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TPLF Anniversary Celebrations Looks Ahead To Regional Integration

On Wednesday (February 18, 2015) all roads in Ethiopia seemed to lead to one spot – the newly constructed Stadium in Mekele city, Capital of the Tigray Regional State in the northern part of the country.

Since dawn, residents flocked to the 60,000-capacity stadium which soon was packed to the full. Outside the stadium, millions participate in the several events befitting the 40th anniversary of the Tigray People’s Liberation Front (TPLF).

Inside the stadium, the TPLF chairman Abbay Woldu was busy receiving dignitaries and they came in droves too.

Ethiopian President Mulatu Teshome, Ethiopian Prime Minister Hailemariam Desalegn, Sudanese President Omar Hassan Al-Bashir, President of Somalia Hassan Sheikh Mahmoud, Prime Minister of Uganda Rohokan Rojownda, and Prime Minister of Rwanda Bernard Makoza attended the event.

The Chairperson of the African Union Commission Dr. Nkosazana Dlamini Zuma was also among the dignitaries attending the 40th TPLF anniversary.

Forty years ago, 11 men having seven rifles took to the woods to start the fight against Africa’s most armed force, the army of the Marxist Dergue regime, and it grew rapidly in a popular struggle. And 17 years down the line, the struggle that began in such a humble, but most determined way, mustered millions across the country leading to the downfall of the Dergue regime.

The coats the dignitaries wore and the coverlet (a piece of cloth combatants used to wear while fighting) they put around their necks evoked the mood of the early days of fighting. Everything else however changed for the better, including the very stadium that serves a venue which is the result of 24-years of peace achieved after the downfall of the Dergue regime.

And the coverlet was reminiscent of the struggle not only in Ethiopia but also farther north by Eritrean combatants, who unfortunately could not reap the results of their bitter struggle. Now not more than a necktie, the quilt served to wrap dead combatants with during the armed struggle, and it is known throughout the region including farther north and as far as people in Yemen.

…Renaissance is very imminent in Ethiopia to date,” said Dr. Nkosazana Dlamini Zuma, the Chairperson of the African Union Commission in her address to the joyous gathering.

Renaissance is there for all of us to see,” she said.

Regional integration

But the tone and mood of the celebration by far and large was forward-looking. It projects for not only a prosperous and unified nation, but also an economically integrated region.

All the leaders of the region including the Somalian President and Djiboutian Prime Minister shed light on the practical activities being implemented towards that end and this same theme reverberated by all others. Ethiopia to date, it seems, has become a center stage where the regional agenda springs.

Somali President Hassan Sheikh Mohamud said “enmity has come to an end and we would like to work in collaboration with Ethiopia. Ethiopia has contributed to realize a stable Somalia.”

Sudanese President Omar al-Bashir on his part said “we open a wide horizon for cooperation in all fields between our countries and we have shared goals in all fields.”

The economic integration between the two countries will be realized through network of infrastructure including roads, railways and electric power.”

Ugandan Prime Minister Ruhakana Rugunda picked up on this idea and said that “we should make use of our resource to realize regional integration as this is part of the plan of IGAD.”

Djiboutian Prime Minister Abdulkadir Mohamed “we will work to further intensify solidarity between the two people.”

The Mekelle-Tadjoura railway will contribute to integration of the two peoples,” he said.

President of Rwanda Paul Kagame said “we, Africans as some say cannot rely on ourselves but we could more than we can.”

Africa as a whole found Ethiopia as an important voice. Ethiopia contributes to peace and development through its peacekeepers and ideas, which Rwanda feels proud of,” he said.

TPLF began its armed struggle when a group 11 took it to the woods carrying seven rifles, and TPLF was founded at a place called Dedebit in the state in 1975.

