories and the riches of the land, of all its consistencies, all that lies above and beneath the surface.

    However, to better appreciate the background of the rise of Trumpism and its wide appeal to the White American Supremacists and to their kin of the Christian Rights, one needs to appreciate its immense nostalgic appeal to the ethos of unbridled long shared by the American enterprise that was increasingly been glossed over by the necessities of accommodating the requisites of changing demographics and the maintained appearances of civility of shared values with the emerging more egalitarian new European economic and political experiences.

    For one to better grasp a better understanding of Trumpism brandishing much of the Unfettered Wild Capitalism ethos of a recent past, one need to correctly judge Trumpism as the normal outgrowth of its immediate kin of Libertarianism and Neoliberalism. Trumpism is an elitist doctrine much belied in this time of age of changing realities of changing demographics and the imminent global and universal challenges of a converging world and fast deteriorating environment.

    Trumpism’ Libertarian ethos, openly professed and widely shared by the American wild Capitalist class, predicate on the following theses:

    • The privatization and containment of Government institutions, i.e. the Fredrik Hayek and Milton Friedman’s schools of thought. This includes essential public services in Healthcare such as Medicare & Medicaid, as well as Social Security.

    • Reduction and even abolition of all forms of taxes, foremost corporate taxes; capital gain taxes and estate taxes.

    • The Scraping of regulations and the ultimate annulation of institutions such as the Securities and Exchange Commission and the Environmental Protection Agency.

    • The abolition of all laws impeding employment by which it meant abolition of minimum wages and the disbanding of Labor Unions intent on collective bargaining.

    • Abolition of all signs of a Welfare State including scrapping programs of social spending.

    • The platform, in short, intends to repeal all reforms passed in the Twentieth century including Franklin Roosevelt’s “New Deal” and Lyndon Johnson’s “Great Society” programs.

    Interestingly, and despite all the niceties attached to smartly crafted wordings of the Declaration of Independence and the Bill of Rights back two and a half centuries ago, the newly stitched together 13 colonies of 1776 growing to the current 50 states in the span of less than one and a half centuries, all that did not happen by accident or natural growth. American Prosperity was that of the exploiting white man on the sweat of enslaved labor, extermination of the indigenous populations and a freehand to prove one’s worth and mettle before a vast territory open for grab with the sole qualification to catapulting to the elitist club of adherence to that supreme race of the White Anglo-Saxon Protestants “(“WASPs”) race.

    In short, Donald Trump’s program is out there to abolish the twentieth century reforms and bring to life once again what was once long thought a relinquishing of an outmoded Libertarianism and its neo-nomer Free-Market Neoliberalism.

  • Dear Awatistas,

    What do you make of an african-american, member of the trump administration, who says that african slaves came to america as immigrants and with big dreams. Could he be so clueless, and he does not know that africans were brought against their wish in shackles, many of them died on the way, or were thrown overboard alive, and after they reached in the americas, they were sold and bought as commodity. The least he could do is resign from his post.

    • Fanti Ghana

      Hello Horizon,

      I think you were done the moment you said “…member of the trump administration.” Also please let him stay there and make America Great Again!

    • Simon Kaleab

      Selam Horizon,

      This is what Dr Ben Carson said:

      “That’s what America is about, a land of dreams and opportunity,”

      “There were other immigrants who came in the bottom of slave ships, who worked even longer, even harder, for less, but they too had a dream that one day their sons, daughters, grandsons, granddaughters, great-grandsons, great granddaughters might pursue prosperity and happiness in this land,”

      He was not equating voluntary immigration with involuntary servitude.

      Why does he resign? Because you say so? He is a good role model for black Americans and he is a well qualified person to do his job [highly likely to be better qualified than you.]

      You may tell some of the thuggish Ethiopian politicians or opposition leaders to resign.

      • Ismail AA

        Dear Simon,
        How about this:
        “Enslaved Africans were, of course, not immigrants, and were transported in the cramped, disease-infested holds of ships while shackled stationary as property of “new world” and European corporations. The enslaved had virtually no knowledge of where they were being taken, and less than 10% of the tens of millions of Africans transported wound up on the shores of the US, with a majority landing in South America and the Caribbean.”, courtesy “The Guardian” .
        Your attempt to doctor Dr. Carson’s statement seems to be dubious.
        Regards

        • Simon Kaleab

          Selam Ismail AA,

          You [and the Guardian] totally missed the point of Dr Ben Carson’s speech.

          He was not speaking in the manner of those in the ‘Race Relation’ industry, trying to play as a perpetual victim in order to milk the system.

          He knows intimately how to grow as an underprivileged child brought up by a single mother. The context in which he spoke was related to the hope and ambition of immigrants for self-improvement for themselves and future generations.

          I hope you understand the difference.

          • Ismail AA

            Dear Simon K.,

            Let us be serious now. Nobody is talking about what Dr. Carson knows or doesn’t know, or even his background. The matter concerns what he said. Of course, he was trying to glorify what his country offered to people who came there in search of better life.
            But the gist of what he stated lies in this: ” … other immigrants who came in the bottom of slave ships, …”. Who were the immigrants? Stowaway fortune seekers who smuggled themselves among the African men and women and knew to find their way to the bottom of the ships and brought themselves to America? Or perhaps the infamous Dutch West Indies Company also had travel agencies for freemen and freewomen immigrants along the former Slave Coast that stretched along the shores of modern Ghana that , Benin, Togo and Nigeria.
            Regards

          • Simon Kaleab

            Selam Ismail AA,

            Who a person is matters as well as the context in which the speech is made. I think the man is the best role model for black Americans, so far, as he was able to prove that through hard work and using a good moral compass one can reach the top of a profession.

          • Ismail AA

            Dear Simon K.,
            With due respect, dear, you are dancing around the bush. The status of Dr. Carson is not the matter at issue. It is what he said. You could consider him as model, but what I am questioning is his views on a matter he had stated. And, thanks for engaging.
            Regards

          • Thomas

            Hi Ismail AA,

            This Simon guy will never retract his stupid argument. He is so arrogant and way ignorant to comprehend facts, “wala tinfer ember tel eya”. His slogan is “zenegese nugusna”. He is for whoever has the upper hand at the moment. He supports Issayas, tramph and tomorrow whoever replaces these people will get Simon’s vote. Vision has no place in this guys mind. He is very opportunistic and unpredictably.

          • Simon Kaleab

            Selam Thomas,

            Keep on waffling meaninglessly. You can do that till the cows come home, but Isaias will still be there.

          • Thomas

            Hi Simon,

            Dude, can you clarify what you meant by “You can do that till the cows come home, but Issayas will still be there”??? You sound “hagereseb” grown up, but you seem to have had hard time keeping up with life there to. Men! You are “bado” in every way we look at you. Why don’t you take the short cut save us our energy:)

          • Simon Kaleab

            Selam Thomas,

            Thank you for the complement. I wish you good luck in your endeavour to bring a democratic system in Eritrea.

          • saay7

            Selam Simon:

            Ben Carson has been quiet a mystery and proof positive that some people have no business in politics. I was a huge fan of the man, having watched the movie about his biography and his inspirational books. Then one day, he was invited to The Breakfast Prayer Club where he was critical of Obama and the right wing adopted him and politicized him and convinced him to run for president.

            Clearly, his books were ghost-written (by his whisperer Armstrong?): the man is barely coherent. And he has no business speaking extemporaneously and, like the man who nominated him for the job, is incapable of saying “oh, wow, I screwed up.” There is a world of difference between “involuntary immigrant” (the indentured Irish servants for example) and the black slaves from Africa.

            There is a funny website called verysmartbrothas. It’s editor in chief appeals to the family of Dr Ben Carson to conduct and intervention and have a talk with him. I think that’s a good idea. He is so deep in the us-vs-them politics of the US, that he can’t admit a mistake as that would embolden “them.”

            saay

          • Simon Kaleab

            Selam saay,

            What I am saying is, clearly he was not equating voluntary immigration with involuntary servitude. He is also a descendant of the victims of transatlantic slavery.

            Besides, he is a good role model for black Americans as he was able to prove that through hard work and using a good moral compass one can reach the top of a profession.

            Remember, Muhammad Ali [Casius Clay] did worse. He used to call hard working black man Joe Frazier, a black monkey. Everybody was laughing and nobody challenged him on this.

          • Berhe Y

            Selam Simon,

            Simon, all things being equal. Do you think if there was no Europeans set foot in Africa and all Africans were left to mind their own business, Africans would be better off or worst?” I think you need to read his comments from that angle. If you haven’t please go watch the movie, 12 years a slave.

            I don’t know why he has to go and invent so much lies. He has already accomplished so much, why does he go out of his way and invent and tell lies.

            This comment is probably getting much attention but search the web and almost everything he said is full of lies…WHY…all the unnecessary lies…sorry can’t post the link below is some of his lies he has told already..

            lie about having been a violent youth—even stabbing someone—when no one else remembers him that way?
            lie about being offered a full West Point scholarship, when no such thing exists, and he went to Yale anyway?

            and the reason for his lies they say:

            evangelicals really, really want to hear a story about sin and redemption. That requires two things. First, Carson needs to have been a bad kid. Second, redemption needs to have truly turned his life around.

            Berhe

          • Simon Kaleab

            Selam Berhe,

            The situation in Africa is not as simple as you think. There are many complex forces at play.

            Who said he lied? Any credible references? I think, you are, as usual, quoting fake news.

          • Berhe Y

            Hi Simon,

            You need to wake up from the hypnosis you are in..perhaps SHeWAte at Gabir DorAnto.

            Berhe

          • Simon Kaleab

            Selam Berhe,

            As usual, you project fake news onto others.

          • Fanti Ghana

            Hello Simon Kaleab,

            “…he was able to prove that through hard work and using a good moral compass one can reach the top of a profession.”

            True, hard work does reward, but was there anytime in history the black man was not working hard?

            As brilliant as you are, how can you possibly miss the classic excuse the David Dukes of the world use to try to free themselves of guilt. They had argued in the “good old days” that “slavery was good for blacks” because “they can’t survive on their own.” Centuries long barbarism waged upon the Black Man including the daily prejudices and discriminations still going on to this day, are irrelevant.

            That is the message they try to convey, and once in a while they find one Trumpeter of the right creed whom they can use to amplify their defiance and denial ridden messages. “Uncle Tom” phenomenon is not a new concept. It is a human weakness that was then as it is now. Please check Trump “for rent” Apartments for a sample of what blacks have to go through every day, and come back to your senses.

          • Simon Kaleab

            Selam Fanti,

            To start with, it is some Arabs and some black tribal chiefs in West Africa that were capturing and selling slaves to Europeans. Nearly all of the time, the European slave traders just waited at the coastal areas with their money and alcoholic drinks.

            Now, slavery is no more. College education, avoidance of drug use and teenage pregnancy, respect for other human beings, ambition and a positive attitude to life could be springboards for future success for black American youth.

            The alternative is what Barry Obozo and crooked Hillary prescribed during the wasted 8 years: perpetual moaning about past injustices and welfare dependency as life style choice.

            What has David Duke got to do with the topic under discussion? Classic Straw man argument!

          • Paulos

            You’re so freaking annoying dude. Damn!

          • Simon Kaleab

            Selam Paulos,

            Your posts are empty of content, are they a reflection of your mental state?

          • iSem

            Really Simon: “… who worked even longer, even harder, for less, but they too had a dream that one day their sons, daughters, grandsons, granddaughters, great-grandsons, great granddaughters might pursue prosperity and happiness in this land,”

            The slaves were worked for less?, slaves do not work for less, they work for free like in PFDJ’s Sawa.

            Your hugging, the working for less reminds me what mafia boss in Eritrea, IA said, “America was built by slaves, basically do not complain

            As a black man and a descendant of slaves, he should be ashamed to say this. The slaves had no dreams of affluence or wealth for their children, except freedom to breath the free air that God give for free to all living things and to walk free with out shackles and white man herding them in the fields

          • Fanti Ghana

            Hello Paulos,

            No, Simon is brilliant. I just don’t understand why he chose to be the Devil’s advocate. His reply to me reminded me Papa Tomato of Pulp Fiction.

            “Three tomatoes are walkin’ down the street.
            Papa Tomato, Mama Tomato and Baby Tomato.
            Baby Tomato starts lagging behind, and Papa Tomato gets really angry.
            Goes back and squishes him and says: “Ketchup.” pause, “Ketchup.”

            So, Papa Tomato is simply saying “Ketchup.”

          • Paulos

            Selam Fantination,

            That’s funny. The guy was flooding Asmarino with the same stupid rants and he moved here with his broken record. I sure don’t know where you shop your stellar patience. I can’t stand him.

          • Simon Kaleab

            Selam Paulos,

            With this statement you confirm my long held suspicion that some of those who complain about lack of democracy in Eritrea are just trying to replace the current system with another dictatorship.

          • Nitricc

            Your Fitness, you got to tell me or do something to get this the image of you belting a big knife and walking around the town in my head. LOL I just can’t get rid of this image of a young man with huge knife and I see a huge belt too hahahahahah. oh my. Thanks for that classic story your fitness.

          • Nitricc

            Hey SAAY, here is someone said it all about the current administration.
            ” As a 31-year veteran, I respect the Office of the President of the United States. That’s why I can’t respect the appeasing pretender, the paranoid schizophrenic megalomaniac with frontal temporal dementia and narcissistic compulsions who was chosen by a minority of (misguided) voters.”

          • saay7

            Nitrric:

            Well. That’s a lot of adjectives for a man who was democratically elected, after beating 16 contestants from his own Republican party, one libertarian who didn’t know what Aleppo was, one environmentalist, and one dinosaur Democrat who was audio-recorded insulting her potential voters.

            Multi-party elections are about choosing from alternatives and the electorate, in its collective wisdom, chose him. And, in it collective wisdom (unlike politicians) it can change its mind and impeach him, force him to resign, deny him partners in congress in less than 2 years or fire him in less than four.

            Pray for those who don’t have the power to fire their megalomaniac leaders.

            saay

          • iSem

            hi Sal:
            and what Nitricc is forgetting is, even if this guy who made it in the private sector and who was elected as you said fair and square, whatever things ppl are complaining are good for democracy because they get to test their check and balances to refine them. Example as you after Nixon abused his power and after Mccarthy (spelling?) the power to wiretap citizens was taken away from the excutive, when Kennedy appointed hi brother as AG, the the Nepotism laws were born etc. a journalist actaully told Trump that he has no crediblity and the that guy went home to his wife and kids
            So yes, pray for those who do not have a fighting chance, but ppl like Nitricc shed tears for th USA citizens and Ethiopian citizens

      • Selam Simon K.,

        Let me ask: who were the other immigrants who came in the bottom of slave ships? Were they not african slaves who were properties of their masters, who had a life or death right over them? Do you want to tell us that they had a dream for their posterity, a dream of happiness and prosperity, when all they cared about was not to be lynched at the whims of their masters, and to be treated as human beings and not as creatures that are less than animals? America is not a land of dreams and opportunity for most african-americans even today.
        It seems that you are one of those africans who do not understand a situation until it knocks at your door. We can understand from your previous comments in support of trump, that you are infatuated with dictators and people who call themselves strong men. How can you understand the plight of these african slaves when you do not understand the plight of your own people?
        Who is more thuggish than dia whom you support so much?

        • Simon Kaleab

          Selam Horizon [tunnel vision, rather],

          Are you going to give a lecture about slavery to Dr Ben Carson? This shows that you are clueless and a professional moaner.

          As far as slavery is concerned, you need to examine its history in Ethiopia. Even now, aren’t fair skinned, less curly haired Ethiopians accorded a higher social standing?

          Menghistu Hailemariam was a drunkard, a liar and inept but he had also Negroid features. Weren’t many Ethiopians cursing him for being dark skinned rather than for his criminality?

      • Hayat Adem

        Selam Simon,
        Are you really defending Carson?!

  • Fanti Ghana

    Hello All,

    There are a brand new and modern looking buses lined up with the caption “Public Land Transport,” between Addis Ababa and Khartoum which will start this coming Sunday. It took 8 years in the making, so it is potentially well planned. Those of you investment inclined may want to find out where the overnight stay will be and invest there. Gondar, Metema, or Qedarif???

    I am personally excited for two selfish reasons.

    1) I had commented a while back on some Egyptian website to spend the money on building a highway between Addis and Cairo instead of the wasteful and useless gun shopping both countries were preparing to do. I am half way there!

    2) My daughter will be able to travel to Addis as often as she wants, and that will give her a chance to have the best of both worlds.

    Now invest, congratulate me, or do both!

    • Paulos

      Selam Fantination,

      Not sure which one to do first: congratulate you or invest first. Maybe I should do the later first and pat your back later when the dividends start to walk all the way to the bank.

      • Fanti Ghana

        Selam Paulos,

        Last night I watched the interview Saay posted of Zenebe Neguse. Afterwards, I saw a header about some 650 Eritreans who had abandoned the army and migrated to Ethiopia “in the last two weeks alone.” They have the entire list (I didn’t count but it felt like that many) with their pictures, names, unit, and rank. I watched every single one of them reading their names with intent.

        What struck me more than anything was their appearance! What Zenebe said in that interview about the poor quality and quantity of the food in the army was still fresh in mind, so I was looking at them as I would look at my own children with that context. It was a rough night to say the least.

        PS:
        Zenebe was stationed on the Asab front, and he made a point of the bizarre behavior of the government by saying something like “we don’t even get a fish once a year although we are sitting next to the sea…”

        It is beyond explanation.

        • Abraham H.

          Hi Fanti, apropos fish in Eritrea, one wouldn’t even believe the fact that most Eritreans never tasted fish while the country has more than thousand kms of sea coast and one of the world’s richest seafood resouces.

          • jordan

            Greetings
            Oh stop it, most eritreans don’t live near the sea. There’s fish available in the fishmarket in Asmara, so if they haven’t eaten fish then obviously they don’t seem to want to eat fish.

            I am disgusted by the ideas of some you guys, why would we want a Addis-Asmara road? It’s like you people want to federate with Ethiopia again. You guys know why we secede from Ethiopia, it was because it didn’t work out! I find it hilarious how you guys portray Ethiopia as something extremely good while every year [unfortunately] a famine happens in Ethiopia, which leads to starvation. Also don’t get me started on prostitution in Addis Abeba. Just because you guys have skyscrapers, new trains we should be jealous? As if that really shows the true colors of Ethiopia, Eritrea has a higher gdp per capita than Ethiopia. I swear, you guys think that skyscrapers reflects the country’s economy? Well it doesn’t. Asmara is building buildings but not skyscrapers due to several factors. After all we are a hated country, we’re trying to build diplomatic relations with other countries.

            Don’t get me wrong, I am impressed and happy for Ethiopia but what’s the problem with you guys never letting us be? Why do you guys always have to talk about Assab? It’s never gonna be Ethiopian anymore. I just see this literally everywhere I go on an Ethiopian-related thread.

            As an eritrean, I am proud to be eritrean and I will fight for the better for my country. I will never ever think of the tought of being apart of Ethiopia because clearly many of you guys have an awful mentality towards us. Eritrea is progressing, of course it could progress much faster but then again what did Ethiopia do to us the 30 years we were federated? They don’t really care about us, and now you guys are talking “It could have been them, oh well that’s their problem” You guys are still petty after 26 years.

            Also, isn’t it funny how you guys redirected this article about the Ethiopian regime murdering 13 rebels to Ethiopia being a first world country? lol.

          • Saleh Johar

            Hi Jordan,
            Are you the one who is supposed to be young and enlightened? Your thought seem to be older than the oldest people around. Cool down and learn a little economics before you discuss it with authority. Don’t be mad at me, I agree we should think of having a road to Addis from Asmara, maybe we can also demolish the old one we have. 🙂

          • jordan

            Hey
            I am just stating my thoughts, it just feels bad that they want to sent us to a guilt trip. To regret our war of independence. No, eritreans are proud people actually. I really don’t dislike ethiopians in anyway but some people just bring it out. I mean what was even the point of all these comments? They were so unneccessary and the supremacism thoughts were very obvious. They simply want to brag about their country but still don’t live there.

            I don’t see how my thought seems old? I’m open-minded and I would love to see a future with Ethiopia being an ally. Khalas, I need to go back to doing homework. Also, I didn’t know there was already a Addis-Asmara road. Interesting 🙂

        • Paulos

          Dearest Fantination,

          Milkias Mihreteab might have said ሻዕብያ ምስ ህዝቢ ኤርትራ ቂም ኣለዋ and I say ኢሳያስ እዩ ምስ ህዝቢ ኤርትራ ቂም ዘለዎ. Simply because the whole thing doesn’t make any sense at all where Isaias is like a vampire sucking the soul of the youth so that he can remain young. As you have aptly put it, their resigned and fatigued eyes tell volumes about their endless ordeal without them saying a single word.

          • Fanti Ghana

            Hello Paulos,

            The Eritrean revolution was unparalleled in Africa, maybe even in the world. If it is not already ruined it is getting there by two colossal mistakes: The destruction of ELF, and the failure to transfer power to the people after the 1993 referendum.

            Extracting EPLF from the man who stole its glory has been the hardest thing to do for me and many of my friends. What is ironic is that “wulke sebawi imnet” was a seriously discouraged behavior in EPLF and of course, its mirror image, TPLF, and yet, this mad man managed to make the entire Eritrean revolution about him and him alone. This is one topic I could write volumes about. We’ll talk about it when the time is right. So, in a nutshell, no, ShaEbia doesn’t have grudges with the people.

          • MS

            Dear Fantista
            You have captured the essentials of the argument, and put it so beautifully. You are reminding me of the historical TPLF, people like Amora who looked into the eyes of their interrogators (murderers) and told them about the justness of their fight and the justness of the struggle Eritreans were waging.

          • Ismail AA

            Dear Fanti,
            I admire your deep knowledge of our affairs. You hit the nail precisely where it should. I think the first point you have underscored had been crucial and we, Eritreans of whatever persuasion or background should duly learn from, and try to rectify what could be rectified. This the point was one on which we implicitly agreed upon with my brother Mahmoud in our exchanges just a few days back. Actually, the run up to referendum was a missed opportunity that should have broken barriers between the two organizations and laying down what you had rightly stressed. But, helaas, we lacked leadership endowed with modicum of wisdom and warmer heart for the lofty interest of a people exhausted by decades of war and destruction.
            Regards

          • ጳውሎስ፡

            ዘለለ ዶ ክንብለካ? ኣይትረርካያን ናይ ግዜ ተጓዓዚት ማሺን? ክንሓስበላ ዶ አዛ ስልቲ ህጁም ወይስ ስላሕታ
            ኣጋ ወጋሕታ
            ዱቕ ዱቒ
            ጸልማት
            ህጂም ደፍረት ድኣ ተዓጠቕ።

            ኣባ ጥመር.

            ጻጸ ኣዚሎ40 ኣግኔያ

          • Ismail AA

            Dears Paulos and Fanti,
            What makes the tragedy devastatingly more tragic is that we still have people among us Eritreans who think the regime and the despot at the helm is a lesser evil to their imagined angel they do not know.
            Regards

        • envision

          Hi Fanti,
          “What struck me more than anything was their appearance!”. This is a powerful statement. Traveling across European cities, I have been able to recognise Eritrean youth by their emaciated looks and stunted stature. Last time, I was visiting a bookstore and met a guy who was also there looking for some new books on Eastern philosophy. We ended up having tea time afterwards and we talked about Eritrea-Ethiopia. He knew about Eritrea and Ethiopia a lot because he works for an organisation that provides education help and counselling for refugees. What he told me was so striking. He said, paraphrasing, that the Eritrean refugees scare him because a 26 year old looks like a 15 year old, their bodies do not seem willing to support them, and they look lifeless. I was so disturbed by his description. Eritrea has eaten first their dreams, then their human rights, then their dignity, then their flesh, and now it is eating their bones.

          • Paulos

            Selam Envision,

            Well said! Thank you.

          • Semere Tesfai

            Selam envision

            “What struck me more than anything was their appearance! Traveling across European cities, I have been able to recognise Eritrean youth by their emaciated looks and stunted stature.”

            “A 26 year old Eritrean looks like a 15 year old, their bodies do not seem willing to support them, and they look lifeless. I was so disturbed by his description.”

            An Ethiopian, and most likely a Tigrean, disturbed by the emaciated looks of Eritreans in European cities. Wow.

          • Paulos

            Selam Wed’boy Tesfay,

            Why don’t you focus on the substance instead of who said it. Do you know that North and South Koreans are the same people where their striking difference is the former are stricken with chronic malnutrition and stunted growth as well. Without going any further, watch any Eritrean movie and pay attention to the random people who are bystanders or passing by while the movie is being shot. And you will see the striking difference between Eritreans and whomever you want to compare them with. The bottom line is there is something seriously wrong with the picture.

          • Berhe Y

            Dear Semere Tesfai,

            You do remember that Isayas Afeworki is a Tigrean/Ethiopian origin Eritrean, right?
            Just a little reminder….that’s all.

            Berhe

          • envision

            Hi Semere,
            So many mistakes and assumption.
            1) “What struck me more than anything was their appearance!” is Fant’s sentence, which I quoted.
            2) “An Ethiopian, and most likely a Tigrean, disturbed by the emaciated looks and stunted stature of Eritreans in European cities? ” is wrong because I said I did not say that. I said I was diturbed by his description. That is a world of difference.
            3) You claim I am Ethiopian and Tigrean. That is Witchcraft. I never said how I identify myself.

            I have read you are about 60 years old? Your character and engagement is childish. Read properly, understand and talk substance please.

          • Nitricc

            HI envision; your description of Eritreans is what I have heard from NGO who worked in Ethiopia describing the hungry Ethiopians. I don’t know who you are and I don’t care but reading your take, I have assumed you were an Ethiopian, Tigryan at that. So, I can see why Semere will feel what he had felt. your take was a typical Ethiopian line.

          • envision

            Selam Nitricc,
            Ethiopians might have been described in those terms previously. Today it is Eritreans. Previously, Ethiopians used to go to Eritrea to find work. Today Eritreans in hundreds of thousands go to Ethiopia/Tigrai to seek refugee and work. Fortunes change. Nothing remains constant.

          • Semere Tesfai

            Selam envision

            “You claim I am Ethiopian and Tigrean. That is Witchcraft. I never said how I identify myself.”

            Didn’t you tell the whole world (Awate readers), you listened the whole Jamaica interview (which was in Tigrigna) and said “I never heard such credible sources before?”

            Now tell me: why would my assumption be wrong?

            Semere Tesfai

          • envision

            Selam Semere,
            Yes I said I watched it. So how is that a sufficient condition for you to claim I am Ethiopian/Tigrean?

          • Fanti Ghana

            Hello Semere T,
            You know people like you and I are living an extra life. We should have died five times over, but for some reason we are still here. I strongly recommend you visit Ethiopia/Tigray. What is the worst that can happen except either you will verify what you already know or you will know something new.

          • Berhe Y

            Dear Fanit,

            አንቱም ጎይታና፡ ንሕናስ ነጊርናምኩም ነርና፡፡

            Hello Berhe Y,

            Semere T. is clear on this one. He had specifically stated that genealogy should not matter very recently. By saying this I don’t mean the others are guilty as charged, but I felt guilt for not defending him because it was a few days ago when he said it and it is still fresh in my mind.

            ናይ ዛር ፈላጥ ስለዝኾንኩም እቲ ነገር ባዕልኹም ትአልይዎ ትኾኑ እምበር ፡ አቶ ሰመረ ድእ፡ ቆሎ ዛር እንድዩ ሒዙዎም ዘሎ ካብዛ ናይ ጃማይካ ኢንተርቬው ዝሰምዑ፡፡

            Berhe

          • Fanti Ghana

            Hello Behe Y,

            It is not my fault!

