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Bologna, Italy, 2013: “Eritrean Solutions for Eritrean Problems”

Since the last Bologna Forum conference in Oakland, followed by Miriam September’s article, The Genius in a Lamp: ‘Eritrean Solutions to Eritrean Problems’, debates centered around EYSC’s slogan, “Eritrean Solutions for Eritrean Problems”, have been going on. I decided to republish the following which was published in Sep, 2013, right after the Bologna Forum conference in Bologna, Italy.


(Note: The following speech from 2013 was delivered in Tigrinya)

Last Wednesday I was in the middle of writing this speech when an excited  friend called and urged me to listen to a discussion in a Paltalk room. “They are discussing Bologna and someone is talking about you!” I told him I was busy and he reluctantly gave me a hint  about the topic. Surely,  I was not interested. Besides, I was excited about the event and the trip to Italy; I haven’t been there since we spent part of our honeymoon in Parma, one-hundred kilometers north of Bologna. But that Paltalk hint was helpful in shaping my speech…

Ladies and gentlemen,

I am elated to be here with you today…meeting so many of you, most for the first time, though some I know but never met in person …I cannot help but reflect and realize we have come a long way. It’s a long way from the days when the opposition camp to the PFDJ regime was so lonely except for a few hardened activists who were mocked, belittled and defamed by the regime and its supporters. I want you to remember this: what irritates some of you today was our daily staple for a long time. I am pleased we came this far.

Ten years ago, I was invited to New York to deliver a speech; my topic was Peaceful Struggle and it was written in Tigrinya. I will try to locate it—it might help us remember that we always allow ourselves to be preoccupied with trivial issues. Back then, the conflicting views of Peaceful Struggle versus Armed Struggle (whose opponents misnamed Violent Struggle) inflicted untold damages on the opposition camp—the debate over that is alive to this day.

In New York, I told my audience that I do not need to declare that I support a specific mode of struggle simply because it is obvious: I don’t carry a Klashnikov in this struggle! My tool of struggle was, and still is, the same; it has nothing to do with an armed outfit. It is based on challenging the regime and its supporters intellectually and at the same time inform, inspire and embolden my fellow Eritreans. Residing in a country 25 hours flight away from Eritrea, there is no type of struggle one can wage except a peaceful struggle…I still believe discussing the topic among activists is an over indulgence, and it has remained a cause of countless squabbles and splits. The so many fissures created among the opposition camp because of that are still crippling our collective ability to be effective.

When EYSC started as a facebook movement, I had reservations, which I explained to some regarding the way many of you tried to distance yourselves from others based on age. I was worried that a horizontal fragmentation would be added to the vertical fragmentation that we were already suffering from. I believe compartmentalization weakens the struggle and damages our unity. Some phases of the struggle that started over sixty-years ago have yet to be completed. Our struggle has always been one long chain, all segments, all regions, and all age groups who, over time, naturally, cross generational stages. If that chain is divided into its constituent parts, then we no more have a chain, but disconnected, unlinked rings, that cannot achieve anything on their own.

For years, we have been struggling to get everybody on board; unfortunately, once new activists joined in, most of them preferred to create islands of their own. And some sleek politicians saw this as an opportunity and campaigned to disconnect the young more, so that they can use them as a constituency, as foot-soldiers. That is why all those who worked behind the scene are anything but young—unless being 50 and 60 is considered young. And you might have seen the reaction when I wrote against the interference in Awassa and the convening of Debrezeit meetings.

I can confidently say that those mistakes led to the widening of the political and generational gap and negatively contributed to more fragmentation of the new movements. The Debrezeit problem is a result of three factors: lack of experience of many participants; political ambitions of a few; the zeal of some Ethiopian officials for creating more blocks. And we are still suffering from it for the last two years.

A few months ago, when the issue of maintaining the Eritrean pride was raised at awate.com, it was in recognition of the risks facing our national identity and how we can reverse the trend of what we have begun to lose as a nation. We recognized that we have become lenient in dealing with Eritrean history, our legacy, what makes us what we are, our foundation as a nation, our resistance to all sorts of un-Eritrean designs—partition, occupation, surrender, etc. We are proud that we stood tall as a people  and accomplished our first goal AGAINST ALL ODDS. Yes, we liberated our country; the fact that our independence was thwarted by a tyrant doesn’t change that. It doesn’t change the reason for which we spilled blood, our independence. It doesn’t negate the sacrifice of the thousands of maimed and killed, orphaned and widowed. It doesn’t change the pain of parents for the loss of their loved ones. Yes, we achieved our independence and, as a nation, we are determined to keep it at any cost.

Lately, we have been noticing an orchestrated attack on our independence, on our nation, and an assault on our legacy and pride. It began with what we consider our cornerstone, we were pressured to disown our glorious Ghedli legacy, the same Ghedli we invested heavily on. No. We will not disassociate ourselves from our love for our freedom simply because Isaias and his clique thwarted it! We would not be coerced into giving up the task of taking care of the affairs of our country on our own. That is really what made many of us feel the Eritrean pride was under attack when our resolve as activists was perceived as weak. But what brought us to that?

I believe we lack diplomatic skills. We lack skilled leaders who could forge clearly defined alliances. Leaders who would inspire and embolden us… visionary leaders who could articulate what we want, and lay out unambiguous Eritreans terms when dealing with anyone, anyone at all. However, it is prudent to recognize that it is our collective failure; it shouldn’t be thrown at some helpless veterans who never swayed from their principles and love for their country. Resource wise, they might be weak, but that weakness was caused by all of us. No mother would send her child to buy something empty handed! We never provided resources and assistance to the leaders we sent to achieve our goals. That collective weakness is now manifesting itself in what we observe around us.

The Ghedli-era veterans are very patriotic; they have more experiences than what many are willing to recognize. Ghedli-era veterans cannot be defined by Isaias and his minions… who are an anomaly, an exception, not the rule.

So, what is wrong with campaigning for a goal of “Eritrean Solution For Eritrean Problems”?

If that is a principle, then no one should have a problem with it. However, we have to remember that political statements are not taken at face value. In politics, not only words, but attitudes and the way the words are uttered also carry a lot of meaning. They create different perceptions in the minds of different people. And we should learn from past mistakes. When delivered to the public (as opposed to specific individual spoilers) it should not be delivered in a veiled insult. The mistakes we committed when dealing with the meaningless Peaceful vs. Armed Struggle debate should not be repeated. And here are my views on how you should deal with it.

