Inform, Inspire, Embolden. Reconcile!

Amidst Trust-Builders and Rumormongers

In its attempt to defeat and end the totalitarian rule in Eritrea, the resistance media disseminates opinion and editorials to expose the regime, to convince its misguided supporters to abandon it, and also to provoke debates on national issues. Its main goal, however, is to empower Eritreans by providing them with news and analysis so that they can take informed decisions and be aware of current events that affects the struggles that they are waging.

Trust Building is not a prominent component of the job description of a news and opinion media outlet. Nonetheless, that should not be understood to mean that media outlets do not have the ability to promote, or damage and hinder efforts aimed at trust building.

In the Eritrean case, there are media outlets dedicated to entertainment, to agitation, to advancing primordial viewpoints, and even to defend the Eritrean totalitarian rule. Somewhere in the middle are propaganda outlets, partisan outlets, tabloids, college bulletin board type outlets without clear missions, and others. But generally, the Eritrean media characteristics range from outlets of exemplary altruism that advance liberal, progressive ideas in defense of the rights of their people, on one side, and parochial, divisive, and reactionary outlets on the other.

There is certainly a space, and an ingredient in the core message of journalism which could help advance “Trust Building” among components of a society, or among social and political actors. And that could be accomplished either through content dedicated to the topic, or subtle messages that are delivered piggybacked with other contents—I believe it is in this context the organizers of this seminar assigned the topic to me. However, I intend to speak about Trust Building in general terms.

My dear allies….

I would like to thank the EPDP for organizing this seminar and for giving me the opportunity to be part of it—I thank everyone who was part of it.

Usually some stories are attributed to Plato, Socrates, Abu Nawas and others, and I will tell you one such story whose source is lost in translation, and in modifications of the original. But based on a little research, it seems the story I will tell you is originally from the old Arabic literature.

A village shepherd used to herd his goats close to a trail outside his village, and he would sit under a shade of a tree on a mound surrounded by the sound of singing birds and bleating goats. For the rest of the day he played mesmerizing flute tunes that made the village women stop doing what they were doing to listen to him, and made travelling men stop by to enjoy the tunes of the flute. However, to his dismay, with the passing of time the shepherd’s flute was not as captivating as it used to be; the villagers hardly noticed the tunes though he continued the lonely ritual of playing his flute.

One day a traveler passing by the village noticed him; he stopped to listen to him admiringly. He was so captivated by the melancholic tunes that he asked the shepherd if he would travel with him to a far place where he would be paid for playing. By then, the shepherd had realized his talent was not being appreciated in his village anymore; he didn’t hesitate in accepting the offer and that same day he left with the stranger. The shepherd toured many villages where crowds paid to listen to him play, he became a famous flute player and earned a considerable amount of money.

Nevertheless, after staying away from his village for many years, the shepherd became nostalgic and decided to visit his village. His manager was not keen on the idea and tried to dissuade him—that his old village didn’t appreciate his talents and he shouldn’t go. The flute-player was adamant and returned to his village expecting a warm welcome. Sadly, there was no warm welcome, but enough curious people came to see him; he has changed in many aspects: well-dressed and wealth radiated from his face. The flute-player teared up with happiness when he saw his people. He immediately took his flute out and started to play for them. When he finished playing, he looked around expecting cheering and clapping similar to what he was used to in the other places where he played; there were none! Only his manager cheered and clapped for him while the rest moved away uninterested.

Observing his sadness, the manager remarked: “son, zemaar al Hay la yeTrib”.

That is the source of the Arabic saying: لا عيب لي غير أني من ديارهم   وزامر الحي لا تشجي مزامره

“Nothing is wrong with my playing except I am from their neighborhood; the tunes of a neighborhood musician is not delightful.”

In Tigrinya there is an equivalent saying: Nediaa gedifaas habtenoaa tnafiq [missing an aunt instead of a mother]. 

The flute player was so sad that he contemplated about throwing away his flute, and stopping his creativity because the flute he liked so much is not appreciated anymore—the tunes he played in his neighborhood were not delightful anymore.

Dear allies, I am from this neighborhood, and I am afraid that what I say about trust building might not be delightful. Therefore, I will speak about the things that don’t build trust—if I convince you to think of the possible opposites of what actually damages trust, you can arrive at what builds trust on your own.

Let’s begin with RUMORS, they do not build trust! Knee-jerk reactions do not build trust. Being paranoid and suspicious of everything that reaches your ears doesn’t nurture trust. Stop that and you will be on your way to building trust.

If some people from your neighborhood are playing captivating tunes, on the flute, reject them at your own peril. On the other hand, if someone is playing something else and trying to tell you it is the tune of a flute, be careful not to be taken for a ride. Reject lies and rumors, better yet, challenge them, even better, buy earplugs.

As you are all aware, in the context of our struggle, building trust is not an end in itself, but a means to promote cooperation in order to achieve total liberation for our people. Anything that would not contribute to the advancement of our struggle, however noble or vital it might sound, should not deceive us by its false glitter. It’s a pretend flute. There! Talking about trust building, and over-analyzing it might make us forget why we need that TRUST in the first place–google would turn dozens of links on the topic of “trust building,” but that would not help our problem unless we internalize, and personalize trust building.

I believe that trying to address such conceptual issues in a political setting is not a good idea; it is an academic, intellectual topic that should be addressed by intellectuals—only those who are qualified and honorable, those who have an impeccable track record. It’s important to remember that being members of the opposition doesn’t give us an automatic knowledge or skill to address intellectual topics. Parties should outsource such topics to qualified people so that they can focus on building their parties—to draw strategies and devise tactics on how to defeat the PFDJ regime, to spend time on creating (or expanding) robust diplomatic networks, to create intelligence gathering cells inside Eritrea, to penetrate the system—focus on the core tasks of a political party, aspects of the struggle on which we are mortally weak. In short, I suggest that political parties create independent units and assign the task to intellectuals who do not consider the struggle a summer pastime. Let such a unit handle intellectual matters while the politicians of the party strictly focus on the issues I mentioned above.

Rumormongering is the worst enemy of trust building; most of you in this room have been toiling for decades, regardless of the result you produced, and now you are targets and victims of rumormongering, isn’t it so? Isn’t what you do a thankless job, though not many are expecting a ‘Thank You’ for doing what their conscience tells them to do? This struggle should not be downgraded in stature to a commercial venture. It is not. It should remain a lofty and noble endeavor to satisfy the conscience, to remain true to the Eritrean ideals, to remain true to our people, and to those who paid the ultimate price while pursuing freedom and justice. We should not allow rumormongers to defeat our pride, to disorient our sense of right and wrong.

Does anyone question that a manual-laborer at a construction site sweats and works as hard as possibly imaginable? Does anyone question that whatever the laborer does, most likely he will never make ends meet? Then, would it be fair, or acceptable, for a lucky chap sitting on his behind all day to belittle the sweat and toil of the manual-laborer? How about you all? Yesterday you were shifta, outlaws, good for nothing blocks, and today you are the same!! Have you encountered more bitter and unfair characterization than that? Worse, are we not the victims of the evil elements who relentlessly defame our patriots and veterans? They do it through rumormongering:

The bible tells us: “You shall not spread a false report. You shall not join hands with a wicked man to be a malicious witness.” Exodus 23:1

And the Koraan tells us:
يَا أَيُّهَا الَّذِينَ آمَنُوا إِنْ جَاءَكُمْ فَاسِقٌ بِنَبَإٍ فَتَبَيَّنُوا أَنْ تُصِيبُوا قَوْمًا بِجَهَالَةٍ فَتُصْبِحُوا عَلَىٰ مَا فَعَلْتُمْ نَادِمِينَ

“O you who have believed, if there comes to you a corrupted person with information, investigate, lest you harm a people out of ignorance and become, over what you have done, regretful.” al-Hujurat 49:6

Rumor is only one of the examples of a practice that doesn’t help build trust, in fact, it is the main culprit of disarray. All the causes of the damage to our unity, for our lack of cohesion, for our mutual mistrust, for the despicable unenlightened rivalry, has one culprit: rumormongering. However, it’s a blessing we do not have to feel guilty for failing to build trust with the rumormongering camp that constantly sows seeds of discord among patriots—this is the camp that we have to fight and win over.

Once upon a time a man came running to a notable shum in a village and said, “sir, I heard some people talking; I came to tell you what they said about you.”

The shum“before you tell me anything let me ask you three questions.”
The man nodded in agreement.
Are you certain that what you intend to tell me is true?”
No, I am not sure of that.
“Is what you intend to tell me good; will it please me or please you?
No. To the contrary; it will not please anyone.

“Is what you intend to tell me beneficial to me in any way?”
No. It will not benefit you in any way.
“Then, if you are not sure whether what you intend to tell me is true or not; you say It’s not pleasant, and not beneficial–why would you be bothered to tell me at all?

The shum is merciless in dealing with rumormongers, wouldn’t you agree? Maybe we should imitate that kind of bold behavior and learn to scrutinize before we become accomplices in spreading damaging rumors. Rumormongers should be embarrassed and humiliated in that manner. And we should follow the golden rule: “If you spread information, be sure of its correctness; if you’re claiming something, make sure you support it with evidence.”

Over the years, many people urged me to help in starting a journalists’ union or association, something to fight the loose and destructive reality of our activist media. Sadly, it has become a nightmare as far as trust building is concerned, and I have been resisting the urging because: 1) I do not believe the media outlets should unite or coordinate but compete for excellence, 2) the opposition camp should build other means of struggle instead of mainly depending on the over-rated media outlets.

The Eritrean media space is now saturated, in fact it has become a nuisance—how about taking a break from the media and focus on building a strong diplomatic presence, for a change, maybe establish well-organized, professional associations, or build civil societies instead of the hodge-podge of associations, though I advise against duplicating the schizophrenic diaspora “civil societies” that are torn apart between loyalty to Eritrea and loyalty to the adopted country.

Establishing an empty shell of a media outlet has become the easiest project for many aspiring activists who aim high, without being prepared to provide what it takes to have more than a me-too news outlet. Instead of convincing Eritrean media outlet managers to help in trust building, I would rather have media outlet managers commit to a Covenant of Honor that would restrain the managers from committing mistakes; once accepted, the covenant can be continuously improved with input from the public that would be able to judge the performance of the media outlets using the covenant as a yardstick, and based on that, the public could either support or denounce any media outlet.

But then, what is media?

“The phrase ‘media’ began to be used in the 1920s. Books, newspapers, magazines, records, tapes, (now digital files) cinema, radio, podcast and anything that can be delivered through the Internet—including cell-phones which are the strongest media, it is no more the two-way communication device as it was intended to be when it was first used in Japan in 1979 and it took almost two decades for that to become a mass media distribution.”

A brief googling about media returns so much information. For example, a Wikipedia entry states that the first downloadable ringtones were introduced in Finland, in 2007… over 8 billion dollars was spent on mobile music: ringing tones, karaoke, music videos, music streaming services etc.; 31 billion dollars worth media was consumed on mobile devices; over 5 billion dollar of mobile gaming; and various news, entertainment and advertising services… E-mail on the internet, and SMS text messaging is used by over 5 billion people. Mobile devices are more powerful media than either TV or the internet, because they are permanently carried and always connected.

And this data is several years old! It’s amazing how all this revolution started with, “Gutenberg’s masterpiece, and the first book ever printed in Europe from movable type, is the “Forty-Two-Line” Bible, completed no later than 1455. Gutenberg died in Mainz in 1468.”

“The first high-circulation newspapers arose in London in the early 1800s, such as The Times and were made possible by the invention of high-speed rotary steam printing presses, and railroads which allowed large-scale distribution over wide geographical areas. That was the birth of mass media, but the increase in circulation, led to a decline in feedback and interactivity from the readership, making newspapers a more one-way medium”—and imagine, people were complaining about that! They were lucky; what would they say if they knew of those who didn’t go through newspaper and radio, but opened their eyes straight to social media?

Now, where does that leave Eritreans?

The technology is out there; we are part of the global development in that aspect. Though we have a monopolistic control freak government ruling Eritrea, soon it will be difficult even for a totalitarian government to control people’s access to mass media—imagine when communication required physical wires that connected consumers to a hub. Now the world is connected without being physically connected. Soon, technology will be affordable but too sneaky to be controlled, and no one entity alone will have the power to promote trust or otherwise.  I believe it is easier, and more practical, to address and focus on solving what creates mistrust in the first place instead of expecting a solution from the media, the humble Eritrean media at that: under-funded, under managed, and too partisan. Unfortunately, Eritreans treat their media as if it were Sindbad’s flying carpet that can transport and deliver the rider straight to a seat of authority. Honestly, not many trust media outlets that serve those who control power or aspire to do so—political parties included.

Depending on the media to build trust!

I am not ruling out some positive contributions by the activist media in building trust, but I am just recognizing its very modest contribution. If you notice, most rumors are created on social media, and most hate-mongering and trust damaging messages are released on social media. No doubt it is a wild forest out there, no regulation, no accountability and no transparency. People who risk nothing and have nothing to lose, using pseudonyms, are wreaking havoc to our national discourse, egoists are disrupting and confusing our communications and debates, just for a moment of fame—and many want to ride the delusion of social media numbers games.

Recently I read a study that was spread all over the world in May 2015, and that succinctly illustrates the state of the media and journalism: a certain John Bohnnon created a fake story claiming that Dark Chocolate helps in weight-loss. He published a fake finding in a shoddy journal, and in no time journalists picked the story which went viral and became a sensation. In the process Bohannon proved how lazy the media has become—not many scrutinize or verify the stories they disseminate! The chase for filler content is a 24/7 affair, there are empty slots that has to be filled with anything, regardless of how confusing, how damaging, or how untrue the fillers are; sometimes it is all fillers, no news. Worse, insignificant but catchy phrases are promoted as Breaking News to create a sensation, and Breaking News has become a favorite slogan of the Eritrean corner of social media—the den of the copy-cats. It is in this distracting and damaging situation that some are operating and trying hard to stay focused.

Last year a news item created by a facebook account, a nickname, got a life of its own and people posted and cross-posted it to death. A few months later, news that the UAE and Saudi Arabia were building a base in Assab got another life of its own and to this day it is being posted and cross posted as a fact, even the Ethiopian PM reacted to it seriously. In some circles, that news is still considered a non-questionable fact and more of that is unfolding as we speak.

The Media Of The Youth

Social media was sneakily promoted as a medium of the “youth”; the old are considered not savvy enough for it, old fashioned—and I remember “Myspace” whose fate might visit facebook though it is unlikely facebook will be considered passé anytime soon. But these days the young are into Instagram! Social media is a wild race that no one would be able to match its speed—it is like chasing phantom goals, an illusion.

Before I conclude, let me share with you what I read on Time Magazine: a study published in the Journal of the Royal Society Interface scientists have found that whilst mass connectivity through social media and the internet makes us look smarter it might be making us stupider. Read more at: Is social networking making us stupid?

Whilst some commentators say the internet is making us stupid and others say it’s helping us make more informed decisions the scientists behind this study say that they might both be right. Being able to copy from other people in vast networks means analytical responses rapidly spread, fulfilling their promise of improved decision-making for well-connected people. ‘On the other hand, the bias may very well decrease the frequency of analytical reasoning by making it easy and commonplace for people to reach analytical response without engaging analytical processing’ say the team, and this tendency to copy without thinking ‘can explain why increased connectivity may eventually make us stupid by making us smarter first’.”

Dear colleagues, if by now you haven’t figured out what my speech is all about, I am claiming that we can successfully build trust if we shun and successfully defeat rumormongering—the most lethal culprit.

Thank you

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  • Abraham H.

    Selam Awatista, is Ethiopia about to implode? God forbid, hope that won’t happen, because it means a major and important stabilizing power in the Horn of Africa and beyond would be destabilized with far reaching disastrous consequences. That situation would be a great gift to the dictators of our region like Isayas and Beshir, who would use it to further wreak havoc in the region. Now it is time for the TPLF and EPRDF elites to wise up and get a fair and speedy solutions to the ongoing multifaceted problems inside the country.

    • Amde

      Selam Abraham,

      Ethiopia is not imploding. But EPRDF is. OPDO has been shown to be irredeemably dysfunctional since the protests in Oromiya started last year. I am pretty sure the process in the Amara region will culminate in the divorce between ANDM and TPLF. The question is whether or not TPLF will deliver the coup de grace depending on whether or not it decides to unleash the dogs of war. Both Amara and Oromya regions are for the most part being put under military administration, so one can argue there is a de facto coup going on as well.

      Amde

  • Nitricc

    Hey Horizon; what is my mission? lol, come on my dude, i can understand your stressful situation but come-on! I am just expressing what i see, what i think and what i read. I know according to the Ethiopians i supposed conceal my feeling and tell everything rosy; but that kind of mentality would not change to the new world order and it won’t be up to the date. the truth is i sow the fat chic burning the Ethiopian flag the night she did it but it was not my test to put it on your face. But since you brought it up, here is more truth what this young Tigryan chic is saying. She told the truth and your people got fired from her job. In my opinion she told the truth and what she feel, why go bananas over what she have to say? isn’t here right to speak what she feels? what she was telling you is that we the Tigryans bend you over the last 25 years besides our inferior numbers and that is the truth. in case you didn’t here it, here she is. by the way, her real name is Yodit Welderufael from Shire Tigray who settled as Eritrean refugee to the USA under the name of Helen Hailu.
    let’s hear it from her. i will volunteer if you have any problems understand her. since you brought it up, let’s go!
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Rx_OdY15wnQ

    • Nitricc,
      Do not ask me about your mission. You know it very well. It is of a sadistic and unholy nature. It is the destruction of Ethiopia and the stigmatization and subsequent victimization of the people of Tigray. You are expressing your wish on awate.com, which is sickening and full of hate, and not your genuine opinion.

      What these chicken-brain and humberger-stuffed zombies are saying is not politics, but an example of empty sound you like to hear. They do not represent even TPLF, let alone the people of Tigray. You will never be able to quench your big thirst for the destruction of Ethiopia and a genocide taking place in the country.

      What do you think of this conspiracy theory? TPLF knows very well that, unless it is foolish of course, alone it cannot fight and win a war from the center of Ethiopia, however it is armed, even to the teeth. Nevertheless, it is sure that it can thrash the hell out of your mini god, DIA. What is 2m Kebesa eritreans for 6m Tigrayans. Do not count on lowland eritreans. They may not be interested in the game between the two. There are two things DIA could do; escape with his life for the KSA or declare the reunion of the two Tigres after more than a century they were separated by Italy, with fanfare from Harnet Avenue. This could be the fulfillment of greater Tigray, to be followed by a thousand years of woyane rule. Afterall, DIA, whom you serve with such a great dedication is a woyane. Of course, you will have no problem. Still you will find a role to play; even under woyanes.

      • Semere Tesfai

        Selam Horizon

        “What is 2m Kebesa eritreans for 6m Tigrayans. Do not count on lowland eritreans. There are two things DIA could do; escape with his life for the KSA or declare the reunion of the two Tigres with fanfare from Harnet Avenue. This could be the fulfillment of greater Tigray, to be followed by a thousand years of woyane rule. Afterall, DIA, whom you serve with such a great dedication is a woyane. And you will find a role to play; even under woyanes.”

        What is this Zeraf all about?

        Today, you’re sounding like the “chicken-brain and humberger-stuffed zombies” who ” do not represent even TPLF, let alone the people of Tigray”. Is that the real you?

        Please stay south of the fence. You look better that way.

        Semere Tesfai

        • Dear S.T.,
          We have been asking ourselves over the last 25 yrs, and we had no answer; why TPLF continues to retain its title of a liberation front, after liberating Tigray, incorporating parts of Amhara state and even lording over Ethiopia, while EPLF changed its name soon after coming to power. It has always been a puzzle. The answer to the puzzle seems to lie (in my opinion), in the TPLF manifesto of 1976, especially in the phrase ”A Tigryan is defined as anybody that speaks the language of Tigrigna”, (this is according to the piece I read).
          The message was written on the wall, but you were not aware of it. If you think that the fire will be limited to the South of the fence, you are mistaken. Therefore, whoever wants to come out with his koboro and start rejoicing, (especially PFDJ supporters) better wait until we see which way things will develop. The situation in the horn is still fluid, and if a hurricane is to hit the region, no part will be exempted. We should all have this in mind, and pray five times a day Muslims and non Muslims alike (Saay), so that the hurricane of disaster passes without affecting the region negatively, and peace comes to the region.

          When I said what is 2m, it was not zerraf, but I was speaking numberwise, in connection with what nitricc brought, that TPLF allegedly has the capacity to overrun easily 30m Amharas and the whole of Africa.

          • Nitricc

            Hey Horizon; did you listen to this theory regarding to the 1976 TPLF manifesto?
            https://www.facebook.com/Abaytube.net/videos/911524698954154/

          • Semere Tesfai

            Selam Horizon

            1. – “We have been asking ourselves over the last 25 yrs, and we had no answer; why TPLF continues to retain its title of a liberation front, after liberating Tigray, incorporating parts of Amhara state and even lording over Ethiopia, while EPLF changed its name soon after coming to power.”

            Sir, I think, you may be right about South of the fence. But I’m not sure about your claim North of the fence. Correct me if I’m wrong, but on my end – the change you’re claiming is from EPLF to People’s FRONT for Democracy and Justice – of course I can see “Eritrea” being dropped 🙂

            Now explain to me, why FRONT in an independent nation? And again, why FRONT when only like minded citizens are the only members?

            2. – “It has always been a puzzle. The answer to the puzzle seems to lie (in my opinion), in the TPLF manifesto of 1976, especially in the phrase ”A Tigryan is defined as anybody that speaks the language of Tigrigna”, (this is according to the piece I read). The message was written on the wall, but you were not aware of it.Therefore, whoever wants to come out with his koboro and start rejoicing, (especially PFDJ supporters) better wait until we see which way things will develop. ”

            To be honest – forget the writing on the wall, I didn’t even see the wall itself. I’m not that bright. But, 1976 MANIFESTO? Definitely, your worry is misplaced. It ain’t going happen.That concern is long gone. All the investment in blood soul treasure and hope, all the brotherly love for eternity brouhaha, all the pie-in-the-sky, all the dream of having a goose that would lay golden egg each day, all the dream of owning a cow that would never stop giving, all the dream of economic hub of Africa, all the dream of Singapore, all the defense agreement up to Alewaha ….. is gone with the wind. That dream is dead; that dream is buried wrapped around its big Kahuna, it is six feet under, it is in a 5’2” grave in the heart of Finfini – not even in Adi-Quala or on the other side of it.

            3. – “The situation in the horn is still fluid, and if a hurricane is to hit the region, no part will be exempted. We should all have this in mind, and pray five times a day Muslims and non Muslims alike (Saay), so that the hurricane of disaster passes without affecting the region negatively, and peace comes to the region.”

            That I agree with you 100%.

            4.- “When I said what is 2m, it was not zerraf, but I was speaking numberwise, in connection with what nitricc brought, that TPLF allegedly has the capacity to overrun easily 30m Amharas and the whole of Africa.”

            I disagree. Numbers and weapons don’t win wars, they win battles. War is not about KILLING armed men and overrunning trenches, it is about KILLING countries by tanking their economy.

            Semere Tesfai

  • Amde

    Selam Awatistas,

    I thought I would share a good article from TigrayOnline.. of all places. http://www.tigraionline.com/articles/guda-kassa-reply16.html

    Good writeup… if someone wants to listen…

    Amde

  • Semere Tesfai

    Selam Blink

    “If you have additional information please drop some of them”

    You seem a close family member who is eager to know as much as possible. If you are, this is all I know (could say) about Abraham Teckle.

    – After six months in the trenches of Barentu, our battalion was ordered to head to Um-Hajer to stop the advancing Ethiopian army. Our first battle with the Ethiopian army was on June 26, 1978. We stopped the Ethiopian army but we were unable to push them back from the Um-Hajer hills. The Ethiopian army was dug-in in the southern edge of the hills and we were dug-in on the norther edge of the hills facing each other for over a week – less than 200 meters separating us. That time, Tegadelties from my unit who were sent to logistics (ክፍሊ ዕጥቕን ስንቅን) to bring supplies told me about Abraham Tecle’s presence there. The place were our logistics was, is called ቃጨሮ.

    – On July 04, 1978, we were pushed from our positions. Our second battle that followed was at a place called MaEloba, and our third battle at Gergeff. From Gergeff we headed to Tebeldia and then reached Goluj around August 17, 1978.

    – In Goluj, our unit was assigned to block the main highway that pass through the center of the town. And the setting was – first there was our trenches, then about 20-30 meters from our trenches there was the Goluj river where our first-aid medics were stationed, and when you cross the Goluj river, it is the center of town. And in the center of town was where Abraham Teckle was with the logistics unit. And that is where I met Abraham Teckle for the first time.

    – We stayed in Goluj for about four days. It was Abraham Teckle’s lowest moment in his Ghedli life. A group of us (from our unit and from a unit next to us) befriended him, told him jocks, played pranks and fooled him…… we made him laugh and he did the same. That’s why he got close to our units.

    – But, above and beyond everyone, there was a guy (Tegadalay outside my unit) who was very close to him. His name is Teckle (I don’t know his father’s name). I don’t know if they were Asmarino friends, blood relatives or just new friends – anyway for the four days that we were there, they were almost inseparable. Abraham was next to Teckle in the foxhole, Teckle was the one who helped him to get-up and head to the medics after he was shot the first time, and when Abraham Teckle was shot for the second time on his back, Teckle rushed to him and tried to lift him up while he was being showered by bullets from the enemy.

    – Teckle survived that battle and many other battles after that. After we got pushed from the Eritrean Field, in 1982, I met him and had breakfast with him in Sudan (Shuwek) near Gedaref. He told me, he is residing at Wedel-Hilewi running a small business – ኣብ ወደል-ሕለዊ ንእሽቶይ ሸቐጥ ጀሚረ ኣለኹ ኢልኒ:: If you manage to locate Teckle, he could tell you everything about Abraham Tecle’s last hours.

    – I’m really saddened by the suffering of Abraham Teckle’s sister and his whole family. I hope wish and pray one day the whole family to enjoy, the peace and freedom they deserve

    I hope I helped a little.

    Semere Tesfai

  • Nitricc

    Hi All: can anyone help me what this, so-called information minister is saying? What does Devil and Tonqay got to do with his corrupted and backward system of governance? anyway what is he saying though? is he giving warning to use more force?

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o3Zcqw6eung

    • Thomas D

      Hi Nitricc,

      You spent lots of time searching news coming out of Ethiopia. It is very strange you say that you are an Eritrean, but you have deep feelings for the Ethiopia. Be honest, are you really from Eritrea or you are an Ethiopian opposition who is associated with the Asmara group? The ethiopians have repeatedly told you that they want to handle their own business themselves. There is no doubt you have some identity issue, but I see you that you are more of an Ethiopian than Eritrea. I wonder why Eritrean commentaries care to read your nonsense.

      • Nitricc

        Thomas; sorry but not only you are too slow for me, but you are too slow for the world. let me say this and let’s end it. If Eritrea to be disintegrated nothing will happen, just like Somalia, life in a region goes on. But if Ethiopia to disintegrate what do you think it will happen? i know people like you slow, can’t process this…. stick with what you do best, organizing drinking event. you are waste of time.

        • Berhe Y

          Hi Nitric,

          You are Eritrean and you don’t care if Eritrea disintegrated like Somalia. But you are worried if Ethiopia disintegrate, because its impact is big.

          Who are you the president of the United States or head of the UN.

          The Eritrean people do not mean anything to you, because deep down you are not Eritrean. The TPLF are in your way and Eritreans are succrufuce lamb to get to them.

          You know who else is like that, Isayas Afeworki. Today I noticed if you are not his evil twin brother but you are his little evil brother.

          You are not Ethiopian either, you do not deserve the honor to be a proud Ethiopian, but soul less human parasite.

          You know what, it will take one brave Eritrean to take down the Evil and with that your dream will die.

          Berhe

          • Nitricc

            Hi Berhe; I didn’t know you are challenged to simple reading but please ask someone to translate it for you what I have written. what ever on CNN is, you are part of the tragedy. when you keep telling people that you live in heaven; what is so surprising if people died to get to heaven? what ever you do, please don’t be hypocrite. you are part of the problem.

      • Hayat Adem

        Thomas,
        I want you to draw a straight line running left to right. Put integer number pointers at the line: zero at the midway, positive numbers to the right and negative numbers to the left. That in short is Nitricc, an integer linear grown up man: where he moves to his left to the negative zone when it comes to Ethiopia; he freezes exactly at the zero zone (neutral number) when it comes to Eritrea and he finds himself always at the positive zone when has to say anything about IA. BTW, he lacks all sorts of sophistication like the integer line. He is either in one place or the other only along that straight line. Do not ask him to grow… And where is Semere A. He was good at tranquilizing Nitricc and freezing him at zero time and space along the line.

        • Thomas D

          Hi Hayat,

          You have presented Nitricc personality in a why I would understand it. I see he is mostly skewed to the left of zero and at that point I don’t bother to even write to him. It is when he falls on the zero (neutral point/inactive), I tend to check him out to see if he reacts:) I just never faced people who have learning problems:)

  • Saleh Johar

    Hi Blink,
    I do not think O remember anyone by the name Berhan Saleh. Maybe someone else can help you. Do you know when and where they were martyred? And was Berhan raised in Keren or elsewhere, if he was my age group or older, I would have known him–hey, Keren has a population of 100,000 only. Minus Saleh Younis.

    • blink

      Dear saleh , he is may be older , what i know is just from a written letter from one ELF cell in asmara who is called Roma Mengesha . the later says , his family are in Keren (i am assuming he grow up in Keren ) . what i want now, is to give his picture and other belongings . At the back of many pictures there are also people like Wedi haji , wedi haji ismael and like birgded 107 and many hand written files with dates . It is too much information and i am too young to figure it out. I am young and i can not confirm about where and how old he is .