            እቲ ዕምባባ (pop corn) ኣብዝሕ ኣብልዮ፣ እቶም ፈናጅል ተር ኣብልዮም፣ እቲ ዕጣንውን ውስኽስኽ ኣብልሉ እንተበልኩዋ “ዋእ ስርሐይ ድየ ክገብር ናትካ ቖለ ክፍልፍል” ኢላ ብጎድኒ ዓይና ጥምት ኣቢላትኒ ከይዳ፤፤ እንታይ ዘይገበርኩ ኣነ?

          • Amde

            Selam envision,

            “Eritrea has eaten first their dreams, then their human rights, then their dignity, then their flesh, and now it is eating their bones.”

            You have a phenomenal way with words. Please visit often.

            Amde

        • saay7

          Hi Fanti:

          That’s why I asked Nitrric to watch it but like all True Believers, Nitrric is very good at avoiding facing facts that challenge his bubble.

          The question, if you remember, was “what accounts for the recurring illnesses that afflict the Asab Front”. Now his answer has no hesitation: he doesn’t say “what illnesses?” “What affliction?” “What do you mean by recurring?” He accepts the premise and begins to answer. It’s par for the course for the PFDJ media to never cover any news that contradict its MDG, clinics built, health care improved narrative. A few months ago, there was news of outbreak of cholera in Western Eritrea and its foot soldiers went to great extent to deny it (until the UN quietly confirmed it.). What is frustrating is that none of Eritreas 17 opposition radios covered this news that waves of illnesses are attacking the conscripted youth in the Asab Front.

          This is due to, he explains, the no-nutrient and meager food rations they get. So the governments strategy to protect Asab is to have malnourished and conscripted youth. Failing that, there is of course the great Emirati Army which has proven its expertise in various wars.

          saay

      • Ismail AA

        Selam Paulos,
        I should add that if historical background would be considered, it should have been Addis-Asmara; Asmara- Khartoum; Khartoum-Addis had we had a sane man at helm in our country. What a wate of a quarter of a century to our people!.
        Regards

        • Selamat Aya Ismail AA,

          If I may add a xaxe whisper: I feel as though it is imperative to emphasise on the “it is not a tottal loss.”

          Though, of the bench in my usual sorting, Paul is throwing down buckets.

          tSAtSE-Azilo40 Agniyeya

          • Ismail AA

            GitSAtSE Solomon wedi Hawey,
            The whisper received in good order. Indeed, that is what hope means because once you decide all have been lost, then you should prepared for the apocalypse of hopeless.
            Ms selamta nwedi Hawey.

        • Dear Ismail AA,

          The advertisement would have read, ‘addis to asmara and back – by road, railway or airplane. Make your choice’. The electric train from addis to djibouti would have been called addis to assab. So many opportunities squandered for sake of politics and egocentric worldview.

          • Ismail AA

            Dear Horizon,
            All option except the senseless wars of the 90s make sense. Eventually all of this could happen once demagogy of self-centered govenments give way to freedom of societies of the Horn nations to install forward looking and pragmatic administrations that have their best interest at heart.
            Regards

          • sara

            Dear Horizon
            how about the wishes of people like ato Abi and myself,that is different than you and your likes?

          • Dear sara,

            Good for you and your likes if you are the majority. Otherwise, it is not going to help, because you cannot stop the future from coming. DIA and his supporters are on the stage today, but tomorrow they will not be around, because they are on the wrong side of history, and against the economic development of their nation. Moreover, they are not in a position to provide an alternative solution. All they can do is to block the way towards the economic prosperity of their people. Nothing more.

          • Nitricc

            Horizon; Wrong when you say ” DIA and his supporters are on the stage today, but tomorrow they will not be around, because they are on the wrong side of history” WRONG! we are here ready to take over and the country and the people to the promised land. What do you mean economic development? you don’t have one. Aid doesn’t equate economic development. it does mean addiction though. Sadly you people are addicted to dependency, crippled beyond repair.

          • Nitricc,
            Where do you see signs of economic development, in ethiopia or eritrea? You should congratulate ethiopia (don’t get angry, no need to), even though she is dependant on aid, ethiopia has the best airlines in africa, the first world class electric train, she is building the biggest hydroelectric dam, she has more than 30 universities, a gradually increasing gdp, etc. What do you have to show from your side? You are begging some countries to fly their airplanes to your capital so that you connect to the rest of the world, you still have the railway italians built a century ago, you have your famous mini-dams, of course, you have closed the only university you had, etc, and yet as much as you are concerned, you are heading to the promised land. Have you noticed that you no more speak of singapore of the horn. Let me tell you a news (calm down), ethiopia is emulating china and she is going to be the china of the horn in 30-40 yrs. China was facing famine about 40 yrs ago. Look where she is today.

            Please, go and sell your pride to the eritrean father and mother whose children go to bed hungry, to asmarinos who are fed up of electricity outages – do not have enough running water – or have got to rise up at 4 am for bread ration, the 5k or so young eritreans who are running away every month from the promised land you have been building over the last quarter century, etc.

            By the way, nitricc, for christ sake, what and where is your promised land? Can you please tell us?

          • Nitricc

            Horizon; do you know what the headline on REUTERS, by Katy Migiro? Well I can’t put the link but let me show you few words…
            “Millions of drought-stricken Ethiopians needing food, water and emergency medical care are not receiving it due to funding shortages…….”
            The above is the reality and you have the nerve to tell us all is the honky dory. Man, everyone says we, Eritreans and Ethiopians are very similar; but I doubt I find any Eritrean so proud his country is begging and the people are starving. True, you have 30 university producing and graduating students can’t read, let alone think critically. I know the likes Aman-H and P are burning your ears on empty bull S. but come on my man. Do you what happens to your country if Trump decided to cut the umbilical cord? Think! In Eritrea life goes on. Do did you see the difference?

          • Abrehet Yosief

            Dear Nitricc,
            So you are ready to take over the country to continue the work of Isayas. I guess you have accumulated enough points in the annual certificate the YPFDJ give for “social media activist” to assure you that you can make this claim. Please don’t let Isayas hear, he doesn’t like anyone talking about what happens when he passes.
            I feel that you have seen Eritrea at its worst and you believe that is what the people are capable of and that is what they should expect. I can assure you that we are capable of doing more and have done more until this monster took over. There is no economic development without human development. The very few college graduates who do well in Eritrea are the ones who get a lot of support from their parents/families. Those who don’t get a chance to go to college are condemned to servitude far away from their families. Not only their education is stopped, their emotional growth is arrested. They are alienated from their younger siblings, the guilt of not being able to support their parents/spouses drives them to drinking and constant fights. They have not been given an opportunity to manage their life. The norms that societies have developed in millennia no longer exist in Eritrea.
            I honestly don’t know who you are trying to fool.

          • Nitricc

            Hey Abrehet; What you and the rest the rest of the goons who agreed with failed to know is that Time makes more converts and unthinkable changes than reason and rationales themselves. And yes I will serve Eritrea in due time and yes, there are many ideas I will retain from the current system. And yes this country we call Eritrea, she will be worthy of all the blood that was/is shade for her. Believe; Abrehet!! Believe!

          • iSem

            Hi Ntricc:
            You may think you are funny, you are not, you are laughable for calling other goons, while you and the regime you love are the epitome of thuggery.
            And no, I bet all the billions brains cells in me that you will never serve Eritrea, would you bet the only cell in your brain that you will serve Eritrea in “due time”. I also bet the same that you, no matter how long time elapses you will support thuggery.
            And your quip that time is superior to reason and rational is as usual is unintelligible, because time is a unit that measure how long something it takes to accomplish something, example if you say, it took Nitricc 6 years finish college and took Semere only one years to finish college the same (direct proportional to the number of cell in our respective brains), we are not talking about time’s accomplishment or lack of, we are quantifying the performance of these two people.

          • Abraham H.

            Selam Horizon, Nitricc doesn’t need to go visit Eritrea/Ethiopia to have an idea about the development of the two countries since they parted ways 26 years ago. Just tell him to see google earth from his pc and I bet he would hung himself when comparing the impressive infrastructure development in Ethiopia with that of the non-existent if not regressing infrastructure of Eritrea. The train of the Horn of Africa has departed, and thanks to the good for nothing Isayas and his nsu-nhna hodgepodge like Nitricc, Eritrea is left in the swirling dust.

          • Nitricc

            Hi Abraham; what exactly is your IQ? I wonder?

          • Abraham H.

            Hi Nitricc, whatever my iq might be, it is better than being a cheerleader of killers like Nitricc.

          • Amde

            Selam Horizon

            I think this forum has reached consensus that Nitricc is a disgruntled Amiche who terribly misses Ethiopia.

            Why ask “By the way, nitricc, for christ sake, what and where is your promised land? Can you please tell us?” when he said he knows every town and hamlet of Gojjam?

            የንትሪክ ናፍቆት ህልምና ምኞቱ፣
            እሽክምክም ማለት ነው ካንዷ ጎጃሚቱ፣
            ምንም እንኳን ባይባል አንደበተ-ርቱ፣
            ጎጃሚንግ ይለዋል ባዲስ አንደበቱ።

            Nitricc, I am praying you get your wish bro…

            Amde

          • Berhe Y

            Dear Sara,

            How about you and Abi sign up on the spaceX travel to Mars, while we enjoy the trip Addis-Asmara; Asmara- Khartoum; Khartoum-Addis.

            Berhe

        • Mez

          HI Ismail,

          The Addis Asmara (via Awash Arba) is in the final plan; will be via Shire Endasillase. ….

          Just waiting for the two Yemanes and Bit’shai PA Afeworki either to be below the earth or get incapacitated. Until then funding is being actively searched to connect the Electric rail to Asmara. …
          Cheers.

          • Ismail AA

            Dear Nez,
            This suggests a seed under a fertile soil that awaits moisture to germinate and sprout. I write this reminded by the post WWII Western Europe that saw the defeat of Nazism and Fascism, and gave way to the European Coal and Steel Community (ECSC) that became the first step towards the current EU system. Perhaps de defeat of dictatorship in my country, and promotion of freedom of democratic governances in the greater Horn region would lead to make what you have written come true.
            Regards.

    • Nitricc

      Your Fitness; If any Ethiopians and Ethiopia should have learned form the last year’s protest. it is futile and stupid to invest with out peace, stabilization and acceptance of the people. what happened on last protest is that many of the targets were investments by the government and private sectors and the reason they were specifically targeted was because the majority didn’t believe it belongs to and benefited them i.e. they were torched one by one. Now, this buses you are talking about; if I am mistaken the way from Khartoum to Addis is must be through Metema, Gonder and crossing the entire Gojjam, if so, isn’t that area is the most contested and most destabilized area in Ethiopia?
      Why not just stick to Air flights and save the money to more safe and sound investments? I don’t think they going to last that long. There is a great danger they will be torched Like Selam Bus one by one. of course some toothless Ethiopians will accuse me as I am wishing bad thing for Ethiopia.

      • Thomas

        Hi Nitricc,

        By know everyone knows that you are a sick person, so no one will come to accuse you. To look or feel good about yourself, you seem to wait & wish to see the failure of others. That is not how normal people behave.

        • Nitricc

          Hi Thomas I actually I was refereeing to the Ethiopians not for some confused stupid drunks.

      • Fanti Ghana

        Hello Nitriccay,

        I read you well and clear. If anyone accuses you, like Thomas just did below, it is because they don’t know you the way I do. Having said that, there are three important factors to consider:

        1) the recent violent demonstration was misguided and temporary in nature which is being dealt with. All the facts about it show that it was aimless and destructive just for the sake of destruction. The great majority who lost their property and investment were civilian owned. The government has promised to replace almost all that was lost.

        2) A country cannot afford to succumb to events like these and modify its infrastructure accordingly. It is true precaution will always be necessary, but to outright give in to the scare would be weak and it would invite more of it.

        3) Some of the news we hear in the diaspora are extremely exaggerated and quite often a blatant lie. I believe Ethiopians are learning about how to support or oppose effectively very fast.

        I have relatives throughout Ethiopia and some the news we hear here they never heard of, in some cases even when the event was supposed to have taken place in their town.

        A cousin once joked with me to come home and help him with his new business idea. I asked what kind of idea. He goes “I heard America is buying a picture of a dead Ethiopian for $250,000.00 each.” I shot back, so what guarantee do I have you won’t kill me, take a picture, and live happily after? Digemilign, digemilign, minew dimtsih yequorareTal…?

        Besides, didn’t I say I am super optimist?

    • Selamat Fanti Ghana,

      This Blue Island the wise Hippopotamus basks and competes on is indeed a fresh narative. I recall a few KharTum, Medeni, Gedarif rides my self. It would be as pleasant as then to do a Shaft In Africa international travels as then-now.

      tSAtSE-Azilo40

      • Paulos

        Selamat Tsatse,

        Did you know that Debebe Eshetu played in Shaft-in-Africa. If you don’t know who Debebe Eshetu is, will direct you to Abi.

        • ሰላማት ጳውሎስ፡

          ሙሳ ደንከላይ፡ Musa a lovely Eritrean friend, New Yorker I know of. As for Debbebe Ishetu, I do not as of yet. The buss ride through beautiful Ethiopia is rather fitting for a Frappaccino moment at Young and Blure. What thinks you?

          tSAtSE-Azilo40

          • Paulos

            Sure thing Tsatse arkey before we cruise through the high ways in Ethiopia, we will chill ኣብ እንዳ ፔሮ in Toronto.

          • መርሓባ ጳውሎስ፡

            አንዳ ፒሮ ጥቓ አንዳመጽሓፍ ኣንጎሎ ክልተ ፈሓም። ኣታ ሰብ አንትይ ገበርናካ። ከምኡ ደኣ ቤላ።

            ጻጸ ጠርጣር ዓካት ቀዳማይ።
            ኣዚሎ40 ኣግኔያ

    • Ismail AA

      Dear Fanti,
      This should be taken as a modest cornerstone that would lead to a commonwealth of the greater Horn. But first the peoples of those countries should be able to shake off despotic administrations and install sane government.
      Regards

  • Paulos

    Selamat Awatistas,

    Sunday is not over yet and thought maybe something out of the usual suspects as in politics may peak your sense of curiosity.

    Today the death of a pioneering surgeon was all over the news where Dr. Starzl was the first surgeon who performed liver transplant in the late 60s where millions of lives were saved and were able to lead a normal life. What is remarkable however is that, as much as he was a towering figure in the field of surgery, he revealed something of a profound in his biography where not only his colleagues but also “lay people” who knew him were stunned when he said, he was crippled with an intense anxiety all his life even performing a straightforward procedure. His revelation encouraged many people to seek treatment who had otherwise thought it was rather not “manly” to talk about anxiety or depression. The statistics indicates that around 18% in the US alone suffer from anxiety and anti-anxiety and anti-depressant medications are the most sold medications with in the population between the age of 18 and 44.

    I am not sure if the issue of anxiety or depression is as prevalent in Eritrea or Ethiopia as it is in the Western world. I have never come across to any study to that effect and it would be curious to know given the social stressors prevailing with in the youth particularly in Eritrea.

    • iSem

      Hi Paulos:
      Thanks!. Lot os people, successful like Mike Wallace of the 60 minutes suffered with depression. So it is not surprising that Dr, Starzl also did
      As to your question, about Eritrea, the answer is obvious, Eritrea has never seen peace since its creation, it was always war and servitude and the last 60 years since the armed struggle have taken their toll on the people and to make matters worse the government of Gheteb, the government of Nitircc, the government for Gheteb and for Nitricc has arrested the only shrink in Eritrea, Dr Futsum G.
      I think metal illeness plague Eritrea starting from its presidents, do you think the people who survived the desert and the sea, who saw people thrown alive, the organ trafficking survivors are not suffering.
      For sure some ppl are more suseptible than others but I would think that the siuation in Eritrea and in Sawa make Eri fertile for mental illness

      • Paulos

        Selam iSem,

        I actually had Dr. Fitsum in mind for I knew him personally. And that was a turning point for me to realize and was convinced that Isaias was not good for Eritrea. I was particularly curious to know mental illness issues with in the populace in Eritrea where as you have aptly pointed it out the challenge here in Diaspora is beyond comprehension when the fleeing youth come with unbelievable psychological traumas as they traversed the oceans and the deserts as well.

    • MS

      Selam PAULOS
      I’m pretty sure these societies (The Horn of Africa countries) are among the most traumatized societies in the world, and perhaps, even more so when narrowing down to Eritrean and Ethiopian societies, considering the war traumas and torn lives and families. But we some inhibitory mechanism built in our cultures, machoism. Once, in the far Galaxy, in the inhabitants of the Tigre Tribe, passing gas and farting in common areas, even in a gathering with friends and family members was learnt to be a taboo of the strictest order. One evening, under clear skies, populated with starts of multiple amplitude, a young man loses a fart, making piercing sound. Everyone, falls silent. The symphony played by the inhabitants of the creek next to the family gained a chance to display their fine harmony, and a distraught do could be heard near by. tHE FAMILY observes silence until an elderly man breaks it. He clears his throat, ” Where we were?”, he continues his story of past glories and the unfortunate twists that had befallen the ancestors of the tribe. These are learning moments for the Tigre family. Everyone is invited to squeeze himself between the attendants and get closer to the elders to learn folklores and tales of the past. Children fall asleep listening to the stories. However, the elder man was not able to gather the attention of the attendants. The individuals in the gathering exchanged nervous and stealthy looks figuring out who was the person who lost his farting virginity publicly. Then it was obvious the Radar Finder zeroed in on one young man. He knew it. He made a sprang up suddenly wielding a knife. It was obvious he was going to gore himself to death. His friends acted swiftly restraining him. Then an elderly woman came closer to him and said ” Hamed mi gheb’aka, ana ETerT, Ebuka Tert…”, translation: What is going on Hamed, I fart, your dad farts, …everyone farts,” in a motherly tone. She soothed him into abandoning the idea of killing himself. He became a productive member of the family.
      #################
      I’m sure he produced many children for the tribe. However, I’m sure that night’s deed of the elderly woman did not spread into the society cultural norms. Our people are still full of TABOOS. Those taboos are making it difficult to break the cycle of silent death mostly attributed to mental health issues, and STD related illnesses. As part of his study, my son is involved with a team that is conducting a research sponsored by the University on Immigrants in areas of STD (particularly HIV) and Post Traumatic Syndrome. His target population is the Horn. Although he it’s too early the statistics does not reflect what we think of our self (people) that we are immune to mental health. We just learn early on to mask it. In most cases we take the illness to grave, and in rare cases we end up in the psychiatry Emergency Room. That’s not our people’s fault though. Developing societies lack the resources to get them aware of the presence of those illnesses. They lack the cadre and the facilities, hence, all they have is their time tested coping mechanism of coping with them.

      • Paulos

        Selam Muhamuday,

        I can relate to the story of the young man where I remember my mother telling us a story when one of our relatives in the village was embarrassed to the moon for passing gas while he was paying his respects in a gathering of mourners.

        On the flip side of the seemingly downside of our culture, the otherwise tight-knit family relationship could be an asset where a sense of individualism loses its meaning. For instance, in the Western world it is customery to talk to your family doctor as opposed to confide in family members where issues of myriad in nature are off limits. In contrast, we tend to open up say to our parents or siblings for the care we receive is organic as opposed to mechanical if it was coming from a stranger-professional. It only becomes problematic and detrimental when the issues are too complex and in need of professional and resources as well for we as you put it more often fall short.

    • Dear Paulos,

      There is this story of the person who asked ’what is peace’, because he was born in war and he grew up with war all around him. May be it is the same with’ anxiety and depression’ in Ethiopia and eritrea. Most people are born into it and live with it. I am not sure if I can say that it is a way of life and people have learnt to survive with it without antianxiety or antidepressant medications. Nevertheless, our people go easily crazy under a stressful situation, and that is why we have a lot of mental breakdowns. Look at our sisters in Arab countries or the streets of some of our cities. Our people are not prepared to cope with stressful situations and they very easly succumb to it. I am not aware of any study carried out.

      Anxiety and depression as we know them may be more of a problem to the affluent Western societies. Contrary to poor African countries, in the West some rich and famous people find it difficult to go on living under the weight of their affluent lifestyle and they commit suicide, because they suffer from depression. Poverty and riches sometimes end up having the same side effect. Only God knows why.

      • Paulos

        Selam Horizon,

        It is rather interesting to note that anxiety and depression are more prevalent as you put it with in the affluent segment of the society. Talk about money can not buy happiness or is it Marx’s vindication? Sure enough, people differ on their copping mechanisms where some people are naturally strong and they don’t crack up under any circumstance. And of course some people are prone to giving in to stressors. That said, national trauma has a corroding effect where more often it doesn’t discriminate between the weak and the strong for we are programed into the noble credo that we are our brothers keepers. As such, when the weak among us is hurting the strong is hurting as well.

      • Fanti Ghana

        Hello Horizon & Paulos,

        There is a study conducted on the rate of suicide among participating 100 nations, and the rate is unequivocally divided between religious and non-religious societies. The more religious the less suicidal, although some of the numbers may be because some or all religions prohibit suicide.

        So, I think the higher rate of anxiety/suicide among “affluent Western societies” maybe attributed to the combination of less religion and more material to be depressed about when lacking. I am looking at it in a tunnel, but at the minimum it is one of the reasons.

    • Fanti Ghana

      Selamat negeregnaw Paulos,

      This is a very important question which may have several complex answers. One reason I get ticked off with people who undermine our religion, with a heavy dose of arrogance I might add, is for this sort of reasons among many.

      In a nutshell, our people take their anxieties to their Gods. For most part it is quite effective. The farther away a society is from its coping mechanism the more likely it will be suicidal, and I don’t think there is more precise measuring rod of anxiety more than the rate of suicides.

      Those of you who may be subscribers of Rumi’s work, which I am, will understand that some kind of coping mechanisms of events beyond our control are extremely important. Our brain is designed to work under a specific set of rules. Every thing it encounters has to make sense to it otherwise it will shut down (faint temporarily or acquire a permanent mental illness).

      All things being equal, is it possible that some people are prone to anxiety than others? The answer is a cautious yes, but that will take us to the field of “mental health” which is another monster.

      There is also the relativity issue. If everyone you know is hungry would you be depressed as you would if you were the only one or one of the few? Very unlikely, and ironic, but group misery is actually good my friends.

      • iSem

        St.Fanti:
        You are more qualified than me to speak to this topic, but I do not think relativity would apply in the case of depression, the chemical imbalances induced by different causes can be not be relative, even in the people with the strongest will power. If group misery is good, it could only be as in support mechanism and that is provided there is open discussion about the common misery of depression.

        • Fanti Ghana

          Hello iSem Anbesa,

          Are you saying my “…that will take us to the field of ‘mental health'” didn’t work?

          You are correct, the idea behind the group thing was that group misery is much more likely to get support base than an individual or the few. However, when we fail as a group or something bad happens to all, it takes one important anxiety trigger away: “internalization!” I am unlucky, I am bad/weak, I am not smart enough… etc. are effectively avoided.

          You are however correct though, especially if we expand the topic to its full extent, which I tried to narrow down to a manageable level.

          • MS

            MarHab Fanti
            I see your point. Some form of manageable anxieties are I think inevitable, and they are OK, some situational depression is also a fact of light. People get depressed because of some setbacks but pull it off and carry on through. I don’t know what life would look like if we were always high. And no doubt what you said about faith and close-knit social relations help individuals with minor forms of depression and anxieties lead a decent life. However, there is this wrong assumption that our societies back home don’t suffer from mental illness as much as we see it here. I think the experts (people like you) know it well that:
            a/ The knowledge (awareness) of the societies about this area is very limited. People go undiagnosed. This the same with other illnesses. We know tropical illnesses that cause obvious symptoms (fever, diarrhea…), but how aware are they about other illnesses such as diabetes, cardiovascular, kidney…how many and how often do they do routine screening. Once a friend went to see his doctor. By the end of the visit, he was informed of more than ten diagnoses, some chronic and few others were easy and curable. I was giving him ride, and while returning home, he said “Arkey, dektor de’a xEinuni endyu!” OR ” Buddy, the doctor has loaded me [with diagnoses].” The point is: since we don’t get diagnosed, we don’t know it.
            b/ People drop dead young, so we don’t see many of the ailments that we see in the west. And then we claim, ” Oh, our society is healthy.”
            c/ The social argument is also controversial. We grew up near our grandparents and were “raised by the village” because the life was simple. My friend Horizon, don’t expect life to be the same 50 years from now. The west did have close-knit family life until the industrial revolution eroded that setting triggering economic and social mobility. African societies will also be challenged by the demands of labor market when economic expansion takes root. Migrations will follow and families will be separated. High incomes will lead to the same sedentary life, and high consumption of “dabo” that will lead to fat axxs, big belly—–>depression.
            Signs of mental illnesses
            – You know the consumption of alcohol is high
            -Caffeine, and nicotine addiction
            -You know how easily people get irritated, remember ” anta gdef…” and then the famous “testa”
            – You know the expression “beynu yzareb alo”; “emni ydrbi alo…”
            -The anxieties and fear that many children suffer because their parents may be in prison; their parents may be living abroad (away from them), or in a different continent…or for years in the army….
            – Think how torn apart families are. Think of random friends and try to see how dispersed their families are. You will find a family spread across more than three continent.
            – High number of war casualties, families who lost more than one. I know several families who have each lost more than four members (brothers and sisters).
            -Suicides happen, we just don’t like to acknowledge them because of honor issues to the family
            Just to say that people suffer from those illnesses. We just don’t have any other option but to toughen them up. Because the awareness or consciousness of the individual about these illnesses is a mirror image of how the society at large see or handle them.

          • Nitricc

            Greetings Mahmuday; I agree with your take but you are forgetting one major point: FOOD!
            Food is Medicine! If anyone in the awate family have an health issue, simply change your diet and throw out the pills. Go all out Green, limit animal diet, eliminate consuming Bread and drink your water then watch the change and watch the body regenerate itself. We are what we eat and what they ate!

          • MS

            Ahlan Nitrickay
            I agree, though I love the meat. Nitrickay, this should be the minimum common ground for you and SAAY. Entering a No-bolotika Zone?

          • Paulos

            Nitrikay,

            Glad to see you being conscious at your age about what to eat and not. No patronizing intended.

          • iSem

            Hi Nitricc;
            Yes, food goes a long way, but it is misleading to totally and solely depend on food as and all be all for all our aliments: eat your flax seed,your abaake,your berber and your broccoli and so on. The medicinal nutritients found in food most often than not must be extracted and formulated to make t potent. Case in point, ther is a third world country in North America called Canada and a Canadian hospital told a Leuikimia patient , please keep your affairs in order: a code for you will be dying soon. The patience said, Ok, I will just drink dandelion tea and he did. When he returned after 4 months, showed improvemenst, enough tp pique the interest of the scientists. So this third world country is formulating the said tea in a paste form, the scients found that you cannot drink enough of this tea to be useful, so they formulated it on a past, and it is undergoing clinical trials last time I checked
            Ye, we are what we eat, but most importantly, we are what we think

          • Paulos

            Selam iSem,

            That’s really interesting. Thanks for the insight. And of course the litany of you’re what you…..is endless including you’re what you drive and what kind of socks you put on 😂.

          • Nitricc

            Hey Semere: I believe it. the problem with us is that we went far away from nature and from what is natural. We become the slaves of big PHARMA and we forgot the simple and safe remedies. Watch the TV, to sell you some pills that cures one element and pay attention the following warnings and side effects, at times they will say “even death”. The other day I was reading some post about virgin coconut oil and let me share with a few what the researcher has to say. I can’t post the whole thing too long but here the 1st paragraph. now imagine we are talking about a coconut oil? how much does it cost but look what it does. any next I will share the amazing thing about Turmeric.