  1. Eritrean solution remains an empty statement unless it is explained and described. We need to explain and describe the problems. I urge you to think what those problems that we want to solve are.
  2. All activists in the opposition camp declare their commitment to uphold Eritrean diversity, yet, our political groupings are anything but diverse… do not feel bad, it is not a new phenomenon, it’s been with us for a long time—let’s find an Eritrean solution for it, diligently.
  3. No single segment of our population can bring comprehensive Eritrean solutions unless we identify all the problems and then look for solutions in tandem: aim for  a lasting solution.
  4. We can only contribute to a solution if we are able to create an effective global movement, clusters cannot achieve much… it has been tried for decades and failed…. but to do that, first we need to…

Recognize the following:

  • During the Ghedli era, so-many atrocities were committed against Eritreans, so many sad incidents, but the struggle media never missed its focus on defeating the enemy. All Ghedli literature was focused on an optimistic image of Eritrea. For example, everyone knew how many kilometers long our Red Sea shores are; the minerals that we have; how rich our country was, how resolute and brave our people were; how just our cause was—an optimist image that the Gehdli drew for an inspiration.The Ghedli image of Eritrea was not built on fear and revenge, but determination and hope of what Eritrea could be with a minimal administration, by tapping into the work ethic, ingenuity and learning-will of our people, our huge potential. Every Ghedli literature advertised Eritrea. It didn’t advertise a nation in crisis, it never highlighted crisis at the expense of the main goal; crisis do not inspire people… and we can learn from that when we are tempted to act like firefighters, overwhelmed by single issues that don’t bring comprehensive solution. Take the refugees issue as an example—it has been seven years (for now, leave the forty-year refugees in Sudan alone) and most were, and still are, preoccupied and focusing on the Mediterranean Sea refugees, Egypt, Libya, Tunisia, Sinai, etc. As important as those issues are, solving them will not solve the Eritrean root question because these are manifestations of what ails our country, not the main problem. Our activism should not be focused on those issues at the expense of the main fight. There are many ways we can address those issues instead of stopping everything and focusing on the manifestations. By the way, that is what I tried to do by writing Miriam Was Here, I tried to address the main reason for the suffering of our people. The presence of tens of thousands of refugees in Sudan didn’t hinder us from focusing on the Ethiopian occupiers, the refugees of today should not hinder us from focusing on the PFDJ—a few efficient, specialized human rights activists among us can manage the incidents.
    .
  • The PFDJ campaign is based on Zura nHagerka…. It encourages people to know the mountains, the valleys and of course the Sahel trenches. That is good, but our message should be better, something the PFDJ failed to pay attention to: know your people, “Fleto n’ hazbkha.” In a speech entitled “Eritrea: The Challenges Of Today And The Prospects Of Tomorrow,” that I delivered in Australia last December, I suggested eight points to improve our situation. Here I will mention suggestion number 1 only:
    .
    “…Our 2013 resolution should include:  Get to know 4 Eritreans this year who are not from your tribe, ethnicity, region, or religion but are in the Eritrean resistance movement.  Preferably in person, and if you can’t, have conversations with them through social media, by phone, by skype, Paltalk, by whatever. I am talking about one-on-one personal conversations where you LEARN what their grievances are. Call It Campaign 4.  Then ask each one you talked to, to reach out to 4 more and so on and so on.”
    .
    If you know your people, all fears and suspicions can be eliminated. Not knowing your people makes one prone to all sorts of damaging influences. If one doesn’t know Eritreans outside his region or religion, one would be receptive to any negative connotations or messages concerning those one doesn’t  know. If you don’t know your people, any message: ezom Kebessa..or ezom Aslam…ezom Akeleguzai, ezom Hammasen, etc. would influence you. But knowing a few casual names is not enough. You have to know their culture, value system, their fears and their aspiration…maybe even their language… that makes one a good Eritrean, fully equipped Eritrean and not compartmentalized citizen.
    .
  • Compartmentalization is the enemy of unity. Our major problem (something that needs an Eritrean solution) has been our tendency to split instead of merging. We love creating small kiosks and then contently declare: “I am struggling!” Unless we build a formidable movement, unless we bring our resources together, we cannot succeed —we do not have the numbers of China, India…or even Ethiopia or Sudan…we have no choice but to stay together. Once we do that, we have to pledge allegiance to the whole of Eritrea, not to one of its constituent parts only. We should remain true to the goals that benefit the Eritrean people—peace, freedom and stability—by keeping and respecting our diversity.
    .
  • The Ghedli era had promoted all of that and more; what it didn’t promote and exercise was diversity of political views. Having nominal representation of people in political positions, or cultural troupes, limited to songs and dances, is not a solution; it is a veil that hides hegemonic aspirations and exclusionary tendencies. Struggling for political pluralism was our experience, and today it is considered treason by the PFDJ which foolishly practices destructive policies, coupled with vilification of dissenting voices. If we display any of the manners that we blame the PFDJ for, we will scare the people who are already scared of our scattered nature. Many express their fear of the opposition and say, “Unless they work together, they will not inspire us; how can they be an alternative?” Sadly, the only time our opposition makes the news is when it fights. Though some of the fights are natural, and at times necessary, they give the impression that if the rivals carried arms, the fighting would have deteriorated to extreme violent and wouldn’t stop unless the adversary is exterminated. And that is not an exaggerated fear.
    .
  • The gist of the slogan, Eritrean Solutions for Eritrean Problems, is a confirmation that the Eritrean movement is not beholden to anyone: it is not about money and personal gain or ego, it is not about funding—the usual real corruption, only exaggerated by the usual Third World paranoia! The slogan should mean a confirmation that we do not have bosses other than our people. It simply addresses those fears. In short, it means, “ngus nebsey e’ye.” But there is a problem in not saying it in the right tone and attitude because unknowingly, we could be echoing Isaias’ empty slogan of self-reliance. We have to be careful not to be perceived as isolationists. Our message to the people should be “Only you are our bosses; our struggle is not a puppet show.” But if we are confrontational, we might sound like Isaias…particularly if we keep accusing others of treason, selling out, and of being unpatriotic—that produces instant enemies. Branding people that way is not wise. No one wants his patriotism to be questioned. I encourage all of you to study the tone of two articles that were lately written by both Daniel and Miriam. No one should imply that those with different views are unpatriotic, they just have different views.
    .
  • If a segment of our population imposes a solution, alone, the excluded segments will not own that solution. Instead, they will consider it as one imposed on them. In that case, they will not see the difference between a solution imposed by an internal force and one imposed by any external power.

I repeat, we should be careful not to echo the tone of Isaias when he mentions his exclusionary and isolationist self-reliance mantra. We have seen how that policy has damaged our country, our economy, and how it has hindered our development. That cruel, confrontational, arrogant, dismissive tone of Isaias and his regime has stripped us of our dignity that we preserved throughout the struggle era.