After seventeen-year long guerrilla fighting, TPLF, sardonically called Woyane was able to oust the tenured Dergue military regime in 1991. The regime which was highly equipped with modern ammunition and able to mobilize nearly 500,000 army had been seemed hard to confront with. It has waged several military campaigns to demolish the small number of TPLF fighters.

After the downfall of the Dergue regime, TPLF and its affiliate parties formed stable transitional government that ruled the country from 1991-1995.

The alliance is called Ethiopian Peoples’ Revolutionary Democratic Front (EPRDF).

Anniversary highlight

The highlights of the anniversary celebrations in the stadium were the recognition given to the early day’s combatants, dead or alive, as well as the people who appeared with framed photos of their sons and daughters sacrificed for the cause.

Eternal respect for them!

By: Mohammed Taha Tewekel, with additional reporting by Seleshi Tessema

About Mohammed T. Tewekel

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  • FishMilk

    Hi All. This old Awate article calling for eternal respect for the TPLF is interesting! Oh my, how times have changed.

  • Kokhob Selam

    well, it is another confirmation, Ok then good for Nitricc. but what actually happen? is that old one or the new line? may be still in building it and are busy in other side, or it is abandoned? what?

  • Nitricc

    To Dedebit and Dedebitawian. I was impressed about the speed of your new train in Addis and its usefulness. I wouldn’t say the best in the world but for sure the best in Africa. I did not know your dedebit self is advanced that much. Shame on me. Lol

    http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-TLzQ4YswCkE/VOZTdcfPIDI/AAAAAAAAIdg/R2mitnuubKM/s1600/Ethiopian%2BLight%2BRail%2B4.jpg

    • Kokhob Selam

      Lol Nitriccay, you always find something wrong to talk about. Are you sure this is in Ethiopia? I will not say shame on you for not knowing Ethiopia is progressing. I will say shame on you when you want to see Ethiopia down. but attention! jealousy is poisonous feeling that can stop the heart bit,.

    • operation sunset

      The trenche converters after 15 years of the battle of operation sunset they start digging train platforms,digging dams, digging sugar factory,finally raya beer And so on we got lessons from the fenkil trenches diggers

      • selam

        Still you are living with a war mentality , why is that

      • selam

        The pure ethiopian election result . EPRF got of 96% vote.

        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iNT_8I2A4kc

        • operation sunset

          Dictator Isayas interview in June 1998 on the war situation: http://youtu.be/Hgb8k47tKU8

        • operation sunset

          We will wait and see what your chief architect of trenche diggers what kind of constitution will introduce you within 5 months time… it could be the first constitution in the world not allowing elections… About the spinal cord breakers upcoming election We are working hard to make free And fair in the eyes of trenche converters people of Ethiopia

          • selam

            ow ya , we have seen it and you know it , Ethiopia will never ever have a free and fair election as far as your weyane is on power. It will be exactly like last time election where EPRDF won 96% of the vote.

            As far as Eritrea , yes you are right , this mad man is doing what ever he want and i am sure we will have the time to do it wisely , so just wait , and give us time to send this monster back to where he belongs.

    • oldbadtimes

      lol…, Oh…God bless me! How petty person you must be 😉 Don’t you rather worry a little bit about your country’s future when you see the construction boon all over Ethiopia please instead of belittling the breakthrough changes that are happening HERE? You look comfortable with the already aging Your master’s Italian built infrastructure. Wake up and challenge your own government and system if you are real person firstly and real Eritrean SECONDLY. It seems your stomach is terribly eaten by jealousy because of the RAILWAY PROJECT though when you bring this silly and minor issue or incident in Addis. I wonder when the people and cadres of Eritrea will question their leaders why Eritrea is lagging in every front let alone to be the “SINGAPORE OF AFRICA” 😉 OH DREAMLAND WHEN ARE YOU GOING TO PAY ALL THE SACRIFICES OF THE STRUGGLE FOR INDEPENDENCE? 🙂 😉 OH DREAMLAND I AM BEGGING YOU, PLEASE COME AND SAVE US BEFORE WE ALL MIGRATE IN ALL DIRECTION TO THE NEIGHBORS AND BEFORE WE ALL PERISH IN THE SEA 🙂 😉 Shame on you and on your intellect for bring this as big deal while your people are perishing all possible directions.