            “Some clarification and further research evidence for any doubters concerning the true benefits of virgin coconut oil (VCO). The most useful protective ingredient by far in VCO is lauric acid — a medium chain triglyceride fatty acid(saturated fat) which, after it enters the body is easily converted to monolaurin — a monoglyceride and the active and protective form. VCO contains about 50% lauric acid. By comparison, mother’s breast milk contains only 20% lauric acid which works to
            actively protect babies who feed on the milk.
            As far as I’m able to work out, monolaurin acts on lipid coated viruses and bacteria in much the same way as BHT (Butylated Hydroxytoluene) and Hydrogen Peroxide. Monolaurin has several weak hydroxyl(OH) chemical bonds which react with all lipid (fat) coated viruses and bacteria in
            the same way to disrupt their hydrogen bonds, thus fluidizing the lipids and phospholipids in the outer envelope of the virus and completely exposing their DNA for recognition and direct attack and removal by the body’s white blood cells, antibodies and neutralase enzymes. Monolaurin additionally also seems to adversely effect signal transduction during replication of these lipid coated pathogens.”

          • Haile S.

            Hi MS,
            I agree with what you said. Waching eritrean movies, theatres and comedies on youtube, can you imagine how extremely rare it is to see one that doesn’t have one ‘mental’ ጽሉል (xlul) in it? I believe, this is a revealing sign of the state of our society, and in addition the only conscious or unconscious critisism that such theatres contribute breaking the absolute gag on sociopolitical critisism prevailing in Eritrea.

          • saay7

            Hi Haile:

            May I present an alternative view? The reason there is a prevalence of people with mental illness in Eritrean entertainment, particularly comedy, is because:

            (1) it’s one of the last frontiers: it is still considered ok to laugh at, and ridicule, people with mental illness whom we call crazy, insane, xlul, Ebud, etc. Someone who would never make fun of someone with physical or emotional illness would mock someone with mental illness;

            (2) for actors who can’t show the range of emotions–happy, sad, shocked, in love– showing “crazy” is really easy.

            I used to watch the dramas (when subtitled) of the world’s third largest movie industry* and the “crazy” schtick is a common character.

            saay

            * Nigeria (Nollywood), iSem, and NOT canada. Sad! 😂
            PS: It would be interesting if someone can categorize the genres of Eritrean and Ethiopian movie prototypes.

          • Haile S.

            Hi Saay7,
            Your explanations are also valid. But I couldn’t dissociate from the revealing side of it too. It is like the Indian film story. Back in the late 70th a friend and I tried to find an indian film without a love/marriage triangle and we couldn’t, not even one. Hopefully our Expowood will come out of absolute inclusion of xlul, mayjaHjah and Hnzi. FYI In recent movies the statue of Pushkin is a la mode.

          • Fanti Ghana

            Selamat Saay,

            “Eritrean and Ethiopian movie prototypes”

            I have watched not more than 5 total movies. One was strongly recommended by the store owner who happened to be a good friend. She had never failed in picking music for me, so I took the movie along with my music. Our friendship has been under review ever since.

            I liked “Yewendoch Guday.” It had a great potential. There was one Eritrean movie I liked a few years ago, but I forgot the name.

            As moviegoer as I am, you would think I would collect them all, but I got too frustrated early on because it had almost no cultural trait or home grown story lines but a translated versions of bad movies of the west. I saw very few actors but lots of comics. There are many great actors had they been given the right text and context, but they seem to be dependent on the whims of the camera owner, western “educated” movie house owner.

            To get back to our xlale, is it possible they include the xlul character often to pass a message a sane person would be arrested for? I haven’t seen enough of them to determine one way or another.

          • saay7

            Fanti:

            There is a long tradition of truthteller-masquerading-as-a-fool in the West (the court jester or the wise fool) but haven’t seen it in Eritrean movies.

            Eritrean movies are like….you know the High School valedictorian who gives a speech not based on life experience (how the hell can you have life experience at 18?) but based on what they calculate their audience (teachers, parents) want to hear? Same with Eritrean art: it sees miles and miles away from issues that would be sensitive.

            Sometimes, issues that are a major weakness of the government, like making a judgement without hearing both sides of the story; or the win-lose strategy it pursues, are (to my shock) covered in the TV series “Sdra”. But that is due to complete absence of irony or awareness in Eritrea: in much the same way Tesfanews covers election flaws in Ethiopia or Ethiopian migration without the least bit of pause for self reflection.

            Also, Fanti, if you are not watching your country’s movies even when some of them are recognized internationally, that makes you a snob. I knew I liked you.

            saay

          • Haile S.

            Hi Saay7 ,
            Great analysis. This reminds me of an observation I had on a recent movie, Tsetser. In part 10 a guy says ምኢንቲ መጎጎ ትሕለፍ ኣንጭዋ that can be translated as let the rat pass to save the vase. And his interlocutor says ‘if the rat was a python you wouldn’ have the choice of saving the vase. The lesson: a large majority of Eritrean literates (I include myself) are silent chosing to save the vase. But that rat is getting bigger and bigger heading to attain the size of the python, getting constantly fed by the intransigency of the Eritrean leadership, the incompitency of the constituted opposition and most importantly by the silence of the majority of ruminating literates, the savers of the vase.

          • Dear MS,

            Indeed, life is not going to be the same for ethiopians and eritreans 50 years from now. The main point is, where would be our people’s place, when the new revolution of AI and Automation takes place. What will be the fate of those countries who have not passed through the industrial revolution? Whatever the case may be, i think that it will be better than today.

            Could our people be the owners of automation and mass production, so that they would see themselves as human gods, who are not in need of a superior power, similar to what the west did more or less after the industrial revolution? Are we in danger of getting rid of our cultural and religious values in the coming 50 yrs or so. Or, could it be the age of their revival? Nobody really knows.

            I imagine that countries like ours will be allotted the responsibility of food production for export. They might send us robots that will work in the fields with our peasants, and our agriculture methods will be automated and productive. In addition, our countries will be tourist destinations for the jobless society of the west and they may be forced to introduce automation for their own comfort. This will indirectly benefit our peoples. Of course, all these depend if white people’s ultra-nationalism, supremacy and neo-nazism are defeated, and the west has normal and peace-loving societies.

            Otherwise we will be forced to align ourselves with the new world power, china, and God knows where that would lead our people.

          • Fanti Ghana

            Hello Mahmuday,

            I hereby officially pass the “expert” torch to you sir.

            Our societies have too many problems to effectively isolate and diagnose “anxiety.” I don’t think anyone would strongly disagree if one diagnoses anyone with any ailment as “something plus anxiety” as a default procedure.

            We used to put a minimum of 1/3rd of our patients in the Sudan under “therapeutic treatment” which had a broad application, but mostly we do that when we didn’t exactly know what was wrong with the patient. So, we use an elimination process starting from the potentially most dangerous to the least.

            In some cases some patients get well for reasons that cannot be attributed directly to the medicine, but we always reasoned it out as placebo effect. We have never entertained “anxiety” as a possible medical factor at the time.

            So, our societies have too many problems to deal with and anixiety is paling by comparison, which means we have zero or very few experts in the field to identify it quickly and correctly. Vicious cycle in the making.

          • MS

            Ahlan Fanti Arkey
            No way, you are the ONLY Fantista who could assume that position until dethroned by someone who should expect Awatista stone-throwers lined up to defend you.
            I totally agree with you. I was just pointing out to the explanations that many of our folks come up with when discussing these issues. Of course, life style (including food, faith and physical activities), regional (tropical versus gloomy climates ) cultural (the relationship between individual and society…) genetic factors play roles. There is also the role that pharmacological companies play. Through their enticing commercials, and monetary incentives, they push drugs onto patients and doctors. And we end up with heavily sedated nation (Lucky you Canadians, you have a government that entices people to grow dandelion tsk, ts, Fab10/elite Semere@Andom—>BerheY%!Mashaallah [xeHayna beriQa] Xaxe theory of “The 49th Parallel” By the way, I also agree on the educational side of your argumen. I mean that’s what many will tell you if they think you are depressed. They will tell you to go to the gym and/or make friends, etc. Emma will explain that our body is a power house of chemicals. It could cure itself with the right amount of cuing and help.
            Now back to fear.anxiety: An Eritrean Edition
            In Eritrean circles, when you complain about IA, you will definitely find someone who says, ” Yeah, but who is really going to replace him?” መን’ዩ’ሞ ዝቕይሮ? And my favorite reply is ብሓቂ ኸ ደሊና ዲና? i.e., “Have we really looked for an alternate?” Then when the discussion continues, I can easily see the colors of the individuals who bring this shaky reasoning that CLEARLY defends the states quo. Some say it out of sheer fear. You see that some are really angry at IA administration; they would love to sea him and his PFDJ replaced, but they lack the capacity to explain clearly the complex situation playing out in front of their eyes – PFDJ versus opposition; Eritrea versus Ethiopia; the national interests that they care about versus international challenges (real and perceived threats coming from the region and/or outside), etc. There are also some who care less about entertaining these puzzle game, they just want to sea a different Eritrea, one that they had dreamed about decades ago, but they simply lack the tools (information, courage/Hamot ) that would enable them to break free from years of IA’s influence ). Yet, others says it out of fear of the perceived loss of power and prestige that they associate with IA AUTHORITY; the members of the last group are hardcore Issayasists who have become to believe the nation could not stand a night without wedi-Afom. They don’t want to think of Wedi-Afom as a mortal soul, and they don’t want you to think past the current moment. They are about now and here ሃገር ኣብ ሓደጋ ኣላ፡ ተጎቢጣ ኣላ…To them the relationship of IA and Eritrea is similar to the relation of chicken and egg. They don’t care who comes first Eritrea or IA ? All they care about it is the notion that “genetically” IA and Eritrea are one and the same as chicken and egg are. That’s why you see slogans such as ንሕና ንሱ፡ ንሱ ናሕና (He is us and we are him). Here, on one hand, you can sea genuine fear and apprehension of citizens. And on the other hand, you can clearly see the political con artists who exploit it to their advantage. If anxiety is an extreme fear of the unknown, then you have it there. And the conflict between what one wants to see happening, and the odds stacked against that desire makes one really miserable. The solution is for all of us to get out of our refuges and explore possibilities. That is true on individual and on organizational level. Open contacts and frank discussions are the key to eradicating some of these self-imposed anxieties and political depressions.
            Speaking of fear/anxiety: the man who openly declare war on fear was FDR. He famously said “The only thing we have to fear is fear itself.”
            Naay lomi Hateta abzi tewedi’u.

      • Dear Fanti Ghana,

        “..Group misery is actually good..” brings to mind what some americans say when they visit ethiopia. They find it difficult to understand why ethiopians are happy under the economic condition they live in. It seems that culture, tradition and religious beliefs serve as release valves under stressful situations and they give hope to the people. What they lack is the additional help science could give them, and how to see and understand things beyond their narrow environment and way of life, which depends on education and exposure. I believe that in the future an educated ethiopian and eritrean societies would handle stressful situations much better than western societies, because their spiritual and physical needs will be fulfilled with their cultural, traditional and true religious beliefs, on top of what they are going to get from economic development. In the west, they have lost their spiritual life, or it has been turned into a sort of business, which do not help them to find refuge in their cultural and religious values in times of crisis.
        Economic deprivation, for example, is toxic to the physical and psychologic health of any group of people, contrary to economic welbeing. Therfore, it is not farfetched to say that unity in happiness and even in misery gives people the power to come together and endure a situation and cope with life.

      • Paulos

        Selam Fantination,

        I absolutely agree that religion plays a big part in relieving anxiety and help us cope as well. But the question still remains—why is anxiety chronic more often than not? The experts like yourself tell us that the probable answer is with in the difference between us and a Giraffe.

        James Clear gives us a scenario where a group of tourists driving by taking pictures of a Giraffe munching on a tree. Here is how the wiring in the Giraffe’s brain work: When it is hungry, it walks over and munchs on a tree; when a storm comes, it takes shelter under a tree; when it spots a lion, it runs away. The Giraffe lives in what he calls it in an Immediate Return Environment.

        Like the Giraffe, our brain was designed to live in an Immediate Return Environment. Chronic anxiety happens precisely because a brain wired up to function in an Immediate Return Environment is made to live in a Delayed Return Environment. In short, our brain was not designed to solve future problems as in am I going to get a raise; am I going to find a soul-mate; am I going to get over this particular disease among other things.

        Sure enough as you put it, there is a genetic predisposition to anxiety where some people are prone to be constantly anxious than others. And it is equally true that, the cultural set up we live in has an impact as well. For instance, talking to yourself is perfectly normal but in our society it is taken as a sign of mental illness where people exacerbate it instead of reaching out to offer help. I think, educating the society can have a positive impact whereby the things that are considered a taboo can come to the open and be seen from a different angle.

        P.S. Hope Emma is not rolling his eyes for we have veered off from the issues we are meant to talk about. Sorry Emma!

        • Berhe Y

          Dear Paulos,

          I think the topic is relevant. My take, specially looking at the Eritrean youth cases, there is or will be a lot of issue related to mental health or depression. When you hear the interview of the ERITREAN colonel Saay provided and the social crises that the millutary is creating is for sure leads to disaster. May be it’s reported a lot more but we hear a lot of crimes committed by the ERITREAN refugees in the western countries that we haven’t seen before. In Asmara because if the arms that almost everyone has, there is killing / murder among people who otherwise wouldn’t have occurred.

          The problem with the churches at lease the orthodox is, it’s under total control of the regime and any role that it could play is limited by the government. Not to mention the the ordeal these young kids going through to escape, rape, death of friends in desert, and the high seas, plus the finiancial stress people go through unable to help family and relatives it’s a lot of to take.

          Berhe

          • Paulos

            Selam Berhe,

            I hear that Toronto* is becoming like DC in terms of Habesha population and I wonder if the community provides support particularly to the young people with all kinds of issues.

            *Toronto is one of my fav cities and the people are particularly nice and courteous.

          • iSem

            Hi iPau:
            Toronto was one of the first cities in NA to establish the community center, but it has been dividing and dysfunction for most of the last 20 years, and the reason is the interference by PFDJ , which does not want independent organization even if one that focus on the local issues of the society
            and BY said, the church was infiltrated and splintered into two, most of time this two houses of God do no talk to each other. The first immigrants and the first generation need a robust support system for belonging and cultural health and the next one will be fully integrated

          • Paulos

            Selam iSem,

            I was in Toronto last summer visiting family members and I remember the divide with in the Church came up in E’lal and that was sad but again that seems to be the case in every major cities. God help us!

          • Berhe Y

            Hi Paulos,

            The Habesha population in Toronto has been growing steadily for past 20 years (both Eritrean / and Ethiopian) and for the most part, I think the outlook in the general Canadian public is positive. There isn’t any exagrated news that identify the people in any negative way, and for the most part people do tend to mind their business and move on with lives challenges.

            As to the two churches, don’t believe everything bad boy iSem says, he hasn’t been to the church lately for a while. There was the initial problem when the Abun was removed but it seems that the second church, which stood with the Abun either relented or folded but the two churches are not in any conflict right now. All in all the people stood and the division didn’t take root that caused a huge fallout as was in other cities. As to dealing to any social issues, I think both churches provide council and they both seem to organize grieving people with access to the church and the normal stuff, which makes it easier for people to deal with in hard times.

            However they never cross the line, other than doing FitHAT but never say what the “root cause” of the problem is other than, “አምላኽ ይተዓረቀና፡ ንመንግስትና መራሒና ልቦና ይሃቦ”.

            The positive side is, they attract a lot of followers and they are in direct competition to the PFDJ organized parties..and events. This is causing PFDJ operatives some series short fall in the cash they use to control, plus the ban of the 2% tax, now I don’t think they are as strong as they use to be. Besides the PFDJ office in Toronto, I think for the most part they are not as crazy as those other cities, to my knowledge, I haven’t heard any specific example where people from Toronto travelling to Eritrea have experienced series problems..they seem to be just going with flow…it’s possible that those who oppose the regime do not take a chance…

            I also like to mention there is a large community of Eritean muslims although, I don’t know to what degree they own their own establishment, like the Christian Church. There is also a big Catholic church which is also in the same line (but a little more active at least in sponsorship of refugees etc) but doesn’t cross the line as well. There is also few of the other church, the Pente and there use to be Protestant (I don’t know if it’s still there) and many be many others.

            On the Ethiopian side, I know of at least three of four churches. The biggest is Mariam Church and I think they are against the government, and there are other pro government church. Also the small church like Pente, protestant. There is also old church (Jamacian /. Ethiopian) church established during HS time.

            I would say the division in the Ethiopian church may be greater than that of Eritrean (at least on people to people side).

            Community services:
            There are pro and none government community organizations. The pro government, I don’t think it gives any social services at all except organizing festivals..the closest is the provide soccer tournament which I think those who run it are pure dedicated guys who do not have much to do with the politics but it’s under the pro government umbrella. The other older community services, it provides better social services with regards to refugees, some training and I think for most people who have issue with social issue (police/ legal help etc). But there is always a problem between those people who run it, those who wanted to make it Anti-government / Political and those who wanted to keep it politics free…but over all I think it does do good services.

            There use to be few news papers…Meftih in Tigrinia and I think there is one in Amharic (Tobia).

            But Toronto is made up of lots of immigrants and the city has many ways and means to accommodate new comers so Ethiopians/ Eritreans just blend in with the society and integrate.

            Lots of Habesha owned business..Language school etc.

            Over all I think it’s almost feels like home…..

            In our last election a Somali Born Immigrant made it to the parliament and now he is the immigration minister, and hopefully he will give it better focus to the refugee crises in our region and allocate more resources.

            Berhe

          • iSem

            Hi BY: This goes back before the Abune issue
            The two Orthodox churches we have in To now, St. Michael and Medhanie Alem, were one and then they fund raised to buy a church, I am talking back in 2000 and 2001. I participated in two fund raising dinners. Something happened, they dismissed the priest, they accused him of lots of sins and one group took the money that was raised and run away (not for personal use, to use to build a church) so the two churches split, St. Michael was established, got their own priest and the Medhanie Alem got their own priest from Eri. Both of them now have bought churches. But one of them took the money, this is the root of the conflict.
            Then the relation was strained and complicated and one accused the other as ‘tehadoso’ because they use the organ during their worship and for a while they did not attend the annual ‘ngdet’, then it got better and started attending each other’s “ngedet” and now still it is sporadic, cordial but fake
            There is no problem if churches multiply, the Bilbe says they should multiply, but this case as in Seattle as in NYC was divisive
            I am sure both provide some services, but they have no business of distributing petitions of we support our government, one of them did.
            Also one of them, during a week when a few hundreds of Eritrea died in the sea in 2015, they were praying for God to give the president and leaders health but never remembered the dead, it was that week.
            So iPaul, you better believe what iSem says in matters of the church, BY is a tad biased, he is a new born Orthodox:-)

          • Berhe Y

            Dear iPaul,

            iSem is exaggerating, that problem was long time ago and i think it kind of dissipated. He is like many of the resident attends who attends both nigdet. You see what I mean he wasn’t to church in a while:), except during nigdet where he goes to eat:)

            I say, the division was limited to few individuals (probably less than 100) from both sides but I think for the most part the people didn’t have much choice or involved. I remember one of those years, one church told to the people not to attend the nigdet but the people just went anyway (majority of them)…

            What’s ironic is, the one that opposed the Abune was primary PFDJ leaders attend with. The second one which was inline with the removal of the Abune was most primary attended by non PFDJ members / leaders.

            If I have to guess correctly, the division is more like those deki Asmara and those Amiche Eritreans…And it’s based on who they feel comforatble with I think more than any other idealogy or stand.

            Berhe

          • Fanti Ghana

            Hello Berhe Y,

            So, you are a “New Born Orthodox.” Thank God there is something wrong with you after all.
            I owe iSem for this vital information. The idea of “Modern Orthodoxy” is so funny (to me), I always wanted to meet one for a heartfelt laugh inducing discussion. Someday, BerheYani!

          • Saleh Johar

            Hi Fanti,
            The Orthodox rejection of music reminds me of the Muslim Selefists who place music anywhere from Haram, a sin, to BidAa, innovation. The kind would consider it Hadassa ( modernity) just like tehadso. For the last few years such issues are boiling among the Muslims and it is led by so many bright and well educated scholars and preachers who are challenging Muslim orthodoxy. I am planning to write about it sometime soon .

          • Fanti Ghana

            Hello Memhir,

            I cannot wait! please write it soon. I am always aware about it although I strongly lean toward leaving it alone as is. Although I can understand the modernizers’ position, once “fixing” is started there is no clear destination where and when to stop. I think it is safer to assume that God wanted it that way for a reason.

            One thing that has been true in my personal experience is that everyone will find in our books what they need to keep their faith intact. We don’t need to “reason” it out to our satisfaction based on our obviously limited capacity, in which case, it will cease to be a word of God but a nice little philosophy about how to live a nice little convenient life.

            Let me know if you are a modernist so that I can put my affairs in order and shoot myself.

          • Saleh Johar

            Selam Kbur ato Fanti,

            I think I could have a different view on modernization in relation to the behavior of believers 🙂
            No, I do not condone the whimsical redefining the theology, it is better left as is. A creed is good enough for me the way it was first preached.
            My problem is the luggage that is added to religions by narrators, philosophers and restless thinkers who advance certain changes for different motives. Since religion has always been an effective tool of governing, it was made to carry elements that advance the interest of rulers but has nothing to do with reliugion. However, over time, many additional edicts were injected into religion and now are considered an integral part of religion. I do not accept that. As you know, the worst additions are those cultural aspects that are now morphed to religion and appear part and parcel of many religions–mythology, legends, traditions and political elements. In eliminating those elements that I do not believe are part of the creed (but human additions) I am a militant modernist. Thanks to God, observing the religions of our region, I cannot help but be a modernist.

            I hope I have replied your question satisfactorily. Otherwise, make sure you load you gun with blank bullets 🙂

          • Fanti Ghana

            Selam Memhir,

            Perfect! You won’t believe how many times I defended both books from attacks emanating from the tradition/addition based adaptations you mentioned. Thank God, I get to live and you get to be free of guilt.

          • MS

            Ahlan Saleh
            And that fits well within SAAY’s “individual/group right” conflicts. I will see how you will navigate the land mines and cultural hot potato. I will not burn my blues and jazz collections. I will still hassle with my Stratocaster.

          • saay7

            Haha MaHmuday:

            But not if Emma’s buddies design a Federalist system and in your corner of Eritrea, the province says that Wahabi version of Islam is the state constitution. (Group rights, religious rights, cultural rights trump individual rights). Only music allowed is hymns in praise of the Glory of God and the Prophet. In Arabic. Better sell your guitar for the Halal Drum. 😂

            saay

            saay

          • Selamat Saleh Johar,

            My recollection, at least in Eritrea, The Orthodox is rather jolly. I am quite sure your lead sentence is incorrect. Unless, you have context in mind.

            ጻጸ-ኣዚሎ40 ኣግኔያ

          • Saleh Johar

            Hi TsaTse,
            I didn’t say anything regarding who is jolly or who is not. Maybe you are mixing orthodoxy , and Orthodox, the noun

          • Hi Saleh,

            I was just inserting myself by recollecting my Orthodox side familly crashinh our Protestant side wedding. ብልዑልና ስተዩልና፡ ኣብየት ሽሻይ ስድራና፡ was followed by ጓይላ። Hence, Jolly. Context in mind matters not, as we are all jolly. How about Wedi Tukhul’s Fetchew link?

            ጻጸ-ኣዚሎ40 ኣግኔያ

          • Abrehet Yosief

            Selam Memhir,
            The issue of music and religion is puzzling to me. In my life I have seen the resistance to modern songs “mezmur” by Orthodox and Catholic, or at least the wish to stick to a few old style religious songs only (outside the Yaredawian songs). The Evangelical Church’s resistance to anything than the two tone classic songs when the young wanted to sing the new “Pente” style songs. I have then seen those who grew up in the Pentecostal church being shocked to hear the “mih’lela” of mothers as it seemed to close to the forbidden “goyla”. And now we have full fledged goyla in the Pentecostal and typical “pente” style songs in the Orthodox and Catholic churches.

            I wish people could understand their very limited capacity to determine what is divine and what is not, and live their own lives in accordance to what they believe without condemning others. I would like to draw the line at Sara Hagos’ “El Shadai” or Sofia Shibabaw’s “Zeraf legeta”. But then I realize that is how all the classification of what should be forbidden and what would be acceptable start. So let it be and promise myself to step away when I come across their exceedingly annoying songs.

          • Berhe Y

            Dear Fanti,

            Didn’t I say don’t believe bad boy iSem says:). I am with the old hardcore adherents:) just a little bit liberal.

            A little of a joke: when someone asks, non Eritrean/Ethiopian, “What’s Orthodox Christian means/anyway”..and I reply ” Every other Christian is Unorthodox, that’s the best way to explain it”.

            Berhe

          • Fanti Ghana

            Hello iSem,

            The Bay Area Eritrean churches also had the exact same problems too. What was also amazing was we, the Ethiopians, also had exactly the same problems with “St. Michael and Medhanie Alem.” It also involved “piano” and “shortened version of Kidasse.” In fact, one priest is blamed to have decided to shorten “Kidasse” because “Yared is Tigraway.” It had gotten that bad.

            It was a four way quagmire with “Tigre/Amara” added to it. We only got lucky in diffusing it quickly because the Amhara Ethiopians condemned all acts of prejudiced remarks and split to form their own “no politics” church way before the Tigreans even heard about the priest’s betrayal. It also involved a resident vs. “new comer” priests. I was in the middle of it mostly as “astaraki” and/or a go between. It has gotten a lot better, almost totally resolved, but what a decade we had.

          • iSem

            Hi Fanti;
            The Ethiopians have 3 churches her: Maryan, Michael and Abune Tekle an they had issues to, the Tigre and Amara.
            In NYC, the Eritreans Abune Aregawi for decades then whey they split in 2006 and the PFDJ supporters created their own church exactly 3 blocks away and called it Abune Aregawi, two churches with the same name and if you go to the original one, they tell you ‘adkha aytmlesin dikha”, so it became opposition vs. government supporters

          • Paulos

            Selam Fantination,

            What I seem to fail understand is that why the Weyanes back in the days in Sudan failed to tap onto your extraordinary gift of the peace-maker that you are. If it was me, I would definitely make Seyoum Mesfin your deputy and you occupy the position of top diplomat. Or to the very least, you would have shuttled between the Ministry of Health and Ministry of Foreign Affairs ala’ Tedros Adhanom.

          • Fanti Ghana

            Hello Paulos,

            You push this theory one more degree higher and it surely will go to my head. You have been warned!

            I wish this was a coffee shop so I can tell you about some of the weirdest assignments I used to have. I was once assigned to recruit a guy who was a “Qole Felfali (enda zar),” because almost all Tigreans were his followers. It took over a year of my commitment to the Enda Qole to score some success, but I had to study all the Zar names and their traits and colors such as “Hagos = Red” and so on for a whole year. Lots of memories.

            I think I could make a good diplomat assistant.

          • Paulos

            Oh Fantination,

            You should see me laughing. I sure am not surprised they assigned you to do the unthinkable. It ain’t never too late now either where you can singlehandedly break the deadlock between Isaias and Hailemariam. If they only knew!

          • Amde

            Ok Fanti,

            This is just too much.

            When is your book coming out.. because.. dayumm as our cousins say..

            I even have a start of a book title for you.

            “Enchanting the Enchanter: A Treatise on Metaphysical Nationalism and its Discontents”

            I will pay the down payment right now.