      • Saleh Johar

        Hi Blink,
        If you do not want to discuss this publicly, feel free to contact me if you think I can help.

  • Semere Tesfai

    Selam Nitricc

    He (Abraham Tecle) was shot by the advancing Ethiopian army. Thank you for your interest.

  • saay7

    Hey Sele:

    Continuing on with our game of random associations, An Officer and a Gentleman had a great soundtrack featuring:

    Joe Crocker (love lift us up where we belong),
    ZZ Top (tush)
    Van Morrison (hungry for your love)
    Dire Straits (don’t remember )
    Pat Benatar (treat me right)

    And Debra Winger was hotter than hot, at least in the eyes of a refugee just given asylum in the US of A.

    Richard Gere couldn’t act then and he can’t act now. Some things never change.

    Saay

    • Solomon

      Hey Saay,

      Joe Crocker’s Love Lifts us..
      Wasn’t that the last scene?

      How about the Vietnamese connection from R. Gere’s character in the movie…
      Yeah, same newly arrived immigrant to Debra Winger being hotter than hot. Chew zelewa Hot chman.

      My random connection exit is gonna have to be the above mentioned Vietnam–>> AfruQawit Vietnammmm Eritrea Hagerey.
      tSAtSE

  • Solomon

    Selamat Amde ,

    I thought it the same and find your subjective observation and report to be credible. I am also not against rewarding CEO’s handsomely so long as they increase share holder’s dividends without utilizing accounting and or tax loopholes.
    My objective is to hopefully stimulate Eritrean’s youth to abandone any rallying motivational mobilizing to serve Eritrea through their utilization attainment of gains is through equal losses for another. To do for nation you must pay a lot more closer attention.
    I do also do entertain conspiracy theories that the generation immediately before me may have secretly swore to achieve as young revolutionaries when they overthrew the progressive Jah and Ethiopia’s Monarchy. So, I am on the lookout for any clash of the Titans and elite due to their ideological or egotistical fueds at the expense of the regions young and future producers and leadership.
    I do appreciate your response. Happy and successful traveled to you Sir.
    tSAtSE

  • Saleh Johar

    Hi Blink,

    You know you were harsh, and it seems it was conscious. I wish you were a little respectful, at least not rude.

    Dear Fanti,
    Welcome back and nice to hear from you. I hope you finish what you have to finish soon so that you can grace us with your presence earlier that the end of September.

  • Hayat Adem

    Blink,
    You could use such kinds of words to address St. Fanti? Trump’s disgrace became quick when he clashed against the Khan family.

  • Fanti Ghana

    Hello everyone! I don’t even know where to begin, but

    1. I am okay.

    2. Still busy and will be busy until end of September (it is always September)

    3. I have been sticking my head once in a while and I almost fainted a while ago when I saw Haile TG, Hayat, and Saay on the same page. All three were gone for a while, but I had sadly given up on Haile TG up to that day.

    4. I read bits and pieces about my beloved Kokhob Selam that lead me to believe that he may have been ill or something. Any updates on that?

    5. However, the most important reason I stopped by to say hello is because I don’t want Abi to think that Tigreans are hiding these days.

    • Nitricc

      Sir Fanti; respect! sir!

    • Hayat Adem

      St Fanti,
      Where can you hide? You are too giant and too free-spirited to be contained by any single place. Welcome back!

    • Tesfa

      Selam Doc:

      Welcome back Your Excellency, Dr Fanti Ghana.

      As long as Dr Fanti Ghana and few of his likes are around,there is always Hope for Tigreyans.

      Remember how a big city and and its people were saved during the Old Testament!

      The Mother of all Materialism and Evil, the USA,as the Catholic Pope said it openly,has survived due to few people like Dr Bill Graham and their prayers.

      Tigreyans deserve the best,indeed,minus the short-sighted and corrupt TPLF Leaders,which does not include Dr Fanti et al.

      Mr Mod:

      I do not appreciate your unnecessary “scrutiny” and deliberate “torture” of Hope.

      Disqus has nothing to do with this torture as it has allowed me to use my old nick, Hope,at other sites with the same signing as a “guest” and using different email addresses(just random for the sake of compliance ,not to violate Policy)..

      You admitted that you flagged me –and that is beyond sabotage and defamation ,FYI and for the record.

      • A.Osman

        Hi Hope,

        Do you have a disqus account for “Hope” or you have always logged as a guest. The reason I ask is that I noticed the guest option is not available as that was my lazy option. As I mentioned in another post, Abi disappearance is likely to do with it as he did not use a disqus account.

        Dear Fanti,

        Welcome back, good timing as your input would help us better understand this “sahabo guteto” discussion about Ethiopian politics.

        Regards
        AOsman

        • blink

          Dear Saleh Gadi and Hayat Adem
          Sorry if you feel that way , i too felt that way and stated on the comment .But the comment was for fanti Ghana to come back and say it wisely , I was expecting too many things from him , because it is Fanti who can tell as it happens.

        • Ismail AA

          Ahlen AOsman,
          I need your help in getting rid of the annoying message from Disqus requesting verification of email every time I try to log in. Earlier I ask our brother Saleh. He tried to help but he also recommended you to me. Any help is appreciated.
          Ismail

    • Peace!

      Dear Fantish,

      Welcome Back!

      Peace!

    • saay7

      His Fantiness:

      Welcome back. I was not supposed to disclose but Haile G and I are actually one person. Watch him show up now.

      I can’t think of a more qualified person to update us on Emama Ethiopia. I know you are from the part of Tigray who rebel with or without a cause (your own description for Raya-Azebo) so stop whatever you are doing and come and tigraysplain it to us. Maybe wollo is claiming you guys now?:)

      Among other things, at some level it must be extremely flattering to Welqotat when two killils are fighting over them, no? Specially when they got no oil nor gold.

      Saay

      • Fanti Ghana

        Hello Saay, Kim Hanna, and all of you wonderful people who may be thinking that I am know something,

        If you guys knew how clueless I have been about what is going on! I have been trying to get the gist of it from here and there, but the combination of time pressure and lack of reliable sources is not helping at all.

        Some undeniable points I can agree with the demonstrators though are corruption and bad governance. Even EPRDF doesn’t seem to deny that, but they are finding the solution very illusive.

        Another very interesting point also is the 100% election result of a few months ago! Where is it?

        I am forming a strong opinion that the parliament system of elections may not be suited for diverse nations like our region. Although I don’t have all the exact figures from the last election, the token numbers I heard about were roughly 55/45 ratio in EPRDF’s favor. Assuming that it is close enough estimate, out of the 55% who may have elected EPRDF a conservative estimate of about 15 – 20% of them may have done so for short term gains than based on a long term political conviction.

        Even after taking a 10% margin of error, what these numbers reflect is that about 50% of Ethiopians are not represented by this government. I strongly believe that EPRDF needs to devise a better system than this for the future. Such as if an organization or an individual scores a vote of 100,000 souls, guarantee them a seat in the parliament.

        On the opposite end, of course, are the nature of the demonstrations and the identity of the demonstrators. In one hand you have those genuinely frustrated by the rampant nature of the corruptions, mal-governance, and feeling marginalized and in the other you have the hardcore anti-EPRDF-TPLF-Tigraway anything. Add a few over zealot and ill-prepared security forces and what we got is what we have.

        The rest we shall explore together!

        Peace!

        • Mahmud Saleh

          Marhaba Fanti
          Welcome back. You have been missed. You wondered where the 100% has gone. Well, It never existed. You knew that Fanti. It even made Susan Rice break a protocol by laughing it off. እንቋዕ ብሰላም ተመለስካ።

          • Ismail AA

            Ahlen Mahmud,
            Asking forgiveness for allowing myself the liberty of wandering outside the topic of the debate, I would like to tell you that I have been enjoying your rebuttal articles as response to a lunatic (scoundrel) named Eyob G/Sellassie. I must commend you for investing time to enlighten and warn people about an imposter.

            Now, the reason for this brief comment is when I saw the three groups you mentioned in the category of the Agazian linguistic root. Assuming you made some reading on the matter, I wanted to ask you whether or not the Adere language does fall in the same category, and secondly, moreover, if our understanding of the roots of Agazian does extend also to the eastern side of the Southern Arabian Peninsula, namely the Hadramoot region of modern Yemen. I am posing this out of curiosity that drove me back to my college school days when the same was discussed.

            Regards,

            Ismail.

          • Mahmud Saleh

            Dear IsmailAA
            Thank you for the feedback. My intention was a forward looking/progressive one as related to Mr Eyob’s attempts to re-inventing historic process. I read some papers written by Ethiopians and foreigners and you see clearly different feelings. Ethiopian scholars are clearly in an academic war- Habesha centric vis-à-vis Oromo and the rest. I found most of them depressing, more to do with their nationalist feelings or pending aspirations rather than history. Among them, we have neo-Tigrean writers who are clearly on a dangerous nationalist footing bordering the notorious “f” term as in Mussolini. This is clearly the work of the few Tigreans I specifically point to as the “elites”, and not of the vast masses of Tigray. They forget that EVEN the UK, Germany, Russia, and Scandinavian countries did indeed enjoy their own “Agaazian age” if we are to go some thousands years ago. Having said that:
            1. I see close relations between the Arabian Penunsula and current Eritrea/Tigray including North Abyssinia.
            2. It’s “well” documented that waves of migration took place between this region, ” tribes crossing the Red Sea, and diplomatic and military muscle reversely crossing to the other shore. You know the story of Abraha who led the Axunite army and their elephants and their attempt and how they were dispersed (with Abraha’s elephant- Mahmoud, etc.)- Suret Al-fil)..
            3. You also recall Geez, most accounts establishing it as originating from that part of the region, some say Agazi is an adulterated form of the Arabic word Gazi, for invader.
            4. You also recall Axumite marriage relations with Babylonian king, I think it was Nebuchadnezzar (Nebukadanatsor).
            5. As you know we are the result of an interesting and an intricate social process that took thousands of years and many waves of migrations and many…many…links of humanity, human contacts and interactions. I think you are better than me to link or de-link the Adere story to this historic “chain reaction”
            6. The nationalist Tigreans forget that everything that came from the Arabian Peninsula or claim, North Africa or the Mediterranean, including the solomonic myth, must have come through present Eritrea because there was no airport in Axume where civilization would simply overfly us and land there. But they tend to re-invent this myth that they were the center of the universe. Eyob is not an offshoot of this concerted remaking of history but he is part and parcel of it. It’s a concerted effort to re-write history. Tigray of today is completely different than the Axume of thousands of years ago. There are people’s who claim that period of “civilization” who either were pushed south/noth; west/east, or invaded other lands displacing their inhabitants or assimilating with them and now they hold a different name and identity.
            7. Pankhurst, seems to be the chief engineer of most of the re-inventions of history, and the shaping up of Abyssinian Grandiosity. By the way when they say Abyssinia, they want to emphasis either the Tigrayan side or Amara, depending who writes the piece. The other legitimate claimants are consciously written off.
            8. My take is that history has been politicized, for the most part. If you were to go through Habesha academicians’ works, you read more histrionics than history. Laymen like me could not make it sane out of the chaotic jumble of pseudo-historians. And I really care less for what took thousands of years ago. Even the countries and the political map of Africa goes only about 150 years back. Therefore, my arguments are based on modern concepts of unity through diversity. We have political entities already formed, each entity contains many social groups, the question is now, do we take the safest way of building countries comprising of diverse yet peacefully-coexisting societies, or as Eyob the convicted thief claims, we resort to fascistic attitudes steering primordial feelings? I choose the first.
            Regards.

          • Ismail AA

            Ahlen Mahmud,
            Thanks for your rather broader answer. I see you have good reading of the background material. My take on the historical claims and counter-claims do not vary much. As student of history I had modest exposure to the material you have mentioned. I raised the of Adere language because it was classified as rooted in the so called Sabean (Semetic) language of which Geez was one, and extending from there to include the three languages you had cited in your article I alluded to.
            regards,
            Ismail.

        • Dear Fanti Ghana,

          I would like to welcome you back in my turn.

          Three important points stand out in your comment, and these are:
          ……about 50% of Ethiopians are not represented by this government.
          …….In one hand you have those genuinely frustrated by the rampant nature of the corruptions, mal-governance, and feeling marginalized and in the other you have the hardcore anti-EPRDF-TPLF-Tigraway anything.
          ……..few over zealot and ill-prepared security forces.

          The fact that the TPLF/EPRDF government which controls 100% of the seats of the Ethiopian parliament, represents only 50% of Ethiopians, show the skewed nature of Ethiopian politics. It is the audacity of power and impunity that goes with it, that a marginal winner takes all and gives no explanation to anyone. What we see today is the result of business as usual over a quarter century, although the people were complaining for a long time that they are not represented in parliament, they are not beneficiaries of the so-called Ethiopian economic and political miracle, etc. The chickens have come home to roost, and it is up to the government to show if the engine still has the fuel to move forward or stops functioning all together.

          We should accept the fact that there is no way anti TPLF/EPRDF forces will ever be able to mass-mobilize tens of thousands of people all over the country, if there were no bad-governance, corruption, injustice, inequality and the rest. If the opposition exploited the situation, there is nothing unusual about it. The triggering factor remains mass disappointment, which the government should correct asap.

          Finally, killings by the security forces take place only because there is governmental policy, and not because there are some zealots with guns and live bullets provided by the government. This is not the first time mass killings have taken place. It is the modus operandi of the government and the security forces, which are the strong arm of the first.

          Therefore, the only way the Ethiopian government can absolve itself is by doing the right thing for its own sake and for the sake of the country. The government should not burn its last and only card, which is economic development, because at some stage people will be forced to forget even that.

          • blink

            Dear Amde
            By approving Fanti points , are n’t you saying that ,All Gonder population are ignorant who does not know who to choose and why ? It is mind boggling you people just make the numbers from 55/45 to be 100% share. The numbers Fanti Used is not even tangible to sale shrimps, You know how the market for shirmps goes in most asian markets . The people has been cheated in election and every corner of their life . EPRDF is good for world bank ccount nothing more nothing less.They did not deliver and they never have the intention. If EPRDF did not stop the use of force plus the “we take it all” they are doomed to fall . They must sit with every stake holders and listen to what they say and make deal . EPRDF can not hide behind winner takes them all logic. There is no logic for a government not even 3 years old from election time to face such rejection by the majority of the major Ethnic groups. There is no support for EPRDF in Oromia nor does it exist in Amhara . Even the people of tigray are not going to walk with EPRDF to define like EPRDF=Tigrai , that is just evil and weird.

            They must stop saying any challenger to be terrorists , how long do they think this abusive low serve them ? They can not use the tigrai people as a back bone . They are a control freak elites . They have been in power for 25 years , how are they going to dictate all these young Ethiopians who know the smell of democracy and justice ?

        • Nitricc

          Hey Fanti, here is a joke in Addis this days. after that I have a heavy duty questions for you, since you were absent for a long time, I will break you in with ease!

          አዲስ አበባ ሀያ ሁለት ማዞሪያ ላይ አንዱ ትግሬ አንዱን ባለላዳ ታክሲ ጠጋ ብሎ ” ሎሞጎናኛ ስንት ነው ምትወስደኝ ያለ??!!”

          “ሁለት መቶ ብር”
          ” እዋይ!! ሎሞገናኛ ሁለት ሞቶ ብር ??!! ሎሞቐለ ውሰዶኝ ብልህ ሎአስር ሺ ብር ልትለኝ ኖው እንዴ ያለ??!!”

          “እዚያው የምትቀር ከሆነ በነፃም አደርስሀለሁ!!

          • Saleh Johar

            Hi Nitricc,

            I didn’t know you were a supporter of Trump. Your choice of a joke tells me that .

          • Thomas D

            Your Majesty SJ,
            DIA and his supporters were excited after George Bush’s term ended. I am sure you will remember that they were very angry with Jendayi Frazer, assistant secretary for African Affairs. That they used every derogatory word/insult to defame that woman. That woman hated Eritrea more than any country on the surface of the earth, sarcastically speaking:) They desperately waited for her term to end. Time flies and her term ended.

            Obama was elected. These people were very happy and welcomed Obama and the democrats. For them, it was like the rebirth of DIA. However, things did not last long that their expectation of the Obama administration was too high. That Obama’s chosen assistant secretary for african affairs Susan Rice started praising Meles. Interestingly, these people completely forgot Jendayi Frazer and started badmouthing Susan Rice. These supporters are now waiting to see Susan Rice go.

            Americans are preparing to elect Hilary who is the friend of Susan Rice. Those supporters of DIA do not have power to influence the americans not to elect their preferred president. A sad at least 4 years term for them:)

          • Nitricc

            Hey SJ, I have never voted in my life. let alone to take sides on this one. it is really shame that all the USA has to offer is this two embarrassing creatures? if you have to make me choose in a gun point I think I will go with Trump. he is crazy and stupid enough to do something to change. like treating Israel like any other country.

          • Desbele

            Hi Nitricc,

            I heard this joke in Asmara 4yrs ago. Here was how you changed the story
            1. ሓደ ተጋዳላይ you changed it to አንዱ ትግሬ
            2. ሰምበል ክንደይ ተብጻሓኒ you changed it ሎሞጎናኛ ስንት ነው ምትወስደኝ ያለ
            3. ናቅፋ ውሰደኒ ተዝብለካ ደኣ__

            Nitricc, I challenge you : ሓውካ ኣበይ ኣሎ፧

          • Nitricc

            Hi Desbele; it is not mine. i just found it in the internet, i thought it was funny and i shared it. so, i didn’t change anything. I don’t know what are you challenging me?

        • saay7

          His Fantiness:

          In my view, the winner-takes-all system, where someone who won 50% +1 gets it all, is not good for any country, least of all for multi-ethnic, multi-faith countries. What it says is this: because we fear destabilization and fracturing, we are willing to disenfranchise our entire population. Let’s take a country with a population of 1,000:

          1. Establish voting eligibility. Is the minimum age 18? Is it 21? Whatever number you come up with, you have disenfranchised those who are almost 18 and almost 21. Is there a minimum residency requirement and what is the burden of proof? Say you get 500 voters.

          2. Let’s say of those who are eligible to vote (500), 300 do. Unless it is Australia or some other weird country which does not respect its citizens right NOT to vote.

          3. Now let’s say of those 300, 148 voted for non-EPRDF party/individual and 152 voted for EPRDF (After they were told voting for EPRDF gets you subsidies for your fertilizer. Even the fact that people are forced to vote for a party and not an individual is another way to disenfrancise people.

          4. Let’s say of the 152 people who voted for EPRDF, half 76 changed their mind and regret their vote. But there is no mechanism for recalling an elected official, just wait it out for 5 years.

          So, what the system calls for is for people (1000 – 76) to wait, patiently, until 2020 and hope that EPRDF discovers this little magical thing called plastic bullets that can contain crowds without shooting them dead.

          Lastly, His Fantiness, when you say “Even EPRDF doesn’t seem to deny that, but they are finding the solution very illusive”, you remind me of PFDJ supporters who say gegatat aytegebren malet aykonen : “it doesn’t mean mistakes were not made.”

          As for the form of government, I think virtually all of sub-Saharan Africa–specially the big population countries– has agreed that Federalism is the way to go, in recognition that they are countries patched by colonialists or patched in reaction to colonialists. Whether that is ethnic or provincial federation is something that is based on a lot of consideration (economic, cultural, historical) but where the TPLF went wrong (which is weird for a Marxist org) is that ethnic federation is most stable and enduring.

          saay

          • Berhe Y

            Dear Saay,

            I agree with your analogy and I live in a country with such emo critic system. If one looks at the voting day and who gets the highest vote, I agre the system does not seem fair. So in Canada the way the county is divided it’s almost impossible any government of any type to get majority if they do not win majority in the 2 most populous provinces (ontario and Quebec ) out of the 10 provinces and two territories.

            In case of an Ethiopia the problem is not of the democratic system but rather the sprit of the current ruling government (just because to removed the previous government it feels that it’s entitled to rule).

            In a fair and free country the system has a way to fix itself. One of them is do they have enough resources to do election campaign, another thing you mentioned about giving fertilizers and can the opposition promise to give tractors etc, is there free media and coverage for the candidate (with the dreconian press and terrorist law).

            In Canada for every vote the members get, I think they get a dollar from the federal government so it will help them / arm them for another election.

            What if the members change their mind, well that’s easy because the government have to pass the budget with majority every year and any member of the parliament can pass vote of non confidence to remove the government if it can secure enough votes. For example the current issue in Ethiopia would call such vote of non confidence with the way the government handled the issue and with the loss of life, then the don’t have to wait until 2020 election.

            Another mail control mechanism is the Supreme Court which allows citizens and political entities to bring the government to court. In Canada last year the government passed a law to force people to remove the niqab when swearing for citizen ship using its majority, and a citizen went all the way to the Supreme Court to strike down the vote. The previous government was appealing the decision and the new liberal government dropped the appeal, with our current prime minister win speech, a Canadian is a Canadian is a Canadian.

            http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/politics/liberals-drop-controversial-supreme-court-of-canada-niqab-appeal/article27280846/?service=mobile

            There are many countries with similar population make up who use the same system and with the right checks and balances, in my opinion the best form of government in my opinion.

            The problem I think is, there hasn’t been a charismatic leader who give people from all regions, from all religion and from all ethinicity who is willing and does not care if he loses or win and can move on with his life.

            In other words an ordinary citizen who can achieve extra ordinary things.

            Berhe

          • Nitricc

            Hey SAAYI don’t know if this is true but it is true, I fear!

          • saay7

            Nitrricay:

            The worst thing you can do is to give megaphone to those who are reckless about indicting entire tribes, nationalists instead of the political party/group they have a problem with. I don’t know who Dr. Deretsion is, but I caution you that in times of conflict, the tribal agitators always show up and, as Dr. Thomas Sowell once observed after looking at the intellectuals of Nigeria during its crisis, that Africa’s intellectuals are the worst tribal agitators. (Refer to his “Intellectuals and Race” series where he argues that it is NOT difference in economic status of ethnic groups that creates ethnic agitation but politicization and institutionalization of ethnic differences. In other words, as you close the gaps in income and education between ethnic groups, the groups actually get more polarized IF you have politicized ethnic differences which is what EPRDF has done.)

            What I don’t understand is this: why is it that the PFDJ, which considers discussions of ethnicity a taboo subject, so very comfortable discussing it and exacerbating it when it comes to Ethiopia? Whenever an Ethiopian soldier defects, it ALWAYS tells us his ethnicity. If it wants to make an argument that ethnic polarization is bad anywhere in the world, why does it feed the fire?

            saay

          • Amde

            Saay,

            The Doctor Debretsion herein referred to is supposedly the Deputy PM of Ethiopia. There is a Facebook page he has supposedly started and this is from that facebook page. But the consensus is that the Facebook account is fake.

            Amde

          • Nitricc

            SAAY, you got be fair. The two nations; Eritrea and Ethiopia took completely different path. I once watched a debate between Prof. Mesfin Wedemariam and PMMZ about the ethnic of Amara. The prof. argued there is no such ethnic called Amara while PMMZ insisted that it exists. the point is the ethnicity of Amara was created by none but TPLF. TPLF encouraged and created for Ethnic Amara i.e. it is fair to talk about Ethiopia ethnicity. at the same token, Eritrea dismantled even the once existed Hamasisen , Seray etc classification. so, the path the two countries took is the product of what we are talking today. I don’t find it speaking about Ethiopian ethnics as reckless or inciting hate. TPLF wanted it and they created it and we are talking about it. it can not be said about PFDJ’s Eritrea. My understanding of Amara was as a religion not Ethnic but now here we are witnessing indeed there is ethnic called Amara. in anycase, i do want TPLF to be overthrowing but i am worried the way it is happening. it is kind of hard not to talk about it.
            Regarding who Dr. Debretsion is, Amde already mentioned it.

          • Thomas D

            Hi Nitricc,

            I know Saay does not want to hurt your feelings, because he looks the other way when you write stuff like “TPLF encouraged and created for Ethnic Amara i.e. it is fair to talk about Ethiopia ethnicity. at the same token, Eritrea dismantled even the once existed Hamasisen , Seray etc classification.” I cannot stop wondering why you would think there is ethnic difference between Awraja Seraye, Hammasien and Akeleguzai? Read yourself again here “Eritrea dismantled even the once existed Hamasisen , Seray etc” Really, you never knew that this group are from Ethnic Tigrigna? Even what makes it more disturbing you are mentioning this while you are talking about Ethiopia ethiopian ethnic groups, with the amara group in question? Again, tell me what do you know about Eritrea except IA and Yemane gebreab etc?

          • Nitricc

            Hey Thomas, you are right and i have up voted you for your Dongolanet. what can i say? for your recored, The old Eritrean districting system is dead like your brave leader Melles Zenawi.

          • Thomas D

            Nitricc – really I did not know provinces/states means districts? Also, I did not know DIA will not die as Meles did. So, he will make sure for Eritrea to not fall back to the old adminitrative or 10 awrajas/provinces way. Everything DIA has created will be eternal that no one/the people Eritrea will NEVER dare to change it because they cannot mess with DIA even when he is dead like meles

          • saay7

            Selamat Nitricc:

            I disagree, Nitricc and I am going to prove it to you here.

            Whenever PFDJ and its adherents (including you) say that TPLF is illegitimate because it is a “minority regime”* or “6% of the population” what is it saying? Surely, it is not saying that the EPRDF ideology represents the view of 6% of Ethiopians. What does the 6% refer to: doesn’t it refer to the people of Tigray as a percentage of the people of Ethiopia? So, that being the case, if Tigrayans were 60% of the Ethiopian population and they behaved exactly the way they are now, what would it be: majority rule? Democracy?

            What I am saying is this: it is the behavior that matters, not whether the person behaving badly accounts for 5 or 10 or 60%. Ethiopians will figure out their issues: they have, they have no choice. But this kind of thinking–whatever you do to suppress your people is fine as long as you are the majority– is very worrisome and if you pause and think (don’t rush to reply), PFDJ emphasis on analyzing Ethiopia ethnically while protesting ethnicism is a diabolical way of sending a subliminal message: unlike in Ethiopia, in Eritrea, the Tigrinya are a majority. Wink, wink.

            saay

            *btw, the PFDJ propaganda about “minority regime” always baffles American politicians who come from minority groups .

          • Nitricc

            SAAY; there is no one speaks clearly as you are when they speak other than SAAY; but it is good to know you have this politically suited smack to take, now and then. i am very happy, lol, we need you down the road. I am saying this because when SAAY talks, there is no space for ambiguity that is left for interpretation, you are one of the most articulate writer i have ever known, hands down. Now, you have lost me on this post. It does not take much to get me confused and i am totally confused on this one. Are you denying that Eritrea and Ethiopia took a very asymmetric path on their political journey? if i share anything you deemed to see it as junk and from sewer, they created it, not me. I am surprised you are trying to silence people from expressing what they see and feel. it is what it is, SAAY. you can hope and pray five times that TPLF is not a minority regime but i am afraid your prayer won’t be answered. I am just simply expressing what i see, no big deal. I have never expected a day to come when you danay that TPLF is a minority one, again, what do i know, i am all confused. let’s call what it for what it it is.

          • saay7

            Nitriccay:

            Thanks. Quick, I am pressed for time:

            The PFDJ and the TPLF pursued an identical goal: how to stay in power in perpetuity.

            For PFDJ, this meant a unitary state where:

            * everything (Eritrean census, number of Eritrean ethnic groups ) was kept a secret and

            * domestic traditional power bases (familial institutions, traditional provinces, cultural icons) were defanged and,

            * external support (Roman Catholic Church, Egyptian Coptic Church) was de-linked and,

            * all of Eritrea was Nakfasized and military discipline extended.

            For TPLF, this mean Federal state where:

            * ethnicity was accepted as legal political tender;
            * partnerships were made with other ethnic-rights-advocates in exchange for sharing the spoils;
            * resulting in patronage and crony state capitalism.

            Both countries have an elite which controls the military, intelligence, immigration, foreign relations. It just so happens that the Eritrean elite can say we are a “majority” (using African definition of “majority” which is “my ethnic group is the largest) and the one in Africa can’t. The thing is, Nitriccay, the one in Ethiopia can only get there by hobbling pluralities into a majority; the one in Eritrea doesn’t have to.

            saay

          • Nitricc

            Dear SAAY; I had to take my time to digest your take but still i am not clear with what you are saying. I agree with you when you say “The PFDJ and the TPLF pursued an identical goal: how to stay in power in perpetuity.” but to what end? TPLF took the action to what maximizes its dominance over the larger majority of the Ethiopian people, can we say that about PFDJ? we can see and witness what PMMZ left behind but can we say that it will happen the same thing when PIA dies? I say NO! but look what happened in Ethiopia after PMMZ. this is the main reason i asked you for what end? In Eritrea every one is treated the same, call it oppressed; however, the same can’t be said in Ethiopia. TPLF’s insurance for power dominance in Ethiopia was established under the tame of SAR Na Cheed; can you say that in Eritrea? I don’t mean to kill your time but on this one, you are being very ambiguous unlike of you. I do understand you have to take higher ground but at the same time the truth needs to be said. In Ethiopia there are 65 generals and 64 of them are Tigryans. I don’t know how many generals are in Eritrea but i can assure you it is not the case in Eritrea. we all know PIA will do whatever it takes to protect his power but to what END? that is the difference. anyway thanks for your response.

          • blink

            Dear Mr.Saay
            If it is only the ethnicity that matters yes all Ethiopian leaders must come from Oromo and Amhara and so on respectively due to the votes . But if it is the idea or idealogy of economy , security , social justice and other issues , yes persons born in Tigrai or welkait must have the chance to be the leaders of Ethiopia. This is a federal system based on Ethnicity , even inside tirgai there are millions of voices who has no chance in EPRDF closed system.