  • oldbadtimes

    Integration in one or the other way such as Economic, Political, Social and so on.. will be for sure the path of African countries. Without that we all might perish in bare lands as what happened during the colonization. Colonizers was working to spread their values and national interest only not Africans values at all. That dragged as into slime mud of backwardness that cannot still clear ourselves from. Therefore, the notion of integration from the Africans leaders is needless to say very important for the current and future generation of Africa. No surprise about that as it is for sure the Future and Present of African Renaissance. But Eritrea under the current leadership chose to shut its doors for integration with its neighbours and that will affect every Eritrean when the web of integration will span across Africa from Ethiopia and vice versa. The railways, Electricity, Road, and other important infrastructures will spread into all ports and cities which are near and strategic to the development of Ethiopia. At sometimes things will be irreversible and Eritrean ports will be out of service as their are now. That will affect the life of Every Eritrean as it does these days. Anyway, Integration should be the theme and mantra of current and future generation of Africa including its leaders. Too bad, wedi Afom is seating on the sideline of red sea, which is the gate to the whole world, without normalizing its relations with its neighbours let alone to talk about the kudos Integration mantra. I feel sorry for the hard working people of Eritrea for being denied the benefit of Integration which our good neighbours Djibouti are benefiting. The bad news is that I do not think there will be ECONOMIC INTEGRATION or whatsoever integration between the sisterly countries as far as Wedi Afom or Wedi Medhin berad is on power. That is the very bad news. Integration for Africa!!

  • Micheal

    Dear T.Kifle

    Not sure what branch of Mabber Andnet you belong to but I find your comment very laughable – no sane Eritrean believes your following comment. “The moment Eritrea declared unprovoked aggression on Ethiopia, the argument shifted to the mantra of “TPLF is the kingmaker.”
    Eritrea did not provoke any war with anybody – sure the might EPLF defended it’s borders and will continue to do so – except members of mahber andnet and the so called Eritrean opposition, the whole world knew the mighty EPLF defeated Ethiopia and installed TPLF in menelik palace -even your TPLF use to say that..
    Michael

    • Sarell Ammyap

      Michael dear, do you read . Cause reading is the key to success . You said Eritrea never proprovoked war with Ethiopia. Let me accept this. But who provoked the war with Yemen, Sudan, and Djbouti. You can’t deni this. Or else you don’t read.
      Thank you.

  • Amde

    Ato Derebew,

    Relax, I am just a random anonymous post on the internet. Lene yetemegnulignin Egziabher inde simuo deribo yistilign.

    Amde

  • Amde

    Dear T kifle

    I am not at the moment able to respond in depth but what you are saying can be fundamentally highlighted by this phrase which i quoted from you namely

    “It delays consensus which is the single most important parameter for democratization.”

    I believe you have it exactly backward.

    In fact i would almost say that it reveals a false dichotomy between completely unrelated topics.. namely consensus and democratization.

    Who is doing the consensing if the consensing parties did not emerge from democracy?

    What are the topics that need to be consensed upon? Are they 1? 10? 1000?

    If these X topics have already been resolved via consensus then what is the point of democracy? and of the supposed organs of democratic expression (such as a representative legislature)

    Someone could interpret your formulation as consensus made between organizations in an opaque process not clear or open to the public at large.

    Amde

    • T. Kifle

      Dear Amde,

      I believe consensus is a prelude for democracy. democracy doesn’t sprout out of vacuum. it emanates from common threads and shared values. In other words, what I am saying is parties need to accept the status qua. Then they can thrive from that starting point. No one is fool to hand them power while being fully aware of what they are going to do with that power. And I am saying the vast majority of Ethiopians don’t have similar complaints as the vocal opposition parties. If they want a real change they have to listen to the popular demands by shedding of their untamed ambitions. By not listening to the aspiration of the people they are only helping the incumbent to run the country uncontested.