Twenty years ago, one inflated his chest and proudly said I am from Eritrea. We were proud people, self-confident when many Eritreans rushed back home to start a new life; those who remained there hoped for a bright future of no wars, no exiles and no squabbles—just a normal country and motivated people. We believed we could launch a new era and lift our country up to the sky, and develop it in no time. Eritreans carried their skills, their accumulated savings and flew home. In a short time, all hope evaporated and Isaias embarked on making Eritrea another basket case, another banana republic… not even a republic, but a banana state with little bananas.

On the same context, the Eritrean Solution for Eritrean Problems slogan might sound as if we want to be isolated from Ethiopia or the world. Let me remind you that the alliance between the EPRDF and the PFDJ in the nineties didn’t go well with many people who thought they were excluded: power and wealth sharing, commercial opportunities and the right to return to their home. But when the border war broke between the previous allies, the people who supported that alliance at the expenses of the other Eritreans became more bitter militants against Ethiopia; those who didn’t bless that exclusive two-party alliance were victimized again—this time they were called Weyane lackeys… but  we have come this far, a long way….

I think we need to sober up and evaluate our performance during the last sixty years or so…I know some of you think history is a boring topic; I assure you it is not.

Three years ago when the youth movements started to pop up, most perceptions and attitudes  were as if divisions and disharmony was the making of the older generation. It didn’t take us long to confirm it is a social problem. In a Paltalk session, when I said that our divisions are social and not generational in nature, that they are a result of unresolved issues and not newly manufactured, a few listeners seemed to chuckle, “We young people know nothing but Eritrea, all the divisions are not ours, it belongs to the Ghedli generation!” Well, since then, I am sure many have discovered the bitter truth: one cannot run away from unresolved Eritrean social problems. Never.

And that is when the issue of Eritrea’s relations with Ethiopia becomes interesting. How about relations with Sudan, Saudi Arabia, Yemen, EU, and other Scandinavian countries? How about the political NGO’s? Are they dictating their solutions for Eritrean problems or not?

We need a sober diplomacy.

To be at war with your neighbors for trivial issues is a foolish policy. To be against NGOs like Amnesty and HRW, and a few rare others, is insanity—the rest of the political NGO’s are a disaster and I do not apologize for despising them. In principle, giving away the driver’s seat of the Eritrean opposition’s vehicle to others is beyond insanity. And since some have erroneously equated the slogan of Eritrean Solution for Eritrean Problems with anti-Ethiopia vitriol (maybe some people state and others understand it that way, which shouldn’t be the case) I would like to say a few words about it.

No one can deny that we need normal and stable relations with Ethiopia, Sudan and other neighbors. But since the Sudanese regime has chosen to ally itself with Isaias against the Eritrean people, I consider it an enemy regime, though I would not force that view on anyone even if I had the power to do so. Present Ethiopia is not an enemy; it is a friendly country, though some activists would be tempted to see it as an aggressive friend.

Firstly, as an activist, the main problem I see is that Ethiopia deals with the Eritrean opposition through its intelligence apparatus… and we all know that intelligence people see everyone as a potential spy and treat them like one. I have aired my suggestions repeatedly for Ethiopia to transfer the Eritrean opposition portfolio to a political office, such as the ministry of Foreign affairs. Unfortunately I do not have any clout to affect that transfer; I can only advocate for it hoping someday someone listens to my advice.

Secondly, I wish the opposition closes (and Ethiopia cooperates) all the offices of the Eritrean opposition in Addis Ababa allowing a small representative office to remain behind—a single united delegation, not every kiosk that calls itself an organization leaving a diplomatic delegation, though I fear the Ethiopian officials would be tempted to leave behind forty-something diplomatic delegations representing the opposition camp in line with their formula that involves a quota system—one for every ethnic, linguistic (and accent!), and age group—something they are fond of doing.

Third, all opposition groups should relocate in North Ethiopia, close to the Eritrean border. But once they do, they should be given full access to the refugees and defectors (understandably this is Ethiopian territory but I hope they would give enough leeway. At present, the opposition has no access to intelligence—and they are not satisfied with the goodwill tips and second-hand information, like the type of information a hair-braider in a refugee camp has.

Fourth, though the Eritrean opposition has been in Addis Ababa for almost two-decades, the Ethiopians have not provided it with any diplomatic assistance worth mentioning. This is despite the fact that Addis Ababa is the diplomatic capital of Africa boasting dozens of embassies, international and regional organizations, etc.

Fifth, Ethiopia has enough resources, though not a wealthy country—something Ethiopian officials are fond of reminding the opposition on every opportunity. But however big and resourceful a country, I don’t believe Eritreans lack the necessary media skills for the Ethiopians to take full control of opposition broadcasting targeted to our country by masquerading as Eritreans.

Sixth, a message to the Eritrean opposition: unite your activities or perish! Ethiopia should stop dealing with dozens of three-person organizations (credibility issue), some of them the Ethiopian intelligence hastily formed, others with members not exceeding the fingers of two hands. Instead, they should leave the task to Eritreans and limit their role to pressuring them to improve performance and produce, not encourage fragmentation—which unfortunately is a well-documented practice. To date, no one knows what is the criteria for an organization—and this has nothing to do with freedom of association but efficiency and effective struggle—not chaos and confusion. (for today I will stop here.)

What if they cannot do the above? The worst that can happen is the EPRDF follows the Sudanese regime’s example and expels every opposition element out from Ethiopia. What would that change on the status of the opposition? What would we lose? Fine, we might risk losing what we achieved over the last two-decades. But what did we achieve over that period by being in Ethiopia? NOTHING. There, we would lose nothing.

Unfortunately, I am sure this speech will irk some of my friends. They will mention the scholarships, the hosting of refugees, etc. My speech is focusing on the political aspect of the relations; humanitarian and charitable deeds are an obligation of a neighbor and a measure of a country’s humanity—that should not be a stumbling block that prevents us from airing our views. If that is the case, blackmailing those who criticize Ethiopia by bringing the issue of refugees and scholarships doesn’t help in creating a robust opposition to the tyranny in Eritrea. It will be empty appeasement, dishonesty that produces nothing for Ethiopia or for Eritrea. And that also applies to Sudan, and I am calling the Sudanese regime, with its fugitive president, an enemy.

My irked friends might remind me for the umpteenth time that Ethiopia pursues its national interest. My answer would be: let the Ethiopians worry about their interest, you worry about Eritrean interest. Ethiopia doesn’t need amateur Eritrean diplomats to advance its cause, it is able to do so on its own; it is upon the eighty-something million Ethiopians to advance its interests. I love Ethiopia and Ethiopians (less the chauvinists among them) and I recognize we are stuck being neighbors. Many of us wish for a relation that works… one based on respect and mutual benefits. Since I feel our alliance with the Ethiopians advances our interests, I like to deal with it in total honesty. Apart from that, we shouldn’t tolerate indignity from the Eritrean tyrant, and naturally, we shouldn’t take it from anyone else.