            In Eritrea what we have is a dictatorship which is quite different. That does not mean the Tigrinja and Tigre will not always rule in a democratic state called Eritrea . Even if the system is a multi party system they will have the votes . What ever the other ethnic groups do , they just can not find the numbers to dictate any policy of the government like current TPLF do.

            All the PFDJ cronies are just ሓተላ ሃገር waiting for a storm to throw them over the sea.

          • Kim Hanna

            Selam Nitricc,
            .
            You seem to be consumed and going out of your mind worrying about me and the Amharas. Don’t worry about us, worry about yourself and yours for a change.
            You didn’t attach the Dr’s youtube/where you got the quote from. You know what that tells me coming from you? Never mind.
            .
            You appear to have listened to what PMHD of Ethiopia has to say, did it worry you more or less?
            What did you hear him say?
            .
            I think you should stick to your last sentence as a signing off exit line. It is appropriate.
            .
            Mr. K.H

          • Nitricc

            Hi KH, okay I don’t know man? what amazes me is, i don’t think anyone of understand the magnitude is what could happen? I know, there is the big factor, the African mentality but can any one see what could come down? when you need the strongest leader at the moment of need, what you got is, dangerously weakened and shitllesly scared so called leader. if that doesn’t worry you then, you are on some kinds of drugs. as far as my country, can’t be better and nothing to worry about, that is till your thing hits the ………..

          • Amde

            Saay, Fanti

            It is called proportional representation defined in Wikepedia as “an electoral system in which parties gain seats in proportion to the number of votes cast for them.” All new democracies are going that route.

            In the 2005 election, EPRDF won zero parliamentary seats in Addis Ababa. I don’t think its support was zero percent.

            Changing from winner”-take-all” (or First Past The Post) to Proportional Repesentation will at the very least take a mental adjustment from seeing Parliament as trophy, to seeing it as a new playground.

            Amde

          • Berhe Y

            Dear Amde,

            Although I agree that proportional representation sound more fair and I think in Australia they have that. In Canada there is some talk to move to that direction when it appears that one petty seem to always set to win the election, which was the case in Canada for the last 10 years until last election.

            All it took was a charismatic leader with brilliant campaign and he got the majority for the party from a distant third in last election.

            The fact that EPRDF is in power for the last 25 years and how people are fed up (in some parts) do you actually believe that it can win 100 percent in free and fair election?

            I think the proportional representation is really sophisticated solution for sophisticated problem and I don’t think Ethiopian political issue has matured to that level where all options have been utlized.

            Berhe

          • Amde

            Berhe,

            As things stand now, I doubt EPRDF can get 10% of the vote..lol.

            I was just pointing out that if EPRDF had implemented PR, they would have gained at least a couple of seats from Addis in 2005. I am just trying to show that PR works for them as well, not just the opposition.

            I honestly think PR is not that complicated to implement. At the same time, if you want the nation’s supreme deliberative body to reflect as much if the nation’s diversity as possible, then PR is without doubt the best way to go.

            The era of TPLF political monopoly is drawing to a close and I think sections of TPLF and the Tigrayan public are uncertain – even fearful – of the outcome. PR will go a long way to assuring them that a democratic (free election based) era will guarantee a place for them.

            Amde

    • Kim Hanna

      Selam Fanti Ghana,
      .
      Glad to hear from you. My goodness where have you been, I know, I know busy, busy.
      .
      While you were away, the arsonists were out there trying to burn your house down and by extension my adjoining home.
      There is still a smoldering smoke, you better come in and tell us more by wearing your GraAzmatch and KegnAzmatch uniform to chase away the arsonists across the river, as only you Fanti can.
      .
      I haven’t seen Abi lately either, he was accusing you for starting the fire in the first place, maybe for the insurance money, I don’t know. Stay engaged, will you.
      .
      Mr. K.H

      • Saleh Johar

        Hi Kim,
        I heard someone was advertising the following in Gonder: : surrender your guns and get free dabo”. I am wondering who that genius could be? 🙂

        • Kim Hanna

          Selam Saleh Johar,
          .
          I don’t know. But I can speculate that he or she is a PHD professor of Political Science at an American University, in Washington D.C
          .
          But then again the world is full of surprises, where is that Abi these days?
          .
          Mr. K.H

          • Saleh Johar

            Hi Kim,
            Of course you can speculate if your professor owns the new dabo bet in Gonder…:-)

          • Berhe Y

            Dear KH, SJ and all,

            I don’t know if Abi absence is related to the current issue in Ethiopia. I think the Dabo before democracy is to his reference and it may be a valid case, for example China, but i also think he was concerned for the wellbeing of the people and the absence of democracy (he redicled the meto be meto like a lot of people.

            I think AOsman has guessed in my opinion correctly for his absence that disques does not allow to post as guest. I don’t know his real reason but he always posted as guest. May be he doesn’t want his comments archived, I don’t know.

            He may just be that he does not agree with this policy (if it really happened I am going by AO said) change and does not want to register.

            In any case, I just want to say hope you are doing ok you come back soon.

            Berhe

          • Saleh Johar

            Hi Berhe,
            It is payback time… do you know how he pestered everyone with his qnie, now he should taste his own medicine. BTW, my comments are supposed to be innocent teasing.

          • Kim Hanna

            Selam Saleh Johar,
            .
            Ha, ha… now I got it.
            .
            Being such a straight person, I thought you might have heard something of that sort the 1st time I read it.
            Well, my response to you was also (not so much) innocent teasing. It was to connect and highlight the proposals and recommendations some of our intellectuals and politicians make to improve the condition of life for their countrymen. Just like that Dabo for gun simplified and grotesque views and solutions to solve problems they have no clue about.
            .
            Mr. K.H

          • Berhe Y

            Hi Saleh,

            I get your comments and it may be a reason for him to come back:). But I also thought I ask that he is ok and wish him well.

            Berhe

          • Kim Hanna

            Selam Berhe Y,
            .
            I think Mr.AOsman is right. It is vacation time as well. He is more savvy than me on iPhones and computers and he will be back when ready. He enjoys telling you something and telling me something else with the same sentence. He has that gift.
            .
            Mr. K.H

        • Nitricc
          • Saleh Johar

            Hi Nitricc,
            Wrong. Abi doesn’t drink beer, he only eats dabo 🙂

  • blink

    Dear Mahamud saleh

    Thanks for stating every point open and clear , i and many people appriciate your true believe ( a true Eritrean justice seeker does not give an inch to what he believe ) . I have one question , who is Abrham Tecle ( is he EPLF fighter ,who is dead ) and his family never get any news about him.

    Thanks

    • Mahmud Saleh

      Selam Blink
      Thanks. Abraham Tecle was one of Eritrea’s unsung hero (I mean on official channels, otherwise, he was probably more famous than the leaders of EPLF or ELF in the urban legends and centers particularly Around Asmara. He was from the ELF Fedaeyin, or special operation units responsible for operations inside Asmara. Vynak was commanding the EPLF side of similar operations and I believe Dawit W.Giorgis and Abraham Tecle were leading the ELF side. Despite the fact that both organizations were competing on minor issues and turfs, these guys never shot at each other, never passed information on each other to the enemy; actually, they were coordinating some of the memorable operations such as the release of hundreds of prisoners… I have his picture in my PC; just having difficulty to retrieve it. Anyway, he was very young looking at his pic. I heard he was martyred in a battle that took place around Shambqo in 1978 or 79, not sure. I’m sure Emma or Gadi can give you more.

      • Saleh Johar

        Hi Mahmuday,

        I do not want to delve into the Asmara operations at this moment, but Hadish Weldegiorgis and Mahmoud Qudwa , his deputy (both matyred) were in charge of internal operations. Abraham Tecle made a name for himself because he was bold, extremely brave, and never hesitated (of course he was handsome. That made him very popular and he was elected in to the revolutionary council in 1975. He was martyred in 1978, the recapturing of cities, in a battle close to Gonye. He was killed together with many others but notably Abdu Mahmuday–the story is conflicting here but apparently one of them was killed trying to save the other. I hope anyone who was at that battle could give us an eye witness report. Second hand testimony has been conflicting to my knowledge.

        • Amanuel Hidrat

          Selam SGJ & Mahmuday,

          Yes Abraham Tecle was famously known for the urban guirilla operations. He was known for his courage and tactical urban operations. He had accomplished many successful operations more than any of his colleagues at that time. In fact he was the most feared urban fighter by the police security of Asmara. Because of that he was a subject of lesson in their official meeting, how he walks, how he looks, and his nature of his moves. They were describing him as handsome with hazel eyes, and when he walks, he moves three steps, glance left side, another three steps glance right side. He was once caught wounded and was taken out by his colleagues operation while he was in a hospital bed. As Saleh said, second hand testimony can be conflicting – and my info is, that he was martyred in 1978 between Goleege and Tesseney while he was pulling his wounded compatriot. Indeed he was one of the unsung Eritrean heroes.

          regards
          Amanuel Hidrat.

          • Mahmud Saleh

            Dears Emma, Gadi and Blink
            Thanks both Saleh and Emma for the information. For Blink: I was trying to post his picture on the thread but am not able. Anyway, there he is, I’m going to use him as my avatar for the month of September. He represents the heroes of Eritrea.

      • Semere Tesfai

        Selam Mahmud Saleh

        Abraham Tecle died at Golj I think the date was August 20, 1978 during Ethiopia’s major offensive. He was shot once on the shoulder area, he got up, was walking staggering holding his arm by his other hand to reach the first aid medics, then they shot him again on his back and fell face down on the Golj river-bank across Enda Motore. I was about 100 feet away from him.

        • Saleh Johar

          Semere Tesfai,

          Now you clear a lot of confusion. That story about him falling while trying to save Abdu Mahmouday, or the latter falling while trying to save him, seems a made up story. Do you agree? However, they both fell in the same battle. Tanks

          • Semere Tesfai

            Selam Saleh Johar

            Yes, Abdu Mahmuday died the same day (August 20-21), the same time (around 5:00 pm), the same place (Goluj) but Abraham Tecle and Abdu Mahmuday where never on the same trench/foxhole. I knew Abdu Mahmouday very well, but didn’t see him when he got shot and fell down. To be honest, to this day, I don’t even know where exactly in the Goluj trenches he was. I heard about his death after we left the scene.

            If I’m not mistaken, Abdu Mahmuday was leading (commanding) a battalion, and he was not commanding my battalion. Abraham Tecle didn’t had permanent assignment, he was at adds with the ELF top leadership, and was frozen. He just came and joined our unit as an ordinary Tegadalay when he didn’t had to.

            When Abraham Tecle died, I was about ten feet from the main highway that connect Um-Hajer – Goluj – Tesenney. It was open plain grass to our knees, Ethiopian tanks were less than 200 meters and advancing, all RPG gunners were told to get-up and fire their RPGs, and the rest were firing their machine-guns and Kalahinkofs. Abraham Teckle was firing Kalashinkoff standing like everybody else when he got shot.

  • Mahmud Saleh

    Selam All
    Speaking of federalism and other “isms”
    I believe federalism as a form of government with all its varieties, and its deficiencies are vetted by the society/people under consideration, i.e., a representative of all the segments and interests of a given country must negotiate what form of government they have to adopt.
    In Eritrean case: We have not yet reached the point at which all segments and interests of the Eritrean people send off their representatives to negotiate the best possible arrangement that suits their region, social group, district, etc. The fight is for such a condition to be met. Once such a condition is met, the rest is up to the people. This ushers the sovereignty of the people. The other factor is the issue of territorial integrity. You see these two factors play a tag of war. The territorial integrity tends to favor a unitary government or a political devolution with a stronger central government. On the other hand sovereign people naturally vote for their local interests. This tends to challenge the central government. Therefore, responsible citizens negotiate in order to strike a balance between the tendency to be free (up to secession) and the need of collective security, and the benefits that come from a joining a bigger family. Who decides that? A free convention of democratically delegated politicians and statesmen. The proposals about future Eritrean government should be limited at the level of party program, with the understanding that it’s not a finished product, with the recognition that other parties and interest groups will also put their proposals on the table, etc. Therefore, it’s very erroneous and time consuming to spend time on what “SHOULD” be implemented tomorrow. The realities of that time and the vibe of the atmosphere, and the process itself will lead to something that most delegates agree on. The opposition is in shambles folks. It’s a reality. While some of its organizations claim to be fighting for democracy, they break the basic tenets of democracy for insisting that “their” program must be accepted. While some claim to be fighting, for constitutionalism and people’s will, they danced when IA declared the the life support of the 1997 constituion was unplugged…
    On Ethiopia: Federalism has been a fact of life for the last 20 years. The questions that need to be discussed are the following:
    1. Was the federal arrangement discussed in open and unfettered climate?
    2. Were all social sectors and interests of the Ethiopian society represented adequately?
    3. Were the discussions done in an atmosphere far from the aura of one party’s superiority (Did the represented parties discuss the arrangement without pressure and on an all-favoring level-field?)
    4. Once enacted what’s the experience? Do we see the spirit and letter of the constitution on the ground? If not why?
    ****************************************************************************************
    My humble observation: I have a “no” answer to the four questions. I have discussed some of the reasons as to why I’m coming with a “no” verdict.

  • Amanuel Hidrat

    Selam Solomon,

    From the long hatata which I am not fun of long hatata, I will pick two things, one correction and the other is, your provocation to my memory on “physical chemistry”- a subject I took some forty years ago – the Boyle’s law.

    (a) I haven’t proposed ethnic Federalism for the Eritrean proper. I believe you are reading to the misguided comments of individuals who advocate for “unitary government” who by the way do not have any clue as to what the relationship of “Federalism” and “decentralized governments” and their differences, rather reading the article itself. Start with this conceptual statement: “All federalism are decentralized government but all decentralized governments are not federalism.” This statement defines the relationship and the differences between the two. Above all, it will help you to understand my proposal (for purposes of debate) as to why I advocate “decentralization government” that is uniquely address the grievances our social group. I will give to read as home work the link below and ask me before you accuse me on what Aya Amanuel haven’t advocated for.

    http://awate.com/contours-of-change-and-equilibrium-of-its-parts-p-v/

    (b) “Boyle’s law” was named after a “physicist and chemist” Robert Boyle who postulate the relationship of “pressure” and “volume” by keeping the temperature constant within a closed system. Now I do not know how the concept of physical chemistry will apply to to social science to which you are trying to.

    P = 1/V that is, pressure is inversely proportional to volume or PV=K, P1V1 = P2V2

    regards
    Amanuel Hidrat

    • Solomon

      Selamat Aya,

      I have further provocations I wrote prior to reading your response.
      Now that my comments are never personal or intended to harm anyone. There is a method to my madness and it is purpose driven that serves all.
      With your current response, my better educated comments will be better. Wory not of accusations, so long you can defend them.
      As for Pchem’s application into the social issues, you have heard of the existence or lack of chemistry for young lovers. I will elaborate later, but to me everything is chemistry or a chemical reaction. Peoples physiological brains is a chemical balance, power and electric flow is a chemical reaction.
      But, specific to the formula PV=nRT, if I am not mistaken R is a Constant, and the other four are Pressure, volume, number of molecules and Temperature. It has been 28 years for me as well.
      Right now I want us to be attentive to the current constant R that I am attributing to Eritrean Factor with regards to the Ethiopian crisis or crisis in the making.

      One last thing about your industrial chemist background. In Albany, NY I made a friend who was worked for GE as an Industrial Chemist who studied in Isarael. He is Ethiopian, a Tigrean who was the late PMMZ’s childhood friend and classmate at Wingate. He would tell me that his friend Meles would send him the Limo to drive him straight to the Palace. This was immediately before the border war. It just occurred to me that you Aya Amanuel were at Wingate at the same time as my friend. I wonder if Abi can help me recollect my friends name as we have lost touch…

      tSAtSE

      • Amanuel Hidrat

        Selam Seleye,

        Short Answer to your wondering in search of links: G.Wingate was a prestigious high school. I did not attend in that high school nor do I was their classmates anywhere. Your puzzle is solved.

        regards

      • Saleh Johar

        Hi Solomon,

        Your comment reminded me how many people say they were Meles’ classmates. If we assign a seat for everyone who claims that, the class in which Meles attended must have been a football stadium 🙂 How did you get the idea Amanuel was attended Wingate and that Meles was his classmate?

        • Solomon

          Selamat GoneSJ,

          This gentleman is the real deal. I bumped into him on Lark Street at a Cafe in Albany. A bachelor that GE moved him around from site to site and put him up in the best of pads I have ever seen a Habesha in. This time GE had him in Latham, NY. I invited him to m home where he can meet my young wife and new born as well as have some enjera and Zigni as there were less than 10 habeshans to my knowledge. He did come and we went to his place. …..He is more Israeli than Habesha/Tigrean in diet and mannerism. Immersed only on his work. I believe, photos or some sort of other proof of his authentic Meles stories I must have seen. I suppose, I have to present him here… Maybe I will ask my wife to remind me of his name. And I think, I may have mentioned him in early awate1.0.
          Scouts Honor! I will produce him, as he would provide valuable analysis and advice considering how close he was to the late PMMZ.

          I will leave at that without delving to the other conjured thoughts…
          tSAtSE

  • Amde

    Selam Solomon,

    This is one if your more coherent postings. I consider it my honor that you decided to make your writings a bit more accessible to us mere mortals in response to me.

    Now then, on the curious case of General Nit. My questioning of his ability to read is borne out of his constant attempt to characterize me as a TPLF supporter. As far as I can tell there only one other Ethiopian regular on this forum who can objectively claim to be more anti-TPLF than yours truly. I find his selective outrages about the suffering of Ethiopians vs his cultish brownnosing of Isayyas the person (not even PFDJ mind you) rather disgusting. I can guarantee you most Ethiopians know the Nitricc archetype very very well – he is the pseudo-slick PFDJ functionary whose job is to maximize chaos in Ethiopia, and who can barely contain the contempt he has for us while thinking we are all collectively too dense to see through him. That is the Alpha and Omega of it. I could possibly think different if he spent some of his efforts bashing the Isayyas regime. But no….

    AH:HA

  • Solomon

    Selamat MoMo,

    I see the gang is all here now. Benhana’s Mr. Kim Hana, Yoty Topy, Horizon, and maybe even Abi…
    I am not certain if you are even reading now… but however long or short time it takes…. You maybe missing data not in this forum.
    So happy fishing to all.

    I will read the dialogues and narate another bed time stories for ya’ll.

    tSAtSE

    • Mahmud Saleh

      Ahlan Solomon
      I have a long weekend Hateta which I believe mashes in theories from the ZaEgol, Dedebit, Himeret Kelboy, and Sahel schools of thought marinated by views from the post modernity discourse. Disqus is holding it on “pending” or the moderator? Allahu AElam. Watch out for its release, I have already paid the required 50,000 Naksfas.

      • Saleh Johar

        Hi Mahmoud,

        Even you accusing the moderators!!!
        It’s beneath you my dear.

        • Mahmud Saleh

          Ahlan Saleh
          Poor moderators!! No, no, it was a sort of joke mixed with frustration, mixed with Mahmuday style…Thanks all moderators for this difficult task. I have nothing but appreciation for what you guys do, all of you, the giant duo, and ths rest. SAAY may sometimes entertain his Asmarino other self and say: ክላእ ኸልየና ያኣኺ፡ እዚ ኸኣ ነዚ ሓተታስ ከም ኣልፋትሓ* እምበር ገይርዎ? [read: cut it out please, he uses HATETAS as frequent as he recites alfatiHa].
          May be just may be, that’s when SAAY is in the mood of listening to the great Osman Abdulrehim ዝርው ኢሉ መዓንጣይ/ልበይ ምድረበዳ
          Well, I scribbled that Hateta when my 12 years old was nagging me to take them out to their favorite weekend thing. Now, after three hours I see it up (Solomon, your Gen.Tso is answered there. It’s under Gadi’s article “Amid trust…”), but it missed the crucial “popular”something featuring.
          Enjoy the great Osman Abdulrehim
          https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h-qIH1Jrv5U
          Regards.
          *ኣልፋትሓ/alfatiHa፡Qoranic verse with which Muslims start prayers. The most repeated one/day.

          • Solomon

            MoMo,

            I like the Green for sure and having a wide view, I.e. arhibo.

            tSAtSE

          • saay7

            Haha MaHmuday:

            I think this is Ahmed Raji’s fave song. When they are compiling their “Fino Asmarino” list, Osman * Abdurehem will be near the top. If you notice in his songs, his girlfriends have jobs that require travel (“megesha qetsila ilomni”), they have phones (“qutsri slki hibki telimkni”) and he stalks them (“dedhria seAbku”)… and he wishes he were a chameleon (“nefaHito…”) ….and all this in the early 1970s. Zkhones koynu iyu megnaHti koynuwo alo, allegedly, until another one breaks his heart and he sings about it.

            Does anyone know who played the guitar in this song and his Aqli Tsbet? Simply amazing strumming.

            Your Hateta… I prefer the audio versions. So my test now is how would this sound if MaHmuday created an audio version? One of them sounds too angry to be MaHmuday so I filed it in the “don’t piss this guy off” file.

            Saay

            * Engineer Asghedom was interviewed by Eritrea Profile. One of the questions he was asked was “who were some of those who inspired you?” (Way up there in journalists fave questions), and he answered “Alamin Abdurahim”. Name meant nothing to the interviewer who didn’t correct him: it’s either Alamin Abdulatif or Osman Abdurehim. Then Eritrea Profile profiled the Beja…it’s written exactly the way a Mzungu for National Geographic circa 1942 would write it. Depressing.

          • Mahmud Saleh

            Selam SAAY
            That’s very funny and depressing. I don’t know if one could feel fun and at the same time gets depressed. So, which one inspired Enginner Asgedom?
            On the guitar: I would like to know that too. Unfortunately, original CDs are not around, and giving credits and acknowledgements are not areas artists and publishers of hagerna known for.
            On my Hateta: one would probably sound like when bxaay IA is chastizing his juniors in a closed room, or when he is answering to Jane Dutton of Aljazeera (that’s if Jane is given an entry visa to Eritrea); and the calmer one would be like when bxaay IA is ready for ERI-TV interview, getting started by the ever smiling Suleiman Osman Abie.

          • saay7

            Hala MaHmuday:

            Well, I have seen your bixay Isaias get all huffy and nostril-flaring with the poor reporters of Eri-TV too.

            On your Hateta, I had written a piece entitled “The Futility of Hate-Whom-I-Hate” many moons ago maybe A Osman will find it because I can’t. Relevant to the issue, I think you are using the weyanes misbehavior as a litmus test to see who is too close and who has strayed too far from the “Eritrean experience”. Remember there was this dude, I forget his name, who had his own litmus test of “you are Eritrean if….” Well your Hateta sounded too much like that to me. See what you get when u tag me to give my two nakfas? My view is that now in the 21st century, when exiled people have so many choices to pick their identity, if someone even bothers with Eritrea, even to burn her official internationally recognized flag, he is my brother he is my sister and I want to know more because he is, as the Italians say, my paisano. Short version: your hateta was, to use an Arabic word, in “tesfiya” mode.

            Now see what you done did? A whole can of worms. Including a response to my Ethio bro Kim: ere tew, the problem with Getachew Reda is not that he is not media savvy, the problem is that he is trying to defend the indefensible. Even my buddy Eyob, as talented as he is, just can’t. You can’t unmow down people your own people that you mow down.

            Saay

          • Mahmud Saleh

            AbusalaH
            Please don’t repeat “tesfia”, emma is snoring it’s 0400 over there. Anyway, not really. But you have to call a spade a spade, Abusalah. I consider her my good friend, by the way she is the queen, no doubt about that. But here is the deal. I have weyenti friends. I know they are weyenti and they know I’m something. I don’t have a problem with some one having an opinion or a view different than mine. I defended Hayat when she was attacked on identity. I still defend her and I hope she defends me. The issue is not about identity, per se, but about her attempts to label Eritreans or EPLF as haters of the Ethiopian people. I just thought that was weird. For some reason she is acting mzungu. I think there is a compound reason for all these: a/ too much political loyalty to TPLF. You or her could not deny that. b/ she openly stated that she did not want Eritrean nationhood but accepted it as a fait accompli thing. Add both points and you will give me the benefit of the doubt. Only a mzungu would say Eritreans meant the whole people of Ethiopia, or the poor Amhara population as a whole when they expressed their detesting. BTW: TPLF itself used to say exactly the same- amharay/amhara. I hope she does not dare to challenge me. You see, there you have it. In black and white. I would not care about who she is but I care when she comes describing Eritreans as bigoted. I have the right to challenge her on the things she believes has strength. Either she thought our memories started getting ravaged by early onset of Alzheimer’s disease, or she is so far away from the Eritrean experience.
            Good night.

          • saay7

            SabaH Alkheir Mahmuday, Horizon, and A.Osman:

            Mahmuday: I don’t think you would write an entire Weekend Hateta about one person, Hayat, and if you had I wouldn’t have responded: I would just enjoy the show. Maybe you had only one person in mind but what you began with was: “Some notable awatistas have been exposed to the bone.” Plural *and* notable. And to the bone, too.

            Horizon:

            If my “you cant unmow….” statements gave the impression that I was predicting the future (as many of our PFDJ friends are doing), that was not my intent. The experience of Bashar Al-Asad, Mugabe should humble all those who like to predict “the end is coming”: regimes, especially authoritarian regimes, are very very very good in the game of thrones. What I was trying to say is that the mowing down, the stealing is now a firmly established characteristic of the TPLF/EPRDF, as much as the Red Terror was with Mengistu Hailemariam.

            Abu Affan:

            Thanks! But how did you know to go to 2004? 🙂

            saay

          • A.Osman

            Selamat SAAY,

            Well I gave you where the clue was, but you checked one link only… tembahuq nerka when u red my msg, I guess……the relevant text was;

            “To answer your Qumneger question, the excerpt I quoted was from an article written 10 years ago. It is called “The Futility of ‘Hate Whom I Hate’ “. I stumbled upon it when I was looking for another article (“The Problems With Confessions of an Economic Hit-Man”) I referenced to Eyob in another conversation that evolved from god-knows what:)”

            Regards
            AOsman

          • saay7

            Hala A. Osman:

            Guilty as charged! Please consider this memo as my “TaEsa wereqet” and the larger point being that because our archive is not searchable, you can only stumble on articles and find things “handebetly”. This is in keeping with the forum where subjects evolve and the gwal neger is more fascinating than her dad.

            saay

          • Amanuel Hidrat

            Selam Saay (Aya Adi-U),

            Tuff bela “TaEsa wereqet” is only for those who lost their courage. Not in the house of Aboy Younis. Abeden.

            Regards
            AH

          • saay7

            Haha Emma:

            Anta enda Hgdef are going to make some phrases completely unusable in post PFDJ-monopoly Eritrea. Ny Taesa wereqet is simply an apology letter and I was apologizing to A Osman for not reading his link. Alebelziya, if we stop doing things simply because PFDJ did them, we are going to have a nation where nobody admits error. No?

            Saay

          • Mahmud Saleh

            Dear SAAY

            Thanks and I may need to clarify that;

            1. most of my Hatetas was devoted to another round of defense of myself. The other part was acknowledging folks who have been consistent, including BeheY’s inputs in peaceful resistance, etc.
            2. When I wrote “Some notable awatistas have been exposed to the bone” Three individuals stood out in my mind: Hayat, Thomas (who is in the severely ignored box), and Kim Hanna. What you and amde have been saying is actually stronger than the benign comment I initially made. But they get irritated when I show up. That’s all. I still value the inputs of this individuals. If you followed the thread, Hayat was progressing it with provocating assertions and I was responding. So, brother, be kind to Mahmuday.

            What about our jebena session?
            Let me invite you to your local heroes:
            1. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JT8zLTaKxeE
            2. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ACdwCIld3kE
            Enjoy.

          • saay7

            Hala MaHmuday:

            I admit, I didn’t follow the exchanges attentively. Ny ergan gdi koynu when I hear qoyqi I move on.

            The two Bay Area bands you linked, Grateful Dead and Santana, I have always thought of their music when played live as meElebi zeyblu, that’s why, according to a telling statistic I am about to make up, 75% of the fans use stimulants to get into their groove. If you going all Bay Area, try Metallica or Green Day. Or CCR. Or Faith No More. Or Journey. Or…

            Saay

          • Mahmud Saleh

            Hala SAAY
            All the attempts are to hold YOU up In the forum, OK. nOW, ON Santana, the guys is a genius. And his music is enough to keep you stomping the ground. I mean this man has fused rock, blues, latin, jazz….He is now partnering Wayne Shorter and Herbie Hancock, two jazz giants.
            I like The Grateful Dead for their spontaneity and of course for Gerry’s soulful solos. RIP.
            Journey is my fav, but I can’t take in Heavy Metal.

          • saay7

            MaHmuday:

            Ok ok, I am here:)

            Santana is a great guitarist, but he can’t sing, so he has guest singers on all his songs. He would have been better off in a genre that doesn’t require a vocalist. Like jazz, where musicians riff off each other.

            My fave Santana song is with Rob Thomas as vocalist: smooth. It was a monster hit, and deservedly so.

            https://youtu.be/6Whgn_iE5uc

            Saay

            PS: listen to Metallicas “one” and then tell me you don’t like it.

          • Saleh Johar

            Saay,
            I am sure you heard this a million times, now make it 1,000,001. When an Eritrean singer (you mentioned today, performed in Khartoum, they found out he doesn’t play any musical instrument. In surprise someone remarked: da Aasha Felateeya da wel’a shnoo!
            Aasha Felateeya, the famous Sudanese singer, also didn’t play any instrument. Some say it was um Kelthoum–the problem with second hand narration.

          • Mahmud Saleh

            Ahlan SAAY

            That’s amazing. I read somewhere Led Zeplin ? plagiarized a song, I forgot what it was. The similarities were very fine and subtle but they were sued and I believe they lost it. Anyway, I’m not a fan of Scorpion but I admire their guitarist Uli Jon Roth. Here he is playing the great Jimi’s famous song”little wing”

            https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R_7Wh0iYr6g

          • saay7

            Hey MaHmuday:

            Everyone was sued for plagiarism: including John Lennon (“come together”), rod Stewart (“do you think I am sexy”), Coldplay (several songs) and my favorite, john foggerty who was accused of plagiarizing his own song, then owned by the publisher.