            Amde

          • Fanti Ghana

            Hello AMdachin,

            Oh my, my! It would make a decent chapter by itself, because the story is actually quite complicated. TPLF, after putting me in that ridiculous position pulls the rag under my feet by arresting and penalizing those with such a “backward” tendencies in Tigray. It happened when I was about to be 100% successful. But alas, the word got out so quickly it was difficult to explain it to my friends. I had no choice but to defend them and fight my bosses in their behalf.

            There were textbook funny statements from that experience including “you send him to a Zar Bet for a whole year and you are wondering why he is going nuts,” “enquan zenbobet dirowum Teza new…,” but the funnies moment was when one of my comrades took me aside and after telling me how everyone loves me and how everyone was crushed when they realized I was “sick”… Many actually thought I had Zar myself.

          • Amde

            Haha Fanti,

            That is really hilareous.

            Now, confess. Did you not learn a few things you can threaten some of the more impressionable with?

            You really should write a book. It could be something between a memoir and an anthology of the strange and remarkable in your years. I still have a vivid image in my mind you drew of you with the Raya knife and wild hair. Dodging EDU and EPRP in the wilds of Sudan. Honestly, how can this not be a best seller?

            Amde

          • ሰላማት ጳውሎስ፡

            ቅድሚ ክልተ ዓሰርተ ዓመት ቶሮንቶ አወ ኣስመራ ጀሚራ። ማዕጾ አንዳ ቢሊያርዶ ፋሕ ቢላ። ኡሁሩ ጃምቦ ሳና።
            Hakuna mattata. Sksksksks, Jumbo Africa.

            tSAtSE-Azilo40

          • saay7

            Hi Berhe:

            I have a friend who is writing a book where the thesis is that generations of Eritreans suffer from Post-traumatic strees. I can’t say more because:

            (a) if the book is out, and clearly I haven’t read it, and that makes me a terrible friend;
            (b) if the book is not out, and the author doesn’t want to say much until it is out, I would have spilled the beans.

            There is a school of thought in linguistics which says if you don’t develop a vocabulary for an experience, you will always be in the dark. I will yield to the experts but I think the only word we have (in Tigrinya) for the gazillion words used by psychologists in DSMD is “chnqet”: stress.

            saay

          • Paulos

            Selam Saay,

            That is really interesting to note that there are no much variety of words to describe stress in Tigrinya. The reason could as well be precisely because stress was never of an issue with in the society over the span of generations.

            That said however, we can also assume that the opposite of ጭንቀት is ፉኽሰት as the opposite of getting stressed is to relax or relaxation. But would you say ሓሳብ በዚሑኒ is the same as ጭንቀት በዚሑኒ? Because when you translate it to English, it doesn’t seem to mean the same. Hope you got my point.

          • Amanuel Hidrat

            Selam Paulosay,
            The closest translation of stress is “Ae’mirawi tseqtet”

          • Paulos

            Selam Emma,

            ጽቕጠት or ጽዕቐት?

          • Abrehet Yosief

            Selam Amanuel,
            The current word used in Eritrea is “chinqet”. Chinqet gera/geru. Once the army commanders are convinced one has a bonafide “chinqet” and is not doing “fiyaka”, there is a possibility for a referral to a doctor. Incidentally, I don’t know what the medication they have is, but once they are diagnosed with “chinqet” and get medication, they mostly stay calm/quiet and stay home. The supply of medication is not constant, therefore, periodically you will notice more openly “tslulat” on the street. But then they disappear with the assumption that the medicine is once again available.
            In the Sawa high school finishing year, at least amongst the girls, there is support system and they look out for each other. They try to make sure that someone who is showing the signs of “chinqet” is not left alone.
            Amongst the recent arrivals in Europe, there are several reports that general doctors advise them to seek counseling but that the young men are too embarrassed to seek it. In Ethiopia the Center for Victims of Torture has done some work with those who returned from Sinai torture camps. I understand there is an Eritrean who teaches in the University of Tenessee who was conducting a survey on this topic.

          • Paulos

            Selam Haftey,

            It is rather strange the kind of perception our society in general has about not only the case in mental illness rather on the person who has the condition. For instance, I remember when we were kids, we used to go on Sundays to see the mentally ill at ጸጸራት as if they were for a public display. It wasn’t the strange behavior they exhibited that “attracted” the visitors, rather the nasty side effects of the older generation-medications otherwise known as typical (read: Haloperidol where the side effect is Tardive Dyskinesia–rigid twisting of the muscles including the jaw) as opposed to the newer ones with less side effects. Hope the perception has changed where the issue could be more prevalent than before given the socio-political realities of the nation.

          • Abraham H.

            Dear Paulos, the issue of depression and anxiety is not only a taboo in our societies, it is also in the modern world that we live in. It is still considered shameful to speak about one’s mental health issues. Most people would not share openly their illness or their use of antidepressants with their colleagues or even sometimes with their close family members, though we know thousands of people use such medicines on daily basis.
            PS. I’ve recently read an article that such kinds of medicines are actually useless,in fact they are more harmful.

          • Amanuel Hidrat

            Selam Sis Abrehet,

            Here is what we use to call them in ELF meda:

            (a) Stress = tseQtti – there is no such as stress medications, but most doctors prescribe antidepressant agents from the SSRI groups, such as – prozac, Paxil, Effexor..etc. purpose to increase Neurotransmitter- Dopamine.

            (b) anxiety = chinQet = when you have mental disturbance. such kind of PT are treated by Anxiolytic drugs, mostly by the Benzodiazepines ( Xanax, librium, Ativan..etc). Purpose to calm the PT.

            (c) The English -Tirigna dictionary by Abdel Rahman, second edition of 2007, also interpret the two Medical Diagnosis as follows:

            Stress = tseQtti, Wutret, metseQetti

            Anxiety = ChinQet, teshaQele, HanQewta, Harerta.

            I don’t know how they call them back home in Eritrea, But surely, stress is not chinqet.

            regards
            Amanuel Hidrat

          • Fanti Ghana

            Hello Mr. Amanuel Hidrat,

            Your translation makes sense. I had considered a few words earlier, but I eliminated them one by one except for፡ ጭንቀት

            ሓዘን and ስቓይ refer more to events of the past, and ፃዕሪ is more of a physical phenomenon.
            “Stress = tseQtti, and “Anxiety = ChinQet” sounds correct to me.

            teshaQele, HanQewta, and Harerta may be relatively “too mild” to have the sense of ”anxiety.”

            I am still pondering about “ዓቕሊ ጽበት” though.

          • Abraham H.

            Fanti, ዓቕሊ ጽበት can best be described by the english word ‘restlessness’ which could, of course, have many causes.

          • saay7

            Hey Abraham:

            I thought restlessness was qechewchew? All other words with self-repeating syllables will also do: fenterter, glbTbT, shebedbed….wait, we discussed this didn’t we? That every Tigrinya word with repeated syllable is negative word?

            Seconding Abrehet, and with due recognition to your mastery over the Tigrinya language, I humbly suggest that you accept that in shebia lingo stress is chinqet. Refer to the letter General Oqbe Abrah wrote Isaias when they demoted him from a 4-star general: the word chinqet is used.

            Saay

          • Saleh Johar

            No Saay,
            FncHcH, fshkhshkh, kmsms, kdndn, tsrgrg, kshnshn… you want more:-)

            By the way, prepare your Hawaiian hulu dance outfit and video camera to post the dance here as you promised (challenged?)

          • saay7

            SGJ

            Zrgrg abilkaya 🙂 I don’t recall agreeing to shemdaEdaE qelelel with hula

            saay

          • Fanti Ghana

            Selam Saay & Memhir,

            entay dea hateftef resiEkum hatewtew tiblu?

          • Abrehet Yosief

            Atum Qolu’u (I hope this can be considered as a greeting for this time only)
            Cheremrem kitblu diqas keli’ekumuna::

          • Fanti Ghana

            Selamat Abrehet Y,

            zisemAni sEnember TefaHfaH aitbelu ileyom nere.

          • saay7

            Abrehet:

            Hijis dendinkna

            Saay

          • Abrehet Yosief

            Saay7
            Ebdbd kitblu eko Egirgir a’etikumulu ezi geza:: wa’e mekos!

          • Selamat SaliHienn,

            Take the word tugtug for example. How about ShaHshaH, and even better ChaHchAH baliqa Chogar Danga Bihere Kunama.

            ኢሂ ‘ታ ብሉጽ ብጻየይ ሳልሳይ ሳልሕ? ጸላኢና ኣህጽበቦ፡ አስከ ዲብ ሓሊብ መንተል ውሰደኒ። ኣርሒቦ ኣርውዮ።

            ጻጸ – ኣዚሎ40 ኣግኔያ

          • Abraham H.

            Saay, yes, we have been into similar stuff before; i think Tigrinya is probably one of the languages with the richest vocabulary.

          • MS

            Hey SAAY
            As a student of Harbegna ShaEbia, I hereby give my humble me’aremta.
            ms sawrawi salamta
            stress= ጸቕጢ፡ ወጥሪ፡
            distress= ጭንቀት፡ ወጥሪ፡ m
            anxiety/fear: ሻቕሎት/ፍርሒ
            panic: ሸበድበድ፡ ዓበድበድ
            hysteria: ክቱር-ጭንቐት
            confusion: ምድንጋር፡ደንገርገር ምባል
            irritability/agitation፡ ምቑጣዕ፡
            anger: ሕርቃን
            delirium: ምዕልባጥ፡ ሃለፍታን ሸበርበርን ወይ ከኣ In honor of L.T. ዝሕዞን ዝዛረቦን ጠፊእዎ መስኪናይ። ይዋኣላ ኣዲኡ!!!
            Stress and distress usually situational. They are symptoms of temporary nature. A little help can solve them. They can result from disease process, or by stressors that overwhelm our faculty to reason out the origin and nature of the factors stressing us.
            PS: This is a non-expert opinion consistent with ShaEbyawi tradition that shuns too much referencing and bookish approaches (ha…ha…a great point for you dear SAAY to have fun on).

          • Paulos

            Selam Muhamuday,

            Many thanks. I would add ሕማሞ መረስዕ for dementia or Alzheimer’s.

          • Amanuel Hidrat

            Selam Paulos,

            Right one, with no alternative.

          • Amanuel Hidrat

            Ahlen Mahmuday,

            You learned anxiety to be shaQlot ? Not even close. The main symptom of anxiety is ” having difficulty of controlling worry or mental disturbance”. How could “nay Aemero chinQet” be shaQlot?

          • MS

            Selam Emma
            That was my 2 cent contribution. The rest is on you and Fantista. But I would still argue ShaQlot is a better fitting term for anxiety because it contains qualities of fear of the unknown or of some unresolved internal conflict where the subjects do not have a clear understanding of the nature stressing them, or when they perceive the sense that the coping strategies they are used to are not making a difference in the resolution of the situation. And please remember, these words vary slightly with fields (eg, psychological, psychiatric, medical, common English definitions, etc.). I agree “nay aemro chinqet” is also fitting but to the more severe types of anxieties. I will use “Chinqet” instead of ‘nay aemro Chinqet” because by definitiuon Chinqet is naay aemro Therefore, I will put your “nay aemro Chinqet” reduced to “chinqet” close by in case I need it. Also of note, these terms are very close to each other for the common reader. And I’m among the common readers.
            PS: Please understand ShaEbya does not assume responsibility of my haTeQeTew, I was joking. But as used in literature and practice, I think we used the word XeQTi for stress, I don’t know if the chegar danga cared if it was fear, anxiety, stress, distress, etc. All those manifestations of “weakness” were shunned. People pulled it through sayin werqi qlenq, sernaay alena….

          • Fanti Ghana

            Hello Abraham H,

            Very nice!
            I have heard ጭንቀት and ዓቕሊ ጽበት in use, one as enforcer of the other as in
            “ጨኒቑዎ’ንድዩ ዓቕሉ ጸቢቡዎ” or “ዓቕላ ጸቢቡዋ’ንድዩ ጨኒቑዋ”
            However, it is official: anxiety = ጭንቀት

          • Abrehet Yosief

            Selam Fanti,
            I would say “ዓቕሊ ጽበት” is “desperation”.

          • Haile S.

            Hi Amanuel, Abrehet and all,
            Our discussion reveals that ጭንቀት can mean many things like stress, distress, anxiety, affliction and probably more. ጭንቀት comes from ጭንቂ whose meaning is shortage or dearth. Furthermore if someone was going to say ‘ኣንታ ቆልዓ መርዘናይ ከይተላዕለለይ’, it could mean ‘don’t put into stress again’ and may not not mean literary migraine. The meanings you provided from Abdel Rahman’s dictionary are interesting and demonstrate the attempt of tigrigna to adapt to the wealth of expressions.Tigrigna linguists have a lot of work awaiting them and would facilitate better their endeavor if they do it in a more organized manner.

          • Abraham H.

            Aman, what about if we say stress could lead to chinqet?

          • Amanuel Hidrat

            Selam Abraham,

            If you mean stress leads to anxiety. Then it is possible b/c sometimes stressful pt exhibits anxiety at early stages. But keep in mind, that the diagnostic results of stress and anxiety is not the same.

            Regards

          • Kim Hanna

            Selam Amanuel Hidrat,
            .
            The feeling you get when the boss calls at home and gives a pat on the back for your past week of hard over time work, followed by how much he appreciated it and he needs you for two more weeks until he solves his unexpected problems. Stress just walked in.
            .
            Now, after you hung up the phone you realized that the second week on your calendar was designated for a family vacation. Your wife had told friends and was really looking forward to it, CHINQUET (anxiety) shows up at the door next. Stress doesn’t look that bad at that moment. This CHINQUET could reach critical mass if the wife is the one wearing the pants in the house.
            Clinical depression, I don’t know the Tigrinya word for depression, sorry.
            .
            Mr. K.H

          • Amde

            Selam Amanuel,

            Look what እናንተ ትግሬዎች did to me.

            I read “Xanax” as ጻናጽ.

            And here I am stupidly trying to figure out if you are talking about our esteemed ጻጸ or about ጽንአት wrt ጭንቀት።

            ወይ መዋረድ።

            Amde

          • ኣቶ ዓምደ፥

            ባዕልኻ ትሕሸሉ።
            ወይም ራስህ ትችላለሁት። I thank the gentleman Pillar.

            ዛናክስ ከኒና ናት። አስከ ኣሁን ፋንቲ ‘ገር፡ ስመያዊ ደሴ ክ ዛናክስ ‘ገር ወጥተን ነው ሃሳባቺን። ግን ከዛሬ ሳምንት ሌላ ቃል ኣዳምጣልህ።

            ጻጸ-ኣዚሎ40 ኣግኔያ

          • Selamat ጳውሎስ፡

            ፉኽሰት ናይ ዓባየይ መድህን( My Grandmother!) conotations would certainly bring forth a smile of the Ahhaa in order to relieve stress. As there is no greater stress than thirst on this Blue Earth, allow me to suggest, ርውየት።

            My Staring line up for game two stands. Although ኣቢ has not factored in by a shot attempt or an assist. ማሕሙዳይ “ብሉጽ” ሳልሕ፡ ሳይ7፡ ኣያ ኢስማዒል ዓ ዓ፡ ዓምደ፡ ፋንቲ ጋ(ሃ)ና፡ rotation. Best Sixth Man or at 7 go too you are well positioned for.,Third miracle on Energy is my expectation. Distribution and relay switches, the work force is ready. How can I say this?

            BIT by BIT the BYTES 64 Chamber Orchestra Rocks. Pumping Aqua – ማይ ንፍሒ።

            ጻጸ – ኣዚሎ40 ኣግኔያ

          • Abrehet Yosief

            Selam Paulos,
            I would think that the opposite of ጭንቀት to be ራህዋ:: In the context we are discussing, they usually say (The opposite of ፉኽሰት would be ክብደት). ጭንቀት ኣሕዲሩ ነሩ፥ ሕጂ ግን ሒሽዎ። It is used exactly like a name of a disease.

          • Amde

            Selam Saay,

            Would this author be your own self by any chance? 🙂

            A long time ago I had a friend who said “What we need are not politicians or philosophers but shrinks.”

            Excellent advice. The return on investment for a team (scratch that) an army of psychologists to treat Isayyas would be simply phenomenal. Maybe, that would be a good chapter for your friend to write about. Beyond the social stigma, I don’t think we do a good job really pointing out the aggregate benefit to society of treating Elite PTSD. (That may be an original term… haha.. and I am taking credit until someone proves otherwise) There is something called mass psychosis apparently, but it would be wonderful if there was a mass version of the opposite.

            Amde

          • saay7

            Amde:

            Weriduni. Psychology? A few weeks ago, Fanti recommended Tom Woolfes “A Man In Full” to Abi without giving an explanation. Well now, I am going to recommend you read (if you haven’t already) Woolfes “bonfire of the vanities” with the same Fanti-like mystery.

            I don’t think we need psychologists. We need the much maligned Elite to translate the works of the original psychologists (before psychology was invented): Russian novelists Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, Nabokov, Chekhov. I nominate Burhan Ali.

            saay

          • Fanti Ghana

            Selam Saay,

            I am glad someone was paying attention. Why I mentioned the book and how it is related to what Abi said would only make sense to those who read it, and I was expecting a lot of uproar, but nada!

            One reason I was expecting a lot of readers was because we are briefly mentioned in it on page 487.

            The Mai’s army:

            Chinese communist soldiers… the Indian sapper, the Ethiopian Commando and a Paratrooper, the two Eritreans who were college students, but they joined some revolution and used to blow up trucks and sh–t…and then they came here… they all work at night, taxi drivers, grocery stores, at the Pioneer Chicken, I mean you got to be a commando or something to work at that damned Pioneer Chicken…

            As everybody else sleeps, there is an army out here.There’s sappers, guerrillas, tunnel rats, commandos, terrorists, volunteers for suicide missions– and I mean they’re from Asia, and Africa and God knows where else, and nobody knows how they got here and where or what they want or what they are really doing or where they want to go, except for Mai maybe.

            PS:
            Mai is the owner of Mai’s 24Hour Mini-Mart

          • Paulos

            Selam Fantination,

            Have heard of the man known for his elegant suits but never read any of his books. Intresting stuff. Thanks again.

          • Fanti Ghana

            Hello Paulos,

            I am not surprised you haven’t read “A Man in Full.” His work is mostly fiction, but very entertaining and educational. He is a good mixture of a street smart and an intellectual. If you happened to stumble on one of his books, or if you have nothing better to do one summer, read him. “Bone Fire of The Vanities” is perhaps, one of his best books. Man in Full is very entertaining.

          • Paulos

            Sure thing Fantination. Will read him time permits and thanks for the recommendation.

          • saay7

            Fantiness:

            You were a miser with your intro to Tom Woolfe. Along with Hunter Thompson, Tom woolfe was the creator of “gonzo journalism”, the novel masquerading as journalism, or journalism masquerading as a novel. Unlike conventional journalists, gonjo journalists insert themselves in the story. Hunter gave us “Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas” and Woolfe gave us “The Right Stuff”, “Bonfire of the Vanities” and “A Man In Full.” Hunter would have gives us a lot more but he liked to shoot LSD and guns so the consequences were entirely predictable.

            The Inheritor of both, I think, is Matt Taibi who, like both, writes for Rolling Stone magazine.

            saay

            PS: Fanti, wink twice if you understood why I mentioned Bonfire of the Vanities when Amde gave his high praise to psychology/psychiatry

          • Fanti Ghana

            Selam Saay,

            The source of my miserly was because I couldn’t directly quote without violating AT guidelines. I was in a catch-22 situation. I had to gamble hoping those who read the book would find my comment hilarious. The book has a hefty amount of animal breeding section that directly relate to the camel breeding we were talking about.

            Someday, you will find the book somewhere, and you will see exactly what my dilemma was.

          • Selamat Saay7,

            Nicholus Cage, dude from his early work, I believe titled Bird(/y) I was hooked. And on a Harley Davidson Roaring Thunder and his latest for a later mention, he got range fo sho!

            I second your excellent nomination.

            tSAtSE-Azilo40

          • saay7

            TsaTse:

            Raising Arizona? Nicholas cage has so little range (inexplicably consumed with weird eye and head movements), he is one of the easiest to impersonate. SNL has fun with him:)

            Saay

          • Amde

            Saay,

            “We need the much maligned Elite to translate the works of the original psychologists (before psychology was invented): Russian novelists Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, Nabokov, Chekhov. ”

            I guess your idea of Elite and mine are different in this case. I meant Elite not as in “the learned and the well-read”, but as in the ex cruel guerilla boss who is now the entitled but still cruel bureacratic boss. Such people are more likely to get more fun out of figuring out how many pages their bullets shot from 100meters make it through a Dostoyevsky or Tolstoy than how much of their brain makes it through.

            I am serious asking if your friend can make a chapter about PTSD among such elite, and the impact on the nation.

            Amde

          • Selamat Saay7,

            There is a certain Mr. FiQre in the East Coast of these Unites States, who ran a group in the mid Eighties. The group named itself LTTFT. And there was a consensus voice Psychiatric experts would be most necessary pursuit they should follow. Two PhDs out if Buffalo Soldiers alone. Bronx and Far Rockaway Lady Drs.

            I was the bus/van driver. N. Cage…”hook”

            Lets Touch The Future Together

            tSAtSE-Azilo40 Agniyeya

          • Paulos

            Selam Amde,

            Here is something trivial but interesting: The reason they’re called shrink is that, a single session with a psychiatrist runs for an hour but they see you only for 50 minutes instead—thus an hour is shrunk to 50 minutes. Moreover, they shrink your wallet as they charge you a lot for every session. That said, here is one of the contested debates in Psychiatry—if Psychiatry is a “real” science where Psychiatrists more often than not do not agree on diagnosis for the diagnosis usually overlap—it could be a bipolar disorder; it could be transient psychosis or it could be early stage of schizophrenia. The judgement call if you will depends on the person who does the diagnosis.

            The whole thing boils down to a rather philosophical inquiry where the question is: What is normal? How do we define normal? Michel Foucoult calls it “Disciplinary Power” to maintain social structure in modern societies. “Normal” or “Normalcy” is a consensus and subjective in nature where in a Marxist parlance that serves the ideals and norms of the elites. Who knows if the person we label “mentally ill” is right and the rest of us are wrong? Who knows really for we all have agreed to accept certain “norms” as normal.

          • Amde

            Selam Paulos,

            “Who knows if the person we label “mentally ill” is right and the rest of us are wrong? Who knows really for we all have agreed to accept certain “norms” as normal.”

            Haha.. I have told many of my friends for years that I believe “sanity” is a purely statistical thing. I had a debate with a psychologist I met once about this very issue. He turned out to be from Saudi Arabia (which is immaterial I guess) but what he told me was that a lot of what they do is not to bring somebody to some objective “norm” but to a state where the patient is satisfied with/no longer distressed about their life or an aspect of it. I couldn’t argue with that.

            This also explains the sheer variety of methods and therapies out there – they are constantly experimenting. One of the first psychology books I ran into was by M. Scott Peck where he said that if his patient told him she needed to have sex with her and he agreed it would make a difference, he would do it unequivocally.

            Amde

          • Paulos

            Selam Horizon and Amde,

            If we look into the root word of genius, it was derived from the word Genii which is taken for some sort of a demon. The people with exceptional insight were thought to have been possessed by a demon. If we push the “argument” a notch up, artists particularly writers harvest their theme when they are in a melancholic trance thus the cliché, “If you are not suicidal or if you don’t have suicidal ideations, you are not a great writer” where Hemingway among others comes to mind*.

            Again, the argument captures its essence when one reads a brilliant essay which was read or presented during the cermony by the Turkish writer Orhan Pamuk who won a Noble Prize in 2006. The essay titled, “My Father’s Suitcase” walks one through the rather melancholic world of great writers where the moment of great ideas are born.

            *Watch “Sideways” a great movie where the brilliant but under-rated Paul Giamatti is in it. The movie as well reflects on the rather troubling world of great writers.

          • መርሓባ ዓምዳትና፡

            ኣርሒቦ፡ ኣርውዮ፡ ትልቅ መሆን ኣይቻልም?

            ውልቫሪን መሳርያ ኣቡ ዓሸራ። Make the lane wider, for “The Best” Dunk.
            Wolverine Weapon X…የ ማር Badger.

            ጻጸ-ኣዚሎ40 ኣግኔያ።

          • Amde

            ሰላም ጻጸ,

            ፈረሱም እነሆ ሜዳውም እነሆ
            Dunk It!!

          • Selamat Saay7,

            Oh Captain my Captain!!! Navigate you shall as it is my opinion there are no experts you would be a runner up too.

            It is like Guda Frmajo on KiTkaTT BIT 8.

            tSAtSE-Azilo40

          • Berhe Y

            Dear Saay,

            Thanks. I wonder why my friend iSem is quite, I think in his second life he is really a shrink. Back in the days he had an asmarino room mate, who was a philosopher of his own kind and can tell you all day long a story about him, that he use to say “I am depressed” when he wanted to say “I am stressed”.

            To Fanti’s point, when I think about the Abat nebsi, with the exception of the greedy, I think they probably provide a service that’s typical what a psychologists does. In the time of grief, in the time of hard ship, in times of problem such as marriage, in times of joy, baptism/weddings, …

            Berhe

          • iSem

            Hi BY:
            hahha
            Yes, and I keep correcting him, “atta wedi”, you are stressed not depressed.
            ‘Hray dotter “he would say and then next week when his gf breaks up with him, he would say, “I am depressed”. I would roll my eyes, he would notice
            He would go on and on, you know people like your are just theoriticans, depressed or stressed,same difference, no pragmatic, society needs technical and handy people.
            Sure, but who do you think is running the the world technical ppl and handy men,or the ppl who can theorizes and synthesize and persuade and think
            Can you please fix the light bulbe in the bath room he would say, alluding that I cannot do it and the book does not help
            That is your job, I can tell you how many voltages and Ohms and Faradays Lawa
            He would change the subject and say so and so, “kndi gelle ykewin si) is taking accounting
            Before I had a chance to answer, he would ask me to give him 3 numbers from 10 to 20 and depending on the numbers he would decide what to do that evening or whether he would call his gf.
            You go by instinct, not by reasoning?
            and we would go at it the next day,
            He would point to the book by Alvin Foffer(Third Wave) in my shelf and woudl say, tell me how reading this will get you a job or make you more money, just more talk.
            I am depressed now, I would reply

          • Amde

            Selam Saay,

            “There is a school of thought in linguistics which says if you don’t develop a vocabulary for an experience, you will always be in the dark.”

            Curiously enough, this is one of the things that interest me. I belive it is called the Sapir-Whorf hypothesis. You mentioned “vocabulary” but someone thought that actually the structure if the grammar itself might affect your thinking. And to test that, someone invented a language called Loglan – later versioned to Lojban – where ambiguity in language is supposedly completely driven out. Results are pending.

            But you bring an excellent point about whether the rash of syndromes and disorders and pathologies people report might be more a result of new entries into the Psychology DSM (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders) or if they are truly new discoveries of a repeatable constellation of symptoms.

            In other words, would we be “saner” if the DSM was translated into Amharic/Tigrinya or not?

            Amde

          • Abraham H.

            Hi Berhe, yes, there are a number of serious crimes/murders being committed by some Eritrean immmigrants in the Western world. Only yesterday I read about an Eritrean man who brutally murdered two people in Sweden in an Ikea store using Ikea knife. It is said he committed the crime after his asylum application was rejected. Surprisingly enough this news story made it to the US right wing website Breitbart yesterday, this time because the man wants to serve his prison sentence in Eritrea because he has been exposed to harassment and beatings from fellow inmates.