The last time I met the late PM Meles Zenawi, he told me the following:

“…For example we are beginning to develop the potassium resources in the Afar region of Ethiopia—that is millions of tons per year that needs to be transported. Technically, the closest port to this is not even Asseb, it is Tio. You could develop it into a big port. So under normal situation, Eritrea could regain most of these businesses and develop new businesses as well…”

Indeed, Ethiopia needs a causeway that would run approximately 40Kms to access the red Sea through Tio. We have to realize that the no-war-no-peace situation is hurting Eritrea as much as it’s hurting Ethiopia; normalcy would benefit both countries. There are many benefits that both can reap from a normal relation serving their mutual interest. We have a lot to give in our relations with Ethiopia, we shouldn’t see our hand as the lower one.

I wish to see beneficial arrangement with Ethiopia—beginning with Tio port access, where our Afferi compatriots would run the project and economically benefit from it before the rest of Eritrea. I hope that someday, Assab would be alive again feeding the Ethiopian highway arteries. I wish someday Massawa would be busy, feeding Tigrai and Western Ethiopian highway arteries. I wish someday, the Assab refinery would be rehabilitated for the benefit of the region. I wish to see a vibrant, thriving cultural and commercial relation between the two countries. I wish a large university would be established in badimme to graduate young people from the region. I wish prosperity for Ethiopia and the rest of the region so that we can all benefit from it. See! I am saying all of that from an Eritrean perspective, with no malice towards Ethiopia, driven by Eritrean interest, within the context of Eritreans living in Eritrea. To me the stakeholders are not in Bologna or Sweden, Canada or USA; they are inside Eritrea and across its immediate borders. Any egocentric bickering among Diaspora Eritreans is just laughable.

Finally, I hope that our principles would be formulated with the idea of salvaging our people and our country. If whatever we do doesn’t affect our people, we need to revise it—we have to stop spinning our wheels for nothing. The places where we reside are not Eritrean zobas—they are foreign places; whether London wins over Stockholm, or the other way around, in some purposeless rivalry, is insignificant. It doesn’t have any effect on our people; it is just a waste of time. Let’s firmly cement our views on the interest of our people and country. To reinforce that, let’s reclaim our pride and self-confidence. And let’s maintain the Eritrean resolve, that thing we call HaboMrwet. Importantly, if we keep forgetting who our real enemy is, I suggest we stick the picture of the tyrant to our breast pockets lest we forget. Let’s stop bickering and extinguish the fires of our petty squabbles. I am Eritrean; and I say it with pride. The way it should be said!

About Saleh "Gadi" Johar

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  • Amanuel

    Dear Mahmud Saleh
    Apology for not replying on time. I was looking for your reply from Disqus and some how it didn’t show up there. I saw this while I was looking for your link about G. Betew.

    As you have said no much disagreement on point one. What I would say is that it would be helpfull to solidify our camp if we give due respect to work done by other before we joined.

    On point two, I think your comment went beyond concern and that was I wanted to bring to your attention. You wrote negatively about the Ethnic politics in Ethiopia and I have asked you what is wrong with it. I don’t necessarily support it but I want to give chance to the people who advocate for it to present their pitch and those who oppose evidence based facts why is bad for Eritrean.

    At last you have asked me 5 questions and i will try to answer them in a summarised way. I don’t support Ethiopia over throwing the government in Eritrea by force. If Ethiopia want to help the Eritrean opposition it should be focusted financially and diplomatically to all opposition groups based on the number of members they have. This will encourage them to campaign to bring as many people as possible to the opposition.

    Regards

  • Amanuel Hidrat

    Good evening Mahmuday,

    [ I brought the thread we were debating up here for our convenience]

    In order to understand “Ethnic federalism” I will say few things what some known academicians say about “Federalism” and “Federation”. While Federalism (as a concept) is an organizing principle that advocate a multi-tiered government combining elements of shared-rule through common institutions for some purpose regional-self-rule for constituent units, Federation is an institutional and structural technique for achieving the goals of federalism [Assefa, 2007: 102-103]. Again as to how federalism can be achieved, Stephan alludes also that federalism can be achieved by two ways: (a) Coming-together-federations and (b) holding-together-federations. Coming-together-federations refers when sovereign states decided to form federations voluntarily due to various reasons (such as security, efficiency). Holding-together-federations usually emerges after consensual parliamentary decisions to maintain “unitary state”*** by establishing a multi-ethnic federal system (to avoid or settle) ethnic, regional or other group type conflicts [Staphan, 2001 : 320-324].

    Therefore Mahmuday, whether the units of the federal states are formed by ethnic boundary or by new artificial boundary for the purposes of organizing principle of “federalism”, the goal is always for settling social conflicts. Each country’s organizing principle on formulating “a system” with institutional and structural techniques, depend on the reality of its social make-up and the persistent unsolved conflicts. That is why we see different kind of federalism (a) on how the governing units are formed (b) on the degree of devolution of power from the center to the periphery or units of administration. Ethnic federalism is a panacea for some countries like India and hopefully to hold true with Ethiopia. The concept federalism is universal but the institutional structure of the federation may vary.

    *** Saay can I remind you holding-together-federal-state is to maintain “unitary state.” Hence US one of the countries that has ” A Decentralized Unitary governance”. I am coming up with an article in two weeks about this issue.

    Regards,
    Amanuel Hidrat

    • Mahmud Saleh

      DearEmma

      Thanks brother. I admit and acknowledge your knowledge about the issue, and I’m looking forward to reading your article. You said “Each country’s organizing principle on formulating “a system” with institutional and structural techniques, depend on the reality of its social make-up and the persistent unsolved conflicts.” I agree and I had that gist in mind when I told abi that the historical origin that had brought Ethnic federalism in Ethiopia are different than what Eritreans could face when they deliberate on deciding the type of system. Generally, I am not against decentralization, and actually, the decentralized unitary government you advocate for (which is different in its formulation than the Ethiopian experience) could be a firm contender among other varieties that might come forward. My argument is that such discussions should be for education and awareness/enlightenment, and it should not be dividing factors among justice seekers, because, at the end, such determinations will be valid only when hammered out at a national level by representatives of our people. Organizations and parties may put them in their programs in order to show where they stand, but they should not be taken as preconditions when they talk about unifying their resources. I think the minimum binding factor should be the achievement of a stage where individuals and organizations advance their agendas peacefully, and where things are decided through the ballot. If every faction and individuals agreed that in a similar issues the final arbitrator will be the people, and what is needed is the creation of a political climate where the arbitrator (people) exercise their right freely, we would save time and energy and the advent of assuring the birth of democracy would come faster.
      Anyway, some friends texted me Biteweded’s speech, and I have been touched so much, because what we are debating here is fully covered in his unprepared speech. He has definitely left a historical speech. , 18 years ago.