      • Amde

        Dear T.Kifle

        I can see where we will be going in meaningless circles round and round. It was not necessary to call me lazy, shallow and misleading. It is amusing more than anything.

        Still, let me quote you:

        ” In other words, what I am saying is parties need to accept the status qua. Then they can thrive from that starting point. No one is fool to hand them power while being fully aware of what they are going to do
        with that power.”

        Thank you for EXACTLY proving my point. This is exactly what I am saying when I say democracy and the current status quo are incompatible. The condition of democracy is that power is handed to those the people elected. IRRESPECTIVE of what they plan to do with the power they get. Period.

        And of course it is threatening to those who tend to benefit from the status quo. They would indeed be foolish to let that go. And that is why they won’t – which was the whole point of this discussion.

        Anyhow, what is the point of an opposition if everybody agrees with everything ahead of time?

        “And I am saying the vast majority of Ethiopians don’t have similar complaints as the vocal opposition parties”

        This is an assertion on your part, which – as you have indicated – EPRDF won’t allow to be tested through the popular vote. I am with those who have stated on this forum that they rather save the money from wasting it in the current meaningless elections.

        Amde

        • T. Kifle

          Dear Amde,

          Well, those who pay the taxes don’t necessary share your views when you say “I am with those who have stated on this forum that they rather save the money from wasting it in the current meaningless elections”

          1. there is no history of democratic exercise I know of conducted without laid out rules. An opposition that doesn’t accept a constitution is not an alternative to any type of democratic exercise. This federal governance order is a result of a revolution that run over a course half a century. Any Opposition party should be determined to defend this federal structure. We are discussing theoretical possibilities. There is no evidence that those who are against the constitution can win a majority simply because their unitary thesis is rejected by the people. How do I know it? One simple indicator is we have less conflicts than any time in our history. We are growing in a faster pace than any other time in our history. Good or bad states are managing their affairs in any manner they see it fit.

          2. Contesting for political office and changing a constitution are not one and the same. Consensus is a prelude to democracy. Accepting the status qua is a must. democracy is a game that must be played by the rules. Amde, we are talking about abnormal opposition that cannot be fitted to any democratic norms. It is only in Ethiopia that a party drafts a constitution as an election manifesto (and it ain’t fun).But accepting the status qua doesn’t mean that no amendment can be made to the constitution but what it means is amendment is effected only through the provisions of the constitution itself. If any one vying for political office cannot bend for this clear and a must formula, there is no meaning to talk of democracy. And I would be happy if you can show me a country with an opposition that rejects a government and its constitution and so vocal to claim rights out of a constitution they don’t blink an eye to tear it off if opportunity arises. Every country worth a democracy have passed through similar tumultuous steps.

          • Amanuel Hidrat

            Selam T.Kifle,

            “An opposition that doesn’t accept a constitution is not an alternative to any type of democratic exercise.” This conceptual argument is spot on from you side, if all political organizations that exist during the constitutional drafting process were part of the political process, and as a result they should respect and defend the outcome of the process – which is the “constitution” as a “social contract” to the political parties in particular and to the Ethiopian people in general. So T. Kifle could you enlighten us a little about the political process within the constitutional process at ? Keep in mind, a constitutional document is a political document before it becomes a legal document. If I am not wrong EPRP was the only organization that wasn’t part of the process during the constitutional process. Correct me if I am wrong.

          • Amde

            Aman,

            What is wrong with an opposition that has different ideas about a constitution but wants to change it through constitutional means? Most constitutions have a corrective amendment process. Remember, a constitution is not the final received ultimate word of God received from high. It is a documnet that has to adapt to changes. Otherwise it becomes worse than irrelevant. It becomes an instrument of oppression.