          • Selamat Abraham,

            On multilevel scales such news and the relevance of the topic or tone set does register.

            After the Three Major fronts that side lined Derg’s Sixth Offensive, the Psychological ወይ ስነ’አሙራዊ ጽቕጠት፡ ተሓኤ ብብዝሓ ኣብ ሱዳን ምስ ኣዕቖበት፡ ብተፈላልየ መልክዕ፡ ክራ ይኹን ብሽጉጥ ይርኣኤ ኔሩ።
            ካራ ኣብ ክሳደይ ማኪና ቤትሮ ምስክር ዓረር ናይዓይኒ ምስክር ዜና ዘይተመዝገበ ውን ኣሎ።

            ሎሚ ኽኣ፡ “ናይ ወረ ማዕከናት ረድዮ ዓለም ኩለን፡ ወር ይወንጨፋ ብኹሉ ወገን። ”

            ኖትድድ ይብሉ ቋንቃ አንግሊዘኛ።
            ጻጸ-ኣዚሎ40 ኣግኔያ።

  • Amde

    Selam Paulos

    “War as Entropy” is a new one for me and quite brilliant I must say. It rings true.. depressingly so.

    But then, it suggests Civilization is an anti-entropic activity, therefore counter to the laws of physics. That makes it quite delicate and hence extremely fragile.

    Thank you

    • Paulos

      Selam Amde,

      You’re absolutely right. It is one of the rare contradictions where the philosophy of science could not come to terms with itself. Here is the deal: Darwin theorized that, organisms through epochs of time evolve from less complex (read: single cell protozoa) to more complex organisms as in us or multicellular organisms—from less order to more complex and more order. What he actually said was contrary to the law of Entropy where a tendency towards disorder. And as you know a law or a scientific law ought to be reproducible anywhere and everywhere through the test of time till it is replaced by something new as in classical physics with modern physics. If you haven’t read it already, I recommend a great but an old book by Thomas Kuhn titled, “The Structure of Scientific Revolutions.”

  • Dear Saleh Johar,

    Kindly return the deleted yet pertinent to me materials. With good will intent I submitted from deep within my soul an experience in order to steer it for the collective build. Apparently we this train is not going my way. I will disembark now. And I will not allow to be picked pocketed.

    You have my e-mail address. If not, I can provide.

    tSAtSE

    • Saleh Johar

      Selam TsaTse,

      What materials? I don’t remember receiving anything from you for upkeep. Kindly explain what materials you are talking about.

      Take care

      • Selamat Saleh Johar,

        Well in toto and retrospectively, it is best I file it under lapsus linguae. I am appreciative of awatista Berhe Y-wayyyy these days. As there is plenty in the pool to draw from, once we identify their causes to the bear minimum.
        An A priori argument explains Gheteb’s ex tempore inspiration. What do you think?

        tSAtSE -Azilo40

        • Saleh Johar

          Hi TsaTse,
          What do I think about what?

    • Fanti Ghana

      Hello Half Brother Tukhrir,

      I once had a nice comment written and prepared for posting. I was getting destructed and interrupted a lot, so it took a while to finish. By the time I was done, almost all I had written was already said a few times over by others, you know the others, no historic background, no introduction, straight to the point types, so I copied all I had written (it was too good to delete) and saved it on my computer as a word document.

      By the time I got home, I had forgotten I did not post the comment. I was scrolling up and down to re-read the once I had skimmed over at work, and it occurred to me my post wasn’t there. I checked disqus, any deleted posts by AT, scrolled slowly to make sure I didn’t skip it earlier, and nowhere to be found. I gave up.

      It was when I started reading one of the posts that sounded like what I was thinking at the time when I remembered I did not post it and why. This is my Sunday version of saying check your computer for saved files.

      Chao!

  • Paulos

    Moderator,

    I don’t see my comment. My apologies if it is beyond your control.

  • MS

    AbrahamH, Emma, and the rest of Awatistas
    The following article or Ginbot7 program and press releases may not give you a clear-cut answer on what Gibot7’s position is on Eritrea’s independence. And I would not expect them to be explicit about it because both ways are full of landmines. If they say it loudly they recognize Eritrea’s independence, they may lose core supporters who have the dream of one day reversing it; if they say they are against it, they will not get bases in Eritrea. And that’s what you sense in the writer’s mind. Anyway, it might give you a picture of how these so-called alliances are not real alliance founded on solid understandings. I don’t know how privy the writer to the matter is, but what he says makes sense when you see it with what we have been hearing/reading. There seems to be pushing back against folks who accuse Ginbot 7 of basing its offices in Eritrea. The summary of his reasoning to those who accuse Ginbot7’s relation with Eritrea:
    “…there are times in life when you have to do what you got to do to get out of a rock and hard place by swallowing our pride and controlling our suspicion. There is a saying in our country,”ቀን እስኪአልፍልህ የአባትህ ባርያ ይግዛህ” that sums it up. This group has to be convinced that there is no alternative except to give the policy of using Eritrea as staging platform to deal with TPLF. This is the group Ato Andargachew Tsige specifically addressed asking them to give G7 a chance while holding its suspicions.”
    It is amazing! Do you see a parallel paradox in the Eritrean opposition context?
    And about Ethiopia’s efforts to deny Ginbot7 a base in Eritrea:
    “TPLF has been working hard to negotiate with Eritrea for years. It has tried 37 times to get a deal from Isayas. And not so long ago, TPLF has even offered free electricity to Eritrea when the ‘dream’ Dam is completed. Three weeks ago, Ethiopia’s outgoing president said he wants to go to Eritrea and negotiate on an individual bases without representing his government. All these furious activities by TPLF should ring a bell in our brains. They know Eritrea is the only option left for the opposition to launch a meaningful offensive against it. Not exploring to use the Eritrean option, despite its problems, is very troublesome to say the least, especially when no alternative has been found for the last 22 years.”
    http://shorturl.at/fvO18
    * On the Ethiopian PR related to what they characterized as a mission to sabotage the GERD, I think you are right that we should not take what the Ethiopian government say at face value. They doctored pictures of the Gulf War in the past, and as a government that’s estranged with its people, they can say anything. The Benshangul rebels’ leaders leader said that they would not sabotage GERD because it was the property of the Ethiopian people and it’s built in their region, which would serve their people, anyway.
    **Technically, it’s just absurd to believe that 20 rebels armed with AK-47, and RPGs would be sent to sabotage a region that is heavily guarded (its space and terrain), very absurd. If the message is to say that rebels based in Eritrea are infiltrating to cause “terror” in the region, well there are more than groups who have more than 20 armed men in the region, some of them recent defects from the ENDF.
    *** There are certain factors that make waging a guerilla war in Ethiopia
    a/ the government in power came through guerrilla warfare
    b/ todays technology of surveillance such as drones, cheap satellite’s rates, and interception technologies make it easier for governments to monitor their borders, and interior territories.
    c/ as a member of the anti-terrorism pact, Ethiopia can divert technologies and capabilities to surveying groups other than the internationally designated “terror groups”.
    d/ it has security agreement with almost all its neighbors, and its border with Eritrea is sealed tightly with Tigray (the power base of the ruling party).
    e. Ethiopia’s current federal arrangement makes the elite of each region stakeholders in keeping the Federal government unthreatened since they are administering their own regions. Their regional police are basically monitoring pathways, waterholes, villages, forests, etc., that they know very well.
    f/ The number of Ethiopians who believe that change through peaceful means is more feasible and less costly than a change that is sought through a bloody and protracted civil war.
    Eritreans should ask the following question. Running the enterprises of myriads of opposition groups of neighboring countries is costly. What’s the return from wasting our meager resources to these groups, other than appearing on monitoring groups as a state that sponsors Ethiopian opposition groups? Why are they roaming Eritrea? Some of them control zones that are off-limit to the inhabitants of those regions.
    I personally oppose both countries in harboring armed groups. Once I said, that my formula for assessing the prospect of an armed movement was simple. If any agitating group fails to gain traction within the first three-five years, if it does not make a headway in arousing the populace and getting followers/recruits within that timeframe, it has to reinvent itself by examining what it is that keeping it from convincing its people.

    • Paulos

      Selam Muhamuday,

      They say, Eritrea for the Ethiopian Opposition is like a Black-Hole where no one can escape from it once they cross the Event-Horizon. Unless of course one as in Molla Asgedom defies the intense gravity and ejects out. That said, what is rather remarkable is that, the Eritrean people do not have a say where everything is decided not on the broad desk of Isaias but in his precarious whim.

      • Selamat Paul and MaHmuday,

        Let’s think of it as a 64 piece Chamber Orchestra. Having strings as base and melody, trumpet.. Cello Cello… Namaste!

        The Event Horizon-String theory if you will.

        AmEritrean GitSAtSE Agnieya Azilo40 Children Books Press

      • ‘Gheteb

        Paulos,

        The objective conditions in Ethiopia is now ripe for conducting all manners of armed guerrilla struggle against the murderous Weyane tribal junta. Armed resistance groups are mushrooming all the way from Gonder, Gojam and beyond.

        Interestingly, in the Amhara regions, these armed resistance groups have coalesced around and led by what is locally known type of leadership as የጎበዝ አለቃ , which was previously known within the Amharas as የጎበዝ ጎበዜ. This Amharic phrase is quite similar to the Latin phrase primus inter pares.

        • Paulos

          ‘Gheteb,

          Have you recently been to Ethiopia? If I have to answer my own question, I really doubt you have. You can not come into conclusion by reading Almariam’s run-away cut and paste articles and by tuning in to Esat. Go and see it yourself and you will be stunned. And you will hate to love the murderous Weyane tribal junta.

          • ‘Gheteb

            Paulos,

            First of, I consider Professor Al Mariam as one of the intellectual giants, er, one of the intellectual colossus Ethiopia has ever produced and I read him as many times as time permits. Now, from what I recollect reading professor Al Mariam, I think he is a proponent of the peaceful means of resistance and I don’t recall reading him calling for an armed resistance.

            One need not go to Ethiopia, to read TPLF/Weyanes tea leaves, so to speak to know what is brewing in the ethnically antagonized caldron that is Ethiopia. To presuppose that one has to visit to know what is going on, on this day and age, borders to the flawed version of “Experientialism”.

            Based on my readings about the going-ons in Ethiopia, I am more than convinced that Ethiopia is on the precipice of an armed rebellion.

          • Paulos

            ‘Gheteb,

            A guy who has never been to his own home country for the last 30 years and he writes articles every week about Ethiopia and you say you read him? Dude, you need to get a life. For real.

          • ‘Gheteb

            Paulos,

            Do all the astronomers and astrophysicists about all the celestial bodies been to those supernal places? Do those scientists who write about the newly discovered planets have visited those planets?

            Not being to a place does NOT preclude one from writing about the place in question as he can gather the necessary information vicariously or secondhand.

            To say that being to a place is the absolute sine quo non for one to write about a given place is nothing but an erroneous form of Experientialism.

  • ‘Gheteb

    All The Alarums And Excursions About The Purported Renaissance Dam attack

    Greetings!!

    Ethiopia’s recent claim that a certain rebel group has attempted an attack on its Renaissance Dam, by all appearances comes across as nothing more than a contrivedly factitious report. Here are some tidbits that make this report fail the smell test abysmally.

    (A) The Benishangul Gumuz rebels representative has denied the accusation and said that his group would never plan to attack the Ethiopian Dam as he considers that the dam belongs to the Ethiopian people.

    (B) The very same representative gave another scenario for the military activities in that are by saying that SEVEN Ethiopian soldiers attempted to run away from the Weyane armed forces and defect to his rebel units. As a result of this attempt, something has transpired, which I don’t think was attacking the behemoth dam with light weapons.

    (C) As their wont, the Ethiopian government is blaming Eritrea for the attack. Yeah, those whose memory is not failing them or those who willfully do not say much about the Weyanes duplicitous reporting, will VIVIDLY remember that these same Weyanes planted a bomb in one of their cities and, you guessed it right, they blamed it on Eritrea.

    (D) With the expiry of their State of Emergency nearing and with the upcoming UNSC hearing on Eritrea at the end of April, 2017, this could be one of the usual stuff hat the perfidious Weyanes cooked up to augment their case against Eritrea.

    (E) This report and the recent statement coming from the Ethiopian prime minister, have spurred some to speculate about an impending Ethio-Eritrean armed conflict, sharply whetted the appetites of certain rock-ribbed Ethiopians and stirred the interest of the unabashed Ethiophiles to see the end of Eritrea as an independent state.

    (F) Their prognostications about the possibility of an armed conflict or war and its possible outcomes is predicated on factors that are so 1998-2000. Their analysis is so bereft of the regnant new conditions in both Eritrea and Ethiopia.

    (G) The objective situations in both Eritrea and Ethiopia are quite contrasting and read correctly tell tales of two differing countries. One in a grip of mass upheaval only constrained by a draconian state of emergency rule, the other a stable and peaceful country soldiering on its national path; Ethiopia is on verge of being rent asunder due to its ethnic based policy, Eritrea getting more united by the day; one on the grip of unrelenting and recurring famine, the other Spartan and self-reliantly out of the famine or draught picture; Ethiopia’s corruption is the international limelight, Eritrea quietly strengthening its mining sector and diplomatic engagement.

    (H) While some are insensately scorning and belittling Eritrea’s resolve and ability of thwarting any military adventures that Ethiopia may conduct against Eritrea, they seem to have forgotten what actually transpired on the Tserona sector in June of 2016, where the invading Weyane armed forces was repulsed through an effective counter-offensive.

    (I) They have declared the Eritrean Air Force dead and done with. Reality is that, albeit sanctions and other hurdles that were put on Eritrea, mirable dictu, the Eritrean Mig-29s, SU-27s, Mig-24s, Mig35s are still flying on the skies of Eritrea. With newly trained pilots by the UAE and the availability of petrol/gas, thanks to the Emirati-Eritrean relations, they have been conducting coordinated practiced from three air fields in Eritrea: Viz., Asmara, Barentu and Massawa.

    (J) No need to practice from Assab, as any intrusion in that side of Eritrea will be dealt with Dassault Mirage 2000 swiftly and decisively.

    • Paulos

      ‘Gheteb,

      “One in a grip of social upheaval only constrained by a draconian law of state of emergency, the other stable and a peaceful country soldiering on its national path….” Dude, the only thing I can say is, if tutoring SAT didn’t work out I am sure stand-up comedy would have picked up the pieces as a plan B.

      • ‘Gheteb

        Paulos,

        Why is that anything I write about the detestably loathsome Weyanes gets your goat? I mean, you get so riled up that you end up, literally, barfing calumnies. What does say about you? Don’t you have any sense of shame at all?

        For your information, I do the SAT tutoring stint, to help some Eritrean-American students in the city I live. I do NOT do it for some form of remunerations, but I do it GRATIS — as in for FREE. And, if you thought that is how I brought home the bacon, then you are badly mistaken.

        The kid I tutored last year, who took the SAT test last year when he was in 7th grade, scored in the 98 percentile of his cohort. He has been accepted into an Ivy League University program geared towards exceptionally talented Junior High School students.

        Nothing engenders more satisfaction in me than seeing the success of these insanely smart Eritrean-American kids making it here in America.

        • Paulos

          ‘Gheteb,

          …..barfing calumnies? Man, what have we done to you to punish us with heavy words? That ain’t fair!

          • ‘Gheteb

            Paulos,

            Through this response, you have grievously committed a red herring fallacy!

          • iSem

            Hi Paulos”
            You have done nothing to former cousin Gheteb. The question should have been what are you trying to accomplish by using heavy words.
            All the heavy words are to impress, to pretend, to hide behind diction. But the garb , the swaddle some times falls and he is exposed.
            Take for example when he said, “barfing…”, he was trying to supplant the word vomit, but barf is a special type of vomit: vomit of food. He does not understand the shades of words and he throws them, for the purposes I mentioned
            You see, ” dedhri adgi,,,,”, I used “supplant” instead of “, “replace”, but it was not to pretend, impress or hide, but to make a point
            🙂

          • Paulos

            Selam iSem,

            Who is he trying to impress though? We as in forumers hardly know each other. I don’t get it.

          • iSem

            Hi iPaulos:-)
            to impress the PFDJ when he goes to Keren and reads them his comments to himself, ” you see what I did to the opposition”, “affen hizzen”, to impress so he can belong. From his head quarters in South Carolina he often travels to Keren and whants to “supplant” and “replenish” and hold the baton and carry the torch one of these days

        • Berhe Y

          Dear Gheteb,

          You said:
          “For your information, I do the SAT tutoring stint, to help some Eritrean-American students in the city I live. I do NOT do it for some form of remunerations, but I do it GRATIS — as in for FREE.”

          Your dedication and volunteer helping Eritrean students is admirable. But wouldn’t also make sense to consider the thousands ERITREAN’s who have the potential equal or more than those you tuter perishing escaping their country.

          Wouldn’t agree that people of your caliber if they had the means to teach houndreths and thousands students in their homes.

          Just like the American volunteers or the missionaries did back in the 60s (which you probably are the product) that the PFDJ government you defend have denied?

          Berhe

          • iSem

            Hi BY:
            Why is what Gheteb is doing admirable? It is the same thing the guys in Eri community center in Winnipeg do ( you know that guy fro Greec), they assemble kids born here and they apply and receive some funding from government of Canada and run some programs for the youth, for women etc but their main goal is to recruit members for YPFDJ and keep the ever dwindling Kobor Junkie, that is it. Otherwise,evil people who do not give a flying fig about the immense suffering of the entire people in the prison called Eri, would not be good Samrittans to help kids who want academic help,
            Gheteb, in all this time when he was talking to himself, never mentions any news of the murders or abuses of the government, Even Nitricc a couple of times, in a rare moment of honesty have admitted some abuses and called/said that IA should release prisoners.
            Given his tenor and tone, Gheteb never does any things for free, but I understand,you are being polite for the “good” deeds. Gheteb is a protype of how to PFDJ functions. His case is not of everyone is entitled to their opinion: he does not have an opinion, he reads from the PFDJ scrip, written long time ago, PFDJ/EPLF for him holds saint hood status with pristine past, impeccable present, bright future and eternal glory and legacy

          • Berhe Y

            Dear iSem,
            I know what you mean but incase of Gheteb if he tutoring Eritreans for FREE and help them get into universities and collages, I think it’s still a noble thing to do, albiat a small number.

            If they are to top students that they become, they are smart and they will not be fulled by any masking one puts on PFDJ ugly side. And I am appealing to Gheteb’s better angle so he can have honest conversation with himself.

            The other day we had a conversation with my daughter went like this. This after a day trip to the Ontario parliament where she was (acting) to be speaker of the house, dressed in gowns and hat and in the chamber of the real parliament at Queens Park. She asked:

            How long was the ERITREAN president in power.
            Since he become one.

            But Eritrea been independent for over 20 years. So you are to tell me he has been in power for 20 years.

            Yes even more.

            Wow, isn’t there any body else the people elect him all the time (she assumed).

            No he was never elected by the people, he become president by the transition and he never held an election.

            What? He really likes to stay power.

            Exactly.

            That’s not good, shake her hands in disbelieve.

            This YPFDJ, majority of them if they are up to simething good, they know the difference between right and wrong. And no matter how one wants to spin it, they are smart to figure it out.

            Berhe

          • saay7

            Ah Berhe:

            You are such an optimist. You forget how easy people are to manipulate when frightened and confused.

            The great compromise between the mob and the dictator:

            Dictator tells the mob you know that the line that divides Order and chaos is a thin line. The US has the longest-lived democracy but if power was to go out in New York City for 3 consecutive nights, there would be looting on the fourth. All authoritarians know this about human nature and how to manipulate it. Ante moi le deluge as some dead French dictator once said.

            The people tell the dictator ok you can have absolute power. But don’t steal too much, don’t abuse your power too much.

            This is why there are only two programs in Eritrean media: the one that shows the chaos next door and the door to the next door. And the “selfless” government serving selflessly.

            Everything else is merely punctuation.

            saay

          • Selamat Saay7,

            “After me comes the flood.” So said the King.
            I am thinking, to end or not to end the revolution. Actually not. In a gin alley way, defining it is the stage from the get go.

            tSAtSE-Azilo40

    • Amde

      Selam Gheteb,

      The Eritrean Air Force comment (Item I: ) may represent sufficient material change in Eritrean capabilities that might be the trigger for a recalculation from the Ethiopian side.

      Amde

      • Paulos

        Selam Amde,

        War is an ugly thing. Dalai Lama once famously said, war is outmoded. People more often out of sheer boredom long for war where World War I comes to mind where there hadn’t been a major war for almost one hundred years from the defeat of Napoleon in 1815 to the start of World War I in 1914. People were clamoring for war as they didn’t know what awaited them till the casualties run into millions. In both Eritrea and Ethiopia someone’s son, daughter, sister and brother dies if war breaks out. Let’s hope it doesn’t come to pass.

        • Amde

          Selam Paulos,

          The Dalai Lama is an optimist. Methinks war is human and thus never outmoded. These phrases – “institutional memory” or “national memory” – are quite enticing, but in reality memory lives within living breathing humans, and thus dies off with people as well. Or if it is remembered it is only in an idealized form, stripped of its horrors or the emotional impulses behind it. Thus leaving us open to want to experiment with war again – through sheer boredom as you put it.

          I don’t see any reason for Ethiopia to initiate war at this point. Status quo favors it. But status quo does not favor Eritrea (although it favors Isayyas). Fanti’s point about Ethiopian delegation in UAE, and Gheteb’s point about UAE support for Eritrean Air Force does not bode well. An implied promise of “unlimited” military support from the UAE, and a belief that the Weyane might be vulnerable seem like classic grounds for a BadmeII by Isayyas.

          And paradoxically, this is the time you would want a US to be around to settle things down. But it looks like the US has been knocked out of any sort of meaningful diplomatic engagement for the immediate future. Makes you think Fanti’s math may have some legs after all.

          I hope like you this is just a bit of posturing. No more wars.

          Amde

          • Paulos

            Selam Amde,

            The objectives of war they say is to render the vanquished surrender to the will of the victor. Or it could as well be politics by other means. Why do nation resort to war in this day and age? Don’t you think Dalai Lama is way beyond the description as in optimist? Why can’t nations resolve disputes through other means as in dialogues? Utopian society is not what I have in mind but a common sense to do the right thing.

          • Amde

            Selam Paulos,

            If I knew the answer to that question….

            I don’t know why the Dalai Lama thinks war is “outmoded”. He himself is in exile because China chose war mode to take over Tibet. Unfortunately it is still seen as a mode that may work out successfully for the ones who win and not so much for those who don’t.

            Personally I think it is in the reptiilian part of our brains, where we form kinship and worry about survival. In other words, it is biological. Therefore we are predisposed to paranoia and war as a rewarding activity. Perhaps I am wrong and you can legitimately speak to it from he biological or even genetic point of view. I just think that evolution favors warmaking – the paranoid mindset and predisposition to see others are competitors rather than collaborators. I am genuinely curious what you might say to that.

          • Paulos

            Selam Amde,

            My comment is on hold.

          • Amde

            Selam Paulos,

            Completely tangential. But I thought I had read somewhere that Tibetan society was a peaceful theocracy for a centuries. As those things go, it devolves into..”.. it depends..”

            In any case, I found this piece on Tibet pre Chinese takeover. It is obviously written from a Marxist perspective, and gives quite a view on their class structure. http://www.michaelparenti.org/Tibet.html The clergy and aristocracy are married at the hip, and they lord over the serf class.

            Amde

          • Paulos

            Selam Amde,

            Thanks for the link. Will read it tonight before I go to bed.

          • Selamat oAmde and Paul,

            Here, only the lead sentence brings both to a point of convergence. Indeed, in and in between, are embedded the red herrings argumentum, if you will.

            Take guromyle for example of reference lacking and the just war theorist not considered, reason for an A-. O.w., how else would one explain the in unison contemplations.

            Beat Street’s graphite artist: “If Art is a crime then I am a criminal.” And Russel Simon is a political activist lobbyist.

            tSAtSE-Azilo40

    • Abrehet Yosief

      Selam Gheteb,

      I remember a joke I read a few decades ago,. Two fathers receive letters from their kids in college. One said, “Every time I receive a letter from my kid, I go to the library to consult a dictionary.” The other responded,” You’re lucky, my son’s letter send me straight to the bank to send him more money.”

      I had to consult the dictionary ten times to understand what you wrote. For that I am grateful. As to the country you describe as “stable and peaceful … self-reliantly out of the famine or draught picture”, the message from its inhabitants send me directly to the bank, Hawala, Western Union etc, to help the young who are fleeing in droves and to beg them to stay put in Sudan. It also sends me directly to a friend, a friend’s friend, or anyone who visit home to send money to help with basic necessities. I guess it is considered self-reliance if the assistance you get is from Eritreans abroad?

      I have seen pictures of infants and toddlers who are bones and skin. Please do not mock us. We have families there. Politics is one thing, playing politics with famine is another.

      • Paulos

        Selam Haftey,

        I suspect ‘Gheteb has just been to one of the Mekhetes before he stopped by Awate. As it happened, my first cousin came back last week from Eritrea. She said, Asmara looks like a ghost city where the remaining are tired of everything. Those are her exact words. And what you just said is simply beautiful. Thank you haftey nate.

        • ‘Gheteb

          Paulos,

          You said, quoting your ” first cousin” that ” … Asmara looks like a ghost city where the remaining are tired of everything”.

          Man, with that assertion, you have hit the absolute nadir of illogicality. Well, the reductio ad absurdum of your and by extension your second cousins assertion is that, the inhabitants of Asmara are so tired of everything that they have stopped eating, breathing, sleeping, going to the bathroom etc. etc…

          Ah, the deep seas of illogic are indeed quite suffocating for ratiocination !

          • Paulos

            ‘Gheteb,

            ….ratiocination? ኣታ ሰብኣይ እንታይ በዲልናካ?

          • ‘Gheteb

            Paulos,

            አዚ ዘይቁኑዕ መጎት ጓል ነገር ( a red herring fallacy) መዓስ ኢኻ ትገድፎ? Committing such a grievous red herring fallacy is not a winning strategy.

          • Saleh Johar

            Hi Gheteb,
            I don’t know the first cousin of most people here. And I can’t relate how other peoples’ cousins are doing in Asmara. I can relate to my cousins and your cousins in Keren. Toiling and struggling to cope with life’s requirements is given, in any country at any time. Can you say the life of our cousins in Keren is better that it was in the sixties to the eighties than it is now, worse or the same. I am strictly talking about justice, fear, security and welding content under the PFDJ. Please consider your reply as if you are saying it to our cousins.

            Your disappointed cousin.

          • ‘Gheteb

            Ahlan Saleh “Gadi” Johar,

            First of all ‘many’, ‘many’ ( As in Tigrigna, ብዙዙዙዙ…….ሕ) apologies for disappointing you. I really mean that, as I don’t intend to disappoint anyone, let alone the one I consider like my first cousin.

            Now Saleh, I am praying that you are going to read my response with an open heart and an open mind. The last thing I want and dread the most is disappointing you, knowing full well what you have been through.

            You know me and you know my political stands throughout the past 10 to 15 years. Throughout these years, my stands have evolved and changed, though I have always been a ‘ShaEbiaist’, at heart.

            On many occasions, I have called out the PFDJ/GoE on issues of justice/fairness and what I deemed as incorrect or wrong-headed political stances of the PFDJ. Ever since the imposition of sanctions and all the declared and undeclared wars on Eritrea, I have relegated “the secondary contradiction” — ካላልኣዊ ግርጭት — to a ‘hold until a propitious time’, and I have been primarily focused on dealing and grappling with “the primary contradiction” –ቀዳማዊ ግርጭት. These EPLF phraseologies are from my teenage years with the EPLF.