      • Amanuel Hidrat

        Mahmuday,

        Thank you for this short comment and the video clip of B. general Bitweded Abraha. It really touches the Eritrean heart and yet the weakest from us are still defending the act and the decision that send him to jail.

        Regards

  • haileTG

    Hello Nitricc,

    Recently you wondered how Fr Mussie Zerai gets in touch with migrants in distress. In fact, the exact story starts with a journalist who met a group of stranded refugees in Libya. The story then takes a rather unexpected twist, and so does fate of many. please follow the very short narration (<few min) linked below.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p034h5yz

    • Gud

      Hey Nitric,
      This shameless dude is supposedly to be a Godly person, but never did he mention God or the act of God in this link*, not even once! Same applies with all his interviews. He never miss mentioning the term “dictator” though 🙂 His Tigrigna interviews are, well, like any of those rats of Woyanie who call themselves activists or opposition or what ever acronym is the fashion of the day. Forget about what he says on the ground, outside the focus of the camera and what he says to the refugees he meets in person.
      We don’t expect a human trafficker to say he is a human trafficker in an international media, do we? 😉 and of course he is not going to mention the phone calls and communications and deals he does while the immigrants are still in Libya and BEFORE they set out for the boat ride.
      * By the way, do you understand how the “Use links sparingly” rule works? I mean what is the difference between this link and the one you posted last time regarding the same human trafficker fake priest? or what dawit (ted?) posted the same week? Actually our mnia kolel Haile G is the one who posts links and videos more than any one in this forum, and I don’t remember reading any warning, do you?

  • Abi

    Selamat Vet Mahmud Saleh
    Phew!! Is right! You used 6 million words to discuss why ethiopian involvement is a bad idea. I agree with you. Semere is an example of a toothless hiring agency. I am sure he will come to defend why ethiopian involvement is a must using 100 million words.
    Mahmud, your comment was loooong as usual. However, you miserably failed to discuss the second part of Amanuel’s question about adopting Ethiopian style ethnic federalism.
    Blame it on the kitchen.

    • Mahmud Saleh

      Salam abi
      Ethnic federalism?
      1. What form of a government Eritrea needs to adopt will be the authority of a properly delegated law making body. It will need a different atmosphere all political views are addressed without any prejudice. The current situation is not a testimony that warrants the prioritization of Ethnic demands. This is a phase where all Eritreans should work together in order to realize a conducive political atmosphere where all sorts of demands and democratically negotiated. The demands of ” up to secession ” would be appropriate if that democratic atmosphere could not address those ethnic specific demands.
      2.Let talaQua EtioPia sail safely through the ethnic federalism rough sea long after the grip of TPLF has subsided. We will watch. Another important point: Ethiopian ethnic federalism has its own historical origin. Although the right to self-determination universal, do we really have an exact reality as that that brought ethnic federalism in Ethiopia?
      In Ethiopia, there was a specific social group that controlled power at the expense of hundreds of marginalized social groups. It was enforced by state powers. What ever marginalization one could mention in our case, has different causes. All social groups of Eritrea are brothers in arms, and they have not had the chance to talk about this issues openly and with the objective of forging a better union.
      So, I say “Go Etiopiachen with your ethnic federalism experiment, “, we are watching. Where there occurs a lesson to be learned, we will jump at it.

      • Amanuel Hidrat

        Hi Mahmuday,

        Ethnic federalism was experimented long before Ethiopia took that road to solve their social contradictions. India and Kenya can be mentioned from the many. I will get back to you this evening with more exploration about it. But I agree, that Ethnic federalism is not applicable to the Eritrean reality. For some countries it is a good governmental structural model.

        Regards

      • sara

        Ya hala Mundanel mahmday,
        Is it a blessing or a curse eritrea is in between a rock and a hard place , with an ethnic and religious politics experimenting neighbors, already one has shown its falldawn and reprucusion and now we have to watch wait for the other experiments outcome.
        What a dilemma. ?

        • Mahmud Saleh

          Ahlan sara
          If we can learn from them, the signs are all over. That’s why the struggle should be more than a mere change of a regime. May the Almighty give our leaders the neurons and their correct networkings necessary for learning a lesson or two from the conflicts mostly originating from Ethno-religious politics! Ameeeeeen.
          That’s TBS’ Tuesday’s sermon.

      • Abi

        Hi Mahmud
        Talaqwa ena Qedamawitwa Ethiopiachin is sailing ever so carefully through the uncharted waters. The ocean seems calmer and calmer. I hope it is going to be a safe landing. Don’t ask how to land on water. It takes a genius like the immortal PMMZ to figure that one out.
        Besides, if eritrea manages to stand on both feet and, at the same time glide with a broken wing, ( according to dawit) Ethiopiachin can safely land on water.
        I appreciate your eagerness to learn from mama Ethiopia.
        Kewelaj memar awaqinet new.

        Now, I have to wait Ato Amanuel to tell us why or why not ethnic federalism works for ethiopia but not for eritrea.