            There are only so many combinations you can make from the notes that a human ear can hear before you, unknowingly, write a song that has been written.

            Somewhere between our peoples total disregard for intellectual property, and the sacred status it has in the US, there is a happy medium. If somone said this before me, I am not aware of it and I am unknowingly plagiarizing.

            Scorpions: stop everything and listen to their “The Zoo”. Stupid lyrics, killer guitar riff.

            Saay

          • Solomon

            Selamat Saay7,

            Does anything really ever land in the truest sense of the word miElab? You certainly don’t consider Bruce Willis’s landing on earthbound Comet – Armageddon a true miElab?

            Now for heavy metal to achieve escape velocity and land on MaHmuday or the majority of MaHmuday like aliens, and with perfect shaped ears like Mr. Spok, well… It is as highly likely as Eritreans and Ethiopians assembling in mass in the desert for Burning Man like festival in 2017.
            Every thinking person’s delima is his/her attempt to land completely.
            Fasten your seatbelts folks, for the attempt good ol’ country music with Head Bangers fusion….
            Now, I am suspecting that it is in fact Saay7 that is the true Mazungu amongst us.
            Now I have my rational for Saay’s, once upon a time, quip: ” Its all been done before.”

            The closest to head banger’s Habesha sound is when tens to hundreds of deacons with large koboros and maracas HUNDEBETLY bust out the BUM BaE BuM BaE BumBaE double beats. Stimulated with out a doubt.

            One week away from Giants Vs. Cowboys

            Watch Giant’s Safety Nat Burhe stop the air or ground Cowboy’d attack and Eli and Odel connect for Touch Downs and NOT miElab.(TD in Tigrigna Tenkif TaHti)
            tSAtSE

          • saay7

            Hey Sele:

            Don’t be so certain because there is an Ethiopian hard rock/heavy band: Jano Band. Two of their songs, Ayrak and Marye definitely qualify. Here’s Ayrak

            https://youtu.be/97-tSL8irmI

            As for heavy metal, I haven’t heard a real one but thanks to this clever video, by someone who took metal music to Ethiopian dance, you can see how the future generation will create a head-bangers ball. I feel safe sharing it because Eyob is not around to tsk tsk me:

            http://youtu.be/wAZjC4MR3-Q

            You are welcome.

            Saay

          • Solomon

            Saay7,

            SO! It don’t mean I ma stop ma provocations of you You Shaggy lookalike.
            My returns are good. Got more of that funck Chump?
            Good sounds…
            Okay I will keep hope alive and ask MOD to do the same, I.e.Keep Hope Alive.
            tSAtSE

          • saay7

            Hey Sele:

            Which Shaggy? Shaggy, the artist famous for “bombastic” or Shaggy, the friend of Scooby Doo?

            Vulcans cannot be provoked. Because it’s illogical to be provoked.

            Saay

          • Solomon

            Saay7,

            Scooby Doo and the Greatful Dead Heads VW van..
            tSAtSE

          • Dear Saay,

            You can’t unmow the people, unsteal an election or unradicalize even the sanest opposition, all are true; but even for the very difficult problem, there is always a solution, if one searches very closely. There was a solution for apartheid SA (a much worse situation), and I hope there will be one for Ethiopia.

            Even injustice should reach a certain point before our consciousness is arroused from its sleep. It is not because our Muslims or Oromos donot matter, but it is because nobody really knows the right trigger and the right time for people to revolt. Our Muslims and Oromos are equally important as any other Ethiopian.

            Everything lies in the hands of the government. As long as it acknowledges the problems and it know the solutions for the problems, then it is all about if and when the gov will take the right steps. It is damned if it does not act rightly and promptly. This time, it has no excuses not to do the right things (implementing democratic procedures, good governance, transparency, accountability,fighting corruption etc), because as you said rightly, it is futile to defend the indefensible. A quarter of century of “look at the dabo and forget about democracy” has reached dead-end, and will not work any more.

            Developmental state without controlling it’s own hippos, who have thrived all over the country, and without making the people stakeholders, will not thrive. The present crisis is the result of these controversies.

          • A.Osman

            Hi SAAY,

            You know web.archive.org is not searcheable, it took a minute to find and the clue (2004) is in your disqus;
            http://awate.com/cadres-for-holy-men-containers-for-churches/#comment-1564889717

            link below;
            http://web.archive.org/web/20041208172943/http://www.awate.com/artman/publish/article_3606.shtml

            Regards
            AOsman

          • Solomon

            Da AO DA Aoh,

            Just had the urge to Handbetly!!! chime in and say:

            Chilax!

            tSAtSE

          • Kim Hanna

            Selam SAAY,
            .
            Did you, yourself, say …”…trying to defend the indefensible.” George Orwell is rolling in his grave.
            .
            “…mowing down since 2005.” ….”…unsteal an election.” …. “un-radicalize the sanest opposition..”
            …”…woke up when the Amara started getting killed…”
            ..”The cancer has metastesized.”
            .
            You see what I mean, I don’t think you really really really believe these statements. You are just doing your job. You gather all these from questionable sources and lob them with ease and delight, to get the applause from your corner. What else could it be under all these circumstances.
            .
            The usual mantra of a NEGATIVE in Ethiopia is a POSITIVE in Eritrea, at play.
            I am sorry to say, in my opinion it is a wasted talent.
            .
            Mr. K.H

  • Solomon

    Dear MOD

    With all due respect, I will have to disagree and point to the gnome once again. At times we have to be Foxy. I am only ranting and not complaining because the extra scruteny can be misconstrued as further manipulations and gaining vantage. By whome, I do not know. All I know us that I am in it for a win win, and the defeat of another… Hence the frustration…
    and rapid fire.
    tSAtSE

  • Solomon

    DT,

    Please, have respect for your self. Not only do you not know nothing, but you are also oblivious of your purpose in this forum. But I agree with your assertion HA tenacity and skill. My egotistical side and falling to your trap however will make state that she turned down my declaration of war and ONLY SHE KNOWS WHY.
    But go ahead and be agroupi. I too admire lady Princes Hyatt’s cream of the crop intellect and grace.
    tSAtSE

    • Thomas D

      Hi Solomon,
      Just tolerate someone to have different opinion than yours. Do not close your mind. Crave to learn more from others if not you will be defined as Nitricc groupie:))

  • Nitricc

    Thomas; again WOULD YOU PLEASE share what you mean when you said “Please keep fighting for the right cause” what is Hayat’s cause? what is Hayat stands for? what is her real motive on this forum? can you please share with us? please? I know you are slow but never thought this much. now, please tell us.

    • Thomas D

      Hi Nitricc,
      There is a very important thing I know about you. That you support the very regime who is oppressing, killing & destroying the nation I love. I consider you & the criminals you worship my ethernal enemies. Hayat is not at your level. You are lucky she is not ignoring you for who are!!

  • Hayat Adem

    Horizon and Thomas,
    I really thank you for the kindest words you have said about me. I do respect you and admire both likewise.
    Mahmud is a dedicated fighter. I respect him but he is so wrong as in voluntary ignorance for petty reasons and in search of healing wounded egos. What a waste! I don’t if he knows it. How can someone whom you regard so much to be supplying wisdom to others be tempted and fall of grace for little things. He is saying a lot: Oromo, ormomomomo, Amara amararara; TigrayTiTIg… 30%, 27%, 6%, EPLF TPLF ….Ugh!!!
    I am not catching Blink really and still don’t know what he really is up to. I will wait until I feel him real. Solomon is strange awatista and i think I like him more than I dislike him. I see Peace and Nitricc as a fallen hair in my soup. Get out of my bowl!

  • Lamek

    Solomon, you are talking about elites. But you are a typical Tigrinya elite, ghedli romanticizer. When will you educated kebessa Eritreans wake up? When? When there is nobody left to sustain your very own identity? I urge you to open your eyes and see what is going on. Things are not black and white as you fools seem to think. I can say a lot but I have been quietly watching you guys and you are all still in lala land. Times have changed. Look closely around you. There is a concerted effort to annihilate you and your people. Wake up and smell the coffee. Read YG carefully and now you can learn from Tesfazion. I don’t agree with him often but the 10 or 20% I agree with him on are extremely eye opening. Watch one or two full videos. You may wisen up. The same goes to the always innocent Amanuel Hidrat.

    • blink

      Dear Lamek
      annihilate ? who is going to annihilate who ? Knowing you who you are , it is not suprising .By the way YG and Eyob are attention seekers who go out their way and say things they can not prove . It was an acceptable to expose people like Yossief Ghbrehiwot and Eyob in this website but what is done is done . People like Eyob are a dead cause for any Eritrean issues . They do not suscribe to what is Eritrea . We have nothing to worry about an agazian crazy men nor do we think about what happen in your EPRDF situation room . Our case is independent of your so called highlanders and lowlanders . You want to worry ,ok great you have enough egges to save ,just see or visit some Amhara and Oromo rooms or websites . Eritrean highlanders has nothing to worry about any thing negative things from their Lowlanders brothers.NONE.As far as you have 10 or 20% of Eyob , who do you think you are fooling ? such ideas has been preached by every crazy unionist or apportunistics yet they failed. Accepting a failure is half success yet they did not do that. Eritreans has only one common enemy and it is first and formost PFDJ . That is it. I advice you not to waste your valuable time worrying about things that does not exist. You want to worry , ok give a kick to a Youtube video that HAYAT adem shared with Adem . YOu will find every thing about the word ANNIHILATE.

    • Solomon

      Selamat Lamek,

      Please do me a favor and tell me my identity good Sir. If you read all I have written so far, you can do me the service of correcting how and with whome I identify thus far.
      YG is a crook that can be proven but not worth my time as I am driving in a hundred and eighty degrees opposite direction
      tSAtSE

  • Nitricc

    Hey TsaTse; you said “We should recognize, the true value of the Eritrean Revolution and its near impossible to duplicate at least in the near future if not ever” okay let me ask you this, what are the true value of Eritrean revolution? be carful, your answers may trap you and may force you to the position you despise.

    • Solomon

      Selamat Nitric,

      One forum response wouldn’t do the answer justice. My time travel machine spanning Milenia, as I navigate carefully with you and others for that purpose will come to light OR the “Modler” should it be ready first.
      You have been here long enough to make sense of my dull Axe that I am not grinding with regards to the lost forum data of long ago which I feel was a sort of hyjacking and steering by our virtual communitie’s wihout regard to minority voices. For now try and recollect the Black Sheep:
      “Engine engine number NIne,
      On the New York Transit Line,
      If you see my train fall of the track,
      Pick it up, pick it up pick it up!
      Who’s the Black Sheep, I am the Black Sheep!”

      Let me go on and hear Manal Younus poems next to SJH on the new thread. The Start Plow on Shuttuck Ave, a stage for Berkeley/Bay Poetry Slam would give a standing ovation.

      I will compose a short and fitting answer for your question shortly.

      tSAtSE

  • Saleh Johar

    Hi Solomon,

    You stated, “the twin opposition website of awate.com, asmarinodotcom, the platform they are providing to producer’s production of victim’s testimonies, such as Dr. Nesredine and young Elsa Fessehaye, I must say the it is counter productive towards achieving Trust…

    Are you saying awate.com provided platforms for the two people you mentioned? If yes, please provide a link. If that is not what you are saying, please explain.

    • Solomon

      Hi SJG,

      My response to you the gnome ate it. It may appear later. my short ansewer is No.
      I don’t like short answers unless it is a Cop / police officer is doing the asking.
      tSAtSE

  • Mahmud Saleh

    The Truth-tellers and the falsemongers

    First off: Kudos to the Ethiopian athlete, Feyisa Lilesa, who forfeited his silver medal and “a hero return” to Addis Ababa. Money, fame, and the deceiving privileges that accompany his stature did not sway his moral compass. He stayed steady, siding with his people, condemning the brutal regime of TPLF. That was indeed an unexpected redress for the actions of some of our beloved awatistas who showed an expected faltering and staggering in logging an appropriate and an unequivocal condemnation of the barbarity we are witnessing in Ethiopia. We lost Hayat Adem (or, did we?) but we found the courage in athlete Feyisa Lilesa.
    Secondly: I’m so proud of my appraisal of the people of Ethiopia. I never lived in Ethiopia. I learned the people of Ethiopia, its food and national language, and a great deal of its colorful culture and diversity through friends and my curiosity to know more about Ethiopia. Like many of my generation, I never held any contempt against the Ethiopian people, never, even when all I knew about Ethiopia was war and the brutal massacres of my people. Ethiopian elites may curse Eritrean revolution for anything including kicking Ethiopian rulers where it hurts and causing the edifice of their brutal reign to collapse, but they can’t blame for wishing the Ethiopian people bad. They could try but history is on the Eritrean side.I wish our leaders worked as deligently to unify Eritrean political groups as they worked to unify Ethiopian rebels. I wish they thought as inclusive in terms of Eritrean reality, holding national conferences in Asmara to unify Eritrean political forces in the days after independence as much as they thought of and pushed for unifying Ethiopian political forces in the aftermath of the collapse of the Durg in Addis. Meaning Eritreans never held contemt against the unity and integrity of Ethiopia. That’s why we never supported TPLF’s aggressive seceessionist agenda, and then continued reminding TPLF at every corner it appeared to falter. The first Ethiopian conference was held under the tight guard of Eritrean commando brigade. I know, TPLF cadres don’t want you to read this. It doesn’t matter now. TPLF might have wiped out its side of the records, but the copies are sitting in Asmara for historians to sift through. I’m bringing this to make the point that we Eritreans and the vanguard organization that had led us to victory never held any contempt against the unity of Ethiopia. On the contrary, history will absolve us for the fact that we paid dearly in assisting to keep Ethiopia as it was minus its ill-gained territory of Eritrea.

    Thirdly: I’m proud of the way Ethiopians held up against a brutal and backward regime which appears to behave Ethiopian only when it is controlling Ethiopia, a regime that talks democracy when addressing Amharic speaking mid-land Ethiopians but shows its roguery and rough nature when ruling Tigray and entertaining its the aspirations of the Great Tigrean Republic relapses in Tigrigna, away from the media. The result is clear. You could see the rest of Ethiopia erupting, almost in unison, exposing the systemic hollowness of the regime, its greed in looting Ethiopian resources, its economic policy that has resulted in creating a small connected middle class. You see Gondar extending unity to Oromia and even to Tigreans against a regime known for its corrupt and divisive policies; a regime that has reduced Ethiopia into chunks of its size for the purpose of maintaining its rule, by pitching against each other ethnic groups that lived along each other for millennia.

    Fourthly: Amid these developments, some truth tellers of our great awatista forum kept telling the truth as it is: The regime needs to come to its sense; it needs to make a genuine political solution. This trend is irreversible. You may crush it today, but that will only be akin to placing a band aid on a festering wound. The well-known hoodwinking and double-talking of TPLF cadres are not going to dress up a systemic and deeply structural deficiency. People seem to be positioning themselves beyond calling for rectifying wrong policies. They did that early on, hoping the toothless constitution TPLF prepared might somehow give them a less desirable yet less costly answers. They knocked on the doors of the so called Federal Government and its federally dressed up but typical TPLF-ploy institutions. They were ignored, then knocked off through the brutal use of the in-name-only federal police- in reality a TPLF instrument. Now people have crossed the Rubicon, people are challenging the status quo. Call it any name, but this is a typical Ethiopian uprising against a minority government that has monopolized the politics and resources of Ethiopia for the last 25 years. This is an uprising for unity; this is an uprising for equality, this is an uprising for the end of a rule of 6% of Ethiopian population monopolizing the institutions of steering Ethiopian fate and future by controlling 100% of its decision making capacity. This is not an ethnic based uprising. People of Amara (18%-20%) region are extending their solidarity with the people of Oromo region (35%-40%); they are extending their solidarity with the people of Tigray on whose NAME the ruling TPLF JUNTA is menacing Ethiopia. Tigray people are perhaps the most oppressed people. However, every child killed by the regime is blamed on it, every looted resource is blamed on it, every wrong doing of the politicians is blamed on it; every gun wielding police and ranger is associated with the people of Tigray. Few gangs and misinformed individuals are venting their frustrations on innocent Tigreans, but these acts don’t define the peaceful uprising, because the people and the organizers are on record condemning them and warning against such acts. However, the wrong policies of the hegemonic and chauvinist TPLF have already trickled down acid rain on Tigreans. This is creating an unfortunate burden on Tigreans living in their own country. We have seen Tigreans exodus from all parts of Ethiopia back to Tigray region. That’s why I said “Unless the government makes a genuine political solution the people of Tigray are going to pay heavily.” It’s a reality you can’t wish away folks. We know how this statement was criticized by non other than the active Head of TPLF cadres, crowding the internet by choking it with an apparent automated comments/replies that were crafted to stave off people’s attention on the matter, by dancing on semantics and beating around the periphery. The problem is: truth endures. You may try to deny it the light of the day by going personal but it never loses its bearing and value. A person who fails to condemn injustice in region A could not be expected to condemn it in region B. The way how some of our “justice seekers” responded to TPLF’s brazen barbaric actions on a well behaved and well coordinated peaceful demonstration exposed their hypocrite nature to the bone. Many Ethiopian Awatistas stood up with their people; few Eritrean awatistas stood up with the government. On balance, that’s not bad. What Ethiopians are doing and the way they are doing it could, frankly set a reference for future African anti-dictatorial struggle. Individuals who view developments of the region through the lens of AGs could only behave the way AGs behave, i.e., blaming everything on Eritreans, describing Eritreans as inherently backward and culturally against modern ideas such as democracy, etc. Once you mention the real deal about their beloved TPLF, they go banana, they lose their bearing, every circuit of their brain goes awry, they go personal. They make good use of their linguistic skills and resort to the weaving of what seems to be as a semantically impregnable rebuttal. What’s interesting is that the reality caches up with them soon and pulls them back to the ground. Athlete Feyisa did that; General Tsadkan did that, 16 prominent Tigreans did that (calling on TPLF to relinquish its ill-earned power to the people), educated and activists Ethiopians (including patriot Tigreans are makig the same efforts; the people of Amhara, Oromo, the southern nation and nationalities, etc. are saying that; prisoners of conscience (activists, politicians, bloggers, human rights activists… who voiced their concerns peacefully, and got imprisoned using the notorious terrorism law) are saying that; the international community is saying that; those who lost their lives while demonstrating peacefully were saying that and would love their compatriots continue voicing that, etc. Reality is independent from TPLF wishy-washy futile attempts. It’s better to seize reality sooner than letter. Condemn the roguery of the TPLF government, support the peaceful demand of the people to create a united Ethiopia that marches on the ideals of REAL democracy, equaitY, prosperity FOR ALL. Call for a genuine political solution. Oppose brutal treatment of defenseless people. Injustice is injustice whether it happens in Eritrea or Ethiopia.

    That’s the difference between the truth-tellers and the falsemongers.

    • mesob werQi

      Dear Mahmuday

      It’s only logical for someone who fights for justice in Eritrea to support a similar struggle in Ethiopia. In my humble opinion, the cause for the shocking hypocrisy by some Awatistas is blind support to the dead PMMZ and his ruling TPLF. Funnily enough, the same Awatistas accuse the ruling party supporters of displaying a blindness not dissimilar to the one they themselves exhibit.

      Another reason is many of these opposition activists and parties are being groomed by the TPLF to behave as satellites like similar parties in Oromia and Amhara regions. So we can’t expect them to criticize their bosses and bite the hand that feeds them.

      Having said this, the struggle for good governance and rule of law in Eritrea needs a much sharper focus and clear vision than what has been witnessed so far. More importantly, it needs to be driven by Eritreans. The current setup is way too scattered and unprincipled to bring about any meaningful change in Eritrea. The Eritrean struggle is being hijacked by all sorts of weirdos, unprincipled fanatics and die-hard supporters of the minority regime in Arat Kilo.

      Finally, I believe there is some much we can learn from the methods used by Oromo diaspora activists such as Jawar Mohammed of Oromo Media Network on how to organize a peaceful grassroots movements. It’s admirable the way they have persevered nine(9) months of brutal crackdown by the Agazi hooligans.

      As usual, I’ve enjoyed the brave Prime Minster’s take on the situation in Ethiopia.
      Thanks

    • Nitricc

      Hey Mahmuday; great take us usual. To Add to your point; I see a good thing coming to Ethiopia. It may cost a few lives and some destructions but I see very positive change, very unique and of course with some risks.
      The great thing about this change about to happen is very good. It is good because there no armed rabbles who can claim the ownership of the change and play it to their advantage. Just like what TPLF has done. But this change is coming and happening through popular up-rising; the very people are the owners of the change. So, whoever comes to power is going to come through the people and chosen by the people. Of course there is a risk; anytime there is a popular uprising; there are no specific leaders and any opportunists can hijack the change.
      Once the Ethiopians make sure the change doesn’t be hijacked then the Ethiopians have ended the culture of coming to power by the gun and stepping out of power by the gun. I really see a good thing coming to Ethiopia.

    • Amde

      Selam Mahmud,

      Well said. I even forgive you promoting General Nit to the head of the truthtellers (really ?).

      I just wanted to re-iterate the important point you raised about Tigrayans being victims of TPLF. This is the absolute truth… I doubt there is any region that is as controlled as Tigray, and in the end the average Tigrayan will be burdened unnecessarily by the catastrophic policy choices imposed by the TPLF. And if things continue unresolved, TPLF could do more damage to Tigrayans in its death throes than almost any place else. Ethiopian nationalism has always been and remains a potent force in Tigray. The TPLF fought against the EPRP and EDU in its young years even before it really started fighting the Derg. The EDU and EPRP fighters it battled were mostly or disproportionately Tigrayans. The form of Tigrayan nationalism it imposed is quite new and alien to the people and their culture, and it will hardly survive any open election. For it to survive, it will need to maximize Tigrayan fear of others. This partly explains the public rally ostensibly for Melles’ fourth year death anniversay. Since TPLF has no answers to give Tigrayans on current events, it has to refer to the ghost of the dead.

      Amde

      • blink

        Dear Amde
        You said it well ,I hope all Amhara and oromo people has such view.
        The problem i see is also that ,EPRDF or TPLF does not want the tigrai people to be friends with other groups in Ethiopia .It is weird and evil . The Tigrai people has paid dearly for the Ethiopians to protest in Oromo land and Amhara land . They have been under seige by elite TPLF for long time, and now TPLF want to live their life by just pretending to be care takers of the Tigrai people. Tigrai people are wholly controlled by these few people and even they can not talk or express their feelings . I think it is unfair for any one to blame the Tigrai people. They are equally victim of EPRDF wrong policies.

      • Hayat Adem

        Amde, Abi:
        Look at this video and tell me this is not it, this is exceptional..or else I will be amazed this is happening:
        These are armed people and I assume they are from the local militia or adminstration and they are saying all these things like yemekele lij ambeTa qortami etc…
        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=szzjHYvEfjs

        • blink

          Dear Hayat
          Do you think there is a failure in the EPRDF informtion birro ? Because if you see every facebook campaign , paltolk rooms and youtube brash talks the blame is falling on the tigrai people . Such media is getting a very vast audions , it is a worrying issue that should be tackled by the central EPRDF information office yet they are talking about Shaebia and Asseb , which is not an issue.

        • Gecho Ze Great

          Hi Hayat,

          Instead of being amazed why the hatred towards Tigrayans has reached this level, you should look into yourself and see what Tigrayans have done to deserve this hatred. Tigrayans are either outspoken apologists for woyane or silent complicits enjoying the fruits of woyanes favoritism towards them. Except for a handful of Tigrayans, all are guilty of the crimes of woyane. Look at the biggest Tigrayan private media outlets (Tigraionline and Aigaforum) and see the articles and comments. Woyane enjoys massive support from Tigrayans. When “professor” samora claimed woyane is Tigray people and Tigray people is woyane nobody spoke up. Even now they are parroting what weyane says about the protests being the work of external agents and attempting to justify the violent actions of their agazi. I was so proud to see the gun toting Amhara protest videos. I was happy to find out that Amhara region has the highest gun ownership in Africa not just in Ethiopia. Ay Neftegna, Endet Yakoral 🙂
          According to Addisfortune, last year hundreds of thousands firearm permits were registered in the amhara region. My hope is that these militias join forces with ODF and AG7 and send the Woyane locusts back to Tigray. We’ve been patient for 25 years and instead of getting better, it got worse. Tigre wede mekelle, yezerfut nibret wede kebele!

          • Amde

            Gecho

            I don’t agree with what you said about Tigrayans, but your “Ay Neftegna, Endet Yakoral :-)” made me laugh out loud. That was funny. And kudos to you for rescuing that word “neftegna” from its EPRDF assigned meaning to its literal meaning, “gunslingers”.

            Relatives have told me how “everyone” in Gonder is armed but this is the first time I heard any reference to high rates of gun ownership being an Amara regionwide phenomena.

            Amde

          • Gecho Ze Great

            Hi Amde,

            I’m glad you enjoyed. 🙂 Yes, weyane has been dragging that word in the mud to mean oppressors and land grabbers. Min yaltebalnew ale be weyane. I was also surprised to read about the very high number of gun ownership in Amhara region. I know rifle ownership is a sort of cultural thing since most are farmers and need it to chase away intruding animals but didn’t know about didn’t it was a modern cowboy region. And the guys were toting AKs on the protest. Betam betam korahu 🙂

        • Dear Hayat Adem,

          If the TPLF/EPRDF government chooses to be deaf and blind to this mass uprisings and this ends up into Oromo/Amhara and Tigrayan confrontation, then it will be a crime committed by the government against the Ethiopian people as a whole. Last time we saw a clip with zeraf and shilela from the Tigrayan side and now from the Amhara side, which shows that both sides are ready for confrontation. It is the responsibility of the government to come up with a solution to avert the disaster that may follow. If the TPLF/EPRDF government tries to subdue this uprising with a spree of killings targeting one side (God-forbid), that could start a civil war and ethnic conflict.

          I listened to a fb clip of conversation of a person who called himself TPLF/WOYANE ( which I could not give the link on Android tablet, because i do not know how. It is on the same page with your link). I have never heard of a more nauseating type of ignorance and arrogance from the person who called himself Tigrayan (if indeed he is).

          • Solomon

            Selamat Horizon,

            Over yonder in Tigrigna language: Kinyow MAEdo…
            Zelekha beal Meedo.

            The Deaf And Blind indeed! I do believe and demand for Saay7 to initiate another Mazunngu analysis.
            This is Awate!!!

            ZaEgol analytics demands for Disqus to cease the obstruction of making Contact with extraterrestrial aliens. “ET phone home.” The Anuch are here.

            tSAtSE

          • Berhe Y

            Dear Horizon,

            May be I will have better luck asking you. Do you know who AG is that they are referring to?

            Berhe

          • Amde

            Selam Berhe,

            As far as I can tell, AG is Hayat’s friend and acquaintance who has so far refused her entreaties for he himself to join the forum and participate. I may be wrong.

            Amde

          • Berhe Y

            Thank you Amde. I thought A stood for Amde and I didn’t know your last name but I thought she was talking about you.

            Is she talking about article he wrote?

            Berhe

          • Amde

            Selam Berhe,

            No, “A” does not stand for Amde, haha… you are way too kind. Alas, our queen Hayat has apparently found a more worthy “A”G to be intellectually dazzled by. Not that I blame her mind you.

            I don’t think there is an article he wrote she is referring to. I believe she is referring to conversations she has had with him and insights she had gained from him. If I am wrong I am sure she will correct me.

            Amde

          • Dear BY,

            When I read your query on who or what AG is, I was happy because I thought I too could have an answer, which i was looking for days. I Googled for AG and the only thing I could come with as much as Ethio- Eritrean politics is concerned was AG7 (Arbegnoch/Ginbar or Ginbot), which did not seem the right answer. I do not understand why nobody up to now came forward to tell us (the not so cleaver), what this mysterious acronym AG is.

          • Berhe Y

            Dear Horizon,

            I am glad I asked you, because I thought I can get a good answer, which I was right.

            What confused me was, Nitricc says AG, Mahmud says AG, Hayat says AG, first I thought they were taking about Amde but I never knew his last name so I wasn’t sure.

            Ok it sounds far fetched joke then. Unless she is married to him, and they are together everyday and talk about AT forum, how is that he is reading every comment and discussing / commenting to her.

          • Eyob Medhane

            Horizon,
            My humble advise to you is “step away slowly from Facebook”…I did. I am out of facebook, because crazies now have gotten a best avenue to let it all out. I just came back from Ethiopia. All I say is that those, who are rubbing their hands with excitement to wittness the next Syria, better hold on to their betting dollars. It ain’t happening. Ethiopia will be disappointing them again. The difference is this time, they have facebook and tweeter to climax their orgasm that gets fired up with the mayhem and blood..

          • Dear Eyob M.,

            I hope you enjoyed your stay in Ethiopia. Ethiopia is at a crossroads, her enemies are many and the stakes are great, if ethiopians do not act in a mature and responsible way for the sake of the common good; far from partisan (narrow ethnic) politics. The trophy for her enemies will be great, especially if Ethiopia falls apart. Who is the most dangerous enemy for a Tigrayan, an Amhara or an Oromo? Is it the other ethnic group? No, not at all. It is Egypt, and those who think the same way with Egypt. Therefore, everybody must compromise for the sake of Ethiopia. I hope the atmosphere back home is much more positive, constructive and national-interest oriented, than confrontational.

          • A.Osman

            Dear Horizon,

            A good news from Eyob, we should hope that the reality is no as portrayed in the cyber-world and the government does repeat the arrogant position of its predecessors. To solve an internal problem, however, you don’t need to overblow an external threat, it may create a temporary sense of unity but it wont solve the raging problem at home. I felt you were burying your head under the sand, so the problem goes away….Egypt is not the threat now, it can’t even handle its own problem.