            If you think this is ትውጋሕሞ ( TwigahMo) redux ala SAAY, I am telling you that it ain’t.

            Since you may not be familiar with these phraseologies, let me proffer these examples:

            Secondary contradictions are contradictions within the a party, a given society or a nation. Primary contradictions are the type of contradiction between a front, a nation or a society and that of a foreign enemy. In Eritrea’s case, the conflict/struggle with the Weyane/Ethiopia, can be seen as a primary contradiction.

            You asked:

            ” Can you say the life of our cousins in Keren is better that it was in the sixties to the eighties than it is now, worse or the same. I am strictly talking about justice, fear, security and welding content under the PFDJ”.

            I can’t compare “sixties to the eighties” Keren with the past 15 to 20 years Keren. Times are quite different and the challenges our cousins faced then are NOT the same to those they are facing now.

            Ideally, I am at one with you and FULLY agree that our cousins deserve a much better life than the life they are leading now. Where you and I diverge at this very crossroad. To wit, you blame the difficult life of our cousins squarely on the PFDJ, while I hesitate to blame the PFDJ giving all the hurdles and challenges that have been thrown on the Eritrean path.

            I am not absolving the PFDJ at all nor do I view the Front as infallible. But given the reality in Eritrea, I don’t see any other way for Eritrea’s survival other than the Spartan, draconian and demanding life that seems worse than the “sixties to the eighties” life of our cousins. The emphasis has not been on IRON DISCIPLINE that has surely impinged upon “justice” and has increased the sense of fear and insecurity.

            I hope I have answered your questions.

          • Hayat Adem

            Dear Gheteb,
            There are simpler ways:
            1) Instead of doing many apologies, do one thing, be honest and be with the people. A number of sorry behinds will never make mistakes right.
            2) Instead of praying that someone reads your note with open heart and mind, pray that you yourself give something good for the hearts and minds of others.
            3) If you are always (repeat for emphasis: ALWAYS) shaEbiaist at heart and you never entertain non-ShaEbiaists, why do you ask others to read you with open heart? Charity starts at home, does it not? Open your ShEbiya heart first before you ask others. One question though: is your heart and mind attached to your body?
            4) You said you called out the wrong-headed political stances of the PFDJ. I have yet to hear one. Prove me wrong and put out one, just for the sake of it. Mentioning one weakness will not kill the PFDJ, try it. You will feel fine, believe me, the amount of oxygen you take in will remain about the same.
            5) ካላልኣዊ ግርጭት –ቀዳማዊ ግርጭት.once weirdly wired, it stays so… a lot of water has passed under the Sahle bridge and you are compulsively forced to repeat a Soviet-in-tigrigna.. big league or was it bigly?
            6) What TwigahMo! You are the best example of titSelimitMo dirgim tibel.. b’eu abila dima fdagim aytiwugaH.. tSehai hilim illa timut.. Badime Tiray TimtSa’e!
            7) You hesitate to blame PFDJ . Yes, this part is clear and understandable. Hesitate to blame the Mafia group that is committing a GENERATIONAL GENOCIDE (new concept coined by YG in his new article: A Waiting Game)
            8) Iron Discipline over Justice…hmmm…and you hoped you have answered SGJ’s questions? You don’t have to hope because you really did. But did he have questions for you though?
            Yes, I remember.. there was one: “” Can you say the life of our cousins in Keren is better that it was in the sixties to the eighties than it is now, worse or the same?”
            So, how did you answer that question? Like this, I quote, “I don’t see any other way for Eritrea’s survival other than the Spartan, draconian and demanding life that seems worse than the “sixties to the eighties” life of our cousins”
            Honestly, what did you say? Did you say better or worse or about the same? SGJ gave you those three simple choices to pick an answer from, and you incredibly run away from picking one.
            This is funny..”life that seems worse than…”. What really is that? Translation: It might seem worse but it really is.. the issue is…it could be or couldn’t be.. you see: I am always ShaEbiaist at heart and I hesitate to blame them… so don’t ask me definitively close-ended questions like that…”
            You defend the mafia group at any rate even if your credibility is on the line, in defense of the wrong on matter that are well known knowns?
            Donald Ramsfield: there are known knowns, known unknowns, unknown known and unknown unknowns.
            Gheteb: there are mistakes and crimes, there are victims and victimizers, If the victimizers happen to be the PFDJ, I hesitate to blame the victmizers because I was born ShaEbiyaist! If I have to, I can always blame someone else. I can blame the groundhog. If not why not!
            Gheteb is good!

          • Selamat Paul, Gheteb Quinattt Abrehet,

            As iSEM would say:
            “Flumen vesoatum.” Egyptologist ZaEgoal Analytics Services;)

            tSAtSE-Azilo40

      • ‘Gheteb

        Selam Abrehet Yosief,

        If you understood that everything in Eritrea is honky-dory, all is milk and honey, no one is struggling to make ends meet, no one is struggling to eke out a living and no one is suffering of any privation, then you read me wrong. Eritrea is still a poor country with many still in the grips of poverty.

        You said:

        ” I had to consult the dictionary ten times to understand what you wrote”.

        I don’t believe that all. I think I have a hunch why you wrote that statement. If I were to hazard a guess, it comes from the following Tigrigna cliché.

        ” ዓሰርተ ግዘ ዲክሸነሪ ተወኪሰ”
        ” ዓሰርተ ግዘ …… Ten times

        • Abrehet Yosief

          Dear Gheteb,
          If you are saying that I used the expression “ten times” because it is a cliché in my language. Yes, you are right. It was not literal. I actually had to check nine words. “alarum, factitious, wont, duplicitous, perfidious, rock-ribbed, prognostication, insensately, Mirable dictum”. And again, I thank you. I learned.

          As to your statement that Eritrea is still a poor country, I very well know that. I have lived it. I have lived through the famine of 85-86 as well. I know poverty. What we have now is a population imprisoned. I have several friends from different poor countries, we all struggle to help our families. However, Eritreans are the only ones who are held hostage by their government. The only ones, whose mad dictator stops the men from harvest and orders them to attend refresher military training.

    • Abraham H.

      Hi Gheteb, airfield in Barentu? Only thing I could see is a dusty field that looks like a ‘landing strip’ without tarmac overgrown with shrubs. Advice: don’t lie on googlable issues (courtesy of Hayat Adem).

      • ‘Gheteb

        Hi Abraham H.,

        I can’t provide you a video link that shows the Eritrean Air Force jet fighters ( Su-27S, Mig-29s and Su-25s) and attack Helicopters ( Mig-35s and Mig-24s) landing and taking off the Barentu airfield.

        But here are pictures taken of Eritrean Air Force plane and Helicopter in the Barentu airfield in the years 1999-2000. [[ Mikoyan MiG-29 and an Mi-24 Hind attack helicopter at Barentu, Eritrea]].

        Check the 9th picture from the link provided below.

        http://www.madote.com/2010/02/pictures-of-eritrean-air-force.html

        Now, let me ask you this question Ato. Abraham H.

        Why do you think that the Eritrean Air Force and one of its airfields in Barentu are in such a bad state that you could:
        “….Only thing I could see is a dusty field that looks like a ‘landing strip’ without tarmac overgrown with shrubs”. You are advising me : “don’t lie”.

        • Abraham H.

          Hi Gheteb, I’m not implying something to the effect “the Eritrean Air Force and one of its airfields in Barentu are in such a bad state”, no, what I said is there was not an airfield in Barentu that could land those kinds of fighter jets you mentioned neither in 1998-2000 (I was in Eritrea then) nor now ( I could see it, thanks to google earth). After searching the ninth picture you or your source (madote:) have posted as from a Barentu airfield, I found it in the website geocities with a caption

          “The scene moments after four MiG-23BN Ethiopians bombed Asmara airport on May 29, 2000. Neither the MiG-29UB nor the Mi-35 helicopter (the helicopter captured the previous year) were damaged despite the large number of Bombs that exploded near them. But several other buildings were destroyed”-google translated from Spanish.

  • Paulos

    Selam Awatistas,

    Don’t mean to set some sort of a tone but it seems the recent revision of policies on Eritrea and the unusual immediate response to refute the accusation calls to the very least something is brewing not of course black coffee but between Eritrea and Ethiopia. What say you as in Awatistas?

    • Selamat Paul-Elite9,

      I am expecting anxiously the revelation of the Third miracle.

      Physics Energy GERD and Kilmer in Russia Exhibits ready from my side.

      I am also thinking about pairing you with Saay7-Fab5E9 as a power forward on the 60 Minutes Marker.

      AmEritrean GitSAtSE Agniyeya Azilo40 Children Books Press

    • Hayat Adem

      Hi Paulos,
      I do beleive the events described in the news story did take place. This is so not just because the sources of the story are officials of high level but they officially mentioned a 3rd country (Sudan) as playing role.
      Did the planned attack on GERD and the recently hinted Ethio Policy-on-Eritrea have crossed paths in coincidence or because-of-ness? Who would know except those in the know!
      Let’s assume the attack plan was real and IA was behind the BPLF, and Egypt was behind IA on this mission. In such a scenario, it is a no brainer that IA really wants to push the very hot-red button for real escalation crossing a thickly reddened line by Ethiopia. That means he is ready to step up the game. I don’t think he would do that without preparing himself for serious eventualities. This scenario is highly dependent on the strength of my “if” if at all.
      Yemane’s quick twitter denial could have come out of any reason or for no reason, most likely out of the habitual template: deny everything thrown by the Weyane. Or least likely out of preparedness in advance of the event. It is very hard to read anything to Eritrean officials’ statements becuase they may know nothing about the real stuff as only IA and few in the intelligence and military know about the true nature of the events. The only important clues may come only from what Ethiopia says about such events.

      • Paulos

        Selam Hayatina,

        Time could as well be the hidden factor but in politics for it is the obvious and the real deal. It could not have been coincidence. That said, one can guesstimate with in reasonable parameters what the new policies are up to. First, it was the let’s talk as in dialogue. Second, it was no-war-no-peace while pressing for a dialogue. Third, it was measured military response for any provocation, again keeping the need for dialogue in place. The question still lingers: What could the new policy be? Sure enough it can not be a repeat or a modified version of the above three for the Premier himself said “new.” Well, it is rather impractical to assume an all out war for again Ethiopia can not afford as it is in an ambitious economic undertaking to transform the country into a middle income nation. My assumption is that Ethiopia may give Isaias a sort of ultimatum as in a time frame to collect his acts or else anybody’s guess.

        • Selamat Paul – Elite9,

          The RPG as choice of ^ it graphics… gave it away… What’s on the Horizon E32 factor if you will…Check out
          “Get Out” with Danielle Kaluuya. Sorry to get all pop culturish but it is Saturday.
          I am sure within the First hypnosis you would formulate a a 10! Permutations.

          AmEritrean GitSAtSE Agniyeya Azilo40 Children Books Press

        • Hayat Adem

          Hi Paulos,
          I agree with you that it seems it is not going to be a repeat. And if PMHD was so conscious of his word selection, he said “new, finalized study, and relations with Eritrea”. If I have to analyse those words against the background and within the context of the trends you gave us above, I would say, he might have been hinting on somemthing broader and more comprehensive that might be larger than and beyond dialogue, demarcation, IA or Algiers. I think the operative phrase “relations with Eritrea” sounds larger and beyond IA, to repeat myself. So IA’s regime might be one element in consideration but not an invited player of conditionality. Expect a comprehensive redefnition of an entirety in order or if not, PMHD’s word use was poor and confusingly not policy lubricated.

          • Selamat Hyatt Adem-Elite32
            This is indeed.a KiTkaTT moment for our Region broadening it’s influence. Envission invite. Silverado Y Eldorado’s Bridge would be fitting for The BeniShangul African Black, Yellow, Red and Green. And especially at a time where The Two Deltas meet. Tekeze’s Hippopotamus Anambra State Ogidi, Nigeria, Cameroon, Chad, Togo, Fantination Ghana-Fab5-E9…Miguel Garcia MarQuez. I believe Fab5E9 Saay7 will tell me about Ayweledm.

            AmEritrean GitSAtSE Agniyeya Children Books Press

          • Amde

            Selam Hayat/Paulos/Horizon

            A couple of months ago, our own Saleh Johar mentioned that the Eritrean opposition had been asking the Ethiopian government for a clarification of its policy wrt to Eritrea and the opposition. He said there was positive movement in that direction but he was not at liberty to say more.

            Perhaps PMHD’s words have something to do with that. Maybe SGJ is at liberty now?

            This attack story is too weird. The target is politically bad for the opposition – GERD is popular. One cannot sabotage GERD, an immense man made mountain, with a small RPG armed crew, It is one of the most protected sites in the country. Most likely explanation is this is just one team of many from sundry opposition groups trying to infiltrate into the country. They were caught. Ethiopian government decided to make them infamous. What we lack is context for why and why now.

          • Hayat Adem

            Yes Amde, the Tower,
            I would be ears if SGJ can share with us anything that is shareable on the matter. On the GERD, your assumptions suffer from too much sanity and logic. You think going to Asmara is reasonable and popular for an organization who claims to fight for freedom and democracy? It is not. It is like some one chooses to go to a desert to fetch water. And yet the G7, OLF and this BPLF do it.
            And yes, like you said, I beleive GERD is popular. And yet many from the opposition are opposed to it. Fanti told us the other day even intellectuals like Almariam are against it in the open. I would ask why? But the only answer I get is because IA is opposed to it. He himself is opposed to it not because he sees any Eritrean interest in doing so but he sees some rentable opportunity to an Egyptian price tag attached to it. The Ethiopian opposition parties like G7 would do anything to please their host. Do you remember when they stood against the Eritrean people’s popular demand for their rights and demonistrated with the ypfdj rallying for Issayas all over the streets of Europe and America officially and in the open? How can an opposition claiming to fight for democracy and freedom come out in support of a dictator opposing people’s demands of freedom and democracy, the same virtues these forces claim to fight for as their cause?
            So, even with the towering brain of yours, you tey try to understand them as if they act with reasons driven out of their principled positions! I love you but these hypocrites who feed on renting their voices and support for the wrong reason and groups don’t deserve the benefits of our doubts.
            Hayat, with respect.

          • Berhe Y

            Dear Hayat,

            I think Amde explanation sounds more reasonable that what’s being offered.

            The opposition going to Eritrea is normal because they need to survive. Where else can they go, other than Washington DC and London if they can’t be inside Ethiopia.

            Berhe

            It’s not like they really have much choice inside the country (dr. Meters as example), regardless of Isayas intention to Ethiopia, right now he is the only one offering support.

          • Amanuel Hidrat

            Selam Hayat,

            Ginbot7 : “who feed (themselves) on renting their voices” against human rights and democracy is the right characterization and good one. These Gonbot-7 are undemocratic movement by their nature, and you are also right to criticize Amde (an astute intellectual) on lending them reasons to their act and behaviors. The irony of the Eritrean regime is to lend hand or help to an organization who do not believe on our independence.

            Regards

          • Amde

            Selam Amanuel,

            The Ginbot-7 is an armed group pursuing political aim through military means as a guerilla group. How are they different from the ELF you joined and served?

            Amde

          • Peace!

            Selam Emma,

            You have not only been supporting but also admiring EPRDF/TPLF for years despite continues killing thousands of innocent Ethiopians in a broad daylight, and here you are accusing G7 for opposing TPLF an organization murdering people hiding behind state of emergency. why not stick to your initial position leaving Ethiopian prooblems to Ethiopians to save credibility from the shadow of hypocrisy.

            Peace!

          • Amanuel Hidrat

            Ahlen Peace,

            There is a saying in science which says “everything is relative” when you make a collective or individual judgements. If you believe in this universal approach, then it is applicable also in the Ethio-Eritrean positions visa-vis to “Eritrean cause and their independence.” TPLF has/had a firm stand on the Eritrean struggle and its independence from its inception until now. Ginbot-7 as the continuation of EPRP policy, they don’t support the Eritrean cause and our independence as a principle. If somehow come to power they will try to reverse our independence using the quest of port Assab. So for me at this point, my “weighing factor” is simple and it is their position on “the Eritrean cause and our independence.” Others are secondary to me. I do not try my personal grudge to make “an Eritrean cause” in my struggle. Anything that may or may not happen to me by the policy of Ethiopian regime will not tantamount to the Eritrean cause, as to what we will do in the diplomacy of our country with the neighbor countries. I hope to stop your own personal hate to make the Eritrean cause.

            regards
            Amanuel Hidrat

          • Abraham H.

            Selam Amanuel H, we’ve heard this claim that the Ginbot 7 do not accept the independence of Eritrea as an independent state, could you or any other Awatista present us with the proof for this? Have they declared this policy publicly or otherwise? Does it exist in their political programe? If this is really true, it is an additional betrayal against the Eritrean people and evil agenda by Isayas the day he is no more.

          • Amanuel Hidrat

            Selam Abraham,

            I read it somewhere. I am still digging to find it where I read it or listened it. If some of our awitistas could help, they are welcome.

          • Abraham H.

            Selam Aman, we’ve to be careful when we allude to such claims because these kinds of rumors could be spread by the Weyanes in order to further isolate and discredit the opposition they face from the Ginbot 7. Therefore, it is important to argue based on facts in basic principles that have to do with peaceful coexistence between Eritrea and Ethiopia even beyond the regime of Isayas.

          • Amde

            Selam Abraham H,

            I do not think Ginbot-7 is against Eritrean independence. There is pretty much zero public support for reversing Eritrean independence, and in fact there are many more Ethiopians for sustaining it now than at any time – just in case y’all decide to come back haha..

            But there is significant public support for anyone saying they will resolve the Ethiopian land lockedness issue. You can interpret that any way you want. Worst case means Ethiopia takes Asseb. Ethiopia “taking” Asseb is not ending Eritrean independence, it is another issue altogether.

            Amde

          • Abraham H.

            Selamat Amde, I’ve also heard even those legal opposition parties/at least some of them, operating in Ethiopia currently have another look at the Eritrean issue than the governing EPRDF, which has traditioanlly defended Eritreans’ right of self-determination and in having independent nation. Probably as someone who has a closer look at current Ethiopian affairs, how far is this true? Do those oppostion parties have support for their hardline postion against Eritrean independence in the general public? “Taking back Asseb” could be explained in many ways, but doing so by force would be repeating previous blunders of Ethiopian regimes towards Eritrea which would be neither good for Eritrea nor for Ethiopia.

          • Amde

            Selam Abraham H,

            I don’t know of any that are proposing ending Eritrean independence. Like I said, the public absolutely doesn’t want it. The feeling is basically “good riddance – now we got some peace”. There may be a few small groups of older folks who might think that, but that is more of nostalgia than policy.

            But resolving Ethiopia’s land lockedness issue as a part of the political platform can almost be termed a universal issue among the absolute majority of political parties and coalitions. That includes people that were part of and fought with TPLF/EPRDF against the Derg and supported Eritrean independence. You see it with unionist and ethnic parties and coalitions alike.

            Even though they have not come out and said it, I think this is EPRDFs unstated objective as well. The point of having normalization talks is not really about the relatively small amount of real estate in the whole Badme issue. They want to get this resolved in a sustainable and satisfactory manner. If you talk to their rank and file members, this is one of the issues many of them grumble about.

            Personally I think Asseb is an albatross for Eritrea. Maybe a different regime would play it better, but it is never a good idea to make your neighbor resent you by threatening that you can choke at will his communication with the world at large. He will find a thousand and one ways to show you he doesn’t need you.

            Amde

          • Abraham H.

            Hi Amde, thanks for explaining my query, Ethiopia making use of Eritrean sea ports and in particular Assab is a text book win-win situation for both countries, but we need two govts that talk with each other for that to materialize.

          • Kim Hanna

            Selam Amde,
            .
            A thousand ways indeed. 1001 would be to sublease it from UAE for 35 years.
            .
            Mr. K.H

          • Amde

            Indeed Mr K.H.

            At this rate though, it looks like “subleased from UAE” is becoming the tagline for every port in the region. It is definitely running Djibouti. There is news of them running Berbera. I don’t know about Tajura – the up and coming port planned to accommodate increased Ethiopian traffic, but it would make sense that the government of Djibouti would rather deal with a company that they know and that knows them.

            There is also some possibility of Djibouti developing yet anther port exclusively to handle Potash exports from Ethiopia.

            The amount of Chinese money flowing into Djibouti just to develop the ports and associated infrastruture is astounding.

            Asseb might not be too far behind and if I were UAE, I’d either sabotage it from being a competitor for the Ethiopian market, or get control for it. The longer Asseb stays unused as a civilian port, the longer time for Tajura to develop with the road and railroad linkages that cement it as an economically desirable port. At some point, it would be hard to justify a third deep harbor port within less than 100 kms essentially serving the same market. But who knows.

            Isayyas is a fool.

            Amde

          • Amanuel Hidrat

            Selam Abraham,

            It is fact. Because I am unable to pull it the internet forest, it does mean I am saying false things. However, it is up to you to take it or leave it. But please for God sake what it matters to me is what their position on Eritrea issue. I care less what the wayane says about Ginbot-7 nor do I care what Ginbot-7 says for wayane. Don’t be worry about me, just be “careful” about yourself.

            regards

          • Abraham H.

            Selam Aman, yes it is upto me to take it or leave it, but since this issue is very serious policy issue when it comes to us Eritreans, what I asked was just to provide any proof of it whether it is true or not.

          • Amanuel Hidrat

            Selam Abraham,

            Take a note if it helps to what I am saying:

            Sir Amde told you “worst case means Ethiopia takes Asseb”. Keep in mind then their adjusted policy is to take Asseb. This is from someone who support Ginbot-7.

            Second, please read the entire comment of Fanti Ghana above, but the following statement says all:
            “I don’t recall any opposition party which did not blame EPRDF for “losing our natural sea outlet” but occasionally slipping and blaming it “for losing Eritrea.”

            regards
            Amanuel Hidrat

          • Abraham H.

            Selam Aman, thanks for your time and for trying to explain the issue, unfortunately, I’m not looking for inferences, but rather on hard fact in the form of written or stated policy from the G-7 that they would work for reversing the Eritrean independence. That, you are not able to provide right now, and I don’t put the burden on you to prove it for me, I passed the challenge to the other Awatistas, so let’s move on. Thanks for engaging me.

          • Amde

            Selam Amanuel,

            Please don’t twist what I said.

            I am not a supporter of Ginbot-7. I just said I understand why they are in Eritrea and that I think it is a dead end. I also said there are many legal parties in Ethiopia that pursue many of their policy objectives. The only difference between them is that Ginbot-7 decided the peaceful path was finished.

            The “taking Asseb” comment is a “worst-case-scenario” I was presenting to Abraham, based on the current Ethiopian public’s political sentiments. It is the extreme option along the continuum of discussion about the country being land locked. The land lockedness issue is a very much live political issue in Ethiopia and EPRDF knows that quite well, even from its own members starting from the TPLF. It would be patronizing and lying to you if I were to say it is an issue of a few isolated groups – it is in fact one would say a mainstream political issue. One can make a good case that EPRDF’s policy towards Eritrea is fishing for the most amenable negotiation partner on this very issue.

            I don’t know how specifically Ginbot-7s would address it. I think the reality is that most Ethiopian political opposition groups (if they are ever in Menelik’s palace) would just blame the EPRDF for the situation and then see what legal and/or diplomatic resolution they can bring to it. I don’t anticipate Ginbot-7 will bring anything substantially different to the table.

            I don’t see war over it. Now, if Isayyas starts something then all bets are off.

            Amde

          • Abraham H.

            Aman, Kim Hanna is a Mr. 🙂

          • Fanti Ghana

            Hello Abraham H,

            There were political debates between EPRDF and several opposition parties leading to the 2005 election. I don’t recall any opposition party which did not blame EPRDF for “losing our natural sea outlet” but occasionally slipping and blaming it “for losing Eritrea.”

            If you have any doubt about G-7 vis-a-vis Eritrean independence I can only blame it on your age.

            Almost all the opposition parties we have today (minus blue party, I think) were created the moment EPRDF set foot in Addis. There was no complaint of “democracy” then. The most popular complaints were “asgenTay,” “zeregna,” and “Asab.”

            Birhanu Nega was one of the participants in the pre-2005 election I mentioned. Besides complaining like everyone else about unverifiable innuendos of those days, he only had one question: he wanted to know “how Ethiopian” Meles Zenawi was. The greatest sin “Meles is half Eritrean” was a popular political weapon in those days.

            Have no doubt about G7 not supporting Eritrean independence because it was one of the reasons for their existence.

            PS:
            Elements of G7 were members of several other organizations known by different names. There were frequent uniting and disuniting among several opposition parties, but the leaders and most of the members are still the same.

          • Abraham H.

            Selam Fanti, thanks for taking your time to explain to me the question I posed. Actually I get the gist of your message, but what I wanted to know was whether this is a declared policy on the part of the G-7 or whether it is something said behind the scenes because I’ve seen many people refrering to it as a fact.

          • Fanti Ghana

            Selam Abraham H.,

            I know I was only providing probable causes, but there is no opposition party in Ethiopia, at least until about 2011, who had a “declared policy” on Eritrea. G7 doesn’t even have a “declared policy” on Ethiopia let alone Eritrea. Their “policy” often is event driven and contributions purposed.

          • Fanti Ghana

            Selam Abraham H.,

            Here is a video that sums up what I was referring to as the then political atmosphere.
            I have jumped the video to where it is relevant to our discussion.

            Birhanu on Eritrea vis-a-vis EPRDF
            https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ievA8QzmGIg&feature=youtu.be&t=407

          • Abraham H.

            Hello Fanti, thanks a lot for digging out this video; I’m not so good in Amharic but I get the gist of the speech which could be summed as “the EPRDF has allowed the break away of Eritrea at the expence of Ethiopia?” I get it that Berhane Nega and many other Ethiopians may not have been comfortable with the independence of Eritrea back then; it is also possible many are so to this day. When I raised the question first, I was hoping to see if there is any declared policy or programe of the G-7 where among other things their policy towards Eritrea is mentioned. According to the basics a given organization must have an a charter or a program through which they want to sell their plans to the public. Unfortunately, neither you Fanti nor anyone else could provide such an information. If Isayas has accepted these people with such bad will against Eritrea it only shows that he is ready to spill Eritrea down the drain as long a his own ego and sick ambitions are satisfied. What is so painful in all this is that we Eritreans have fallen to such a degree of submissiveness that we have allowed some mad person to handle affairs that are so detrimental to our very existence. One has to ask what if such gropus win the power in Ethiopia? well that would mean opening another chapter of mayhem between the peoples of Eritrea and Ethiopia. Isayas cannot see beyond the tip of his nose.

          • Hayat Adem

            Abraham,
            You are pressing Emma hard and unfairly on what is a public knowledge. Emma’s claim is solid. So, what Fanti posted below must do it enough but Birhanu wrote a 600+ page book and a few pages of that speak to the EPRDF’s unpatriotic stance with regard to un-negotiated separation of Eritrea and loss of sea access. There is more, Birhanu gave a very telling interview in 2000 and I will repost here here what i posted a year or so ago. I invite you to read the entire the entire interview if you can and you can pick the mind and heart of Birhanu from the interview at the link…
            Dr. Birhanu Nega of G7 sounds a very ugly personality for me. He spoke loud and advised the meles regime then of the two things as to what what the goal of the war should be; completely destroying the Eritrean army and reclaiming Assab. He was just asking Weyane not to get back from Zalanbessa and to apologize for making it difficult for Ethiopians to reclaim Assab. There is nothing he can say “I told you so” on both accounts unless he put it this way: “you know 15yrs ago, i encouraged the Weyane to destroy you and reclaim Assab. They didn’t do it. So, now I came to you to punish them for that”. That too might be acceptable in PFDJ’s bizarrely absurd world.
            http://www.assimba.org/Arti

          • Amanuel Hidrat

            Selam Hayat & and Fanti,

            Thank you for linking the audio or utube about Berhanu and his organization and their positions on Eritrea and Asseb. I hope Abraham will take home something about them.