  • Mahmud Saleh

    Selam Abraham (Good to hear from you)
    At the outset, I want to let you know that I’m not a politician (vying for office), or an ideologue pursuing to impose my views on others. I’m an average guy wishing good for our country. I like combining and reshuffling ideas for the sake of causing a move or an action. I hate stalemate. That’s why I have been playing with different ideas, including on the border issue, because what I care about is the end-result. Politicians, of course, want to squeeze you into their box, if you don’t fit or refuse to fit in, they will label you with really ugly names.That’s all. Now, bear this in mind when I talk about PFDJ.
    I always wonder at the paralysis that sadly has defined Eritrean opposition camp; and the never-ending bickering taking place among leaders who are supposed to lead. They are wasting too a lot of time on matters that should be resolved by democratically elected Eritrean body. Take this: we have an opposition that has existed for the last 15 years in order to answer political blunders that PFDJ has committed (including the issue of marginalization). Theoretically and practically, the formation of a united front that we have talked about so many times should have been easy, because there is only one opponent wronging all the sectors of our people, both at national and ethnic level. And the accommodation of these demands should have even been easy if there is good will. Because the essence of opposition is to act diametrically opposite to what PFDJ is doing. You have accounts and articles that depict how badly shaped the opposition is. We have evidences that show us that the components of the opposition are more distrusting of each other than they all are distrusting of PFDJ. That’s why ethnic and regional factions want to keep their strengths. I call this a commitment that’s half hearted, and its engineers are TPLF. That’s why I want to re-emphasize Eritrean Solutions to Eritrean Problems. It is neither an isolationist nor a blind nationalist. It has been at the center of who we are. It should not be seen as appropriated by a certain group. It’s a spirit. This will help us mitigate situations that may arise from the following scenario.
    Think about this: Say tomorrow, a TPLF allied regime comes to power. What chances and resources do scattered nationalists have to scramble for asserting Eritrean interests in the face of well armed ethnic factions and Ethiopian backed regime that will adopt “…including…and up to secession” phrase in the constitution which would makes Ethiopia reclaim interests it lost in the war of our independence through its stooges, peacefully. Some friends want us to trust the Ethiopian government and explain how neutral it will stay…they, actually, go far more than the Ethiopians would go on polishing their image. History shows us that Ethiopian elites have not been good at keeping their promises. After all, we should depend on trust this time. We know what happened the last time we trusted our own leader and its organization. I have no doubt that any pro-TPLF regime coming after PFDJ will impose its political and ideological packages, including ethnic federalism. That’s why some factions carry እንተቀዶ ሕራይ እንተዘይቀዶ ምፍላይ programs. In such a reality it is prudent that we widen our horizon in building a national consensus.
    Change may mean different for different people. Do we really have a consensus on what change we are looking for. A change for a secular national entity may mean different from a change that Kunama movement is seeking, or ELL are looking for. A change for a secular movement with a unitary governance in program may be different than someone looking to implement a federal or decentralized unitary government, or other forms of devolution of power. These issues need a national consensus before attempting to assume power, other wise, there will be a long cold and dreary political period with an almost predictable civil strife, and may be civil war, too.
    I tend to believe that the immediate mission of any change agent should be changing the statuesque for better and passing power to people, including the transition process. Here, I ‘m just broaching ideas; I hate dogmatic posturing. I like to see things moving. Our main problem is the fact that we have become too conditioned to doing things the same way, using again and again tools that have failed. That’s why I like emergent ideas and forums that raise values that have become defining markers, such as efforts that celebrate our resilience and self-reliance (not in how pfdj uses it, but in how we should use it) which, I believe, ESEP is a part of it.
    Coming to your points:
    I agree with all the points you underlined. They could still be broken down, but they are fine with me.
    On your question of the prospect of reforming PFDJ:
    You used interesting descriptions such as “reform friendly elements” and you mentioned some state apparatus such as the army. That’s all good. And I think you have already part of what I have wanted to say.
    When I said PFDJ members need to reform their organization, I also said opposition members need to reform their opposition camp. This goes with my belief that Eritreans, wherever they be, need to talk to each other. It is also a recognition of the rights of others.We are here because IA declared the end of the possibility of political organizations competing for vote, or constituency (ናይ ውድባት ሓሸውየ ኣብቂዑ). In essence, politics is all about Hashewye. Anyway, are we going to repeat the same? I know PFDJ as it stands will never be willing to sit for political compromises on equal footing, but that does not take away the right of its members to reform it. If it was reformed in 2001 by the G-15, we would be in this situation. Remember Haile DuruE, Mahmoud Sherifo, Aster Feshazion and their comrades were founding members of PFDJ. They wanted to reform it and that’s why they are paying with their lives. What if successful attempt happens, don’t we have to encourage the innocent peace loving members (hundreds of thousands of them) that they are part of this process? I’m not its member, but anyone who wants to reform it, I’m fine with it. What concerns me is what reform has taken place. In reality a reform that makes PFDJ an equal player would have been a far reaching reform; may be some sort of revolt in higher ranks…army…cabinet level…PFDJ executive office level, wresting PFDJ from the small clique that is ravaging the nation. It would mean making PFDJ reclaim its founding charter.
    A change would generally do the following:
    – Rule of law, starting with the release of prisoners
    -starting the process of political legitimization firmly on democratic principles.
    -Reaffirming principles of social justice, guaranteed by law.
    – unleashing Eritrean potential and particularly its entrepreneurial ingenuity; laying foundations for lasting economic progress (making food security apriority).
    -Charting out a prudent yet friendly foreign policy, closing conflicts with neighbors peacefully; looking for regional and international economic and security cooperation…
    -Add all policy changes that need to be done on in all sectors…
    Now, if you look at the finding charter of PFDJ, you will see all of these detailed as a political document. What do I say to a PFDJ member who works in the ministry of education, health, agriculture…that they have the right to reform PFDJ and reclaim the founding principles? I had a discussion with a friend recently. He told me the following.
    a. You guys (diaspora) are leading the fight, and we are watching you closely.
    b. However don’t ever think you are alone. Eritreans are now expressing their dissatisfaction in meetings (sub-zonal or qebeletat), at municipality level, in cadre meetings level. People are no more scared to express their disapproval of PFDJ openly, in cafes…that they follow our discussions here in this forum, and listen to opposition radios…
    c. No body knows who is running the country, even cabinet level ministers complain openly in cafes. There is no ideology that a PFDJ is going to fight for.
    d. We are just scared what will happen ones an abrupt shock happens, people, particularly, the elite carry on the same discussions that we do here, except they are done with extreme care, because ones conversations hint they are progressing to organization the security forces will nab you.
    This, which is not new to me, tells me that the need of reforming PFDJ is there. But the space is missing. All indications show that even PFDJ is aware of this increasing pressure from the public and the small clique is doing all it could to divert it to ensuring the continuity of its interests.
    When I say domestic potential, I have this assessment in mind. How the Diaspora plays its role will determine how fast this potential changes to kinetic energy.

    • Semere Andom

      Hi Mahmud:
      Ok, your made your case of the safety of the reformed PFDJ and the risk of the opposite. I want you to address the following when the kitchen duties are done:-)
      I agree with you on the G-15 reform movement, if they succeeded we would have a better Eritrea but not the Eritrea upon which the armed struggle was predicated, not even close. but that is different topic.

      Do you believe as I do that Eritreans tried to reform PFDJ from the beginning ( I know PFDJ did not exist then) but I believe it did:-) but every reform failed, Without going to detail and old history, even after independence IA was talked to reform, the reforms like Beraki introduced small reforms like making IA face people in answer and question but who ever asked tough questions were disappeared, the push back of the university students, the religious groups for freedom and even Forto was about reform, their short lived announcement is a testament of that. It is not that reform is not the safest idea for Eritrea, but it is not the safest path for the PFDJ once reform, in its true sense is implemented there are lots of consequence form them: facing their demons and that is the worst for them , they want to live in their delusion and in the long run we are all dead as one economist put it.