            Regards
            AOsman

          • Eyob Medhane

            Hey Horizon,

            Thank you. Please check my general assessment of my trip on the response I shot to Kim H.

          • Kim Hanna

            Selam Eyob Medhane,
            .
            Glad to hear from you. I think it is a great advise. It is so hard to get a clean information. The sources that have a history of getting it wrong, become the sources for some legitimate media, it is unfortunate.
            .
            In the absence of good information, my refuge is the track record and the general leadership qualities of the Government that will adjust and respond to the peoples grievances.
            .
            Those who wish for civil strife and chaos are the usual suspects and their useful idiots.
            .
            Mr. K.H

          • Eyob Medhane

            Kim,

            Thank you..

            In terms of getting information from the right places is indeed a challenge. On top of that the embarrassing and utter incompetence of Ethiopian government public relations methods helped extremists and Shabia funded media outlets to fill the gap. For example, the Amhara region is a region with over 24 million inhabitants and more than 10 major cities and towns with over 300 small towns. The significant protest that was challenging to the government was in Gonder city and Debark town. Bahir Dar (the capital of the region) has seen another serious protest that was deadly. Other than that there were no significant protests that one should equate to a herald for coming civil war. Desse, Kombolcha Woldiya Debrebirhan have rejected calls to protest. Even Debretabor, which is very close to Gonder have seen very little disturbance. In Gojam, Debre Markos, Finote Selam, Jega, Injibara, Dembecha, Dangla…. are also as quite. More can be said about protests in Ormomiya region than Amhara region. Even there, major cities and large towns, Adama (Nazret) Bishoftu (Debre Zeit), Jimma, Neqemt, …are sparred from protests. Some middle sized towns like Shashemene, Chiro (Asebe Teferi) Ambo, Adaiyitu, Haromaya (Alemaya)…have seen some protests or a lot of tension. In Oromiya small rural towns have had a whole lot more protests the most. The reason why I am listing all these to you is to make my point that the real war is being conducted on Facebook and tweeter. Last Sunday, when the top generals of this facebook war called their army to march in Addis Ababa, they were sure that everyone will take their orders and Weyane will be gone with. Ye Addis arada, gudayem alalachew.

            Having said all that I agree with you that there needs to be a serious change that EPRDF has to do with itself. Its local officials as David Cameron would say are fantastically corrupt. Most of greviences of especially in Oromiya has to do with land alocation for investors or projects. Compensations are too small and they don’t get to the people intended properly. With those greviences the Jawarians pester the people especially the young everyday with the call of sophisticated incitement, which makes things more complicated.

            The southern part of Ethiopia seems a different country. People in the south work frantically and seem TOTALLY undisturbed with Facebook call of revolution or anything else. I had a chance to go to Awassa and Arba Minch. As ye Addis lijoch, would like to say, “wef yelem”. This time my trip took me to Jigjiga, which made me pass through Dire Dawa. As I told you Alemaya is a bit tense. Jigjiga however is a boom town. A region in the past was known for insecurity, now can be considered mode secure and peaceful than Gonder city. That is amazing.

            In conclusion, I just say to those who are out to change Ethiopian government through facebook posts, I do believe they have a long way and many many years to go to accomplish their goal… 🙂

          • Kim Hanna

            Selam Eyob Medhane,
            .
            I really appreciate the information. As you said the Eth. Gov. spokespersons are so out of it, change has to start there. Getachew Reda need to get a desk job away from the public. We need to hire somebody like your friend, SAAY, no matter what it cost and duke it out in cyber space.
            .
            I am confident the necessary adjustments will be made to mitigate the corruption and grievances of the people. I just hope it comes without much blood shed and disorder that emboldens our real enemies, who want nothing short of our complete destruction.
            .
            Mr. K.H

          • Hayat Adem

            Dearest Horizon,
            EPRDF must do things to steer the country to stay steady on the positive direction, You are spot on on that. I think thinkers such as yourself should also throw a helping hand. While pressuring the gvt to do the right thing: security and people-to-people conflict must be avoided at all costs.

          • Dear Hayat Adem,

            I read always your input with great interest, because of the depth and breadth of your ideas and your unflinching free spirit. I would have liked to call you in my turn, the queen of awatistas, as Abi has already done so. Where are KS and Abi to bear witness? I hope we will hear from them soon.

            Simply, I do not want to imagine ethiopians shooting at eachother for ethnic (tribal) reasons. Conflict due to political ideology targets power, while ethnic conflict could lead to genocide. I hope no such a thing ever happens that leads Ethiopians to kill eachother, because they are of a different ethnic group. This takes the main factors (the government, the opposition and the people) to act in a responsible way, because whether they like it or not, they should live together to be able to survive in this dog-eat-dog world. They should not burn the bridges that joins them. Otherwise, they will be victims, and they have nobody else to blame but themselves.

            One final thing; there is this weaknesses of Habeshas. They are ready to destroy, and they never think in advance, if they can ever build again what they have destroyed.
            Regards.

        • Solomon

          Selamat Princes Hyatt Adam,
          Better form that union with Nitricc for it seem you are beggining to see Kingdom cometh! Why ask amde or Abi, us it for the purposes of one to walk you down the eisle to Nitrics hand? MaHmood SaliH can stand in. Abi is too busy with his Martini and “mn ybelu nachew meroT TiTow biscilets yashenkoretitu!” HA HA H A…
          Wait.. Here comes Luke SkyWalker iSEM!!! Tan teraTammmm!! To rescue his beloved Princes, whose endearing name for iSEM is “Chocolate”. He will liberate her from the fire breathing acid rotting breath TOOTHLESS Nitric and build her a deserving majestic castle in Debre Bizen.

          tSAtSE

        • Amde

          Selam Hayat,

          I saw the video with fascination to be honest with you. Couldn’t make out much of what they are saying. But when I grew up, a shilela and fukera was something someone did on stage in a costume that consisted of a war garb that went back a hundred years or so, with spear and sword and ox-hide shields. To see fukera and shilela alive and well with people in modern garb, toting AK-47s, recorded on smartphones and shared via youtube… well that was really something

          To my eyes the ones doing the fukera are most likely farmers (not even city slickers – the city slickers are the ones in sneakers whipping out their smartphones to record this). I am almost 100% sure they are not militia or administration. They seem genuine to me – in other words, they are expressing how they themselves feel and not as performing as propagandists per se. Much of the talk referred to the whole Welqait issue.

          I don’t typically take much stock in what is said and uttered in such performances. They are typical war dances – trash talking of your opponent, the goal being to embolden your side and frighten the other. I am pretty sure there are equally graphic and nasty things being said by the Weyane side as we speak, its just that we don’t see them on youtube.

          The big question TPLF has to ask itself is, what could it have done so catastrophically wrong that it has made an enemy of the people of Gonder. Gonder is the most Tigray like of all Ethiopian provinces/areas. There must be more Tigrayans and people of Tigrayan extraction in Gonder than anywhere else outside Tigray, with the possible exception of Addis Ababa. (This also applies to Eritreans by the way)

          If reports are to be believed, yesterday there was a sustained shootout near Gonder between Federal defense soldiers sent from Addis and Amara regional police/security forces with the regional forces gaining the upper hand . So the rebellion of the people is now being actively joined by members of the security establishment.

          TPLF/EPRDF should be thinking really hard right now, instead of finding cause to be aggrieved by farmer trash talk. The farmers have legitimate reason to trash talk TPLF. TPLF has nowhere close to any reason to respond in the violent ways it has so far chosen to.

          Amde

          • Hayat Adem

            Yes Amde,
            That is what I mean. Normal people saying those things is scary. Not necessarily such things presuppose actions but even at the oral level. Either similar things were said by others to provoke this or this is going to provoke other similar things from the other side. To tell you the truth, I thought no of this kind at people to people level.

          • Amde

            Selam Hayat,

            Yes…. war chants are meant to induce fear and inflame passions. I thought it was a lost art, apparently it isn’t

            Hayat, there are a couple of much bigger really concerning issues than these simple farmers venting their frustrations. Both are a result of TPLF meticulous design and execution, not of miscalculation. But they both are terrible for Ethiopians in general and Tigrayans in particular.

            The first is the birth of Amara nationalism, a heretofore unknown feature of our political history. TPLF spent years equating Ethiopian Nationalism with a nonexistent Amara nationalism. Intellectuals who argued otherwise were laughed at. People that wanted to simply identify themselves as Ethiopians were forced to identify as Amara. Political parties that wanted to identify themselves and work as Ethiopian were snidely laughed at and harrassed as being nothing more than Amara apologists. And for twenty five years, Amharic speakers were psychologically burdened with the ills and mistakes of the Ethiopian State. And now, a generation later, you are starting to see signs of the birth of Amara nationalism.

            The second and related point is that it is highly likely the end effect of current Amara region protests end up with the ANDM declaring de facto independence from TPLF. More equality within EPRDF is an absolute good thing for sure. But ANDM is complicit in the squashing of political opposition within the Amara region just as TPLF and OPDO have. Just like TPLF, ANDM is used to holding absolute uncontested power within its region. The possibility that such a regional political monopoly filled with a generation of functionaries who don’t know otherwise will be open to having their power tested through open election is highly questionable to me. Another way of putting it is, the probability of TPLF dictatorship being simply replaced by ANDM dictatorship is quite high, especially since ANDM can ride the new Amara nationalism by blaming everything on the TPLF.

            Amde

          • Amanuel Hidrat

            Selam Amde,

            I do not have a say on the Ethiopian issue. But Amde as an Ethiopian, who has a stake on the Ethiopian matter, I want to ask you a simple question. And that is: Are you against Federalism as a system of government? Or are you against the ruling party EPRDF? Just to know your position and learn something from you. May be I will have a follow up questions depending on your answers. I highly regard your input on governments and system of governments.

            Regard
            Amanuel Hidrat

          • Amde

            Selam Amanuel,

            That is a simple question.

            I am strongly FOR federalism as a system of government.
            I am strongly AGAINST exclusively ethnic (or more precisely – language based) federalism as we have it in Ethiopia.

            Within the Ethiopian context, it subsumes actual diversity. But even worse it makes all Ethiopians hostage to to a potential of a duopolistic Amara-Oromo “National” political game.

            As far as EPRDF is concerned, I truly admire the hard work they do to bring development and fight poverty. But I disagree vehemently with their view of what constitutes democracy, and the model of political monopoly franchise they put in place. I don’t think TPLF represents all Tigrayans, nor does ANDM all Amaras. I would even be comfortable with rephrasing that sentence with “I don’t think TPLF represents most Tigrayans, nor does ANDM most Amaras.” You can say that is an assertion on my part, but it is an assertion EPRDF has not been willing to disprove in an open competition.

            To me, the two (“ethnic political units” and “regional political monopoly by a single ethnic party”) are not separate issues. On the contrary they have really bad negative feedbacks on each other.

            Single “homogeneous” political units under the complete control of exclusive ethnic parties are not very far from meeting the classic definition of fascism.

            Such a system rewards politicians who polarize more effectively than politicians who moderate more effectively. EPRDF itself says year in year out that it is fighting narrow nationalists or chauvinist “elements” from within. It is not a question of “elements” The system rewards the type of people who can best play the game along those lines.

            Amde

          • Nitricc

            Amde, wise people warned you long time ago, but your far sighted TPLF didn’t listened.
            https://www.facebook.com/selamizim/videos/539615829559568/

          • Amde

            Nitric,

            Sometimes I wonder if you can even read.

          • Nitricc

            hey Amde; i always wondered why you never read between the lines. federalism will never work in Africa, let alone in Weyane led Ethiopia. besides, i was reinforcing your comment. having negative perception forced you to take my comment as negatively issue. i understand though, you are TPLF sympathizer and i understand your knee jerk reaction.advice, stand with your people and what is good for your country.

          • blink

            Dear Nitricc
            I think , Amde is the only reasnable person from south at this forum. Amde is not hiding behined like K.M or run away like Abi , Eyob and T.kifle

          • Hayat Adem

            Kibur Amde,
            I’ve questions for you. I am asking these questions in a spirit of learning and I know you can come up with very beautiful explanations.
            1) Do you really think the non-Amara nationalities like Oromo would readily settle with federalism that doesn’t consider language and culture?
            2) Language and culture based kililization must be seen as favorable by the big and rich kilils; and by the peripheral that are not competing for a hegemonic status. And Kilils that would be rationally wary of such system are Kilils such as Tigray that used to have a frontal seat role in the sate historically but are now relatively small demographically and economically as as the system puts them in a junior status. But it appears a paradox that the opposition is coming from the ones that must welcome it. Reflect.
            3) Related to (2), do the Amara nationals see advantage in structuring the federalism without consideration for culture and language because they believe they Amharic language and culture is more countrywide?

          • Amde

            Selam Hayat,

            Excellent questions. That’s why you are the queen.

            1. This is a question that has been debated quite a lot. It is a matter of both degree and efficacy. Do you make language the exclusive criteria? Or do you make it one of the criteria? The case of Welqayit brings the exclusive and a-priori language based determination of where a people belong to be an exercise fraught with problems. Apparently Welqayit people speak Tigrinya, so according to the current dispensation they are folded into Tigray. But the people themselves feel a stronger affiliation to Gonder through custom, culture and tradition and hence prefer to be aligned with Amharic speaking Gonderes. There are many less well known but similar issues with people in or close to the borderlands of Oromiya. In any case, I would agree almost exactly with the way you phrased it. Units SHOULD take into consideration language and custom. As well as many other factors.
            Since you specifically mentioned Oromos, let me say this. There is no other group as Ethiopian as Oromo speakers. This is not platitude or sloganeering. It is statistical fact. No other language group holds within it the full range of Ethiopian diversity. You can pick any metric.. geography, climate, livelihood, religion, intermarriage with others etc etc…. This kind of diversity tells me at the end of the day it becomes inevitable that Oromos will end up with multiple smaller Oromo majority units vs one Oromo exclusive unit. I think if you took a poll of the Oromo youth today, they will probably tell you they want one unit which they finally feel would be truly administered by Oromo speakers. But I think this is an artifact of the history of the past twenty five and hundred years. I know for a fact some of the young Oromo activists are looking ahead to a post-ethnic region period. That of course assumes the true implementation of a few core issues for them: one man one vote; Oromiffa as a Federal working language; status of Addis Ababa; proportional representation in core national institutions… I personally think those could be feasibly implemented within the next five years.

            2. Your second question really cuts to the core of the TPLF problem. At the end of the day the “ethnic” math of Ethiopia is simple. Two thirds are either Oromo or Amara. Everybody else adds up to another third. And within that third, Tigrayan are not a majority. It. This is what makes democracy and one man one vote a terrifying prospect. For that reason a true Federalism is an existential issue. The current picture, where you see protests in the larger units, is truly bizzare and tells you the arrangement TPLF put in place is simply not sustainable. It was predicated on fanning and keeping alive ethnic hostility between the two. As you can tell, this was a game only good enough for a generation at most.

            What works sustainably would have been having a system of smaller units – Tigray size for example with which one would be able constantly work by forming dynamic alliances on an issue by issue basis. For example, I cannot imagine a single issue Gonder and Tigray wouldn’t be able to have similar interests and challenges with. For example, I would think Wellegans would have more issues in common with Tigrayan than Oromo speakers in Borena (bordering Kenya).

            3. I cannot adequately answer this.. it may be an artefact of the role of the Amharic language being a State language. But until the EPRDF era, thinking of oneself as Amara first was quite unusual – one was more provincial. I dont know about the current generation.

            Short Form:
            a) With one man one vote system, the form of arrangement for the Amara and Oromo is immaterial. As long as central/federal power is roughly commensurate with population, they are OK with single units or multiple.
            B) smaller communities are better off being able to form and break ad hoc alliances with smaller units of the larger communities

          • Berhe Y

            Dear Amde,

            In light of what explained, I don’t know if it was Haile Slasie or the DERG come up with the division, the 14 Kifle hager (including Eritrea) or the 13 Kifle hager division, what was wrong with it.

            I think the main problem with it to continue was, the expansion of Tigray province from what was during that time, TPLF being the main party that brought the change may not felt to have that was enough.

            I see a similar issue in Eritrea where during Haike Slassie Eritrea was divided into 8 Awrajas. So for example the Kebesa were divided into three (Hamasien, Seraye and Akeleguzay). I consider my self lucky and I have direct link to all. The PFDJ come and changed all of it and divided Eritrea into 4 regions I think plus Asmara. It was a disaster, at least looked from the Kebesa merging. Every one from those three region, are proud of their region. There is small history of rivary, specially during the foot ball time but for the most part, they respect each other and they live along. Them the PFDJ merged most of Akeleguzay with Seraye, and to make matters worse, they made mendefera (Seraye) made the central administration. This did not seat well with people of Akeleguzay, first it was taken as insult and second it’s quite inconvenient, travel etc. And the people of Seraye felt proud, which in reality was empty pride, they didn’t really benefitted anything, but the PFDJ created perfect strategy to keep them divided (one felt in favor so they become supporters of the regime) and the other may felt out of favor and thus felt neglected.

            So based on what we are learning of Ethiopia’s experience, I think it’s wise that we consider adapting that old system. The main advantage I think is, it divide the Kebesa majority into three which makes similar size like the other Awrajas so they don’t become dominant.

            Berhe

          • Solomon

            Selamat berhe_yeman,

            Why is it that you direct us all to a theoretical alternative, while taking part in the designs by those who possess the meat and bones? Maybe its me, but your words to Hyatt Adam: “why waiste your time with people who don’t have any power to do anything.”

            This too you will not see ln disqus. Right!

            My requisit for Trust Building is Reaganesque, I.e “Trust but Verify!”
            I certainly hope all Eritreans reading this now to go up several levels to at least Code Yellow before you join the Amhara/Oromo Code Red level.
            I ain’t into Waging the Dog….

            tSAtSE

          • Berhe Y

            Hi Solomon,

            Ok I get it now. It was a passing comment to Hayat, as I thought she was spending too much time what the relationship between Eritrea and Ethiopia should be with people like us (like you, me or Nitric or Mahmuday) who we are not in any position to do anything about it. Because today Eritrea is under the control of one person IA, so basically I thought she was diverting the attention of the discussion instead of what’s happening inside Ethiopia.

            Hope this make sense.

            Berhe

          • Solomon

            Berehe,

            Now do you really think I was addressing that now. Or would you like to answer my not so rehtorical QN of the current. Pardon my sarcasm of as
            king you if my current question you are not able to see in disqus?
            Just like the good old days… Hope your sharper.
            tSAtSE

          • Solomon

            Berhe,

            In my last snapping at you, it was right after you suggested Non-Violence ad a means of struggle and even went further of suggesting books. Now, you are suggesting for reverting to Barks, Sahil….Hama,Akele,Seraye
            Despite the real nd the theatrics that’s going down.
            Now, iSEM told me a story about how you complained about the hard time I gave you back in the days…
            So, I know you have an Engineering background as do I.
            And as a consequencr of PV=nRT , not knowing the sources ordirectionss of the pressure felt, equilibrium mandates information to be released. Lest Pressured busts their pipes.
            This is why Nitric the General pays attention all the time.
            I an waiting for MH’s directive.
            tSAtSE

          • Berhe Y

            Dear Solomon,

            I don’t know why you have to mix the joke with the series stuff.

            Have you seen Hama Seraye, allele fight in your adult life, let alone conflict be it land, religion etc.

            Do you think it’s because of the Eritrean government or because of the society in itself ?

            So I ask you do you think this debub what ever has solved anything? Do you think in tomorrow democratic Eritrea this would not create a problem, as we can learn from others?

            Again it’s not a priority issue right now but the comment was in relation to what Amde talking about it.

            The problem I had with you and I think you still exibit from time to time is, you believe as costodian of Eritrean unity or the country, forgetting that you are just an individual like the rest of us with your own opinion. I think this self claimed authority that you think you own, instead of reading what’s written you go on search and kill mission and look for something else.

            I have been saying about non violence for the past 10 years as I believe we have not fully exploited it and my comment was with topic at hand.

            The only wish that I have is to see the PFDJ system to be removed from the face of the earth.

            Sorry if this sound harsh but I just want to clear things.

            Berhe

          • Solomon

            Berhe,

            Mann not only am I aware of it but I have argued it for dacades without having any emotional bias.
            Resin: By Burth, I belong to Hamasien, Seraye, Akeleguzai and Barks. And I am speaking of my immediate first home famil consisting of father,mother,children, birth place.
            But again, you are diverting from what Hyatt, AG/amdde, AH and the powerful are weaving.. Though real issue, the introduction of an emotional topic is a diversion for the many not to pay attention…. You are as skilled as Hyatt Adam…
            But, I know your fighting style….ask iSEM to borrow the Menfeetler my nephew and crew from MynufHi Tech have designed.
            I an waiting for a signal to arrive due to the drag force or microdam called Dusqusgnome.
            tSAtSE

          • blink

            Dear Berhe
            Hamassien , seraye , gash setit , sahel ,Akeloguzay , and others are gone . There is nothing that left of them to come back again. What remains is the people who do not see things in that way . They grow up listening things like , malelit , weyane , Hgdef ,Pfdj and like that . It has been ages since old time .The current Eritrea is totally different .People are dynamic by nature . I think the opposition especially the facebook and paltolk people has playes their cards unwisely. At this time what we need is a peacful leader in Ethiopia and a sudden death of Issias Afewerki after that pray . Unless what is left ? There is not that much the opposition can do to remove the dictator by force , they know it and DIA know it.

          • Amanuel Hidrat

            Selam Blink,

            No matter what the current government does, the Eritrean “geographic identity” will not be erased simply by imposing new “social engineering” without consulting the Eritrean people. Everything in our Eritrea is by decree and that will be changed sooner or later.

            regards

          • blink

            Dear Mr.Amanuel
            You know for a fact people are not getting fair information from the PFDJ and other people , generational change brings a new political landscape to any country . We are living in a fast moving world and in fast moving world if you can not educate the young , you lose the next that is it. There is no mechanisim to creat the old as new .How many people do you think get right information about who they are. There is a very very smal chance for Eritrea to have the old geographic identity,. it is not visible politically , economically and even the populations life style are just not at the old time. I can not see any new government who is elected democratically to come at short time to do what you say.

          • Berhe Y

            Dear Blink,

            It’s a time bomb IA buried inside. If you think there is an election in representative of debub and a guy from Seraye and another guy from akele and a third guy from Hamasien are running for the same spot, you will see how ugly it will get. Same goes from people of the low lands and semhar.

            It’s not that Eritreans are different that any other people but it’s the human nature. You are comfortable with what you know.
            Anyway an issue not worth it’s time, but if you think the problem in the opposition has nothing to do with region, and religion then all I can say is that’s the reflection of tomorrow Eritrea.

            Berhe

          • blink

            Dear berhe
            Regional politics in the opposition is burned until it looks ugly . I can not imagine all the division in the opposition is the same inside Eritrea , you can may be find few just for personal glory but the idea is just not visible. I understand it is not timely not even close .

          • Nitricc

            Hey Blink; PIA needs to stay. I agree he needs to implement a rule law and needs to free all prisoners. He must stop arresting people with the due process and the likes of limiting national military service what have you other than that he must stay. Don’t worry about election and constitution we will take care of it.

          • blink

            Dear Nitricc

            I do not understand why the man should stay , i mean what is the point ?

          • Amde

            Selam Berhe,

            You said, “So based on what we are learning of Ethiopia’s experience, I think it’s wise that we consider adapting that old system. The main advantage I think is, it divide the Kebesa majority into three which makes similar size like the other Awrajas so they don’t become dominant.”

            I agree with you. Plus, if you think about it, the reason people are still psychologically tied to the old system is because it is now their true identity. The language they speak is an important consideration but where it counts – in terms of forming meaningful association for productive scial and political work – it becomes distinctly immaterial. That kind of region-based bond is not an artificial thing – it develops over many generations and has the weight of true organic history to it. In a multi-ethnic society, regional affiliation are not a bad thing – they are especially to be valued to prevent tyranny of the majority.

            Amde

          • Emba

            Selam Amde,
            Great discussion. You stated “apparently Welqayit people speak Tigrinya, so according to the current dispensation they are folded into Tigray. But the people themselves feel a stronger affiliation to Gonder through custom, culture and tradition and hence prefer to be aligned with Amharic speaking Gonderes.” You correctly stated the language of Welkayt is Tigrigna but what are the other customs, culture, and tradition that aligned with Amharic speaking Gonderes and not Tigrayans that you indicated in your post?

            Furthermore, how did you arrive at the conclusion that the people of Welkayt want to identify as Gonderes/Amharas as oppose to Tigrayans or as simply Welkayts?

          • Amde

            Selam Emba,

            I think I said they feel more affiliated with Gonder. You said Gonder/Amhara. I didnt say that. I don’t think Gonder = Amara.

            Beterefe I dont know enough to tell you why they should end up this way or not. At the end of the day it really doesn’t matter to me. It is quite evident though they don’t think the current arrangement is working for them.

            Amde

          • Emba

            Selam Emba,
            I’m sorry for assuming Gondar= Amara. What evidence do you have that they feel more affiliated to Gondar than Tigray or themselves?

            When you say the current arrangement is not working for them, do you mean for Gonderes or Wolkayts? I’m asking you these questions because I feel like people assume things from isolated incidents and draw conclusions based upon them.

            You can correct me if am wrong but from my understanding, the primary question of Wolkayt is for better administration and lack of democracy. This are the demands basically everyone in the country.

          • Hayat Adem

            Kibur Amde,
            Sorry for responding late and you have already generated a lot of reactions from many. Thanks for all that and i didn’t expect any less. Really great. I wish Awate recognizes forumers here for different exemplary contributions: intellectual, decency, presence, popular (that can come from the number of votes), etc.. every year. Yours would be the first.
            I do agree with nearly all of your points but few…
            1) All federal systems have some identity currency to them (explicit or not, language being part of it or not). Otherwise, there would never be any justification for federal system. I am aware “decentralization” can be pursued without federalization. If language is added as a definer, then it helps. For the life of me, I would not see how these diversities become liability to a nation building. Ethiopia never tried any kind of federalism (AG argues Minilik’s and Yohannes’ regimes were federal but I think that is a stretch when you think of the period where that concept is considered a bit of recent times), but what has been achieved in terms of state consolidation and nation building under the long existence of Ethiopia is little. Language/culture federalism sounds a way for me. And yes, i think that kind formula can be considered for Eritrea as well. Actually, the kind of system i have been pondering for Eritrea is slightly different which I call it “a nested federalism” That divides Eritrea in to two broad federal entities (metaHit /Kebessa mainly of culture) and then the two further decentralized into sub-federal entities of 9, mainly of language. I would never allow a 6 year kid to be schooled, and a local resident to be administered in a different language and culture that is not her or his mother tongue. The bottom or top line here is, culture/language based federalism is not a deviation it is modern, honor and recognition. Philosophically, I can’t have any relations with you unless me is me and you are you. So federalism or Unitary of any kind are about a relational arrangement. In any relational arrangement components are made first before the whole and as such they are a starting setting, not negotiated makings. And I am the kind of person who thinks empowering the component is empowering the whole.
            2) What you said about the Oromo makes a whole sense.
            ) What you said on EPRDF and the Economic Development also makes a whole sense.
            4) There is one big book written by TPLF towards the end of 1980s. It is a compilation of a decade long debate that happening between EPRP and TPLF. It deals with all the issues we are discussing. I disagree with the notion Horizon mentioned that TPLF brought these kind of federal system in order to dominate the power. Honestly, this is not the kind of political formula any group representing a minority would dominate and sustain power. Federal system means empowering the federates. That means empowering Amara and Oromia and Tigray as separate entities. That erodes power from the center and shifts them to the big federates. I think we should see their rational with the context of the time they introduced this. When Derg was about to die , there were 17* armed groups inside Ethiopia fighting for separation. Today, almost every one is fighting either for hegemony or consolidated autonomy. That is quite a shift where TPLF/EPRDF should be given enough credit for
            *I think I don’t want to over-report someone here for some of the ideas in 4 but…

          • Solomon

            Selamat Hyatt Adam,

            Recognized.

            1. Your divided into two Eritrean Federalism form of government could be impimproved by Three regions which would be best for me, but why not the current Six or the old Eight?
            2. The altruisim of TPLF/EPRDF Federalism formulation may very well be a sincere far sighted nation building and development goal of Weyenti such as you and Aya Amanuel Hidrat or berhe_yeman out of genuine respect and or incentivised relationship with PMMZ’s TPLF. The flaws and my main criticism however is that whether it is due to small groups or individual greed of amassing wealth and infrastructure in favor if Tigray since 1991. Is it very evident or barely noticeable as to weather or not the 6% Tigryans did benefit from EPRDF’s reparations dept to Tigray national budgeting or simply TPLF utilizing it might and snatching more for it’s region as entitlement. Is it possible amde is admiring EPRDF due to his witnessing poverty eradication success in Tigray only? What of the other province’s youth significant unemployment and economic woes?
            3. In short, TPLF’s leveraging on the divides, of Oromo/AmHara as well as Eritrea as hindrances to Ethiopian and regional stability and development will be their undoing. Their Federalism prescription as a best form or intellectual theory could indeed be the winning one to convince the intelectuals elites if Ethiopia and beyond with clever funding schemes to fatten their individual coffers. Again, I think EPRDF or TPLF has to face the rising Ethiopian Youth demands as well as some how release some pressure valves with Eritrea immediately for it’s own province’s people sake.
            I don’t think Eritrean matters is mutually exclusive from that of Ethiopia’s.
            Thanks for the education to all, the dynamics I am a bit clear on now. Focusing only on Eritrea and Eritreans plight is what have corrupted Eritrean oppositions the past two decades.
            On to the Modler.
            QN: Who is General Tso?
            General Tse is asking.
            tSetSA

          • Hayat Adem

            Hi Solomonom,
            1) What is this question of General Tso if it is not a tune to an alien drum Amde was mentioning?
            2) Eritrean Federalism can come in many options, the one you suggested being one, but federalism is not an enemy to nation building. If it were, it can only be the other way, any country that sees diversity as a threat doesn’t deserve to hold together.