          • Selamat Abraham H.,

            This is an excellent question. In 1991, AGSU (AGSU) I argued the following to Pan Africanist tuned audience. Truth is, an Ethiopian presenter was significantly late into a room I happen to stumble into that particular day. Without preparation the improvisation utilized was, for the necessity to recognize the body parts first in order to strive for the whole. Now, you may add approaching from whole to parts as not necessarily being problematic.

            The Ethiopian scheduled presenter, who politely listened as the rest and fielded questions of his own, seceded a continuum invite upon my request where as justification, tightening the unprepared presentation which I obliged to fill…

            The unanimous grant for a follow-up, including that of my Ethiopian collegue, was more than likely to the fait acomplie of Eritrean Independence then imminent.

            Perhaps, Guromyle can add as to how Part 2 was delegated.

            tSAtSE-Azilo40

          • Amde

            Selam Hayat,

            Please don’t make me into a partisan. I just try to see our politics within a historical arc. And basically, seeking support from a neighboring state perceived as “the enemy” is a not-so-fine Ethiopian tradition. We can set the moralizing aside and see it strictly as a gamble on effectiveness.

            The problem illegal oppositions face in general is they have to sell a piece of their soul to the hand that feeds them. It is simple math. This can also be argued for Eritrean opposition in Ethiopia.

            Personally, I think going to Asmara is a dead end – but when they see Meles spent a few years in Mogadishu (immediately after the costly Ogaden war), they see it is a historical risk worth taking. I grew up hearing about Eritrean groups in Sudan carrying water for the Arab cause. So – all in all – a rich vein of history to entice the ambitious.

            It is easy to condemn and demonize opposition groups who feel the peaceful path is closed. But it takes two to tango.
            The fundamental question is WHY do we have illegal opposition in the first place. I still can’t wrap my mind around how it is possible that an ex-TPLF member (we are not talking about ex-EDU or ex-TLF) can create a Tigrayan opposition group so large (TPDM), that it is routinely accused of being Isayyas’ go-to ultimately-trusted force for sustaining his autocracy. What is the political story behind THAT?

            I don’t understand people like Al Mariam. He is a bright guy, and if he needs to oppose the EPRDF, there are a thousand and one reasons to oppose. Just as attacking the GERD site makes no military sense, opposing the GERD project does not make political sense. I know a few economists that have some reservations on the economic burden of the GERD for example, but they recognize its other attributes.

            In any case, there are probably a few more shoes that have to fall before this story makes sense. It hasn’t really excited anybody among the Ethiopian public at large.

            Amde

          • Paulos

            Selam Amde,

            I think there is a fundamental factor that is terribly amiss with in the persons of Birhanu Nega and Isaias. They both not only do not know the Weyanes well and sound, they underestimate them as well. Thing is the Weyanes squarely capitalize on that all the way to the bank.

            If the victory in Adwa cemented a proud identity with in the Ethiopian psych, GERD equally carries a psychological weight where the ghosts who rattled Tewodros, Yohannes, Menelik and Haileselassie are made to rest. As such, GERD is not only the “Trans Siberia Railway” of the 21st century but also something the likes of Almariam would go down in history in the company of Benedict Arnold and Vidkun Quisling.

            I get it, as you put it Realpolitik is in play and of course the sense of morality is set aside again for all practical purposes. When strategy and tactics are like the Chinese chopsticks with in the cruel choreography of war and politics, to opt for Isaias as a dancing partner is beyond me for the latter is a total loser. Instead I see a rising star in Lidetu Ayalew a guy who seems to have internalized the call of the game and before we know it he will own Menelik Palace.

          • Amde

            Selam Paulos,

            “GERD as Trans-Siberian Railway” is apt in its economic, political and diplomatic import. I don’t undertand why people oppose it just for the sake of opposing the Weyane. I heard a story of an ex-Derg soldier who escaped through Sudan, came to the US, made his money in real estate, then voluntarily signed up to help collect GERD Bond investment among an otherwise hostile Ethiopian diaspora community. That is one anecdote of many.

            I don’t blame the Ethiopian opposition for going to Asmara. It is a simple process of elimination. The same dilemma is faced by Eritrean opposition. In any case I believe it is a dead end, not necessarily because of the uniquely Isayyas pathology, but generally speaking the world has changed.

            Lidetu is rhetorically gifted. In Menelik’s palace though? Right now, I don’t see how that will work. He has a brand. His appeal is that he is not EPRDF. The main reason for his downfall was the perception he was an EPRDF collaborator. EPRDF keeps embracing him, but they won’t take him in. Where would they put him any way? A large part of his appeal was his rejection of ethnic politics. Nobody – not a single person – is a member of EPRDF. You can only join as a member of one of the component ethnic parties. If you come from a multi-ethinic background, you are asked to choose the identity of one of your parents, and then you are assigned membership to one of the EPRDF ethnic parties.

            Can he actually find a middle way? He did. It was his old party, but they were wiped out by EPRDF in the meto-be-meto debacle. So, within the current system, Lidetu is what he can logically be. Basically a good political commentator and critic. Which is EPRDF’s idea of a loyal opposition.

            Now, if the system changes, we will see what happens. But right now, Ethiopian politics is simply intra-EPRDF shuffling about. There are some signs things could be changing for the better, but nothing concrete yet.

            Amde

          • Paulos

            Selam Amde,

            EPRDF has monopolized the political sphere for far too long by systematically denying a political space to any opposing force simply because Ethiopian politics has gone ethnic politics with in a smokescreen of unity in diversity. If it has any intellectual underpinning at all, it was thought as an elixir to the political rust Ethiopia had been under when the King was in power—dominance of a single ethnic group ala’ cultural hegemony if I could borrow Edward Said. If in fact, a federal system warped in ethnic politics is working, it definitely is defeating it’s purpose for political parties are nipped in the bud precisely because the party-structure is dictatorial if not totalitarian. EPRDF needs to overhaul it’s grip on total power for what happened last year is not only the tell-tale signs of a system on a precarious momentum but it will be hard pressed to accommodate to the needs of the rising middle class with a specific interests and demands that transcends ethnicity.

          • Abraham H.

            Selam Amde, I think if Ethiopia keeps its political situation under control, the GERD is going to bring a major transformation to its economy, whose effects are going to be felt far beyond its borders. Economic miracles happen when the basic ingredient is there to begin with, that is electricity; and in case of Ethiopia it is not only going to be pure energy but also it will be abundant.

          • Amde

            Selam Abraham H.,

            You said “I think if Ethiopia keeps its political situation under control”. I agree wholeheartedly.

            It is not just GERD. There are a number of crucial capital projects that are well on the way to getting completed in the next 2 – 5 years. The railway networks. Industrial parks. Engineering and technical schools. In totality, they represent the methodical laying down of the foundation for an export oriented, clean energy fueled manufacturing economic growth.

            Sudan is probably the one who benefits the most from GERD, so they want it done soon too.

            Unless there are things we have not heard about, there is no obvious logical reason for Ethiopia to change course wrt to Eritrea at this point. Isayyas’ motives are known. The opportunity to destabilize Ethiopia is always there, but it ebbs and flows depending on what happens in Ethiopian political situation. His means so far have been Ethiopian opposition groups – primarily because he has been seriously outgunned by the Ethiopian side. He can only be a spoiler.

            Now, if he has somehow acquired additional means to be a more serious threat to Ethiopia, that might force a recalculation on the Ethiopian side. Did he get new military capability from his new found friends the Emirates? Maybe agree to site Egyptian anti-GERD missiles in Eritrea? Did he sign a secret deal with some other party/country? Did he crack open some of the mining cash stash for new types of weapons?

            I am not holding my breath on anything earth-shaking. Probably a consolidation of the Eritrea portfolio within the PMHD cabinet, and a promise to arm and support the opposition better.

            Amde

          • Saleh Johar

            Hi Amde and all,

            My view on the Nile, GERD and all its offshoot manufactured crisis is similar to the following:

            “This part of the water, Nile, which is supposed to have shortage of water, doesn’t have shortage of water; it only has shortage of money. Ethiopia is structured to be the power generating center of the Nile, geographically. Sudan is, geographically, created to be the main agricultural producer of this region. Only the delta part of Egypt is supposed to produce goods, agricultural goods. And so if you use the Nile water in a rational manner, there will not be any shortage of water. ” Meles Zenawi (interviewed–April 13, 2011)
            http://awate.com/awate-com-interview-meles-zenawi-sizes-up-the-region/

          • Amde

            Selam Saleh,

            Yes. I completely agree. And that is why I see the GERD as a diplomatic and political instrument first of all, designed to force trans-boundary management of the whole Nile.

            But try to tell that to the Egyptian street. That was supposed to be the job of an Egyptian government. One that enjoys strong legitimacy. But Egyptian legitimacy deficit have made them all sensitive of being accused of selling our water, and so we are where we are.

            Stay the course and finish GERD. In ten years it will be a new age.

            Amde

          • Kim Hanna

            Selam Amde,
            .
            It is always interesting to read your posts. It is solidly grounded in reason, information and facts.
            .
            Are you ready for some sort of speculation from someone who is far far away without any facts but guided by reason to suggest a real possibility?
            .
            A suspicious person might conclude that these “freedom fighters” whose lives are worth less than a penny, carrying RPG and their donkeys explosives, might be the expendable intelligence TESTS and measurements of the various Eth. Gov. responses.
            .
            Sorry for the suspicious mind, I was born and raised in the area. Maybe, military people like M.S/A.H could put thumbs up or down from that point of view.
            .
            Mr. K.H

          • Amde

            Selam Mr. Kim Hanna,

            That sounds very plausible actually. I had also thought it could be one unit of many that are being infiltrated gradually and asked to lay low until called up.

            But still, the GERD as military target seems rather strange to me. All it would accomplish is DELAY of the project. Now, if you got other things lined up to capitaize on the delay, that might mean something. Which leads to what you are alleging – namely that there is a bigger game afoot.

            There are two things behind the project at this point: political will and capacity to execute. The Ethiopian government has the will. It’s capacity so far is still there, even if there may be some financial strains now. It’s capacity will be seriously compromised if it gets sucked into some costly military situation for sure.

            We’ll see.

            Amde

          • Dear Amde,

            Modern dams are built to withstand aerial bombardments, let alone ground attack. At this stage, the gerd (a mountain of concrete, as you rightly called it), has reached a point where it is more or less beyond anybody’s power to affect its future, and it is going to produce electricity, a lot of it for that.

          • Nitricc

            Hey Kim, let me tell you the truth. no military personal or military wing will try to attack GERD with RPG and lowly foot soldiers. it is a fake news in attempting to extend the state of emergency. you know SOE is about to expire and some stupid excuse is needed. You will know and it will be unmistakable when Egyptian rafale are going at it, for the real attack. The ethiopian government is getting more embarrassing with every passing day.

          • Abraham H.

            Nitricc, just in case you don’t know, the Ethiopian Constitution allows the gov to extend the state of emergency further as long as it deems it necessary.

          • Abraham H.

            Selam Hayat, I mean what kind of person would be against GERD? They must be out of their mind or outright evil like that of Isayas.

          • Hayat Adem

            Dear Abraham,
            May I tell you one funny story I heard: I could tell you who told me that but there is this sweet Abi staring at me and saying “again! are you a one-and-only-one-source girl?”
            Those of you who live in the DC area may know or relate to what I am going to say.
            There is one Ethiopian owned store which is much frequented by Ethiopian shoppers in the area. The owner used to be an EPRP member and he is still an outspoken hater of Weyane. But even Weyane supporters go to his place to shop because he brings good stuff, I guess. /witness the power of market outdoing politics here/ But that is not the point I wanted to share.
            The name of the store happens to be Abay gebeya or Abay Siga Bet or so but surely the name of the store is Abay. Hold on to that. So, this guy runs some ads on the weekend Amharic radios in the metropolitan. The last line towards ending his ad message is meant to be punchy and would say this: “abay yigedebal, hizbum yimgebal!” Nice line, right? But when GERD came, the guy changed that line to ” abay mingiziem yegna new, yeweyane mekeleja gin ayhonim!”
            So, your question: what kind of person would be against GERD? You have sane customers who symbolize the general public; and you have a crazy store owner who represents the crazy politicians.

          • Selamat oAmde and Hyatt Adam,

            Nomadic people know where to go and fetch water. This is for the lead to the GERD and Egypt.

            Here is Utilities Sources via Direct Current V Alternating current and Source from roughly the First Quadrant corner neighborhood of ours. (Note: Electromagnetic Theory ECE course-500)
            1. Solar
            2. Wind
            3. Sea Wave
            4. Fossil Fuels
            5. Coal

            These in abundance in which a one fool finds thirst.

            tSAtSE-Azilo40

          • Paulos

            Selam Hayatina,

            Not sure if Hailemariam made the statement in Amharic or English. If it was in English, maybe he used the word “relation” either for lack of a better word or maybe it is as he is not at a complete ease with the English language. If he made the statement in Amharic, it probably got lost in translation. Me think so.

          • Hayat Adem

            Dearest Paulos,
            A friend alerted me thay there was such a statement from PMHD. I went to VOA Tig website as advised by her. The phrase he used he was was in Amharic “ke ertra gar yalen ginugninet”. It looks like it was a policy study as opposed to a policy decision. A study supposed to be comprehensive and it is not a specific response.

        • Dear Paulos,

          Your assumption is right. Nevertheless, a punitive action against the regime in Asmara is a costly undertaking for Ethiopia at this point in time. Her economic development is very important, as you said, and moreover, Egypt and the Gulf States are trying to expand their geopolitical influence in the horn, more or less encircling Ethiopia (read Eritrea, Somalia, south Sudan, and one should not bet on Sudan as well), which are continuously on Ethiopia’s mind.

          In my opinion, may be at last Ethiopia wants to do the right thing; which is, to arm Eritrean opposition and give them full material support, short of taking part herself in fighting the despot. An unstable government in Eritrea due to the crisis that is going to follow, will give hope and courage to the Eritrean people, if they really want to depose the despot and bring a change. There will be resentments, defections and even uprisings against the regime from all directions, which could finally bring it down. Simply condemning DIA and the PFDJ day and night, will not bring the change many Eritreans say they want to see. The Amharas say ‘ካልደፈረሰ አይጠራም’, which shows that only action can bring a change in this situation.

          As Hayat A. has said, although the phrase ‘relations with Eritrea’ looks significant, nevertheless, it is ambiguous at the same time, for there is no relations with Eritrea, but policies towards Eritrea, unless something new is brewing, which I doubt. DIA personally has nothing to lose, if he goes to the end, for his psychopathic and dictatorial behavior does not allow him to compromise. It is ethiopia that should resist provocations.

          • Paulos

            Selam Horizon,

            I think the relevance of Eritrean Opposition parties with in the Ethiopian political dynamics has been fading for the simple reason that the Opposition has been a bad investment strategy if you will where the liability seems to outweigh the political gain. The Opposition parties do not agree to the minimum in identifying the root cause of Eritrea’s challenges, they don’t share common vision either. The Ethiopian government would have left Issias alone if he wasn’t harboring G-7 and others to thwart Ethiopia’s economic and political ambitions. But of course, Isaias abhors vacuum if you will where he needs some sort of noise to feed on his deflated ego as a spoiled brat child throws tantrums for attention.

          • Saleh Johar

            Hi Paulos,

            I think the Eritreans opposition as diverse as it is, as diverse as its influencing forces are, do have a common goal: to overthrow the Isaias regime. And they have a common ground for the post-Isaias period: to establish a Just, democratic, inclusive system and a constitutional government. They have signed and agreed upon covenants and political programs. I agree they are not united as they should (to be effective) but there are many reasons preventing that, including the natural partisan politics and causes that I wouldn’t describe it in one or two simple sentences like a commercial pitch 🙂

          • Paulos

            Selam SGJ,

            To overthrow the Isaias regime is hardly a common goal. Rather a common goal is to establish unconditional TRUST with in each other to overthrow the Isaias regime. Unfortunately the mistrust has a life of its own where it has become more challenging than overthrowing Isaias and his regime. As such, asking for a helping hand before clearing the mistrust is tantamount to asking for a loan with a bad credit history.

          • Saleh Johar

            Hi Paulos,
            I didn’t mention support and I didn’t underestimate unity. My point is that the goal of the opposition (and my personal goal) is the end of the oppressive regime. As far as I know, the overthrow of the regime is a common goal. The fact that the goal is not accomplished does not negate its being a goal, albeit It is not attained so far. I didn’t say anything about soliciting help or anything of that nature. My reply was to try to explain there is a common goal.

          • Paulos

            Selam SGJ,

            I respect your opinion. As it happens, it got me curious to get your angle, should say tomorrow Hailemariam says, Ethiopia is ready to pull out of Bad’me and normalize relations with Eritrea (which is highly plausible.) What do you think is in store for the Opposition?

          • Saleh Johar

            Hi Paulos,

            Disclaimer: this will be the firs and last time I use Unique and Eritrea in one sentence.

            I wish people would not see the current Eritrean opposition in relation to the conventional opposition in other parts of the world that exist for the sole purpose of power. Thus the Unique 🙂

            If Isaias and his clique were fair and just, we wouldn’t have an opposition and he would rule like he is rulingwith no opposition. He knew that but yet he chose to push it too far. A reason many believe he had other agendas.

            The “Unique” Eritrean opposition is issue oriented, if it was power, it would have been more effective because it would have played the political game smartly.

            Whether it Isaias rules or is deposed, whether Ethiopia vacates Baadimme (not American Bad’me :-)) or not, whether any or all of the opposition assume power or not, the current opposition will continue unless the major social problems and political fairness, and legal issues are resolved. If they are, the rest will be easy to resolve. So, the resolution of Eritrean issues is not beholden to Baadimme. A few think it is whether to confuse us or to complicate the matter. I think that explains it in my view.

          • Paulos

            Thank you Saleh Johar.

          • iSem

            Hi Paulos:
            You ask: “…. What do you think is in store for the opposition?”
            I Hope the opposition have pondered this question, because if they have not then it is the end of opposition if Ethiopia indeed mend relationship with the dictator to survive whatever is bedevillng them. The opposition will be hunted like dogs in the towns of Ethiopia and Ethiopia would look the other way. But this is conditional on how deep is their reconciliation and the people at the help, TPLF are masters of this and Eritreans will be the victims, will be hunted down in their country and in their places of refuge. PFDJ would recruit spies in the camps and crash any opposition, they did this in the Sudan refugee camps, that is why the ELF splitter groups failed to go back the field and reclaim their past glory and mount a formidable challenge to EPLF. Imagine, the mighty ELF, which freed 1000 prisons from Mendefera and Asmara in a coordinated operation, which robbed banks (Abi yes, it was their money), which assassinated spies in cities, which run social program in field etc, over night disintegrated: reason EPLF run spies in ELF based on religion and ethnicity. People have problem accepting this, but it is the truth, intellectuals know this but they do not touch it. I mean the unity with Sagem, the disintegration of ELF, even the “successful” but evil alliance with TPLF was all based on ethnic and kinship relationship, (I know, as bright as you are, you will ask me, how was the alliance of IA and Ramadan groups then?), that is a differ story, of differed dimension, a screw up of ELF before they mend their ways that calumniated with the 1969 congress.
            So, if the opposition have not thought about this question, they will be history. I know things have changed over the last 15 years in TPLF land and thinking, so one might argue that even if they reconcile, Ethiopia will not allow PFDJ unfettered access as before, I hope so, but knowing TPLF and the challenges they are facing internally and if PFDJ has something to help them, they can do it
            Sudan is the best place to mount the challenge even if the government is friendly with IA, the opposition groups can potential control in all the refuges camps and they can mount their attacks from there, the 500,000 neglected refugees can finally take revenge if the opposition smartens up and they can remain silent if there is crackdown by Sudan. I know PFDJ will have their own spies as did before, but the opposition would have a fighting and winning chance in Sudan but not in Ethiopia
            Ethiopia under MZ sounded to regret their 1998 actions and has taken measures to correct their blunder, but to me the deporting of the Eritrea’s and stealing their property pales against the crimes TPLF committed by always siding with PFDJ and EPLF at the expense of our people, so I am not sure if they have done soul searching regarding how they have hurt the aspirations of our people and the relations between us will be strained for generation if they fall in love with PFDJ and crash our dreams once again

          • Paulos

            Selam iSem,

            If and only if the Weyanes offer Isaias a political victory as a small gesture of perks to the Eritrean people, their relationship will not be some sort of huggy-kissy for the mistrust between them is far deeper than the naked eye can see. As such, it is rather a bit far fetched to assume that the Weyanes will resort back into throwing the Eritrean Opposition under the bus.

            To be certain, the reason the Weyanes let Isaias and his henchmen hunt down the Opposition in the 90s was simply because Isaias was practically the de-facto leader of both countries. The Weyanes were in a much weaker vantage point. Obviously, things have changed since then to the extent the Weyanes can play a King maker if need be. That said, again if they mend fences with Isaias, they certainly know for a fact that, it would be a matter of time till Isaias provokes them and they will work to undo him while they extend a greeting hand. If there is a take-away lesson for the Opposition, playing indispensable is much better than playing a pawn to say the least.

          • Berhe Y

            Dear iSem and Paulos,

            I do not think the scenario you are stating has any reality. Is the Ethiopian government decided to give Isayas the upper hand and agree to his terms, he will NOT take it because it means the Ethiopian government is weak therefore he would rather see them finished. The ONLY time Isayas accepts any peaceful means to end a conflict is when he is cornered and he has no way out. Any peaceful solution would have a negative effect on his power, because people may revolt as there is no more “no war no peace” situation.

            When the ICC and HRC was the possibility last year, he was hunting to end the hostility with Ethiopia by dispatching Ambador Cohen, but Ethiopia rejected outright. Now that threat appears to be out of the picture and Ethiopia is in no better position and he has no threat by the ERitrean opposition, and he is getting military and finiancial suppprt from SA and Guelph states, I think he has the upper hand.

            As far as the opposition is concerned, I don’t think they are any threat militarily that he loses sleep over. The opposition if military is the option they take, I don’t think they need to be in Sudan or Ethiopia. They should be inside Eritrea just like ELF and EPLF and fight and defend their torritories. But the know that the do not have the support from the youth to fight and take up arms. Isayas made sure in the SAWA program that non of ERITREAN youth have any desire to fight but to run away as far as possible.

            The Ethiopia plan is probably confrontation or some sort of quick military interference. Remember, Ethiopia is safe because Eritrea has no means to initiate war or take over territories,

            Other than that (unless the Arab country presence) has huge implications, and Ethiopia decides to deal with it, nothing will change anytime soon, in my opinion.

            Berhe

          • Dear B.Y.,

            The questions that revolve in my mind are: why would ethiopia give in to dia’s blackmail at this time and under this economic, political and social circumstances that exist in both countries? Why would ethiopia accuse the eritrean regime for sending in terrorists and at the same time reconcile with its nemesis? Is the tplf/eprdf government afraid of any conspiracy that eritrea is ready to facilitate, and is blackmailing ethiopia to submission? None of the above seem rational explanation for a possible ethiopian surrender, for it is more or less a surrender, to beg dia for friendship.

            Some say that tplf is under a stressful situation and it is in need of a savior, which does not hold water, for ethiopians have a love-hate relationship with tplf, at least up to now, and it has survived under this situation. There is a degree of tolerance and not fear, as much as the ethiopian society is concerned.

            An eritrean-uae-ksa-egyptian coalition against ethiopia facilitated by eritrea that puts its existence in danger may be entertained by some. Nevertheless, this would be a regional war that would involve many, and the war theater most probably would be within eritrea and not in ethiopia.

            Finally, is it possible that the ethiopian government and the regime in asmara have received bribes from the eu and the usa, because the west believes that peace between ethiopia and eritrea is important to curb the flow of refugees to europe mainly from eritrea? The only plausible scenario with a great stretch of imagination is this one. Even then, it will be very difficult to reach at this point, having in mind the opposition especially in ethiopia the tplf/eprdf government would face no doubt if they go with it.

          • Berhe Y

            Dear Horizon,

            I think there is a lot of unknowns and at this point is just speculation, until we see what this new Ethiopia policy on Eritrea is going to be. I agree, even if Ethiopia is to make peace with Eritrea, it would not be for the said reason (weakness etc..) it will be done under the table and then bring to the public for consumption.

            I highly doubt there is an eritrean-uae-ksa-egyptian coalition against Ethiopia. I think Eritrea is just happen to be in the mix because of the opportunity it presented by the crisis in Yemen. SA and UAE have a big problems in their hands, re: Syria / Iraq and they make enemies with Russia and Iran that they need to deal with, rather than make a mess with Ethiopia which they will have “ZERO” chance of doing any damage.

            If anything it may be Egypt but still as Amde said, it will just delay the project but it will not stop it…GERD is a done deal weather they like it or not and it will not change….unless there is a crisis in Ethiopia beyond repair and the government is over thrown ….

            Ethiopia has to say what they need to say..to divert people attention, to discredit the opposition etc..that there is shaebia hand in all the problems Ethiopia is facing..just pure politcs..the same way..PFDJ says….or was saying..to stay in power.

            The EU and USA bribe,..they already bribed the Eritrean govenment may be twice so far..to stop the flow of refugees and in both cases, I think they lost their money. Eritrea is not going to stop the SAWA program any time soon…and as long as the program exist there will be Eritrean refugees.. Even if the program stops, the flow of refugees will not stop but the EU countries will have the legal ground to deport them back to Eritrea.

            I personally think this nothing more than anything we have seen in the past 10 years..tit for tat

            Berhe

          • Selamat Paul and iSEM,

            The Ying and Yang of it is the same, unless the Ethiopian opposition’s favorite status inside both Eritrean Government and Ethiopian Government weighs in as the significance actor it needs deservedly.

            tSAtSE-Azilo40

          • Amanuel Hidrat

            Selam Paulosay,

            Let me give one analogy of goal: During our armed struggle, to defeat Derg and as a result to win our independence was our common goal For ELF and EPLF. Similarly in the current struggle to overthrow Issayas and his party and as result to create a just and democratic Eritrea is a common goal for the opposition camp. Does it give you sense now? how ever the mistrust among the opposition organization on the other issues they have. I hope I will touch it in my future article.

            regards
            Amanuel Hidrat

          • Paulos

            Selam Emma,

            I am sure it is preaching to the choir when I say, differences between ELF and EPLF was power struggle nothing more nothing less. If anything, the cardinal difference with in the Opposition is mistrust with a baggage that traces its roots to the struggle for independence era. If Dergue capitalized on the power struggle, equally Isaias is cashing on the mistrust within the Opposition as well.

          • Dear Paulos,

            Indeed the eritrean opposition has not proved up to now to be an effective force to bring a change in the political situation in eritrea, whether they are stationed in ethiopia or elsewhere. If there is a policy change towards eritrea, I believe that it cannot be towards a military solution of the ethio-eritrean problem, it won’t be succumbing to the wishes of dia either, but towards finding a third solution, the only one remaining, in my opinion, being the eritrean opposition. Up to now ethiopia has been accused for not doing enough to help. This could be the chance to prove to them that the ball is in their court, and it is up to them to find an eritrean solution.
            It is true that dia would have been forgotten had it not been for the forces he shelters. I think that it is all about the so-called ‘የቸገረው ርጉዝ ያገባል’ thing. It is a marriage of convenience that will one day end in disaster. For dia what matters most is to use everybody and everything that could harm woyane; and ginbot 7 has nowhere to go but to eritrea and work with the archenemy of woyane. Unfortunately, ginbot 7 fails to see that no political organization can come to power by opposing the economic development of a country it opts to rule in the future. That is its main blind spot, which makes it irrelevant in the eyes of ethiopians. Therefore, it will never be able to impact the political situation in ethiopia in any significant way, except may be, acting as a spoiler.