            Amde

          • Amanuel Hidrat

            Dear Amde,

            There nothing wrong to bring a constitutional amendment through legislative body, if the opposition have accepted the current constitution and participate in the election, which then gives them a foot in the chamber for proposing an amendment to it. But keep in mind if you try to change the constitutional-governmental structure, which is now “federal structure” say for example to “centralized unitary government” you are totally overhauling the whole constitution – hence it isn’t amendment. You need a new constitutional process. Just a reminder.

          • saay7

            Amde;

            There are two positions here which are defensible:

            1. In both Ethiopia and Eritrea, there were segments of the population who felt excluded from the constitution drafting process. But, in the interest of their peoples urgency to make up for time lost, in the spirit of compromise, they must accept the constitution, warts and all.

            2. In both Erhiopia and Eritrea, there were segments of the population who felt excluded from the constitution drafting process. In the interest of a durable formula for peace and creating a constitution that has all stakeholders with a sense of ownership, the process must be rebooted.

            3. Then there is the twilight zone which begins with this premise: Everything the EPRDF does is good and everything the EPLF/PFDJ did is bad. Facts be damned, the Ethiopian constitution drafting process was inclusive–even if it was hurried and all done in total secrecy and excluded key stakeholders–and must be embraced. The EPLF/PFDJ was more inclusive–in terms of having key stakeholders participate–but it must be rejected because I didn’t get an invitation specially addressed to me and it just doesn’t meet my preconditions, of which I have many 🙂

            Ummm…

            “Avoid exclusion of key stakeholders in order to ensure that genuine agreement on key issues is reached. Ethiopia, Venezuela and Colombia exemplify the dangers of a process, which excludes some significant actors.
            The Ethiopian opposition resented its exclusion from the transition agenda and the constitution drafting process. Opposition leaders rejected the legitimacy of the Constitutional Commission and its project, and called for its resignation. Also, the fact that the Commission worked behind closed doors did not contribute to its legitimacy. Furthermore, the lack of debate among the various political groups meant that important and controversial issues regarding ethnicity, self-determination and federalism were never adequately deliberated.”

            http://www.unrol.org/files/constitution%20making%20and%20peace%20building%20report_jamal%20benomar.doc

            saay

          • Amde

            Saay,

            Haha I see what you did there especially on number three. I have my doubts that PFDJ is reformable, but that is probably the least costly way for change to at least be attempted.

            Overall though very well said. The only thing I would add is that we are now basically approaching a quarter of a century – which is a generation. One would think whatever reasons may have obtained at the start, one would imagine a new generation should have another stab at revising or reforming.

            The thing is – I can’t really say what EPLF may have done, but the current Ethiopian system was baked in without a genuine effort to provide maximum representation, but to impose something that was already decided on the field. (I expect TKifle to jump in at this point to lecture me on the process). I understand victors dictating their terms, but at some point the system has to be able to respond to the actual demands of the day.

            Just a current case in point. Having ethnicized everything, the normal expansion of a city – in this case of Addis Ababa – has become embroiled in intra-EPRDF row, with TPLF’s Abay Tsehay threatening OPDO regional and state officials. This one issue is a perfect example of a classic artefact of the ethnicized and yet TPLF dominated political system. He may have been blaming OPDO officials in his capacity as a federal official, (in this case I think he is right) but the politics is seen as TPLF browbeating OPDO to give up Oromo land for the benefit of Addis Ababa. There are many incidents like that which did not need to occur if they were a bit more open from the get go or even afterwards.

            Maybe I am getting old, but I tend to appreciate “evolution” more than “revolution” now. Incidentally, this was said to have been uttered by the Emperor “We Believe in Evolution rather than Revolution”. I was told this in the 70s when I was still an impressionable child by revolutionary firebrands who wanted to show just how much of a reactionary the former Janhoy was.