          • Solomon

            Selamat Hyatt,

            Don’t hate on my eggrol and General Tso’s Campawww Fried Rice and Chicken.
            As I told AH I will tell you HA. There are variables we are all guilty of neglecting. You and Aya will soon have your Eurica! AH:HA!!! moment when as ammde is confident on both you to lead and PROVE practical the best theory amongst all theories.
            Now, please excuse me Sire as I am hearing the sound Nanu Nanu.. ET phone home!
            I believe it is MoMo’s Hateta. Now, I am worried about a potential Nitric Acid explosion at Arrd Awate.

            i.SEM be very very careful on your next editorial considering Meskerm 1.
            All the NinjaSamurai: Haii! Wakkari Mashta.
            tSAtSE

          • Amde

            Selam Hayat,

            To be honest, the line between federalism and robust decentralization is fuzzy to me as well. To me it revolves around the idea of sovereignity. The lawyers might think otherwise of course, but sovereignity is an aggregation of all the things that one has complete authority over.

            I tend to agree with AG in his argument that Menelik and Yohannes were Federalists. Nothing says they were democrats. We tend to try and see them with today’s very different perspective, but they generally followed the maxim that if you recognized who was boss, and paid your taxes, you were pretty much left alone to be the local king.

            That balance was irrevocably thrown out with the advent of modernity. In the previous centuries, the top-dog was determined by war between units (kingdoms) that were more or less matched in terms of access to the means of war (guns and what not). With the advent of the 20th century, this balance was thrown out with the Shewan incumbent in the top-dog position now getting the benefit of access to means of war more in tune with those reserved for countries. And with that came the gradual erosion of local power until we had a King-of-Kings with no Kings below him.

            Politically speaking, there were no Amara or Oromo political units fighting or contending for power. There were just provinces with majorities of these ethnicities. The ideas of an Oromo or Amara “nation” (distinctly different from elites who came from provinces with these majorities) are quite new – not much further than the 60s or fifties.

            When TPLF came to power in 1991, it chose to give prominence to the groups espousing the liberation front sentiment. And later on to institutionalize their ideas in the ethnic regions. The thing is, it is now impossible to see whether they instituted these regions out of goodwill or for tactical political advantage simply because their political hegemony for a generation has blurred that picture. You are absolutely right in that empowering much larger ethnic groups than yourself would be an irrational thing for a smaller group to do. Unfortunately, what Horizon says is the popular consensus. Since they monopolized everything, the Oromo are convinced TPLF never meant to really give power to the units. Since they actively demonized the Amara to the Oromo, the Amara are convinced it is a fake federalism to maintain power.

            In any case, I just think we have a lot more diversity and hence “identity” than just the linguistic ones. The very fact people are arguing about regionalism (in Eritrea but also exists in Ethiopia as well) is because there are deeply held identities at a psychologically more intimate level than the linguistic one. I just never understood why people always complained about “regionalism” – it is just the natural result of population growth and geographic diffusion.

            The federalism we put in place should just recognize that.

            Amde

          • Solomon

            Selamat Gual Adem,

            Who is General Tso and why is he not “The right General.”

            TaErifa TaErifiha…
            Thank you for asking AG the right questions for the forum and all awatistas.
            I await More “the best,” Mo’s next cooling response to you.
            Yo Adrien! MH, I need you to drop everything and reinforce, and stop me from going Sylvester Stallone LONE Rambo! I don’t even think AG knows what’s going on now.

            tSAtSE

          • Dear Hayat Adem,

            It seems that a lot of discussion has already taken place and I might not be aware of all that has been said. Nevertheless, it I can say my two cents worth on your first question, as I see it from my side of the shore, it is like this.

            I am among those who vote for ethnic federalism, not because I like it, but out of necessity. TPLF and OLF, have of course a different role for their brain child, ethnic federalism. TPLF has used it to divide and rule, and OLF dreams of the day when with the help of article 39 it will be able to create its own independent Oromia.

            We have got to have in mind two main factors: the diversity and multi-ethnicity of the Ethiopian states and the history of the relationship of the three main ethnicities of Ethiopia (Amharas, Oromos and Tigres). Unfortunately, the Ethiopian population is not homogenous, and much more the relationship of the three main ethnicities has always been characterized by rivalry, confrontations and wars, over so many centuries. Worse still is the fact that some ethnic groups have kept these past memories as vividly as possible as if they happened yesterday for their own reasons. It is therefore impossible to bring Amharas, Tigres and Oromos under one centralized government, which does not delimit the influence of each ethnic group. Going back to the old centralized form of unitary government or any other arrangement that does not contain the Ethiopian opium of ethnicity simply will fail, and much more, we had been there. Regional federation will not be accepted, because it will bring different ethnic groups together. Unfortunately, at least an other century should pass before their humanity ties them together more than their ethnicity.

            Today the problem is not ethnic federalism per se, but ethnic federalism dominated by one ethnic group plus the absence of real democracy.
            Regards..

          • Amanuel Hidrat

            Selam Horizon,

            Before you give your own vote as to what kind of Federalism your choice will be, why do not Waite for those who are looking an alternative to the one in place? Sr. Amde is one of them. He will educate us what kind of Federalism and how it will satisfy the diversities of Ethiopia. The crux of the matter is how their prescription will address to the existing grievances without inducing other grievances. Their Alternave should be something that gives an equitable sharing to the Ethiopian Nations and Nationalities however they want the redistricting of the state’s. Let us listen to them.

            Regards,
            Emanuel Hidrat

          • Dear Ammanuel Hidrat,

            I am ready to lend my ears to anybody who has something to say, but that does not prevent me from having my opinion, or I should first wait for the opinion of others before I form my own. I respect Amde’s opinion on every subject he discusses on awate.com. I have learnt a lot from him, and I do not think it will bother him to see other people having a different opinion from him, or put forward their opinion before he says all he wants to say. Afterall, my comment was for Hayat Adem, without saying that others should not comment on it, of course, without others telling me when to have an opinion of mine. At least I tried to explain why I voted the way I voted. This should have been the point of disagreement, and not why I did not wait.
            Regards.

          • Amanuel Hidrat

            Dear Horizon,

            I do not mean you should not involve in the debate. What I mean when I said wait is , if you support the “current federal system” let those who oppose it, spell out in detail the alternative. When they do, it is even better to rebut it for yourself. You just bombarded them with relevant questions how their prescriptions address the current grievances and possible future grievances, without substituting grievances by other grievances. At the end of the day the system should bring a fair equitable sharing among the shareholders of the Ethiopian social forces. I hope I made clear my statement what I mean by the word “wait”. Other than that I equally respect your views and open to learn.

            Regards

          • Amanuel Hidrat

            Dear Amde,

            So far very persuasive answer or argument. Thank you for that. The difficulties are on the specificities and I am sure the follow up questions will not be as easy as my first questions.

            Okay Amde, at least we will agree that a multi-ethnic diversified society like Ethiopia, Federal system is the only option, more so when the diversities are bogged by inherent mistrusts. I will leave the EPRDF issue to Ethiopians. I will further my follow up questions on the theory and institutional concepts. The questions are as follows: (a) if you are strongly for Federalism, what kind of Federalism do you think will address the sociopolitical reality of Ethiopia (b) How do you evaluate the mistrust of the diversities, especially among the four major Ethiopian ethnics ( the Amhara, the tigreyan, the Oromos, and the Somalis)? (c) What ever Federal system you have in mind, how will it address the issue of minorities (minority ethnics) to avoid marginalization and ensure equitable sharing? If the current Federalism (ethnic federalism or language based federalism) does not work, what kind of “Redistricting” or “Kilils” will work taking into considerations the mistrusts among the Ethiopian social groups and their grievances? The reason why I am asking you, b/c you are looking for an alternative Federal system and I want to learn something I don’t know. Probably I might argue on the concepts depending on your answers.

            Thanks,
            Amanule Hidrat

          • Ismail AA

            Ahlen Amanuel,

            I notice that you and Amde are having mature exchange of views – the sort of debate I would one would cherish in this forum. Amde’s position represent wise angle from which the situation in Ethiopia ought to be approached. When alternatives are offered, blanket condemnation of the status quo would tend to recede; it’s the antithesis of solutions motivated by chauvinism, which feeds on nostalgia for the status quo ante: restoration of old system of centralism under the domination of the remnants of the former feudal-cum-imperial regime under the shadow of Oromo-Amhara partnership supplanting the defunct Amhara-Tigrian alliance.
            But reality tells us that restoring the old order would be anachronistic and near wishful dream since no component of the country would ever condone it. History has already moved on, and domination by any of the nationalities, alone or in cohort with others, has gone for good.

            The questions you have posed to Amde are significant and could add up to be a package that could become real challenge to conscious Ethiopian elites who should be very worried about their country’s uncertain future, which once (God forbidding) slides into turmoil, it would be difficult to manage or preclude it re-entering a Zemene Mesafint era. During the previous one the warlords fought one another with spears, swords and stones even. This time devastating mass killer modern weapons are plenty.

            Such developments would pose direct threat to all the neighboring countries in the region, including our own. So, we have all stakes in the hope that our Ethiopian brothers (both the government and opposition side) would be wise to sort out their problems peacefully through dialogue with the best interest of united Ethiopia in clear focus.

            Regards,
            Ismail

          • Amde

            Selam Amanuel,

            I apologize for the delay in responding.

            To answer your question, allow me to express how I see Ethiopia and then I will paraphrase what I responded to Yoty Topy above.

            I think of Ethiopia as a nation of minorities. When I say minorities, the most obvious one of course is the ethnic one (which in the current arrangement is really talking about linguistic one). But I think there are many other sub-identities, that cannot be easily categorized in the current linguistic/ethnic system.

            I think this is an enormous blessing. We should cultivate our diversity, and allow it to express itself in however form it wants – not just the linguistic straitjacket we have currently imposed.

            It means, under the right circumstances, there will be no permanent majorities. For issues to get resolved, majorities will have to form on an ad hoc temporary and alliance basis.

            I have to take issue with your characterization of “mistrust of the diversities, especially among the four major Ethiopian ethnics ( the Amhara, the tigreyan, the Oromos, and the Somalis)” Call me naive, I accept it. Perhaps it comes from the fact that I am myself from mixed parentage, and that I was born and grew up in Addis Ababa. But to me, the “mistrust” between the major ethnic groups is more illusion than real. There is just as much mistrust within each group. There is no single coherent voice and interest for an ethnic group. As you can imagine, the larger and more diverse each group, the more the internal incoherence. The common assumption is for example, that all Oromos can’t wait to be independent, but you should see how vehemently some of the Shewan Oromos feel against that idea – as far as they are concerned the Oromo are central to Ethiopia. I was this weekend talking to someone from Gojjam, who was amazed that TPLF has managed to have Gonderes and Gojjames agree on something for once.

            In the Ethiopian context, as I have said before, the ethnic demographic math is simple. Oromo and Amharic speakers are two third of the population. Everybody else – including the Tigrayans and Somalis you mentioned – make up the final third. It may historically have the been the case that the elites of Tigray (the province – not the ethnic group – a very important distinction) were enthusiastic players of the power game with the elites of the other provinces – Lasta, Gojjam, Shewa etc… But I am assuming that going forward, the political game is going to be more or less on a democratic (free elections) basis. Which is essentially a demographic game.

            To my mind long term stability could be found by
            1) cooling and tempering the nationalistic excesses of the larger groups,
            2) giving strong protections and additional political weights for the smaller groups.
            3) allow free elections and the other things that go with it
            4) implement proportional representation (as opposed to the cursed first past the post system)

            To my mind, the solution would be to form multi-ethnic Federal units with ethnic majorities within them. Something perhaps between the old provinces and current zones. Within each unit, you would have provisions that allow minorities additional powers they can use as leverage. Perhaps something like the way the US is set up where the smaller states have a disproportionately larger electoral weight.

            If you are an Amharic or Oromo speaker, your language group would be a majority in a number of these new states. There is no existential threat to you or your language (I foresee Oromiffa being a Federal working language in the not too distant future by the way). You can protect your interest in any unit, as well as at the federal level.

            What is in it for the smaller groups? Some medium sized groups like Tigray will not have multiple units obviously. But, a party that stands for Tigrayan interests, that wins in Tigray, but also runs in a future Gonder where there are significant Tigrigna speaking population is now a possibility. Such a party can be involved in the political processes in Tigray, in neighboring units such as Gonder, and at the Federal level. It will have multiple levers to play with. The same can be said of a pro-Amara party winning as a minority in a Tigrayan district.

            Once the language and cultural rights are protected, the rest of politics really becomes a matter of issue prioritization and asset allocation. I really do not see what issues could there possibly be for a Tigrayan farmer that a Gondere or Wellega farmer don’t have in common. Conversely, the nomadic Oromo and Somali speakers have a lot more issues they would face (grazing land, water, vast spaces etc..) compared to Oromo speakers in Keffa who make a lot of their income from selling cash crops off their lush farms. The system should be set up to encourage coalition forming and issue based alliances.

            I really believe implementing proportional representation is crucial, especially if we are talking about multi-ethnic units. Without that, elections in the first-past-the-post system become exercises in ramping up and maximizing differences. It may not be a guarantee, but it definitely maximizes the chances of ethnic or political minorities having at least some impact in the political process.

            I hope I make sense. Think of it somewhat like the Swiss system, where they have multiple French or German speaking cantons.

            The four elements I listed above have to all be in place though.

            Is this something we can implement in Ethiopia? I feel it is feasible and doable. At least it should be up for discussion.

            Amde

          • Kim Hanna

            Selam Amde,
            .
            I read your response to inquiry of Yoty, Hayat and this one with interest. I appreciate your views and knowledge on the subject matter. I have been away from Ethiopia for a long long time and the forming of the Amhara Killil at that time had always left me with a wait and see attitude. I am a Shoa Amhara and most people looked at folks from Gojjam or Gonder as another kingdom. Now I see a little more affinity with this new identity, Amhara and wherever that might lead.
            .
            As you said we have new generations and the new leaderships have to navigate with what we have and find solutions until the next set of problems that will come. Always work in progress.
            .
            I think if time permits you may not need to wait to be asked but let us read about a subject matter that you deem need to be known.
            .
            Thanks again.
            .
            Mr. K.H

          • አዲስ

            Hi Amde, Amanuel

            I am following your discussion here with great interest. Amde, my idea of what kind of federalism is good for Ethiopia is much more aligned with yours. I hope we’ll be able to implement something similar in not so distant future.

            I also hope EPRDF soon realize the problem the country is facing right now can not be solved by internal party gimgema and be part of the solution by including all stakeholders.

            Despite the blood shed and gloom, I remain hopeful and convinced that Ethiopians will come out of this crisis united and stronger.

            Thanks,
            Addis

          • Amanuel Hidrat

            Selam Amde,

            Again thank you for your insight to the issue at hand.
            I could somewhat agree to your argument with some caveat to your assumptions on the mistrust issue. Though my recollections and my understanding about the mistrusts I mentioned earlier, goes back to the sixties and early seventies, when I use to live in Ethiopia, I do not think it is mitigated even in the current situation.However though, your optimism to the management of Ethiopian social contradiction is something everyone has to welcome it and I did. With that said, I will continue with my follow up questions.

            In your response you have said “Ethiopia is a nation of minorities .” When we say minorities it is relative to something to certain majority within a given contexual realities. There is no need of using the word of minorities if there is no majority relatively speaking. I do believe there are minorities and majorities of social groups relatively within the context of Ethiopian population. Ethiopians must accept the msjority/minority realities, and as often in any society the majority suppress the rights of minorities. The crux of the matter is to accept and deal fairly and equitably those social demands. But, what do you mean Ethiopia is a nation of minorities?

            Second, if the issue is for fair proportional representation, does it matter how to redistrict them? If yes, then what will be the factors other than language and common cultural make up (which finally falls to a social group identity) can be used for purposes of redistricting in forming Federal states?

            In one of your comment you suggest the splitting of the big ethnics in to multiple states. What will be its significance of it if the issue of proportional representation Observed in the electoral law and process? second if you are looking fair representation for the small social groups like the small/large states of the USA, then wouldn ‘t the second chamber of the parliament structured similar way to reflect your suggestion?

            From your argument the redistricting except with some modification does fall to the same ethnic feferalism. Correct me if I am wrong. The reason why I am saying that, is still you depict tigray as one kilil or state in one of your comment.

            Finally, you have a palpable idea that you could share with your fellow Ethiopians, if you could invest some of your time, and come up with a researched paper on the pertinent issue.

            Regards
            Amanuel Hidrat

          • Nitricc

            Hey AMDE; it is good to read some solution oriented article the likes of this, yours. but in your mind what is the most pressing issue of the people? what do they want? With out addressing that pressing issue of the people, no solution can be intelligently reached. once you identified the most pressing issue of the people, can this existing government capable of addressing and answering to the satisfaction of the people? you have four points of plan that you think are part of the solution but don’t you think a new constitution should be written? can the old districting system be a solution? I mean why not go back to the province system that you had during the king and the Derg? if you ask me, the Killil and the corruption that came with it are the mother of the problem.

          • Yoty Topy

            Hi Amde,

            I think I agree with you that a government based on ethno-centric systems is not sustainable and we see the shortcomings of that as you have outlined clearly. However, I have few reservation on some of the assertions you have made and which I frequently hear it from the opposition group i.e there was no Amhara nationalism prior to. By definition , “nationalism” has a hint of real or perceived ‘threat’ to it. They did not feel that before, because they were the status quo. They dominated everything from politics, economics to customs. But with the rise of other empowered nationalities, they find themselves competing for the spotlight hence the rise of Nationalism. The same phenomena that is currently manifesting in the West i.e the rise of White nationalism who feel threatened by the encroachment of brown people. So what is the solution then? A situation where everyone armed to the teeth with nationalism cannot be good. But if that is not good, then what? Should we go back to an era when a single group dominated basically every aspect of life so that we can spare ourselves the onset of this hyper nationalism that we have now?

          • Solomon

            selamat Topsy Turvy,

            I got you covered. You have also noticed Turkey and their Otaman Empire revival….
            Don’t be startled or scared, but Noah’s Arch is being built as we speak. Segregste , then choose your male and female representatives. … Then Neo challenges the destructions and rebuilding of the matrix…

            No, in all seriousness I have a sound theory/counter theory to the globalization reordering of killils even the EU…. but I will speak of it in a more serious tone later.
            First thing is firs: Candor and complete honesty by Ethiopian and Eritrean elites.

            It is impossible and futile to go forward with your controlled experiment. Who.were your consultants?

            Allow me to put in a bid for the account on behalf of my Mergers, acquisitions and spinniffs consulting firm;
            ZaEgol Analytics Inc.
            An AmErutrean GitSAtSE subsidiary.

            tSAtSE

          • Yoty Topy

            Hi Solomon,

            ‘impossible and futile to go forward with your controlled experiment. Who.were your consultants?’

            Are you talking about ethnic-federalism?

          • Solomon

            Hello Yoty Topy,

            Yes. I am just waiting for an awate select Meskerem 1 editorial. I am also going to do my Bronx Science HW Aya Amanuel has assigned me first.

            I see Fanti Ghana is reading to lead the Black Stars with his Kwame Nkrumah statesman lessons on African Independence.

            tSAtSE

          • Amde

            Selam Yoty Topy,

            I apologize for the delayed response.

            You said “By definition , ‘nationalism’ has a hint of real or perceived ‘threat’ to it. They did not feel that before, because they were the status quo. They dominated everything from politics, economics to customs.”

            I believe what you are saying is, since Nationalism is formed out a sense of being threatened and victimized, and the Amhara were in fact the beneficiaries of the pre-existing status quo, they did not feel threatened, and hence had no reason to form or create a Nationalism of their own.

            I take it then you agree with me on the fundamental point that there is now an Amara Nationalism which did not exist before?

            Where you then contradicted yourself is on the cause. Having said that in general Nationalism is formed out of a sense of victimization, you then say “But with the rise of other empowered nationalities, they find themselves competing for the spotlight hence the rise of Nationalism.”

            One way to interpret that is to say.. the loss of pre-existing privilege can be seen as a threat sufficient enough to morph into a Nationalist cause. I can see the merit of this type of argument.

            But I may also argue that what you are saying is the formation of an Amara nationalism is a special circumstance, created out of no objective sense of victimization. This I reject, if for no other reason that Occam’s Razor – there is nothing special about the Amara. Someone has to go out of their way to prove the exceptionality of the Amara, before we start saying theirs is a special case.

            What are we to make of the fact that this is a generational uprising? This is a generation which was born, grew up and was educated under EPRDF. Whatever privileges the Amara are supposed to have had were removed and institutionally limited. This particular generation has no privilege to protect.

            You said “Should we go back to an era when a single group dominated basically every aspect of life so that we can spare ourselves the onset of this hyper nationalism that we have now?” I would venture to say it is not a matter of “going back”. That is the current reality that is fueling the fires burning in the country right now. People perceive the TPLF exercising supreme and unchecked power (“… single group dominating every aspect of life..” as you phrased it). And since TPLF has done a drumbeat of telling everyone that TPLF = Tigray = Tigrayans (they suffocate opposition and alternate Tigrayan voices just as thoroughly as they suffocate everybody else), everybody is taking them at their word. And here we are.

            You said, “So what is the solution then? A situation where everyone armed to the teeth with nationalism cannot be good.” You are exactly right. Personally, I would like to see a process where the nationalisms of the two largest ethnic communities are cooled and diffused through many mechanisms, and strong minority community protections. If you are from the smaller communities, the last thing you want is to feed nationalistic competitions between the largest ones. First of all, they can morph into exclusive and xenophobic forces on their own. And secondly, the competition between the two can be destructive for the others. There is a good reason for the adage “When elephants fight it is the grass that gets hurt”

            What TPLF has been engaged in has been fattening of the elephants and poking them so they get and stay angry at each other. The belief was they would forget the grass. Well too bad. I think coming generation of Tigrayans will be shaking their head in wonderment that this policy was considered sane and good for Tigray.

            I am just saying since you asked, but I am aware what will emerge will be something out of the current chaos, not my fondest wishes. I can see the there.. but getting from here to there.. well that is a different story

            We forget we are a nation of minorities. That is a huge blessing from my perspective. It means we have built in demographic features which with a little tweaking can be supported by a political system that rewards co-operation, coalition forming etc etc… I think a federalism based on units between the current zones and the old kiflehager will work beautifully. It will create multiple multi ethnic units with ethnic majorities, and constitutionally protected smaller communities. But – a big but – it absolutely needs political freedoms that will allow people to elect who they want, with proportional representation instead of the current First Past the Post system. The idea of political hegemony is baked into EPRDF’s DNA, (not just TPLF) so the open political competition part is anathema for them. But without it, forget everything else.

            Amde

          • Solomon

            Selamat Mr. Amde,

            There is news of EPRDF implementing a Three Month State of Emergency? If true, what effect will that have on the restless youth as this does seem a generational uprising to the hegamonic rule of EPRDF consisting all regional privileged governors? Could Derg erra like declaration feed an influx of youth to the jungles for armed insurrection?
            Is Chinese labor import a significant contributor to the unemployment rate or population explosion the main and only culprit to this current Ethiopian in a picle state?
            Should you find time to answere to complement your long out look solution oriented contributions.
            tSAtSE

          • Amde

            Selam tSAtSE,

            Well, one facebook posting I saw talked about a one month plan of action where the EPRDF member party central committees are to hold meeting, followed by other meetings etc…. I haven’t heard of a three month state of emergency. I wouldn’t know how different it is going to look from what obtains now. So far the government has been using the stick.. little talk of carrots. It seems to want to talk about the type of stick instead.

            I don’t think Chinese labor is any meaningful contributor to unemployment – that would be negligible to non-existent. But Chinese domination of economy could be worrying trend. It is definitely a factor in the construction sector.

            Amde

          • Yoty Topy

            Hi Amde !

            First, thanks for taking your time to respond to my concern thoroughly. I do always learn from your inputs.

            I agree with you on most of the issues including the need for EPRDF to open up political space and the glaring limitations of ethnic-based political system.
            I thought it was funny to watch some of the ETV program on the celebration of the 35th anniversary of the founding of ANDM. Its original name was converted to ANDM from EPDM to emphasize that it was formed to emancipate the oppressed people of Amara. I was thinking ,’ from whom?:)’
            But the issue that I do not want to get lost in the midst of trying to figure out what is the ideal form of government good for our country we should not forget the injustice that was committed on other minorities. Let me know if you feel that is unfair accusation.:)

          • አዲስ

            Hi Yoty,

            I hope you are doing well.

            A quick question for you, last time we spoke (i believe a couple of months back), you said the Oromo Protest which you coined as the warka movement, lacks wide appeal. Do you still believe that?

            A simple Yes or NO would suffice if you don’t mind. I don’t want to muddle the discussion in the current thread.

            Thanks,
            Addis

          • Yoty Topy

            Hi Addisye:)

            Yea, nice to see you too.
            Yes, I have changed my view since then 🙂

            Amde 2025!

          • Kim Hanna

            Selam Amde,
            .
            The reports you mentioned that the Defense forces and Amara regional militia were engaged sounded a rather ominous development. My hope is sometimes these reports are produced and disseminated by an individual and subsequently gets picked up by the likes of CNN or other legitimate news organizations. It is unfortunate.
            .
            It is so hard to get a clean information these days. The enemies of Ethiopia close and far are excited and busy adding value to their evil intentions to exaggerate everything bad.
            .
            I hope that is the case. In the absence information one has to rely on reasonable people like you to form an assessment and likely scenarios.
            .
            Mr. K.H

          • አዲስ

            Hi Kim,

            I hope you are doing well.

            In more than one occasion here, I read you stating : “It is so hard to get a clean information these days”, what do you think is the fundamental reason for that?

            Thanks,
            Addis

    • Peace!

      Dear Mahmuday,

      Hayat Adem and Amanuel Hidrat are not going to speak out against TPLF because that’s the only leverage they have in mind that make change in Eritrea go their way. It is becoming clear that the reason why our opposition groups remain crippled and failing to make progress is because not all of them are interested on stable and democratic Eritrea. It is not that a surprise, but rather to conspire in the name of justice against a country and people is just morally dubious and foolish. Both people need each other and together they will win!

      Peace!

    • Hayat Adem

      Hey Mahmuday,
      I thought I killed you and I was regretting it with too much guilt. Thanks for coming back. The Ethiopian marathonist act must have done a miracles cure on you. That all is for a good reason. No you didn’t lose me; i thought I lost you. We are both here.
      I think the marathoner did fine. But one question: would you react in the same way and strongly support if that act came from Ghirmay? Would you call it an act of heroism or treason? If the former, would you come out and criticize Ghirmay for becoming a less hero than Lelissa?

      • Mahmud Saleh

        Selam Hayat
        I passed up some good comments from peace, Mesob worqi, Nitrickay the great, and amde because of time pressure. I could not afford passing your toothless comment though. No, I can’t go on without replying to you. Now, what was the question, Hayat?
        Hayat, although you overdo the suppression fire, you still do it with grace, and I’m fine with it.
        One more: I agree with Gen.Nit that Eritrea (Girmay) should express his support for the young athlete who told the world what’s going on in his neighborhood and to his friends by one simple symbol. BTW, his name is Jegnaw Feyisa Lilesa.

        • Hayat Adem

          Aha Mahmuday,
          Then dialogue format may do better
          Hayat: Mahmuday, you are now saying our Eritrean athlete should also support the Ethiopians:) Don’t we have problems in Eritrea that are worse than the Ethiopians?
          Mahmuday: No, Hayat. There is one point you don’t understand. We always give priority to helping Ethiopians. We even try to help them preserve their unity. We were guarding them in their palaces in 1991. So, for us, it is not new helping Ethiopians first. Ghirmay should support the Ethiopians before turning his face to Eritrea.
          Hayat: I see. You boldly asserted “Like many of my generation, I never held any contempt against the Ethiopian people, never, even when all I knew about Ethiopia was war and the brutal massacres of my people.” What do you mean?
          Mahmuday: I have always been like that. We had other tegadelti who really look down at Ethiopians, especially the Amaharas. But that never was part of me from day one unlike my generation.
          Hayat: Bad news Mahmuday. Blame it on Disqus but a year ago you told me here in public in the open: “I used to think Amhara are bad ( I used to take it synanimous to the Ethiopian army”
          Mahmuday: Listen Hayat…why are you digging my notes from a year ago. Times have changed. I have changed.
          Hayat: So Mahmuday why did you want to say then, “like my generations, I never…” if it is something that came now?
          Mahmuday: Hayat, I am so disappointed by you. I think I will stay away until another marathoner from Ethiopia does something…

          • Mahmud Saleh

            Selam Gual Adem
            Fact: TPLF was founded on the program that The Great Republic of Tigray encompassed “all Tigrgna speaking, Kunama, Afars” people. Its border? You guessed it (or better, you knew it): From WalQayt all the way to the Red Sea.
            Fact: TPLF cadres were in disarray in 1988 when the Durg left Tigray because they insisted they were indoctrinated that they had been fighting to create the Republic of the Great Tigray. It’s also a fact that when TPLF had an army of 6 divisions, the number of the fighters from the rest of the three junior member organizations that merged with TPLF to form the EPRDF was about 400. That’s why TPLF never lost the fact that it was TPLF and that Ethiopians looked at it that way.
            Fact: Eritreans fought their way to Addis; the tanks you see in the presidential palace and cruising around Addis belonged to the great EPLA. It’s a fact Hayat. It does not diminish the fact that TPLF fighters were also effective fighter. They just needed capabilities that classical war demands now that they faced well trenched enemy positions. Those units were praised by MZ saying that they played a crucial role. Of course your friend AG has a different story. Doesn’t he?
            Fact: Yes, while TPLF convened its Addis Conference, Eritrean Commando units guarded government institutions, gradually transferring the responsibility to the TPLF units; they stayed there as late as 1995. I don’t know after that.
            Fact: It’s true most Eritreans called Ethiopian soldiers as Amhara because they spoke Amharic, and for most Eritreans it would be impossible to differentiate who is Tigrean and who is Oromo or Adere. The same is happening to Tigreans as we speak. Most Ethiopians call the government or its army “ye Tigrewoch”, meaning -the tigrean government/army. What’s the difference? Do the Ethiopians who call the regime in Ethiopians as Tigreans consider the people of Tigray as their enemy?
            FACT: Hayat refused to shake off whatever spell or prestige she has earned from the TPLF. She refused to discuss current abhorrent actions befalling Ethiopians by the government Hayat defends. Hayat, refused to debate substance. She continue dancing around the periphery, although gracefully. What a dance!!
            Fact: Feyisa Lilesa exposed TPLF’s double-vision for Ethiopia
            1. When you are in control of Ethiopia, when you are comfortably looting the resources of Ethiopia, act Ethiopian.
            2. When you are threatened act rogue
            3. When you are comfortably lording over Ethiopia, when you are addressing Amharic speaking public, act democrat
            4. When you are back to MeQele, act strictly wayanay, i.e. rogue and rough.
            5. Reduce Ethiopia to manageable chunks of your size, enjoy the looting of Ethiopia by pitching those chunks against each other.
            6. Always keep an eye to the double-vision of Ethiopian fate: if you are able to rule Ethiopia, keep acting Ethiopian, but if your rule is threatened, retreat to The Great Republic of Tigray that you have been bolstering through a 25 years of looting Ethiopia.
            Ladies and gentlemen: that’s the double-vision of wayanay democracy, and Hayat is defending it despite sincere suggestions of awatistas who care for her, including Mahmuday.