      So the question is: given the past history of successive reform failures, the lack of learning from our reform movements the likely of PFDJ reforming itself in either after soul searching or the G-15 type or what Sal calls democratic coup is low, do we wait endlessly until the separatist like ELL and unionist divide the country make unsalvageable or we enlist the help of Ethiopia in the parameters that Ab Hanibal articled (what does it mean EPES) and I always favored: owning the vision, the direction of the struggle to remove PFDJ
      I think whatever reform movement that is left in PFDJ is impotent to effect any change from inside, they will lament IA, drink their beer, live in their villas, send their kids abroad so they can return educated and affluent to lord over the poor people if Eritrea still around and if it is not, who cares as the Arabs say, poverty in your country is like being refugee and wealth as a refugee is like being in your country

      • Mahmud Saleh

        Selam Semere

        I went in detail to answer your question, but let me pull some sentences from my comment:
        – “It is also a recognition of the rights of others” [people who want to reclaim their organization]
        – “I know PFDJ as it stands will never be willing to sit for political compromises on equal footing, but that does not take away the right of its members to reform it. Proposing it as a principle says more about us than about its possible occurrence”

        – “What if successful attempt happens, don’t we have to encourage the innocent peace loving members (hundreds of thousands of them) that they are part of this process? I’m not its member, but anyone who wants to reform it, I’m fine with it. What concerns me is what reform has taken place. In reality a reform that makes PFDJ an equal player would have been a far reaching reform; may be some sort of revolt in higher ranks…army…cabinet level…PFDJ executive office level, wresting PFDJ from the small clique that is ravaging the nation and a complete reversal of policies including genuine openness to reach out to other stakeholders.”
        So, bxaay Semere, I am aware of the puzzle, but this is a recognition of the fact that PFDJ itself is held hostage by a few people who include top brass army commanders, top security officials and the executive office ( which in reality consists of Yemane and IA, its has been hollowed out, anyway). Others are all shafaH members who complain of the government that they run. Semere, I can tell you the majority members of PFDJ want change. This does not object to a non-PFDJ actors from seeking change. What this means is it recognizes the need of broadening the base for change. What this means is it recognizes that the majority of our people and indeed PFDJ members want change. And change without the participation of this big chunk of our society is not enduring. It is a strategy that is oriented on unifying forces that eventually will have common grounds, anyway. Reformed PFDJ, in my opinion, would look quite different. It woyld be someone which would say “Come on and let’s see what we can do together, let’s put decades of missed opportunity behind…”, it would mean recognizing the problem (dictatorial culture and tendencies), fixing them through internal cleansing, and then handing power to the people. We have discussed how an ideal transition would look like. This seals Eritrean ranks from getting exploited by foreign interests. Is it possible? Again, it is just a principle; it is not an action plan because I am not a member of any political organization. This is exclusively the opinion of TBS (aka private citizen).

    • Amanuel

      Hi Mahmud Saleh

      Two ovservations on your very long comment. I am on the opinion that comments would be better if they are short (like in Twitter). Because it will save commentators from contradicting them selves and making unintentional mistakes, which I believe the two points i will discuss now are as the result of your comments being long and you didn’t get time to review it.

      First, you seem to suggest that the opposition existed for 15 years. You are wrong, Eritreans have been opposing the arrogant and not inclusive government in Eritrean since its creation, either individually or in an organised manager. You mentioned “(ናይ ውድባት ሓሸውየ ኣብቂዑ)”. That was in 1991 but some how you thought opposition started in 2000. SGJ spoke on the article above about creating a chain not isolated rings, there fore, the movement of 2000 should be seen as extention to the one already started when IA closed the door.

      Second, The usual scare mongering Ethiopia issue. First there is no evidence to support your hypothetical assumptions that Ethiopia wants to create a poppet or ethnic government in Eritrean. Yes, there are ethic based movement supported by Ethiopia as there are also multiethnic movements. Lets assume that you right that Ethiopians wants to see ethic federalism in Eritrea. What is wrong with that? It seems that it is working in Ethiopia. I am sure you agree with me it is better than the existing system in Eritrea. So, if it better than the one we have now, it should be considered. I am on the opinion that as I political activities you should promoted your idea but discounting others by being an extension of the PFDJ scare mongering Ethiopia this or that is wrong.

      Regards
      Amanuel

      • Abi

        Selam Amanuel
        Parties formed on the base of ethnity should be banned. They are divisive and dangerous in a society where people consciousness is low. As I said before I HATE the ethnic federalism in Ethiopia and I don’t wish it for eritrea. It makes it more complicated and challenging specially where there are ethnic groups found in multiple countries.
        My appologies to bring myself uninvited.

        • Amanuel

          Selam Ali
          You may be right that it could be dangerous in theory or you just don’t like it. I haven’t been to Ethiopia in the last 18 years but from speaking to people who live there it is working for the country. We should judge it based on the facts on the ground. The other day I was speaking to a man from the Somalia region. He told me that there are considerable progress on education, health and economy at the same time he also acknowledged there also allot need to be done to strength political &judicial institutions. However he is optimistic. The other question is, is it going to be good to Eritrea? I don’t know.

    • Abraham Hanibal

      Selam Mahmud Saleh,

      Thank you for your rich and elaborate reply. There are many points that we agree upon, in fact I concur with most of your ideas, apart from the role you see for the PFDJ, both in bringing change and in shaping the post-Isayas Eritrea. I agree that like all Eritrean political actors, the PFDJ-members also deserve a place in enacting change and shaping the future, however, I’m very pessimistic on whether the PFDJ in its current
      form is fitted for these tasks. If we are to refer to history; starting from the Menkae-movement, the 1993-uprising (this was basically based on socio-economic reasons; but its backers faced the same brutal reprisals), the G15-initiative, the Wedi-Ali Forto-incident, etc.; all these events tell of a clique which is determined to hold on to power crashing any dissent on its way. This reality is compounded by the so called PFDJ-members’ inability to rally behind agents of reform. There was, and still continues to be an absence of togetherness, and on the other hand person-cultivation culture within the organization that cedes power to a single person or few individuals. Could we really speak of the current PFDJ as a member-driven and sustained grassroots organization?

      In my view, the PFDJ is a ghost organization, only existing in name. If you followed Al-Queisi’s interview, the PFDJ, then EPLF had lost most of its politically matured cadres during the long liberation struggle; if we add to this the loss from the last war and the never ending cleansing of the organization of its members seen to be agents of reform throughout the decades; particularly after the G-15 initiative, it is very unlikely that reform would come from the PFDJ. This is not to deny the presence of reform-backing entities within the PFDJ; but they are isolated, and the current situation of fear doesn’t allow them to organize people, hence the need for a concerted effort by all Eritreans to overcome fear and mobilize the people to stand up for their rights.