            I wanted to let this topic cool off because it very quickly devolves into meaningless theoretical discussions, and bad faith name calling of he said she said etc…. I feel I do more to defend both Ethiopian and also specifically Tigrayan interests on this forum than actual sworn TPLFites. I provide a good historical context for why EPRDF is legitimately an Ethiopian government in line with our political traditions lasting over a century, but I earn sobriquets calling me a demon, a liar, lazy, extreme when I mention what we in Addis would say “ager yaweqewun” – namely TPLF dominance of the political process. Something so obvious it is not open for debate in Ethiopia.

            And since this topic is about legitimacy, here is a Monty Python presentation on this topic for your viewing pleasure…

            https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pQD03sb8NIs

            Amde

          • Abinet

            Amde
            Don’t worry . TK is not coming to defend ” that ” process where the so -called representatives voted for even before they understood what they were preached about . It was the most embarrassing show on TV. The first thing eprdf did was cloned many ethnic political parties/ partners in its own image. Then make them vote . If that is a process TK want to defend , well , what can I say?
            That is why I don’t want to focus on political issues . Let’s talk about the economic progress. Actually, I never write democracy and ethiopia in the same sentence. ( oops I just did).

          • Amde

            Abinet,

            Thank you – I need the common sense.

            Amde

          • saay7

            Amde:

            (Firing Eyob: you are now my favorite Ethiopian. He doesn’t even watch Monty Python:)

            One of my favorite scenes: one of my favorite lines “see the violence inherent in the system.”

            The violence inherent in the system came out in the form of the anti-terrorism proclamation designed to stifle ethio oppo and press. Al Jazeera English had an interview with exiled journalists and one of them said (paraphrasing): imagine if in the US the only media allowed to operate was Portugese language press? That’s what we have in Ethiopia: the only press allowed to operate is in English language. The Amharic language press is shut down exiled arrested accused of being terrorist.

            To answer a question not asked: I follow Ethiopian events for the same reason I follow Sudanese Yemeni Libyan djibouti events. Second, nothing absolutely nothing has been more toxic to the Eri diaspora opposition than its embrace of EPRDF which is by all objective measures a warmongering, democracy-hating, ethno-obsessed abomination. Still, still, it’s core, TPLF, lifted its people from 100 years of humiliation and for that, I salute it.

            saay

          • Eyob Medhane

            Sal,

            Oh come on…you have been firing me bizzilion times, when someone comes along, but I am still here, and I actually am getting a promotion, I am getting closer to the position, where I can fire you.. 🙂

            Now, ATP is a God sent legislation, which closed the door slam shut on Al Shabab from blowing us up and crippled it’s recruiting abilities. Using the cover of press freedom those, who want to encourage seditious activities in the country and those who want to spew the venom to spread ethnic and religious violence have lost their loop hole…Therefore, that law is there and I hope will be there for as long as it takes….

            I just came from Ethiopia. I saw so many non English and non Portugese 🙂 news papers, criticizing the government in Amharic, which is the working national language. There were tens may be twenties FM radio stations covering social problems and discussing issues…It’s a process. It will grow in pace how we want to grow….Not in a pace CPJ,HRW or whatever alphabet soup “human rights” organization, which I believe have nothing to do human rights want. We don’t let them to be our king makers. We make our own kings… We have seen their hand democracy delivering job in Egypt, Yemen, Libya, Syria, Ukraine… Thank you. We got this….

          • saay7

            Haha Eyobai:

            I know you hate this comparison, but u are doing that thing that pro PFDJ diaspora do “I just came back from the country and Hager tHmbeb ala!” (Translation available upon request. )

            Now now. From the gazillions of Amharic language press u read and listened, can u give me one, just one, example of actual criticism of EPRDF? Mind you, not the “grmawintew fqadachew kehone” type (available during Janhoi era), or “zmelketom akal kHasblu alewom” (available during PFDJ era) but actual “these EPRDF guys are taking the country to hell in a handbasket” type of criticism, which is guaranteed by the Ethiopian constitution.