          • Thomas D

            Hi Mahamudai,

            I never knew that there are Tegadalai who talks like you. You are being emotional and acting weird here. Time has changed it has been 25 since Eritrea got independence. I am bored to death reading your comments here. Man up, stop the “Netselai Habuni neger”

          • Mahmud Saleh

            Selam Thomas
            The kind answer would be “sorry that you are bored.” But knowing you Thomas Arkey, I will only say “tune away” when you see my name. There are people who inspire me and who are inspired by my comments. Hayat is one of those people who put me on the mood. And I appreciate her exchanges no matter how far apart we come on a lot of issues. So, buddy, Never mind.

          • Thomas D

            Hi Mahmud,

            Initially, I strongly believed that you care for own people more than anything else. I was uplifted by you when you told us the tragedy death of 367 Eritreans in Lampadus, the eritrean refuge camps filled with underage Eritreans, the Sahra desert rape and organ harvesting; and in general the difficult life Eritreans are going through was the #1 issue to you. However, you let me down and I am really disappointed with you on this.

            I thought you would have NO sleep until the flam drastically burning your country; the oppression, and eradication the honorable people. We never saw the tegadalai you are know coming. We thought your #1 focus would always be your people, those who believed in all the time. We see you getting inspired by the upraising in Ethiopia, but we also see turning your back against the victims of of your former comrades in the country you call your own. It is sad to going the hill. To me, you had creating a monster out of yourself. It has been over 15 years since the G-15 has been put in prison. Victims of the regime in Eritrea asked the international community to step up and support for release all prisoner. It was shocking to me when you brought the stand of the UN on Eritrea over I don’t know 50 years ago. To me, it was shocking hearing pick up on the COIE.

            Understand that I do not deny the the huge sacrifices you made fighting our enemies back during the struggle for our independence. I know you will tell me what I have done to change the current course in our country. The only thing I am doing is focus to see if there is ways out. The regime talks about the weyeane and ethiopia 24/7 and I refuse to be diverted the its mission of externalization of issues of its own creations.

          • Hayat Adem

            Mahmuday,
            I do understand what you are trying to do here. The only thing I want you to do is just call it by its name. And then all will be okay. If you said what you said in a Monkey voice, it would fit exactly that. And I would understand perfectly why Monkey would have said those words. That is all. But if you speak with a Mahmuday voice, and I have known Mahmuday now for quite a while and I detect inconsistencies, I point to those. It is fair.
            1) For example, you are accusing me of not focusing on the current events. Okay, but you need to do the same. You are taking us to so many years back as if you are debating T. Kifle. We are ot here to discuss who did more favor who between TPLF and EPLF in the ghedli time.You had that discussion before with T. Kifle and you settled it at even. EPLF helped TPLF and TPLF helped EPLF. Either leave it there or debate it with the right persons. Not here. But, I am also aware that you are doing it to win credits from Ethiopians here that EPLFDJ was the maker and breaker of things in the past and it is a force to depend on now. You are asking them to understand how weak was TPLF without the help of TPLF and to understand that it can stand the uprisings alone. Good luck with that.
            2) You are telling people here wrong facts about my views. My views are Ethiopians should be free to advance their grievances without resorting to violence and pressure their government to address them adequately; government should develop wisdom not to use force at all unless to maintain law and order; Ethiopiopians should vigilant not to let bad hands coming in to exploit the situation and risk their hard won achievements registered so far. If you find this not enough, I understand but don’t change it for me and say things that i didn’t say.
            3) You told things in the past and we have them in our knowledge data. And since you are an Awate notable person, we expose them to light for you to address. Not long ago You told us TPLF is the only best choice to work with for Eritreans. You also told us you were disgusted by Esat to the point of making you throw up and you likened a Derg propaganda media. What happened to those views. You chnaged them within a year? Okay, then walk us through that change process. But, I’ll make it easy for you and I will tell you what is happening here. YOU SAW AN OPPORTUNITY WHERE YOU THOUGHT EPRDF MIGHT BE REMOVED AND YOU THOUGHT THIS IS A MOMENT FOR EPLFDJ TO RISE UP FROM THE ASHES AND SMILE DOWN FROM THE SAHEL MOUNTAINS AGAIN TO PLAY A HEGEMONIC ROLE!!! This has nothing to do with supporting people seeking justice. After all, you have all those causes of supporting justice seekers at home. But you will always put your EPLFJD ahead of millions of peoples and two fraternal nations.
            4) AG is a truly intellectual and real time analyst. He is very independent. He is from Tigray but he has too big a heart and brain to give him to only one place. He is not a typical TPLF/EPRDF supporter. He has never been with them but he has been studying them. He has been studying EPLFJD too. He is a lone bird without a political ambition to himself. He follows events meticulously, analyses them with detachment and sees them with an honest clarity. He is a person you would love to meet and discuss with, no matter how your perspectives are divergent. He thinks TPLF’s dominance was dealt to true size long ago in two phases: 1993 and in 2001. The first was voluntary and controlled, and the 2nd was involuntary and definitive. TPLF now is the weak partner of EPRDF. And he thinks that is good. He doesn’t like to see a comfortable TPLF but he likes them to be around always on their toes and running for their political life. Comfortable TPLF, or any political organization, he thinks, looks like the same with PFDJ. He calls EPLF/PFDJ only Shaeibiya. He is happy TPLF’s comfort in Ethiopia has been effectively eroded and he hopes the rest of EPRDF must be eroded as well. But it pains him that TPLF have still maintained a monopoly in Tigray, which he thinks that is why they are running the same show PFDJ is doing in Eritrea. He told me about a demo by Muslims in Adigrat on a cemetery land issue and how it was crushed with force. People died but everyone was mute as everyone thinks Tigray is doing great. He told me about protest demo in Ambasenayt where thousands clearly came out and called back their elected representatives from Kilil and federal houses, and revoked their status. That demo was not only powerful but also held in defiance of the government warning but it really happened at the heart of TPLF turf and thousands of peasants showed up in defiance. TPLF sent its 3 cc members to abort it ahead and they tried their best to intimidate the organizers but the organizers went ahead and people heeded. That protest, over bad governance, was so huge and shocking to the TPLF. Again major media didn’t cover it because they all think Tigray is harvesting honey. No where in Ethiopia is a household head arrested in night times in front of his family from his home for failing to pay tax except in Tigray. And the tax rates and estimates are out of this world. Tigray tops number one in tax revenue in Ethiopia while it has the poorest economic base. He hates Effort companies and he thinks they are doing more harm than benefit in scaring away private investors. He thinks the unresolved conflict with Eritrea is a big burden and cost paid mostly by Tigray and Eritrea. He has a lot of facts and data to show that.
            AG hates Shaebiya. The only country Ethiopia must find worthy of fighting is Egypt. He sees no reason for the fight with other forces of the region had it not been for Ethiopia’s weaknesses. He told me it pains him a lot to see Shaeibiya advising and guiding Ethiopian oppositions. “Ethiopia is too big, too great to be played by Shaebiya”. I brought you to his attention in one discussion and he said he beleived that you are a knowledgeable person. He also thinks you (Mahmuday) are suffering from duality: running into and away from Shaeibiya depending on the mood in the region.

          • Mahmud Saleh

            Selam Hayat
            I read your reply bmlue xmona (with full attention); now that Nitrickay is collecting his dollars, let me just say you are still your highness. I do have a say on what you have just said but am so pressured with time. I promise to give you my 2cents worth of reply. Meanwhile, power to the people.

          • Berhe Y

            Dear Hayat / Mahmudy,

            Sorry for my ignorance. Who is this AG you both refer to? Where can I find his writing?

            Thanks
            Berhe

          • Hayat Adem

            Dear Berhe Y.,
            I saw this inquiry late after others gave it a shot. It was buried somewhere and I have to stir all the hay like to find a needle. May be because one-liner notes are very slim to see them while glancing. I think you got your answer from Amde and that was how I would have told you about AG. And yes, Amde is the closest I come when I think of AG.

          • Nitricc

            Hayat and GechoZgreat.

            Hayat it seems AG is a very sensible person and what I don’t get is, how is it you are so oblivious and indiscernible while dealing with AG? I will think AG will knock some sense in to your insensible self. Now I want this video AG listen and please tell me what he thinks.

            GechoZgreat; would you please listen to the same video and tell me your take is? I could have recommended this to my good friends AMDE, Abi and Horizon but they are not interested to listen. They made up their minds.

            Here it is …

            https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fymKmsy7yhw

          • Kim Hanna

            Selam Hayat Adem,
            .
            Wow! again, Mahmud HOUDINI Saleh is so Clintonesque. You catch him red handed, he disappears for a couple of days and comes back with a different talking points and ‘word debris’ to boast about how great he is. He has no shame or humility.
            .
            You are probably acutely aware that your participation here at Awate is mostly a waste of time and energy. However, the solace to this exercise is even if one percent is effective and contains a seed for future germination, it is a worth while effort.
            Besides, TRUTH requires a permanent pilot light to be present however dim it is in the darkness.
            .
            {{When A.G described the adoptive changes TPLF made in 1993 and 2001, I was impressed with his ability to call a spade a spade. I always thought from what I was able to read at the time that TPLF was an extension of EPLF in 1991. I wept at the time. I was questioning its true Ethiopia-ness. The Killilazation of Ethiopia at that time, I thought, was the final solution to our existence designed by our enemies. However, throughout the years particularly since 2000 to now, the relative peace and economic progress Ethiopia made changed me from weeping to smiling. Our enemies are still hard at work but at least, unless we are stupid, we have a fighting chance, irrespective of the Mahmud Salehs of the neighborhood to survive and prosper.}}
            .
            I do have a request to make to A.G through you.
            .
            It is with the earlier above mentioned caveat that I request you ask A.G to tailor his approach and methods to suite him and come to Awate University as a visiting professor and add a little chlorine into this contaminated swimming pool water, so to speak.
            .
            I boldly have taken it upon myself to recommend a nick name for him to avoid being subjected to the possible odor that is out there.
            .
            Abet Gud.
            Arab Ghost-buster.
            Aba Gasha.
            Etc, Etc
            .
            Where is Abi when you need him.
            .
            Mr. K.H

          • Nitricc

            Hey KIM; you have so much respect for TPLF thugs and you have nothing left for yourself. talk about humility. try it for your self. if you have any guts, listen to the video link I have for AG and GechoZgreat.

          • Mahmud Saleh

            Selam Gen.Nt
            Alas, what did he say about Mahmoud Debroms paint? He said she looked Arab, only SAAY to remind him that there were many Ethiopians who dress that way. Well, Nitrickay, these are individuals who feel Ethiopians only when their TPLF is lording over Ethiopia. They have an Ethiopia of their imagination. The talk of pluralism and diversity… yada…yada is a fake talk that they exercise when they are in Addis and firmly ruling Ethiopia.

          • Hayat Adem

            Mahmuday,
            “Well, Nitrickay, these are individuals who feel Ethiopians only when their TPLF is lording over Ethiopia”.. You are rally becoming a full time job for me. What is eating you up man? Where did this bitterness of yours come. You were just telling us proudly and holding your head high that EPLF was ruling Ethiopia until 1998. You were more than okay with that and you are crying red tears over a TPLF ruling Ethiopia. Isn’t TPLF Ethiopian? Why would you be so green-eyed about it more than Abi, Horizon, KH and Amde? Wow! Absurd!

          • blink

            Dear Hayat

            yes , who could forget the EPRDF Tank roaring in asmara and the mighty EPRDF democratic thing . You was the one saying EPRDF is taking EThiopia to the right dircetion . Too much to remaind you even if you assume to dump them all at once.

          • Nitricc

            Hayat the dedebit grad,you said “Why would you be so green-eyed about it more than Abi, Horizon, KH and Amde? Wow! Absurd!” because they don’t know and we are trying to make them open their eyes before it is too late. if they knew anything, your greedy TPLF couldn’t able to bend them for the last 25 years. trust me, not only they don’t know but worst, their TPLF’s apologists. what a shame!

          • Gecho Ze Great

            Hi Nitricc,

            Thanks for the video. That was an interesting interview. Its a very long video and I had to skip some parts here and there to get to the parts where he discusses about Eritrea’s relationship with Ethiopian opposition groups. About the allegations that he’s helping them just so they can be an annoyance to weyane but short of launching a full scale war to bring about regime change. His response is very encouraging and touches up on a lot of areas. Amongst them were the expectations of opposition groups agenda and strategic goals to be aligned with each other and aligned with the interest of Eritrea. He briefly touches on the concept of self determination and how each group has different interpretations of it etc. He seems to indicate that there are some kinks that the opposition groups need to sort out between themselves before Eritrea can fully support their efforts. Considering that this video was made february of last year, way before the oromo and amhara protest, way before the protesters in amhara and oromo region started supporting eachother and way before AG7 and ODF created an alliance, It would be interesting to hear his current take on it. One important thing the Amhara and Oromo protests have achieved is uniting the two people as well as uniting the two biggest opposition groups ODF and AG7. This is something weyane cannot undo. I’m hearing that weyane is now entertaining the idea of holding a referendum on some of the issues to try and calm things down. But they have zero credibility right now and even if there is a referendum they will cheat again like the 100% election fraud. So this regime can only be changed by the muzzle of a gun. Even Meles zenawi said it a long time ago that they will not give up power they obtained through gun by ballot. So, even if they calm the protests through a fraud referendum or other trickery, I’m encouraged by the fact that AG7 and ODF will be conducting a joint military operation very soon. They will start from the plains of Eritrea and roll south destroying an already ethnically fractured woyane army. They might encounter some resistance in Tigray region but nothing that would stop a coalition of Amara and Oromo forces. After that it would be a smooth ride as they roll their tanks and march their army through the Oromia and Amhara region all the way to Addis. People will be dancing, waving and clapping their hands to give them a heroes welcome. I think everyone wins from this turn of events including peoples in tigray. Only weyane and their supporters/benefiters will be on the losers side. It also goes without saying that Eritrea comes out winning. I don’t think Eritreans need to worry about the very few Ethiopians with expansionist ambition. I agree with your earlier response about the demographics of Ethiopia. That around 67% of Ethiopians were born after Eritreas independence and won’t fall for an expansionist propoganda. Even with those old enough to remember the war, there are very few people who still hold that expansionist ambition. But the beauty of Eritrea supporting opposition groups to get rid of weyane is that the weight of this gratitude will restrain those with expansionist ambition from turning around and challenging the sovereignty of Eritrea. You’ll be our Qurt Qen Lijoch that helped us get rid of the tyrant weyane. I’m confident Ethiopians would rather continue their partnership and co-operation with Eritrea than embark on a destructive expansionist ambition.

          • Kim Hanna

            Selam Nitricc,
            .
            It is so precious and rich.
            .
            In 1994-1997 there was an article I was reading from a prolific Eritrea writer, a professor in one of the southern sates. I think he had a connection to the Eritrean Government. He was, I believe addressing another Eritrean to explain to him that the Eritrean Government was having difficulty with the Ethiopian leaders. I don’t remember exactly the topic but what I still remember is the high globalization and economic cooperation lofty terms and the difficulty to open the eyes of the Ethiopian leaders. He was gingerly telling his buddy that they apparently don’t know what was good for them in that condescending tone.
            My Nittricc, God bless him says it bluntly, the effect is the same.
            .
            Mr. K.H

          • Mahmud Saleh

            Dear Hayat

            No way, you are not going to lose your coolness. OK. Please. Steady Hayat, steady please. May be you need to listen to Bob Marley, you know that familiar shuffle. Again, I’m really busy, but as I told you earlier I can’t afford to miss your replies. I really enjoy them. I will come back with a crispy and clear message that meets Emma’s standard to the other Hateta. I promise. Meanwhile, in the imaginary dialogue that you wrote yesterday, you sayt “I have always been like that. We had other tegadelti who really look down at Ethiopians, especially the Amaharas. But that never was part of me from day one unlike my generation.
            Hayat: Bad news Mahmuday. Blame it on Disqus but a year ago you told me here in public in the open: “I used to think Amhara are bad ( I used to take it synanimous to the Ethiopian army”
            You remember that? I would expect any Mzungu to interpret it that way, but not an Eritrean. Because Eritreans know what they mean when they said “Amhara/ray” . They meant it the army. You see Hayat, you are just exposing yourself how far you are from the Eritrean experience. By the same token, do you believe Ethiopians are holding contempt against Tigreans when TODAY/NOW they say Tigrean government, or simply Tigre? I need an answer here Hayat. Because I don’t want to believe what my instincts are telling me. I have reasonably fair feeling about you. I believe your blind political loyalty to the TPLF has clouded your judgment, despite the obvious intelligence you exhibit in your exchanges..

          • Solomon

            MoMo,

            The gnome has a response hostage. In the meantime you can check out the clip of the blind and deaf @GiTsaTSe

          • Hayat Adem

            Hey KH,
            AG told me exactly the same: it is a waste of time. I have tried to pull him in many times and still nagging. I will try one more time… but if any success, I will never tell you unless he wanted to make it open. But you can’t miss him from his pure, refined theories and thoughts and his impeccable English. It is the only person I knew to possess Saay’s English, SGD’s knowledge of history and culture, Saint Fanti’s sanity/positivism, HTG’s processor…all in one.

          • Kim Hanna

            Selam Hayat Adem,
            .
            Thanks for your response. Tongue in cheek, let me play the role of a trainer for sales representatives of Kirby vacuum cleaners, ….Don’t take NO for an answer.
            .
            In addition to the ones AG mentioned, I wanted to point to the 3rd landmark changes in TPLF since they came to Arat Kilo.
            It is the passing away of PMMZ in 2012, the powerful head of TPLF and the architect / head of the Ethiopian government from its inception. The passing of power as a head of the Fed. Gov. from PMMZ to PMHD is a major significant event. The unexpected loss of PMMZ and the grief and sorrow felt by the TPLF members was shared by the four corners of the entire nation. It shows the tendency of the people to see themselves as one nation. (Mahmud Saleh would tell you that the men and women weeping were paid to do so..eh…the world we live in)
            .
            If one is to take a snapshot of TPLF, in 1991, 1993, 2001 and 2016, we are talking about an EPRDF that is a different animal from its original form. That change does affect the internal make up and cohesiveness of the other parties as well.
            The adoptive nature of the four parties that make up EPRDF is the trait that most of us rely on to march on with the adoptive changes and continue the progress.
            .
            BTW: Is the Republican Party of the United States in 1991 and 2016 the same ? That is 25 years. Time changes everything.
            .
            Mr. K.H

          • Amde

            selam Mr KH

            Indeed, time changes everything. 25 years is a generation. Time changes everything, except TPLF it seems.

          • blink

            Dear K.H

            I can not imagine you think EPRDF or TPLF are changed in this 25 years , passing a chair for a papa galo does not make it simple. EPRDF or TPLF never changed , what changed was the Ethiopian people . why do not you give the credit to people who are working hard for their right ? EPRDF will only change once it goes by the people’s choice simple and clear. Did you forget the tainted thing .

        • blink

          Dear Mr. Mahmud Saleh
          I have been reading your comments for long time , i can only say one thing :-How on earth you maintain such skill and cold head with people who are purposfully deaf and blind . How is that possible ? i mean is it worth at the first place. These people like Hayat , T.Kifle, Eyob and others has no principle at all . They can not talk and walk . They are not justice seekers at the first place. So why waste your time ? . why do not you grace us with your articles that can help us move forward. And second are they really important to Eritreans and Ethiopians ?

          Is not it hayat’s motive to use Ethiopians poor solidiers to clean the ground bomb for her to jump to asmara ? how evil does she has to be for you to completly forget her as non existent.
          she does not care about Ethiopians nor for the Eritreans . She has no motive to believe on the well being of the two people. What she care is her queen TPLF . They tigrai people are opposing TPLF yet hayat will not even say a word . The Amhara people are opposing TPLF , she will not even see it . The oromo people are getting killed , she just brush them all as non humans . What ever she do is always weird and simply chamelon .

          • Mahmud Saleh

            Hi Blink
            First I request you to change your nick to Jahret. Well, if you know Tigrayt, you already know what Jahret means. If you don’t, it means the morning star. Jahret for female and Jahray for male.
            Reason: like peace and Nitrickay, you seem to be young and energetic. You seem to be wanting to see a better Eritrea, a REAL change, not only a change of regime. You seem to be a proud nationalist who also happen to be a fighter for justice. Your comments tell me that you are not beholden to old grudges. Well, those are the qualities that will eventually take root. Countries are saved by the hopeful and purposeful youth. Link up with young Eritreans who hold similar views. The future of Eritrea will be determined by young people who have no country other than Eritrea, meaning, the youth inside the country. BerheY brought excellent comments on peaceful resistance. I do believe that’s the safest and perhaps the shortest way of creating a government that the people could claim ownership on. So, don’t despair. All the elements for an enduring change are aligning for the best.
            Thank you for your concern. I understand it’s time consuming particularly if an interesting thread develops, I have always thought of using that time for a more productive contribution. I just happen to value this forum and this site so much that despite the booing I’m still here. I usually jump in when an inspiration hits me (it could be any of the awatistas or a thread). As you said time is the most scarce resource, particularly for a parent. Well, disqus becomes handy when something itches me and I don’t have to look for the amount of time it requires to develop articles. But I will be on soon Blik. You will see me on the same places. If it’s in English, of course, this is my home.
            Thanks again.
            Keep the hope alive.

    • Solomon

      MoMo,

      Forest Whitaker just corrected me. It wasn’t during bdho preparations 1980, it was shortly after Nadew 1989’s Fenkil, that the Last Queen of Scotland, her Majesty HA wad beamed down by Scoti SS Enterprises’ Chief Engineer.

      And the Deaf and Blind correct link is: Hear No Evil, Sea No Evil
      http://m.imdb.com/title/tt0098282/

      The question in Tigrait language is; Mnn reAyka, man semaEka.

      Are we now reverting to the suggested answere to be: Tim Tim Tim!
      http://m.imdb.com/title/tt0098282/

      tSAtSE

    • Solomon

      MoMo,

      While you were at Fenkil and the Weyane Cadres, due to their indoctrination, were ala Bush “Mission Accomplished!”
      (I think berhe_Yeman complained to IA in Washington DC why the Tigreans were victorious ahead of him and EPLF and demanded his $20 back so he can go to McDees. Where is the Beef? Joking)

      The dynamic duo, Gene Wilder and Richard Pryor, did the movie Hear no Evil, See no Evil.

      I am still working on The Last Princess of Scotland with Forest Whitaker as the HNC in the special investigations unit of SHAIA, Shabia Intelligence agency. HA HA HA HA..

      Luke “The force is with you?”
      tSAtSE

    • Solomon

      MoMo,

      Mr. Spike Lee and the cast of Reservoir Dogs are waiting man. You got point… OW I might Birdy it with one shot from the Tee.
      tSAtSE44

      • Solomon

        MoMo,
        Check out the pending on my disqus. And if you like classical music I will tweet it so that you can tell me your preference for the sound track.

        Luda! “When I move you move! Just like that .” is another sure in. LUDA from ATL was in the movie Crash! Ahhhh with dude from Love Jones and All about the Benjamin’s.. And Hotel Rawanda’s Don’t Cheadle.
        let me go and see about TO and iSEM while you read.
        tSAtSe

    • Solomon

      MoMo,.
      Why is General Tso NOT the right General?

      Have you ever ordered Kapaw General Tso chicken from a Chinese restaurant?

      Wedi Fray, Yemane is ahella of a guitarist player. Via Kuait eventually on the stage with AA in Rome.
      wait do I have this right? The late General Wuchu is Yemane’s brother?
      So Wuchu is not Tso.
      Let me know when to stop with your feedback.
      tSAtSE

  • Tesfa

    Hello All:
    Here are simple steps to be taken for the Opposition Camp moving forward to be successful:
    -Reconciliation among the parties and its members and among the Media Outlets as being initiated by the EPDP
    -Create a Guiding unbiased, neutral, nonsectarian and nonpartisan Charter to work together towards a Transitional Government
    -Put aside Constitutional and Gray areas to the Democratically elected Assembly
    -A Strong and United Coalition of Leadership-to minimize power struggle
    -Create a United, Neutral, Centralized, well coordinated and organized Media Task Force-and an ESAT-like Radio and TV-to be shared by the individual Media Radio and TV Programs with a Relay Station in Nairobi, Kenya(not Ethiopia)
    Bring together-The Radio Erena,Assena,Dimtsi Harnnet,TV Adal,SBS(Australia),Radio Medrekh,Radio Dimtsi Delina(not Radio Wegahta) and make them to be on the same page to work for one Goal…….
    This will lead to a United Front of Justice Seekers and will challenge the Regime in Power but and unless we do that and come up as a United Front, no Eri Opposition Camp shall challenge the Regime and we will be back to status quo…
    Neutrality and Independence from the presumed Eritrean Enemies is of utmost importance so as to buy the hearts of the Silent Eri Majority.
    The Good thing is that the TPLF sponsored Opposition Gangs have already collapsed except those six mercenary Pseudo Opposition and Mercenary groups, which have refused to join the real Progressive Opposition Camps

    • Ismail AA

      Selam Tesfa,

      Had I been asked to vote for the points you have listed, I wouldn’t have hesitated for a minute. But the dilemma that has been bewildering us for so long was how to come to that goal of “simple steps ”?

      If we look back through the various stage of our struggle, at least since 1975, we will notice that there was never lack of fine suggestions like yours. I agree with you what we need or Eritrea needs at the present is what you mentioned in point two: the charter. But how many times haven’t the mainstream opposition organizations signed such a document, just to ignore it before the ink dried due to the chronic hurdle of who should take the driver’s seat or at least a lion’s share of it in the process. Haven’t you realized that there has rarely been discord on conference agendas, and the difference appeared when handling the last agenda point, namely regarding the formation of leadership?

      Regards,

      Ismail AA

      • blink

        Dear Ismail
        Do you think the elite on both sides are not good to understand the eritrean people’s need?
        I mean we have been forming group after group and after group on and on just until miss their numbers and their charters , what is really the eritrean people want.
        Look at the young people who are zooming European cities looking for any one that can understand them ,
        Look at the eritrean people at large who forget every thing what it means to fight for freedom
        Look at any one and ask her or him if ever they do not know the crime acted by DIA , they all know it.
        Dow we need any one to advice after all, People has been complaining about PFDJ for ages and yet we can do nothing except running after new Groups goe knows who they are .
        I think we should keep quite from talking about the eritrean people because they seem to be ok with the horrific situations .
        PFDJ has been creating havoc and killing our youth to death yet what we are able to do was just sit and watch if DIA is falling by our constant internet trashing or forming charter after charter only to be ruled or advised by people like Andebrhan who are equally dictators like his former boss.

  • Amanuel

    Hi Saleh,

    Thanks for sharing your speech and glad you are now fit enough to fly long haul.
    I agree with what you have said on your speech, specially about the state of Eritrean news outlets and rumormongering, is true. However, I am skeptical that if you have earned the right to claim that or will be taken seriously, as I think you and Awate are not free from these sort of shortcoming as well . There is no doubt Awate is the best by miles comparing to other Eritrean news outlets, but at times there were very important news items or assertions in articles, which were not supported by verifiable evidence. This in itself is not a problem as mistakes happen, the main problem is that when you were requested to come up with evidence or correct your mistakes, either you ignore it or give empty promise.

    For now I will mention two incidents, one, a news item and another an assertion in your article.
    1) In May 2014 Gedab news claimed that M.General Omer Tewil died in prison; with a footnote that his relative who lives in Canada is denying the new and you (Gedab) were continuing further verification and will update it accordingly. About two weeks later I wrote to Gedab news that, it time to come up with your verification, which was ignored. As far as I know there was no any verification or update to date.
    2) In August 2015 when you republish your article “Language and Religion in Eritrean Politics” you have asserted the following “In the 19th century, the population of the Eritrean highlands was less than 300,000, most of whom were settlers who came with the waves of the invading Abyssinian armies from the South.” When i have asked for evidence you said that you were way from home and will provide it when you are back in two days. To date you haven’t provide your reference.