          • Ismail AA

            Selam Paulos,

            I do not think cost-benefit reasoning rationalizes the relevance or irrelevance of the Eritrean opposition within “the Ethiopian political dynamics”, as you put it.

            As to the preposition that the Eritrean opposition lack vision, I won’t add anything more to what SJ has written- getting rid of the oppressive regime and replacing it with democratic alternative. In addition to charters signed by umbrella organizations on the collective levels, the political programs of individual organizations are unanimous on the need to changing the regime.

            On the Ethiopian side, the ideological dynamics within which they want to harness the Eritrean opposition is understood by the Eritrean opposition (the mainstream constituencies) as irrelevant to Eritrea. In other words, the Ethiopians want the Eritrean opposition to organize and operate in the image of the pre-1991 EPDRF and its politico-ideological platform – coalition of ethnically structured actors or players. This has proven total failure, and whatever had been invested in it, was a bad investment. As early as the ascendance of the EPRDF to power, they have been trying to encourage and counsel the Eritreans to organize ethnically based organizations that can eventually build up into an Eritrean EPRDF. In order to facilitate the path in that direction, they tried to financially and political prop up the ethnic organizations at the expense of the national organizations. Qernelios Osman has been of the point men in this endeavor.

            The policy crafted to serve that ideological and political end crippled the options of the Ethiopian government. while their adversary in Asmara has been more pragmatic in arming and supporting the Ethiopian opposition groups. So, no sufficient ground had emerged for them to properly arm and support the Eritrean opposition. Neither the ethnic organizations could sell their project to the Eritrean public opinion and build a reasonable force with commensurate mass support base that minimize the risk of investing in them, nor were they capable to differential between the scenarios acceptable to the Eritreans from the one they had implemented in Ethiopia – ethnic federalism.

            Thus, I think it is a bit an oversimplification to read the relation of the Eritrean opposition with the Ethiopian government in the premise of normal national expediencies without paying attention to the factors that drive the interest of the EPRDF government, as I rudimentarily tried to outline above.

            Regards

          • Paulos

            Selam Ismail,

            For all practical purposes, 25 years on the Opposition got nothing to show for. There is something seriously wrong in that picture. Who is to be blamed? Or are we asking the wrong question in search of the right answer? If that is the case, either pre-91 Ethiopia or after should not be blamed simply because Ethiopia in the final analysis is a means never an end in itself. I find the cookie-cutter scenario hard to take in for ethnic federalism as a prescription in post-Isaias Eritrea was forwarded by Ethiopia in a take it or leave it ultimatum. The way I see it, the Opposition not only is unable to come together but it can not come together for a reason only known to them to the extent of keeping it a taboo to talk about it in an open. If I have to be blunt, there is a far more serious problem in Eritrea where Isaias seems to be the only option to keep and contain it together.

          • Ismail AA

            Dear Paulos,

            In relation to politics played in conditions of severe and pervasive restrictions, achievements shown on score cards are relative to the factors dictated by constraints. I won’t generalize and boldly state that the Eritrean opposition did not do anything in 25 years. The fact that today more Eritreans are turning against the regime is because there is opposition. The issue to me is not whether the existing opposition formations succeed or fail to rally the increasing number of Eritreans opposing the regime behind them. Under the objective circumstances, the myriad geopolitical interests should let us be a bit judicious in our judgement before serving a verdict that the opposition is a total failure. A well-read and informed man you are, I do not even assume you rule out the fall of the Wall in 1989 and Perestroika had no impact on developments in Eritrea and Ethiopia and how the Derg fell.

            As to question of who is to blame, well, I would argue that though the opposition organizations are not immune to flaws and mistakes, one of the principal problems was the role of the operational environments available to them. At the risk of repeating myself, the politics of ethnic formations in Ethiopia as well as the political Islam in the Sudan under the General Bashier and the late Dr. Hassan al- Turabi have played considerable role in obstructing unity of the opposition camp. I mean those two areas of operational bases had injected ideological element in the Eritrean opposition equation. Of course, the Ethiopian factor has had more space for playing influence via the Sana’a Axis Forum which ended up a mere Ethiopia department after Sudan and Yemen quietly withdrew and stopped their contribution.

            Moreover, I agree with you that the Ethiopian government did not table a take or leave offer as I have mention in my comment in response to brother Horizon, which I would like you to refer to if you wish.

            Finally, let me end this rather stretched comments by a word about your last sentence, which state that:
            ” If I have to be blunt, there is a far more serious problem in Eritrea where Isaias seems to be the only option to keep and contain it together “.

            Regarding existence of problems in Eritrea, there are in fact lots of them. But, I was surprised to be informed about existence of ” a serious problem” in Eritrea that makes Isayas crucially indispensable. I wished if you had added a bit of detail because I could not see a problem that rationalizes presence of a ruthless despot and his oppressive dictatorship for the sake of a problem that could cause havoc if the despot disappears. To be candid, after reading you for sometime in this forum, I was a bit surprised when you wrote about a problem that imposes Isayas as an unescapable option without informing us what that problem actually is.

            Regards.

          • Paulos

            Selam Ismail,

            I always admire your time tested and cool headed assessment of circumstances where it is always a joy to read your comments on politics.

            With in the last decade, something profound changed when those who were born after independence came of age. They stated to get disillusioned when they found themselves between a rock and a hard place in the sense that they lost the hope that was promised to them by the government in Eritrea and couldn’t see an alternative to it for the Opposition could not collect its acts together either. The only option that was left for them was to cross the merciless oceans in search of a better life anywhere but in Eritrea. Then something new also happened, the supposed role of the Opposition got replaced by human rights activists where Elsa Chrum comes to mind among others. Mind you, the plight of Eritreans did not gain traction and attention because of the Oppositions’ efforts but because the mass exodus started to become a burden to the host countries. The human rights activists uped the momentum and the CoI was established.

            The division between the highlands and lowlands could not have been more of a glare than before where the former seem to hold on to Isaias in spite of his cruelty and blunder. When I in my previous comment said, Isaias is the only option, I was talking an option for his supporters not particularly for me. My position is clear, Isaias is not good for Eritrea.

          • Ismail AA

            Dear Paulos,

            Thank you for the compliment and the elaboration of the point in your last paragraph. The point you mentioned on the supportive power base in the highlands that widened the gab with the lowlands is true to some extent. But appraised within the long-term parameters, I would argue that apparent solidarity with the despot is more transient than perpetual or enduring. If we walk through time from early 90’s to the present, we can witness how our people in the highlands are reacting to the policies of the regime that have rendered them big losers. Moreover, I can recall how much effort and work had to expended since 1961 until near consensus was reached during the second half of the 70s. For sure I do not disregard the eventful changes that had impact on us, namely the change in Ethiopia and East-West relations.

            About the disillusion that struck our youth, I totally agree with you that we, the Gheli generation in general, and the opposition cannot shun our shortcoming. The diminishing link between the two generation is indeed very worrying issue on both level. The liberation war generation have not hand the young generation a healthy legacy they can be proud of and pass it to generation that will follow them. Handing them a readied state infra-structure on which a ruthless authoritarian dictatorship would be erected does not constitute a legacy to be proud of.
            On this score, I will share with you, and others in the forum, that just yesterday we had a visit by a couple of youth (under 25 years of age) who are newcomers in our town. During the two hours they spent with us almost every question they posed dealt with why the veterans failed to see and correct the mistakes that brought the regime.

            Of course I had to tell them about priorities the liberation war imposed etc. But I could see they were not really persuaded. Then one of them boldly said “qalskum imo intay Tiqmi neruwa indHri izi zelo hagern mengistin inte amxaAkum. Hiji nHna intay kingebr nisded imber”. That was a heartbreaking truth. I could not say anything except reminding them that we, too, as youth had inherited an illegally annexed nation, and used to blame the generation before us for letting the country to be annexed.

            Regards

          • Dear Ismail AA,

            The information I could draw from your comment, if I am not mistaken, is that the difference between the ethiopian government and the eritrean opposition seems to be on the type of government eritrea should have in the future. The ethiopian government may think that through ethnic federalism eritrea could be a peaceful and progressive country, the grievances of different ethnic groups could be answered, authoritarianism will not rise again, etc.. On the other hand, the main eritrean opposition groups want a centralized national government, may be decentralized one way or the other, for example, on regional grounds, with a certain amount of power left to trickle downwards, which could be withdrawn anytime, the aim being to keep eritrea united and strong, which may frightens the smaller ethnic groups. The second scenario looks more or less similar to the type of arrangement we see today in eritrea, with democracy infused into it.
            It seems that trust and interest are the things that collide, both among eritreans and between the ethiopian government and the eritrean opposition. If so, what is to be done; stay put until one of the two parties accept the position of the other, which will lengthen the suffering of the people, who are living under dictatorship? Moreover, if the opposition does not want to accept any sort of help with conditions attached to it, and the other party does not want to give it freely, what is the way forward for the opposition from now onwards?

          • Ismail AA

            Dear Horizon,

            To begin with I must commend your sober engagement. Furthermore you will probably agree with me that nation-states do hardly give help away except when generosity would compel them to respond to humanitarian contributions. So, in the case of Ethiopian government- Eritrean opposition relations, we are talking about political and ideological undertakings. The non-ethnic Eritrean opposition want the relationship to be anchored on the future state-to-state mutual interest based normal relations without the type of governance matters are affected since this option concerns the prerogative of the Eritrean people’s demand of fair and democratic system.

            What I tried to write yesterday was that the political part has been subordinated to ideological. To put it another way, the political support has been predicated to ideological interest. Of course, this condition has not been publicly stated policy that had been offered to the Eritrean side. But the department that oversees the Eritrean affairs and its affiliate organs take care of the job on behalf of the ruling part. If you were to live the day-to-day running of the way the affairs of the Eritrean opposition organizations is run and aid distributed, one could have the picture clear.

            Regarding the ethnic federalism issue, it is prudent to not miss the fact that two scenario in Ethiopia and Eritrea cannot be understood in parallel terms because they were products of different historical backgrounds. The EPRDF had to deal the question of nationalities and ethnic formations with the context of the legacies of former empire-state and aftermath of the Derg era policies.

            The Eritrean scenario is quite different and the ethnic formations and their interests have not transformed, demographically and territorially at least, as to qualify for comparison with that in Ethiopia. For example, we do not see in Eritrea an ethnic group as the Oromo nationality. It is true that the current dictatorship has created a situation (mainly state jobs) of imbalance. But this does not really suggest that there is classic ethno-nationalistic domination. The non-ethnic opposition organizations and parties believe this can be rectified democratic and fair system after the demise of the dictatorship that caused it, and believe that the ethnically forged federalism in operation in Ethiopia does not fit the realities in Eritrea.

            Regards

          • Selamat Ismail AA and Horizon,

            In it’s simplest form, as, I understand it:

            1) The ideological investment to create “an Eritrean EPRDF” suits better Ethiopians than it does Eritreans as represented by their respective governments as far as foreign policy is concerned.

            2) Both governments face a lot less support in their domestic policy and equitable access to national resources thus far.

            3) I believe both governments do collude as co pilots steering respective regional and sub regional developments, and security concerns, with global sociopolitical impact, despite the Two States’s historical grudges due to war scars and unresolved legal issues.
            4) Ethiopian Opposition’s are proving more relevant than Eritrean Opposition’s only because Ethiopia’s priority concerns since the secession of the the last major war.

            5) Ethiopian Government maybe feeling a carrot makes more cost-bennefit sense, than a stick.

            6) “Civilization is anti entropy” indeed on the macro level. The quantum physics laws apply to human thought, rational and actions, if and only if each human accepts they are but a single string wiggling somewhere that is really nowhere.

            tSAtSE-Azilo40

          • Ismail AA

            Tena ysTlN gashe tSAtSE-Azilo40,

            How to you make a person who had never attended a single Physics class for over half a
            century to have a clue of how entropy-anti-entropy-black hole related to one another?
            Ms selanta.

          • Selamat Aya Ismail AA,

            Short answer, I suppose is, to create physical matter from metaphysical objects of one’s world. Illustrate momentum, escape velicityn, the Kepler eye’s and the Newtonian tangible fundamental law’s of physics first, then translate hlimmm Ilka yeERbb zbileka tSELim gudguad, seHabi Hailuu ketemliTelou zeytikhilEl ab Tefer nnewiH gzie kabb AAyni Wedi sebb tesewiru ztsenHe.

            That is presuming the one is a Tigrigna speaker. For early childhood education, tsintuayy upgrades rather than push for The English language sooner. simultaneously could be another option.

            Please feel free to point out or give directive, if I am missing something in this brief intro. The symbolic formulas and access to Astrophysics is to be encouraged and not be viewed as hinderances for progress or negative competition, as you are very aware of.

            tSAtSE-Azilo40

    • Dear Paulos,
      Sorry, I have not read yet the change in policy towards Eritrea, because I have not come across it. What does it say? Besides the attempt by the Benishangul LF and the Ethiopian government’s accussation of the Eritrean regime in connection with it, what else is there that points to a changed policy? Thank you.

      • Hayat Adem

        Dear Horizon,
        It is just based on the recent talk from PMHD affirming his gv has finalized a policy study on relations with Eritrea. No much, no details.

    • Fanti Ghana

      Hello Paulos and All,

      (+ = war likely, – = war unlikely):

      I am not sure if it was on the same speech but, on his (PMHD) most recent talk with Ethiopian journalists, he was asked about Eritrean belligerence toward Ethiopia, and this is what he said, more or less:

      1) What Eritrea is doing is not new; it has been going on for a long time and we have been successfully thwarting it. (-5)
      2) We are capable of going into Eritrea and do what we want with minimum effort (he used a recent example of going in and getting out a number of Ethiopians out of there with no resistance to speak of). (5)

      Putting the “two” speeches together:

      Eritrean has been continuously belligerent. (10)
      We have a superior force. (10)
      We have finalized a study. (0)
      We have a new policy. (-10)

      There was recent news regarding Ethiopian high officials visiting UAE, but it did not go into the usual “economy based” details except to say that it was good and successful. (5)

      Some US officials quietly visited with Ethiopian Officials a few days ago and discussed “cooperation” regarding Al Shebab. (25)

      I think it is very likely for Ethiopia to have brought Eritrea into an Al Shebab discussion. (10)

      Ethiopia will farther claim that PFGJ is getting weaker as the “Eritrean Islamists” are getting stronger, to farther strengthen support from the US. (5)

      Ethiopia believes that Eritrean is involved in the causes of the state of emergency. (25)

      The new Somali Government called on/gave ultimatum to Al Shebab members to join in the nation building and that it will not prosecute should they decide to become peaceful citizens. (5)

      All these pieces lead one to think that a military action is a strong possibility.

      However, if that is the case, why advertise it with the unsolicited “we have a new policy” (-5) and why call it “a relationship” (-5)
      We have draught in the horizon (-15)

      60% war along with/through/without the Opposition, and
      40% out of the box idea we must wait to hear.

      The rest is up to SGJ!

      • Saleh Johar

        Hi Fanti,

        I have some zaAgol that I would like to give you; the sea-shell prediction would be better than mine 🙂

      • Kim Hanna

        Selam Fanti Ghana,
        .
        I can accept your analysis as a reasonable synthesis of what is out there. Judging from the body of your considered items, giving it slightly different weight, the 60% and 40% should be reversed.
        .
        Regarding your last sentence, SGJ disagreed with you. I AGREE with him. (I am trying to build my credit balance with him)
        My crystal ball, influenced by my wishful thinking, tells me that open warfare would be unlikely. If occasional military operation can work with minimum cost, why raise it. Time is on Ethiopia’s side. Ethiopia would be better served to keep the status quo for as long as possible, until the world politics takes shape. In the mean time we should hug the Chinese a little harder for the moment.
        .
        I just hope that the result of the study is to change diplomatic word here and there and not much more. There is so much good work at varying stages of completion, it would be a pity to change the focus and energy.
        .
        Mr. K.H
        .
        P.S
        I sense that our own Sargent Nitricc would start call me Woyane soon, I expect you to tell him I am not.

        • Fanti Ghana

          Selam MR. K. H.,

          Your “intuition” sounds better than mine. There is also the “Tigreans are complaining” part of his speech which can be interpreted either way. Obviously, they would be demanding for “peace” but how do they think it can be achieved? Negotiation or replacement?

          Anyway, let’s hope for maturity from both sides.

        • Saleh Johar

          Hi Kim,
          I am already seeing a tilted trade balance. What would you like me to export 🙂

          I think most of us are very much influenced by the American political culture where politicians speak in sound bites because they wage their wars on the media. Other leaders may try to mimic that tradition when they consider diaspora opposition. Otherwise, they are asked a question and they have to answer on the go — I doubt they brainstorm and prepare their taking points as carefully as an American politician would. In short, a few of us are reading too much into the prime minister’s statement. Otherwise, the situation between Eritrea and Ethiopia has not changed. It can be ignited anytime if there appears a situation that warrants it. In short, the risk is still there regardless of the statement.

          I think Kim makes a great, great sense and I agree with his views. I hope the balance is even 🙂

          • Paulos

            Selam SGJ,

            You’re probably right. We are reading too much into it. It could as well be a change of what Hailemariam has been saying over the years. He said, he is willing to go to Asmara if need be. Maybe the new policy reads, “We are ready to receive Isaias in Addis if need be.”

        • Amde

          Mr. Kim Hanna,

          Check to see if you have all your teeth. Sarge Nitricc’s obsession is with teeth – not coherence.

          Now, if you ARE toothless, God help you. He will order Rafales on you.

          • Paulos

            Selam Amde,

            Experts can tell us what kind of personality we have by simply reading our respective comments. Maybe there is some sort of tell-tale in Nitricc’s obsession with teeth or lack thereof.

          • Abraham H.

            Selam Paulos, from some of your comments I could notice that you’ve some personal knowledge of who Nitricc is, why wouldn’t you share it with us:)

          • Paulos

            Oh Abraham,

            No I don’t know him from Adam so to speak. But it is kind of strange where we sort of feel we have known each other forever as we interact in the virtual world.

          • Amde

            Paulos,

            Man you just made Nitricc’s day. He’s an expert in something alright.

            Maybe it is projection?

            Like he ain’t got no mo’ toof’ so everybody be toof’less. ….Nah … he just like da toof’

            I really think he is an Ethiopian or deportee. Berhe’s theory is spot on. Seriously seconded.

            There was this one time he posted the ONE and ONLY ONE music video of an Amharic singer from Adama/Nazret I had never heard of who had just passed away saying what a tragedy it was. I mean I am sad the man passed away, and he didn’t get a chance to make more music. He had a good voice, but come on – that is really really obscure cultural reference.

          • Paulos

            Selam Amde,

            No doubt. He is Amiche with grudges for having been deported. That is a classic profile or as they say it back in Asmara, posse’ from Bar Diana. Bar Diana is one of the popular bars in Asmara located right across the famous Asmara’s landmark Cathedral. The bar is Amiches’ hung out.

          • Amde

            Selam Paulos,

            Aha.. so Nitricc could be both an Awatista and a Bardianista?

            Now the rap on him is that he has never set foot in Eritrea.

          • Selamat oAmde,

            El segnor Nitric es un hombre Sandinista. Un amigo fuerte de Panicho Via y Chegovar.

            El dicen, porque usted no puedes hablan en Segnor Nitricc’s Lingua? Que estas Lingua? Amharic/Tigrigna/Tigres/Arabic?

            tSAtSE-Azilo40

          • Nitricc

            Hi Amde, i think just mad because i managed to talk and scrambled. For your info i have never been to your country nor i have the interest. can i ask what is there? if you are that bright why don’t try to learn Tigrigna instead of showing your hate because I learned your useless language? what i don’t get is what is to you or Berhe or anyone else for that matter what Nitricc is? If your lives are that depressing and worthless to sit there and analyse about nobody Nitricc? I don’t get it? live your life and use your time wisely and don’t worry about the Nitriccs.

          • Kim Hanna

            Selam Nitricc,
            .
            Did you say you have never been in Gojam, never? I seem to remember your romantic description of Gojam or some part of Ethiopia. Was that a virtual description all along?
            .
            Do you know what the penalty is for perjury at AWATE? I don’t.
            .
            Are you trying to hide behind “scrambled” words like some Presidents do?
            Lastly Sarj, you said “…..don’t worry about the Nitriccs.”
            .
            Oh Lord! are there more than one Nitricc?
            Have a good Sunday.
            .
            Mr. K.H

          • Nitricc

            Hey KIM, yes, you are right and i can tell you village by village when it comes to Gojam but it does not mean i went there. i know it is hard for you guys to understand, so i leave it there and let you people argue about it, you won’t get it.

          • saay7

            Hey Nitrric:

            You get to know Gojjam, Gonder, from reading National Geographic. Meanwhile, Ethiopians get to know about Eritrea from the long procession of deserters who are narrating their stories. Here’s the latest. Now, if you tell me because it is in Wegahta, it is not true, I will rank you at the lowest scale of toothless scale.

            It is an interview with Commander Zenebe Negusse which was just done on February 28. Pay particular attention to the fate of “Ertrawit Ade” (Eritrean Mother) and rather than passing propaganda of yesteryear, observe the truth of today. Take a one day break from Eritrean government propaganda, listen to it, then tell me what doesn’t ring true. If it does ring true to you, do you think IA is struggling to defend his power or Eritrea’s sovereignty?

            https://youtu.be/_aAfu4vn5XI

          • Amanuel Hidrat

            Selam Saay,

            ” heger’do tiAbi weysi eti Kole’A? They gave him an answer “the nation”. Very sad to hear it. What a convoluted world our people living in. That is why they are leaving in drove to find an adopted country like many of us. A country without its people is not a country in real sense. You haven’t give up with Nitric but we shall see how he respond.

            regards

          • Fanti Ghana

            Hello Paulos,

            We performed an experiment recently where I was one of the “victims.” We were told to think an animal, domesticated or wild. Then we were told to list three traits that animal is known for.

            We were told to do that three times. So, we had our three animals with their three traits each.

            Finally, the director explains:
            The traits of the first animal were traits that we think we have in ourselves. (how we see ourselves)
            The traits of the second animal were traits that others think we have. (how others see us)
            The traits of the third animal were traits that we actually have. (how we actually are)

            Now, those of you who read this, do not bother to experiment because you are aware of it, therefore you will get a false reading.

            How this can be related to toothless-ness is anybody’s guess, but I am saying that you maybe correct about word usage/preference and personality relationships.

      • Paulos

        Selam Fantination,

        Why advertise it in an open? That is a fair question. Thing is though, in the Weyane world, future tense is already a past tense. When Hailemariam said that they are crafting a new policy, it ought to be read as, we have already finished doing the study. That said, Salina is reporting that last month alone over 650 Eritrean soldiers crossed the border to Ethiopia. If we do the math, unless otherwise Isaias confuses a real war with a video game, he doesn’t seem to stand a chance should an all out war is in the offing. Sure thing, if that is the case, it is improbable that it will only be confined with in the two nations where Isaias could find a breathing space when Egypt senses an opportunity to weaken Ethiopia.

  • MS

    Selam The great zeyHlel Xaxe
    Excellent take. This comment does not require Ustaz SGJ to employ his Xaxigma machine to decipher your ideas (the enigma machine does not break Xaxe’s codes). They are clear and to the point. It is amazing how you switch from an all-American-pop culture junky to a mature political commenter, from a satirist to a coder…etc.
    I always feel sorry for our brotherly South Sudanese people. I’m sorry, the very armed struggle that they had paid so dearly to wage in order to break free from the dominance of the North is now eating them up alive. Some say it’s the curse of waging a protracted armed struggle. The course of armed struggle (revolutions) usually produce the aura of “indispensable” leaders who later turn up to be monsters menacing fledgling nations. Look all around the world.

    • sara

      Dear MS
      If I may, just small correction
      The south Sudan struggle was for justice and equality not to break free from Sudan. Remember garangs program was the New Sudan…that went awry because of you know those who like to device and rule the world.
      Mahmuday I know you know this and more, but I thought would be good to open a discussion so that you could grace us with your famous ta’alek…for sure hatetas.

      • MS

        Ahlan Sara
        Thanks and I think you are more situated to grace us with an insightful Hatetas on this subject. Definitely, Garang was more pragmatic. I don’t know if he would be able to convince the factions of the SPLA for some sort of federal arrangements. But at the final analysis, South Sudanese had opted for independence by an overwhelming majority. The current situation has nothing to do with their decision. I would argue that even if South Sudan were to stay within Sudan, political strifes, such as the one we currently witness, would probably occur considering the culture of politicians who happen to be the outcome of armed conflicts, and viewing the history of SPLF and its factional frictions. The geopolitical considerations you alluded to also played a role. But at the final analysis, I think, it is the lack of a unifying and visionary leadership that is aggravating the situation. I don’t know if John Garang would fill in that role. But he was a lot better than Salva Kiir, he had more support from across the ethnic divide lines.

        • sara

          Dear MS
          Indeed the tragic death of Garang created a situation others to exploit towards their agendas to divide Sudan.the irony of all this is what is happening now in the south. It has become a playground for regional actors . the prescription being discussed is ethnic federal republic. The problem is they don’t know how and where to start. The main players are those in IGAD who have different political system and all are trying to draw them towards the unknown.

      • Selamat Sara and MaHmuday “The Best” SaliH,.

        Uppon seeing the EPLF, the acronym for South Susan’s armed Revolution, the parallel’s of the entire regions Yesteryears happenstances by in area’s sub regions as delineated by The. OAU. There are similarities we can draw from which I will. For now, I will bring attention as an Elite32. In order to give IshmaelAA-Elite9 and Berhe Y-Elite32 less exhaustion and mortal pace, as I do like to be read, I will utilize American Pop culture as an indication to the hidden door Sara revealed. Check out the 2011 movie Machining Preacher, The Movie with Gerar Butter.

        AmEritrean GitSAtSE Agniyeya Azilo40 Children Books Press

  • sara

    Dear awtistas
    since the story involves Eritrea Sudan, i have interesting news for you but this is not an armed incursion to Ethiopia like the news story above, but to the Ethiopian embassy in Khartoum, now if Eritrea is implicated as the told by the Ethiopian spokes man , are we going to hear the same thing( eritrea trained ethipians in khartoum attacked ethiopian embassy) for the Ethiopian embassy attack by Ethiopians in Khartoum.

    • blink

      Dear sara
      Does it surprise you that ,this report is about Ethiopian opposition and EPRDF not about the Eritreans who are dead on their way to sudan .

      • sara

        Dear blink
        No surprises… Blink…about the news….e
        Eritreans do not die going to sudan (their second home) only if they go out of Sudan.

  • Hayat Adem

    The Great and Unconcurable GSS,
    Your call on SS is sound.
    On the news above, Charely denies he even knows the very existence of such a rebel group, let alone the possibility of Eritrea supporting them. The Bloomberg reporter googles the contact of the group and the area code in their phone shows that of Eritrea. Lesson for Charley: don’t lie or at least don’t lie on googleable facts.

    • Selamat Hyatt Adam,

      I honestly thought GSS is an acronym for Global Solidarity Solutions. At best, Charley likes it. You are on to something. Thank you.

      AmEritrean GitSAtSE Agniyeya Azilo40 Children Books Press.

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