            Welcome back btw ! Amde yqdem! Eyob ywdem! Etc etc.

            saay

          • Eyob Medhane

            Sal,

            Really? You want to do this? Fine lets do it. I will start from the more staunch critic one… ‘Finote NEtsanet’

            http://www.andinet.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/01/a.jpg

            A better professional one…

            http://www.addisadmassnews.com

            Esti ketru wodaje ke Amde atatalagn… 🙂

          • saay7

            Ok Fihira Eyob:

            All I see is squares (damn iPhone). I am going to have to enlist Amde and then we are going to beat u up. Even Abinet might join. Maybe.

            saay

          • Kokhob Selam

            Dearest Say, the people who didn’t participate on drafting Eritrean constitution could have participated and were allowed but under PFJD only. I participated for example, thinking trying is not danger. the reason most didn’t participate is first they were not called as parties or fronts and the very important reason was from long experience and history recorded confirmation PFDJ even EPLF was not meant to lead democratically and constitution and that group are totally opposite.

            the case of Ethiopians is different and here we are the 1997 constitution of Eritrea is just a book written in snow while Ethiopians one is concrete see practically at leas as starting point.

            accepting and fighting to materialize the 1997 constitution or rejecting it and think of new one will not have much different for me (ደስ ክብላ እንጣጢዕ ጽብሓላ,) but honestly speaking that is just nothing, it is not the book we need it is a leadership that leads to make it practical.

          • T. Kifle

            Dear Amanuel,

            As far as I know, EPRP didn’t accept the legitimacy of the transitional charter and refused to participate in the process. I personally don’t believe EPRP as an organization exists but some individuals reminisce their good-old-day-songs of FANO-TESEMARA from distant places. There was nationwide participation on the constitution making process starting at the kebele level and all the way to the then transitional council(comprise of the parties participated in the transition period). Then finally endorsed by constitutional congress of more than 500 men and women elected directly. Though some people might feel physical exclusion, almost all concerns of Ethiopians were put to the table fiercely debated and passed on by majority vote.

            the issue is not a matter of being excluded but feeling threatened by the new establishment and instead of participating in a process they opted to boycott it hence, denying its legitimacy. They work 24/with the so-called “opposition” in the country in tarnishing the image of Ethiopia hoping that one day the government would crumble. So the issue never been whether the constitution is good or bad: in their mind it doesn’t exist.

            Some people in this forum try to make a mockery of our parliament. I support this constitutional process not because of its current strengths but because it has a potential to lead us to democracy. Even if these vocal opposition were to settle with the constitution it doesn’t mean that democracy would prevail overnight. It will take us time to build the necessary social and physical infrastructures even if the said political polarities were absent.

          • Guest

            How is eprdf constitution good for tigrai if it is implemented accordingly ? Is there any other ethnic group live in Tigrai which can affect the identity or whatever of tigrai? Is that good the constitution protect tigrai economy from the other regions of ethiopia? Do you think democratic ethiopia with this constitution will exist as one country?(assuming olf will take oromia , EPRDF will take tigrai, g7 will take amara and onlf will take Somali on democratic election ) The reason why I ask this because if an Oromo or south or ethio Somali defend the constitution assuming it will implement accordingly i can understand but a guy from tigrai I don’t understand .. As for me I want to see the constitution to be implemented accordingly.

  • Amanuel Hidrat

    Dear Gonbel,

    Just a simple question to you: When we say there is “democracy” in any country, isn’t it relative, as there is no any country that fulfill all the requirement of democratic values? I hope you will not pull me to theory of democracy and the values that reflects to its essence but not to its appearance. As I am from a science background, my argument is always based on “relativism” and democratic evolution. So I don’t think Issayas has any kind of my argument.

    regards,