    This is not meant to pick on you, to be honest it is rather to provide you with an opportunity to live up to what you are asking (preaching) other to do. There is an Amharic proverb ” ጽዳት ከቤታችን”

    Kind regards
    Amanuel

    • Brhan

      Hello Amanuel,

      [Osman Saleh] the Eritrean foregine minster said that the G 15 are alive ….can we believe him

      • Amanuel

        Hi Brhan,
        No, I don’t believe him.

        • Tesfa

          Brhan and Aman:
          It is always good to be Optimistic and Hopeful–until we know the truth.
          The Amahrus say: “Christian tesfa Aykortim”.

    • Saleh Johar

      hello Amanuel.

      Sorry you feel that way. But if you are expecting me to engage each and every comment exhaustively, I m afraid it is not doable–I wish it was. My speech, as indicated in the intro, is a general take, and not specific for awate. We cannot debate each news item on behalf of Gedab News, again it is not doable. Even the well staffed international media outlets cannot afford to debate it that why–but we take feedback into consideration. But we do not debate it individually.

      Indeed, we would like to verify, and verify, and verify some more. We put a view that negated the news and that is what we can provide. Given the situation, I think you have to be fair. If in 16 years these are the only ones, then judging the performance of awate.com based on that is a high sore, as you insinuated. Thank you.

      When I suggest a covenant, it is to regulate our operations–you are ahead in putting me on trail 🙂

      The question you asked about the population can be found in Pollera, translated into Tigrinya. But if you think it is wrong, I encourage you should come up with what you think is correct and educate us.

      Thank you

      • Amanuel

        Hi Saleh

        Thanks for your reply. I must admit that my comment was a bit unfair. With hand-sight i should have used better words to articulate my feeling. I think time got the better of me and posted it with out being fully satisfied. Like i said my intention comes from the high standard i have for yourself and Awate. I am not asking for exclusive engagement individually. I am just asking to full fill your promise. I don’t want go back again, specially about the Gedab news as it is very sensitive issue, however what I would like to say is, it was a disputed news and you had a duty either to verify as per your promise or tell your readers you got it wrong.

        As per the second issue thank for the reference. However, I don’t know what Pollera is (forgive my ignorance) and googled it. I have completely unrelated answers some like a dress in Spanish and restaurant/ night club names.

        Thanks

        Amanuel

        • Saleh Johar

          Hi Amanuel,

          On the contested news: there were many instances when people rejected different news based on their stands. You are not the first one. At any rate, I explained the problem of debating news and the claim of the relative was included as an additional information not because the news was doubtful.

          On Pollera, what if I gave you abuye Hebtes of ban jengeren as a reference 🙂

          Okay, it’s Alberto Pollera, an officer of the first batch of Italians who studied the society and wrote about it. The book is Called “The Native Peoples of Eritrea” and it was translated into Tigrinya many years ago. You will find its English translation by Libda Lappin, on Amazon. I am sure it is not a Spanish restaurant. It’s a long-dead Italian officer 🙂

          • Amanuel

            Thanks Saleh.

  • iSem

    Hi All:
    PFDJ ALWAYS Breaks its own Criminal Record.
    The heinous crimes perpetuated by PFDJ is innumerable, almost numbing and every time they up the ante as if to dare us to challenge them. A country run by a network of criminals, staffed from both religions, from both genders from almost every ethnic group, just like the armed struggle represented proportionally by their numbers.

    Eritrea a country that murders its founding fathers, rapes it future mothers, kills its future scientists, hires mercenaries from DEMHIT to round up its youngsters has once again beat its own criminal record by moving on to new scheme of murdering people: poisoning. The appeasing of Russia by building a monument for one of its artists seemed to have paid off
    Radio Wogahta has interviewed, Dr. Nesredin Mansoor, who was poised with HIV intravenously as a punishment for his refusal to murdered an inmate who was under his care.
    PFDJ and its supports will try to discredit this brave Eritrean, but who would want to admit he is HIV positive to jeopardize his employment chances and face the stigma that his horrible disease brings. PFDJ competes against itself to break its own record, it is bored as it reigns over a country with no opposition and people who are shell-shocked, too chilled to defend their lives and the lives of their loved ones. And many of the criminals are outside the country, seeking refugees and spying on us. When we want to alert the host countries the wise men of the opposition tell us this will discourage others from defecting, what a misguided idea! PFDJ is no going to disappear when defections chip away its power because for every defection there are10 waiting in the wigs to audition for the crime job vacated by the defection. I say we should hunt all the criminals like the brave people in the nation of Israel did of the Nazis and still doing after 70 years of holocaust

    And it is this country of ours known for the above brutality that one of the architects of the regime we have today dubbed: a country at cross roads instead of a county dangling from the edge of a cliff.
    My mother used to say “gzzat Turki” whenever we were so demanding, so one day I asked her why does she say that, to which she replied that the Turkish used to demand the people to milk cows on a container with holes and still wanted their milk, an impossible task!
    The crimes of the Turkish, the Italians, the English and both Ethiopian rules pale compared to what PFDJ is doing now
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Yhf4bLp2Vxo

  • Amanuel Hidrat

    Dear AOsman,

    If you do not mind could you please email me your email address to share the status of our compatriot Kokhob Selam? My email address is tebeges@yahoo.com.

    Regards
    Amanuel Hidrat

    • A.Osman

      Hi Amanuel,

      Sent you pvt message, let me find out more tomorrow and see if he needs support.

      Regards
      AOsman

      • Amanuel Hidrat

        Selam Aosman,

        I got it. Thank you very much. Check your email you have my reply.

        regards
        Amanuel Hidrat

        • A.Osman

          Dear Amanuel,

          I got KS’ relative to call and give me feedback. The good news is that he is recovering, hoping he comes back online to reassure us of his well being and progress to recovery.

          Regards
          AOsman

          • saay7

            Thanks A.Osman,

            Please pass on this message to Kokhob Selam:

            1. We are rooting for him;
            2. Stay away from Eritrean politics during the recovery phase. He needs someone to confiscate his techno toys I am sure whatever he wants to say is being said by people who agree with his viewpoint.

            Saay

          • Nitricc

            Hey SAAY; one of many things that bother me about Eritreans is that everything go to be secret. I am not talking about you and what you responded for but when you say “Please pass on this message to Kokhob Selam:” why can’t we have his email and express our feeling directly with him?
            personally i will love to tell kokhob i miss reading his toothless takes. he will be fine though. I never get it why everything has to be secret.

          • A.Osman

            Dear Nitricc,

            Sorry I don’t have KS email nor his number, as I said above I know his relative and he has been my feed. I am sure if you write your email, KS will be happy to contact you before his gadget is confiscated. Take a lead bro, everything does not need to be a secret in this spineless world :).

            Regards
            AOsman

          • tes

            Dear A.Osman,

            Thank you for keeping us informed and give us hope about KS condition. I wish him fast recovery.

            tes

          • Hayat Adem

            Hi All,
            kokhobselamone@gmail.com is Kokhob’s email. Though not authorized, I see no harm or reason in keeping his email address from those who wish to say something to KS privately.
            I must thank Osman for the info on his situation.
            Hayat

          • Desbele

            Thank you HA,
            ካብቶም ዘፍቅሮም ከዋክብቲ
            ሃረር ዝብሎም ከብሩህለይ ከውታ ለይቲ
            ይጽበለኩ ብተስፋ
            ቲ ኮከብ ዝዓበየ
            ንዛዕባ ሎሚ ብመሳጢ ግጥሙ ከሰንፋ

          • saay7

            Selamat Nitriccay:

            One of the first culture shocks when we came to the US is the realization that Americans tell you everything “kem Tebib zHazom” as a dear woman once said of them. What they ate, what they did last weekend, what they are planning to have for dinner, how much they paid for the cats surgery, and why they hate their parents.

            Thus, the perception of amerika as being Ayashu, from our people’s perspective. Back in my day in Eritrea, little girls were instructed to answer an innocent question like “gwal men ikhi” (whose daughter are you” with “gwal zwelede” (I am the daughter of who sired me). Why? Well, we don’t give opportunities to evil-doers, thieves, kidnappers, spell-binders and evil-caster, buda, tebib.). Is your mom home? No. Where is she? IndiEe! Now the buda, Tebib is blocked for good.

            Little girl, where is your older brother? indiEE! Now the Derg is blocked from knowing her brother is wenbede. Etc Etc.

            Add to that the Ghedlis culture of stoicism, and you got all secret all the time. I could tell you more…but it’s a secret.

            Saay

          • Amanuel Hidrat

            Saay (Aya adi-U),

            Good story teller. I love they way you tell our cultural background for some one who does not grow in it. Well said my friend.

            Regards

          • Amanuel Hidrat

            Dear Aosman,

            Thank you brother. It is good news that he is recovering. Wish him fast recovery.

            Regards

          • Ismail AA

            Hi Osman,
            I notice that Kokeb Selam has been sick; I hope it is not serious, and wish him speedy recovery. Please kindly pass my greeting and hopes to him if you are in contact with him.
            Regards,
            Ismail

  • Ismail AA

    Ahlen Saleh,
    Glad that you have fully regained your health and could fly that long distance across the Atlantic to Europe. The speech was rich in substance and coverage; some might have liked it a bit shorter. The style and skill in delivery was too familiarly
    entertaining to need me reiterate the compliment.

    Regarding the media outlets and their role in trust building or perhaps its opposite (in my amateurish opinion) could depend on the policy parameters within which it is set to operate. In other words, what purpose it should serve, and in what way, is the crucial question one should handle? It’s just like a factory manufacturing useful goods, and a salesman persuading the consumer to buy. Worthless goods would attract nobody’s interest; and salesman wouldn’t help either. Thus, media outlets without clearly set policies and purposes would not accomplish much, if at all.

    In our case (Eritreans) I think the question of trust among the stakeholders in the country goes beyond what the media can do and not do. The problem of trust in the past and current (I hope not in the future) has been there as prerequisite for consensus on foundations on which nation-building will have to rest, which if successfully discharged would lead to stable conditions for state-building. Setting those foundations in, let say, a charter or covenant presupposes existence of trust, which has so far proven elusive.

    Warm greetings,
    Ismail

  • Brhan

    Thank you Saleh for your article and its key message about the importance of disseminating correct information

    But Saleh don’t you think that professionalism is also missing in a lot of our resistance media. I believe you agree with me that the resistance media to upgrade its staff with training with regard to fundamental basics of journalism and also with content and style of information. In the past to be a journalist, you have to be licensed by Journalist syndicate which puts an academic knowledge of the field as a precondition. So far our resistance media are not revealing any info about their staff educational back ground and experience in journalism . Or is it ok anyone can have a website and disseminate info without giving attention to the fact that electronic media has also to be professional where its staff have to be empowered by the knowledge of journalism and media.

    I also believe you agree with me if the resistance media form a kind of association, forum, seminar to look in the matters of professionalism. That will enrich not only the profession but our struggle against the dictator.

    waSalam

    • Saleh Johar

      Hello Brhan,
      You are right, in the past media outlets enforced certain standards to maintain professionalism in their establishments. Journalists had to be members of associations to be licensed to work and it was very embarrassing to employ a person who was not a member of professional associations. But the Internet broke all the norms of the past. Now individuals do not need license or employers to use the available technology and create what they believe is a media outlet. Social media is just that, social–so and so i getting married; I am having coffee; look at this cute dog; and this singing goat and dancing cat…. You don’t need professionalism to say that and it’s not journalism of any type.

      The current resistance media is mostly not-for profit and mostly is owned by individuals and no one can force independent owned medium to follow any rules they didn’t create. The public should help the media to institutionalize–once they are, they will be professionals. The problem now is not from the established mediums, but from individuals who are running amok using pseudo-names and phantom organizations that add anyone unilaterally an boast about their self inflated membership. The public have also to be involved in cleaning the mess. What do you think the public should do? I have an idea but let me hear yours

      • Brhan

        Hell Saleh,
        I agree with you the resistance media can create its rule to be governed by but that rule must reflect the essence of journalism and its profession, ethics , responsibility, neutrality and credibility.

        As for the public:
        1. Support the resistance media that reflect the essence of journalism financially and morally through fund raising
        2. Make the irresponsible communicators accountable through petition, rule of law
        3. Enrich the role of journalism in our struggle against the dictator, through giving a journalists a space in our poletical gathering

        • Hope

          I second you Brhan.
          Addendum:
          -Create a coordinated, United and Organized Eri Opposition Media guided by the Basics of Journalism Ethics.
          -Create and organize an Association of Eri Opposition Media Outlets

  • Saleh Johar

    Hi Solomon,
    Extensive comment, thank you.

    I agree the parts that you skipped are available everywhere for those who look for them. I had to include it to show how communication technology is growing and soon, how irrelevant government censors will be–and how chaotic the exchange of information (all types) will be. I though that was needed as a support for enticing people to look into that with interest. If not, it can always come handy during coffee ceremonies and chitchat times.

    On the “all winners” idea, honestly I was a proponent of that idea but in time I became more of a realist–victory requires a defeat, otherwise it loses its meaning. For forces of freedom to be victorious, forces of darkness and tyranny should be defeated. The “we should all win” theory is not doable in our case, maybe in negotiations–but we are not there yet. It also has some currency in motivational speeches and training, church talk and Opra talk included 🙂 In the context of my speech, I think we need to defeat the forces of tyranny. That is the only way we can usher freedom. If teh forces of darkness would change their mind and join the freedom camp, then all the same. That is the ultimate victory. Think about it some more and I am confident you will stumble into something. We need to debate this some more.

    I am never angry. Never. The closest thing I come to anger is disappointment. Believe me, if I was angry, it was not for myself, but for those around me–those I see in pain.

    As you might know, speeches have a purpose related to the moment and the context–it should not be seen as an exhaustive in depth description or proposal concerning specific matters.

    Just curious: how do you serve anything but defeat to someone you are fighting (please put on your mathematician hat which comes with logic not emotion or goodwill) you can serve victory to the vanquished but that is a nice way of making defeat palatable. Genius 🙂

    • Solomon

      Dear Mr. SaliH J. Ghadi,

      -1 + -1 = -2

      -2 + -2 = -4

      I think, the above two should suffice for the trend, to follow your method of “how you destroy trust” in order…

      Okay how about my favorite Newtonian…
      “For every action, there is an equal and OPPOsite reaction.” Forget Opra show, she has a Television Station now.*

      -1 + +1 = 0
      =2 + +2= 0

      I came across a word while at church earlier that made me think again about your speach and media in general…
      It is a Hebrew word;
      Machtem and it means engraving.
      It sounds like the Tigrigna and perhaps Tigrait word MaHtem.

      Opra is probably targeted because of the BEEF she had with the beef industry. I don’t think it was with McDees, maybe Wendy’s? “Where is the beef?”

      But let us all go to church with the Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s MathePhydics:
      “The only way to get rid of enmity is through Amity.”

      We are not fighting to destroy our enemies. We are fighting to destroy what is harmful to them. What they did and are doing. So, if we help them “Do The Right Thing” by hook but NOT crook, then it is a win-win.
      tSAtSE

      • Ismail AA

        Selam Solomon and Saleh,
        Let me jump in and ask: shouldn’t we need to break the trenches and come out to a level ground in order to engage and craft a win-win condition?
        Regards,
        Ismail AA

        • Saleh Johar

          Hello Ismail,

          Exactly. We have to come out of the trenched and sit on a level ground, and then work for a win-win situation. Some people ask me why the opposition media doesn’t cover the positive aspects of the PFDJ–for a minute I will just agree there are positive things that the PFDJ does 🙂 My reply has been this: “the opposition will compliment the PFDJ once it starts to compliment the opposition. That it will never do and I do not believe it deserves anything but to be defeated. What portion of winning can we possibly provide the PFDJ when it has taken everything forcefully! Judging from the trend of the last 25 years, any more win will be the eradication of Eritreans.

          • iSem

            Hi Saleh:
            I hear that a lot, the why do we not mention the positive aspects of PFDJ either from the well-meaning Eritreans or from he self serving supporters. My reply is not like yours. It is, there is a single positive thing I can mention, then they mention their stupid dams and colleges and I say for every dam they built they have disappeared hundreds of people and for every college they built they have raped hundreds of girls and tortured hundreds of Eritreans, so there is no positive thing about PFDJ. NONE!
            If PFDJ stars complimenting the opposition then that is a different ball game, and the first compliment is the allow the opposition to function in Eritrea then we can count their dams for them as we compliment them.
            Actually whenever anyone says that to me my reply is that dumb

          • Thomas D

            Hi iSem,

            “first compliment is the allow the opposition to function in Eritrea then we can count their dams for them as we compliment them.” This has got to be put on the funnest jokes of the day. However, we need them to walk us to the dams that way we will make sure they are dunked in that dirty water. Though, I know there will not be enough water in their dams for us to drown them in all the way……..

          • Berhe Y

            Dear Semere,

            I know we both agree on this so no need to preach to you. In my opinion, I don’t think there is a single thing the PFDJ and by that I mean Isayas Afeworki did any good for the Eritrean people, NONE.

            If you are going to count if there is a good math or English teacher, a good engineer or a doctor in Eritrea today who Is doing something good, the answer is YES.

            But the PFDJ and by that Isayas Afeworki who owns and decides for the whole country has NEVER done anything good for the country or the people.

            If the dam is considered as an example of what good PFDJ did for Eritrea, there was an interview with an engineer who was expert in the area who use to work in the president office who refute any benefit of these dams to the public. The million this million that cubic meter numbers they throw in with the news is just to confuse the public as most people (including me) have no idea what they actually mean, but gives the illusion that the government is doing something. How redicles one needs to be to go all the way where the dam is build to visit / meet the president to get his signature / approval.

            For everything good we are told the president has done, at least one can find 5 things that he did wrong. Build airport in Massawa, how many planes have landed since, he build the road from Massawa to Assab, how many goods has been transported.

            How many collage has he opened and how many have been closed.

            It’s endless and I don’t know for the life of me, who are we trying to convince.

            As to why people have not joined the opposition and help overthrow the government, I don’t think because they don’t believe the opposition or that they support the government.

            I believe if there is a secret ballet election tomorrow, I think 99 % of the people reject him. The reason I think they have not joined opposition or abandoned PFDJ is because like all other people they don’t sense there is a capable people / leader who can oust him. And they do not want to take a chance to ruin their relationship with the country / family back home.

            Joining the opposition is a long, long and most of the time lonely fight (unlike for example during the armed struggle) and I don’t think a lot of people are willing to make that choice and sacrifice and make the bet.

            Berhe

          • Yohannes Zerai

            Selamat SGJ,

            Thank you for an interesting article and for the thought-provoking comments by you and others. Let me add to them my own comment which attempts to view the issue of “appraising PFDJ’s accomplishments” from a different angle.

            There are few things (associations, interactions, processes, situations, etc.), if any, in human society that are entirely good or entirely bad. It is often the case that something which is largely bad has a small part to it that is undeniably good. The converse is also true. Thus, if it is ascertained that most aspects of something are bad, that thing can logically be characterized as BAD although it is known to have or contain a small GOOD in it. The logic here is that we can characterize something as bad without denying that a relatively small or insignificant part of it is, in fact, good. Otherwise, if we are unwilling to concede that there is a “small good” in a “largely bad” thing, then our judgement would correctly be deemed biased. In consequence, public discourse would lose rationality, and our denial of some details of the matter would imply that we lack conviction and sincerity regarding the veracity of the ideas/arguments we are trying to advance.

            Whether we like it or not, the foregoing approach or lack thereof is having a critical impact on the ongoing struggle for democracy and justice in Eritrea. The importance of this approach is not in relation to the question of whether or not PFDJ ought to be given credit for some specific measure it has instituted in the country. Rather, its importance is in ensuring success in the effort to bring over to the opposition camp Eritreans who, for a variety of reasons, have so far been sympathetic to the government or have been sitting on the sidelines. Obviously, adopting a rejectionist, absolutist and “black-and-white” stance/strategy is unlikely to win us many such converts.

            This could perhaps be illustrated by borrowing the example of dams mentioned in an earlier comment. Instead of denying that dams are being built by PFDJ or simply dismissing them as unimportant, one can make a convincing case by admitting that, yes, dams are being built, and proceeding to relate them to the livelihood of intended beneficiaries. It can be shown that despite the regime’s dam-construction program, living conditions in rural areas have worsened or at best remained unchanged due to the following FACTS. Dam-building projects (i) are not designed based on socio-economic studies of target communities, (ii) are not undertaken in the context of an integrated development planning for a region, (iii) are government-imposed and beneficiaries have no say in their prioritization and planning, (iv) force entire communities to toil for weeks and months on manually collecting (and transporting to site) construction materials i.e., rocks, sand) – all to the detriment of their farming activities and other livelihood tasks, and (v) fail to empower beneficiaries with skills training required for effective community management, operation and maintenance of the new facility. Thus, yes dams are being built; but they are known not to have had any positive impact on the lives of the population.

          • Ismail AA

            Selam Yohannes, SGJ and others,
            It is prudent for me to take note of the valid points from the feedbacks several friends have posted under the current title of SGJ. When considering judgement about whether the regime should or shouldn’t deserve credit for what it has done, each one of us is looking at the matter from own specific perspective with an anchor in expediency or priority of the moment.
            But perspectives do vary. For one who looks at things from the refugee camps in the Sudan, the view is different from the one who appraises things from a metropolitan center in Europe. For the former, current Eritrea does not really make much sense since it does not have a place for him or her. One might think that dams or reservoirs should objectively garner credit for the regime. While for another, who looks at things from a place in the eastern or western lowlands where the waters of those streams that drain into the new dams used to replenish the waters of artesian wells, would tell you the regime is ignoring the very survival of the citizens there. His position would be that there should be priority to sort out such matters of live and death before we indulge in arguments about democracy and libertarian system of rule.
            So, the issue is how to create conditions allowing trust to thrive and engagement in national dialogue to iron out hurdles to construction of foundation for the nation that must serve as fundamental legal reference on which all the vital national institutions (constitution among them) will have to anchor.
            But as I mentioned in my earlier comment of yesterday, I maintain that we have not come to the crucial departure point yet for us to consider meriting or de-meriting the work of the regime.
            Here, I would like to invoke the wisdom of a saying our compatriots in the highlands popularly use: “to bake (burkuta) or not to bake, let us come to where we can get water”. Translated to our affairs, this means that we have not yet collectively agreed on a charter or covenant of fundaments (principles) that should govern the polity, as I mentioned above. And, discharging of this national duty presupposes existence of trust which has become a very rare commodity at the present.
            Ismail AA

          • Amanuel Hidrat

            Selam Yohannes,

            When we are talking on specific issues with its limited scope, l think it could be entirely good or bad. Forinstance Judging PFDJ as a wholesome organization and judging its stand on free press and its media is two entirely different. So in the case of PFDJ ‘s mass media, there in no good that we can extract from its policy on its mass media based on what mass media entails. So my take on bad and good depend on the specificity of the issue nd

          • Saleh Johar

            Selam Yohannes,
            Thank you for teh rejoinder.

            On the issue of “giving credit where it is due” I am afraid I have a different position. As Amanuel explained (though I go further), and as Ismail also explained, the perspective, my view is as follows:

            We in the opposition are not judges to apportion good and bad to the PFDJ, we are out to destroy it if we can. We are out to uproot it. And there is a conflict between justice and injustice that has been going on for 25 years. WE are here to eradicate injustice and therefore judging the merits of the PFDJ should be the least of our concern because we are not arbitrators, but forces of justice trying to remove the regime with whatever attriubutes it might have.

            I believe looking at the conflict from teh persepctive of a neutral observer (if one is for justice) is not helping the opposition. By now there should have been clarity on that issues. And all those who claim to be sitting on the sides are doing so because they are having a quasi neutral position on the conflict. That is making the struggle an uphill journey when it shouldn’t.

            I also believe that convincing the supporters of the regime to join our side is a noble idea, and the opposition has always been trying hard to win them over. That will not be fully accomplished because we will never have 100% of the Eritreans aligned to one side, there will always be a portion that prefers to sink with the ship or jump ship at the last moment. Unfortunately, that is life. And then, let the elders and people who can influence them continue the efforts; but the general resistance body should not waste its time in that, but on facing the regime. Trying to convince people for 25 years and they don’t receive the message is enough proof they have made a conscious decision to sink along Isaias. Sadly, there is nothing that can be done to those whom the Amhara would call “awqo yetegna…”

            But your take is always deep and provocative and I thank you for that…

          • Amanuel Hidrat

            Hi SGJ,

            Aside the coexistence of the traits “bad and good” in any entity, as in any struggle of opposites that drives life in itself, it is the dominant trait that explain who you are. The dominant characterstic trait of PFDJ is ” Bad “. I think Yohannes was trying to explian the existence of both triats in any entity as a rule of nature. Otherwise the PFDJ system should be dismantled.

            Actually the most buffling thing than the existence of opposites in any system that drives the motion of life, it is the difficulty of identifying PFDJ as our common enemy is driving me nuts so to soeak. It cringes me when our fellow Eritreans expect reformism from an evil organization.

            Regards
            Amanuel Hidrat

          • Solomon

            Selamat Aya Amanuel,

            Is it possible for either you or any one else to define for us the PFDJ of Two Decades ago And the PFDJ of Today.
            Is every graduate or legal age Eritrean required to be a member of PFDJ?
            Do we have data of professional organizations inside Eritrea available to us to at least learn how their specific prifessions, with all the limitations they are faced, strive to either build the nation or leave it.
            I can relate with your bafflement but not necessarily in the same direction at times.
            Take the recent academic symposium in Eritrea for example. Have we on our side really studied the growth in Eritrea or are we always focused on the wrongs?
            Other than the in equitable access in favor of the Tigrigna of a decade plus ago, shared by Mr. AHmed Raji, has anyone attempted to see if at all things changed for the better or worst?
            SAAY7 says its all cosmetics and marketing. If I need to be directed to any open source others are privy to, then by all means I am pleading with any one out there to point their index finger in that direction.
            I have ample data of my own that could be decisive in deciding against your desire Aya Amanuel.
            Eritrea is surely more than just prison wardens, prison guards and prisoners.
            Today’s Eritrean youth cannot simply inherit enmity declared and based on decades ago players and circumstances. Neither should opposition of Today have the same end goal of seeing the opponent’s legacy of Yesterday defeated or destroyed Today.
            I will wait to be educated more before making the case for “OTTO.”
            tSAtSE

          • Amanuel Hidrat

            Selam Selye,

            Until my upcoming article (though I am late to deliver it as promised), I will leave you with these questions:
            Are you currently satisfied with the “system of government” we have? If not what kind of system do you envision to replace it? If yes the debate will continue. I do not want to hear a platitudnal answers and symbolic political talk without substances ? It had been said so often in many occasions by many fellow Eritreans from the highlands. Even the current regime before it becomes a formal government told us that they will built a nation that governs its subject with democratic constitutionalism, all symbolic talk with no pragmatic or programatic solutions on table. They told us they will built an equitable nation to its diversity and to its various political persuasions; but in reality they are building a party-state nation that serve to the party’s interest that monopolize the economic and political life of our people. So if you are for fundamental change, think about remedies along those lines that negate the current system. If you are for peace, think the peace that comes through strength, because peace will never survive without strength or will not take root by begging to the authoritarian regime. Hitopadesa had said something that reminds us and his words are as follows :”Subdue fate by exerting human strength to a maximum” – human strength of all facets to change the fate of our people. That is the thing we ought to do precisely – exerting all the power of strengths to change the political system in our nation.

            regards
            Amanuel Hidrat

          • Yohannes Zerai

            Dear SGJ and Amanuel Hidrat,

            Thank you both for the insights provided. I could not possibly disagree with the statements that both of you made on the nature of the PFDJ/GoE entity and on how it ought to be viewed from the perspective of opposition politics. I believe that, having conducted their personal evaluation of the regime, genuine members of the opposition camp have, by and large, rejected the existing system and have unconditionally concluded it must go. For most of us, there can be no going back on that conclusion! And, given the explicit disclaimer to the contrary I made in the third paragraph of my earlier comment, “acknowledging the merits of PFDJ” could certainly not have been the focus of my argument.

            The point I was trying to make there is that political discourse characterized by rationality and tolerance would go a long way towards convincing citizens to abandon their support for the regime and even persuading them to join the ranks of the opposition movement. I believe causing support for the PFDJ regime to be eroded in this way is a critical aspect of the struggle that is being waged to remove it from power. I appreciate SGJ’s contention that those who, 25 years later, continue to support the regime or to sit on the fence are diehards that are incapable of redeeming themselves. But that statement cannot be made with emphatic certainty.

            For example, respectable Eritrean political and human rights activists have been indicating in the last few weeks that the UNHRC human rights investigation and its findings have led many former pro-government supporters to abandon the regime. Thus, it would certainly be worthwhile if we could persuade some of those who are bound to “jump ship at the last moment” to take their jump much sooner thereby helping to hasten the regime’s demise.

            Regards.

          • Solomon

            Selamat Mr. Yohans Zerai,

            Excellent arguments you have made. But my points of contentions go further than your attempted limits. The little good is in fact significantly larger than the micrdams. The converse is also true in the opposition side.
            I will pickup on your diplomatic skills and the following statement further later.

            “Thus, if it is ascertained that most aspects of something are bad, that thing can logically be characterized as BAD although it is known to have or contain a small GOOD in it. The logic here is that we can characterize something as bad without denying that a relatively small or insignificant part of it is, in fact, good…”

            tSAtSE

  • DreadFool

    Salem: I have been looking for part-time truth-mongers all over, and have met only the opinionated owners of rumors.

    • Solomon

      DreadFool,

      Yeah right. Look me straight in the eye next time , though with a bit more sincerely to those apologetic and perplexed eyes of yours. I will pray for you and the others as you are only applying the “get in where you fit in” theorem. Lots.of valid rational, including misseducstion/miss information.
      Half truth is lacking brevity in one’s stance to fear signing your given name.
      tSAtSE

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