      The non-existing or dysfunctional PFDJ leadership and organization is not a guarantor that ensures Eritrea doesn’t fall in the wrong hands, resulting in the country being fragmented across ethnic and regional lines. In fact, as we are witnessing it today, the existing status quo is creating a favorable ground for the weakening of Eritrean nationalism and unity. Therefore, I believe something dramatic has to be done to reverse this frightening breakdown, and the almost non-existent PFDJ-organization is
      not fit for this huge task. That is why we need Eritreans inside and outside the country to take their historic responsibility in saving their nationhood from disintegration.

      We know that the current status of the PFDJ is created through unfair and unjust monopolization of economic and political opportunities at the cost of other political and social structures of the Eritrean society. Even the “hundreds of thousands” of the so-called PFDJ-members who are merely there to fill the statistics are registered under an atmosphere of absolute domination of the political space by this single PFDJ-entity, hence making it illegitimate to exist in an atmosphere of free political competition in its current structure. The other important aspect of contention is the issue of the economic assets the PFDJ has amassed through unfair practices, and exploitation of Eritreans during its decades of rule. These assets have to be transferred to the national treasury or fund as Saleh Johar has stated.

      At last I believe the great majority of Eritrean political groupings are for a secular government, and I really do not believe eventual fallout from what type of government or constitution to adopt could lead to civil strife or civil war.

      Regards

      • Mahmud Saleh

        Selam Abraham
        Thanks Abraham, an enlightening conversation, indeed. I think, principally, we don’t have divergence, except on the possibility of members of PFDJ reforming their organization, and that’s only on the probabilities. I am pessimistic too, and that why I said it would take a higher level of revolt within the organization (this could be similar to SAAY’s democratic coup), mine focuses primarily on the political aspect of it. I did not ignore the fact that it could be something of a remote possibility. But 0.1 is better than zero, and 0.75 probability is even better. I give it 0.1to 0.15 (Aman don’t ask me about the statistics!! CHEERS bro.). It may take different tracks. It may be dramatic, done by a sudden decision of frustrated top officials or gradual liberalization. However, it will take a pressure from the public.
        The sour fact is that the opposition is not in a dictating position. Its political legitimacy (that of the traditional organized opposition, armed and unarmed) is not better than the legitimacy PFDJ enjoys. It has been pursuing self depreciating policies. Don’t get me wrong, the idea of opposing unjust regime is noble and it is gathering acceptance by the mass. However, a mass is just a mass without a clear guidance. Its ability to work in a coordinated fashion will be undermined if there is no organization. And by organization I mean a unifying organizational framework.
        Anyway, as I indicated in my original comment, it’s all about my belief that there are good citizens within the ranks of PFDJ, and calling them to reform is just a principle that like minded Eritreans should break ranks and reach out to each other.
        I also don’t mean Diaspora members but the mass inside; Abraham the grievance is ripe within the organization, we should not think IA and monkey as untouchables. There is a day for everything.
        Regarding the resources and treasures I agree. All PFDJ resources belong to the state. Also please remember, this is more about understanding the complex matrices that lead to solution than if PFDJ is going to reform or not.

  • dawit

    Dear All Awatistas, Happy Sunday, October 04, 2015,

    Today I have decided to deliver a short sermon based from the book of Mathew 22-, 1-14. “Many are Called but
    Few are Chosen” another verse tells us those who [now] are last will be first [then], and those who [now] are first will be last [then], and another verse written talks about ‘Elect of God”

    How does God’s invitation and choice or election work? He chose a simple shepherd boy and making him King David, he chose a simple humble carpenter Jesus and making him the Christ, and chose a camel herder a Prophet Mohamed? Today billions of people follow the teaching of those ‘God Elected’ individuals as their guiding principle in their lives. The late Emperor Haile Selassie’s title included among others “King of Kings of Ethiopia, Elect of God. There are thousands young Ras Tafarians in the Caribbean, America, Europe and Africa who follows his teaching.

    SGJ publish a picture from EPLF Central Committee from 1977. He wrote about the fate of the thirteen people in the picture over the course of time. Some are departed, some still in prisoners and few still on leadership positions. It is obvious Isaias was the not the first to be called to Ghidli, or the richest, oldest , strongest or wisest among the few who answered the call, but he ended up among the few chosen to lead.”. Can we talk with same reasoning of faith that PIA is an ‘Elect of God’ to his people Eritreans?

    • Kokhob Selam

      Dear Dawitom,

      I don’t know if we can really will discuss about it. People talk a lot our out of their dreams and worries. here is one. NEGAGA GA GA

      https://www.facebook.com/salem.hamed.754/videos/1638122493135433/

    • Semere Andom

      dawt
      By invoking your twisted understanding of God’s election and applying it to DIA you are telling us the killing he committed was God’s will like that of David so in effect you are using the Sunday sermon of yours to act like towel of PAI for his murders , nice try but only an imbecile can buy this baloney.
      If you are calling him elect of God for his impeccable success in murdering Eritreans, one thing your are missing from your scriptures, God does not change his word and God follows rule of law so all the fight, the coming of Jesus twice that the Bible talks is all about are following the rule of law of the kingdom, so satan will do his thing, his satanic thing and his devices are people like IA and his demons people like you, your anguished soul that manifests in sermons will do nothing to hinder IA final fate, facing fate of all devices of satan and the little demons when left in the cold will commit suicide like Juddah and their bodies will be claimed by satan
      So do not inject our two great religions, Islam and Christianity to sanitize your master’s crimes by calling him God’s elect
      I ask the team to delete this offensive comment of yours
      By the way to answer your questions, because kids the tell truth

      • Amde

        Selam Semere,

        Why should this post be taken down? I would say if possible it should be immortalized with dawit’s name on it.

        I can’t tell if he is being a massive troll or genuinely believes what he wrote.

        Amde

        • Semere Andom

          Hi Amde”
          classic Made, I agree:-)
          immortal words by mortal man:-)

          • Amde

            Hi Semere,

            You know of course with this post dawit cements his role as a royal retinue. I don’t know if he is getting ready to be His Majesty’s chamberpot chief, or the one who lays out the Lord’s underwear in the morning.

            You know those Elect of God’s – they still have to endure their existence in human form for us unworthy mortals, and it is only the lucky few who get the honor of ministrating to their royal persons.

          • dawit

            SEM
            me-too

        • Kokhob Selam

          Dear Amde,

          I also agree on this,
          ራስን መፈለግ ትግስት ሟጣጭ ስራ ነው :: ሰዋች ተረብሸዋል – ተጨንቀዋል :: በነገራችን ላይ ለዛሬ ቆጠሮ ነበረን ::

          • Amde

            Selam KohkobSelam

            Giziyawi technical chigir new… the keyboard I am using sometimes works then won’t launch again. Will be reslved soon. yitagesugn

          • Kokhob Selam

            Dear Amde,

            እሺ :ችግር የ ለም :: እንግዲህ ይመችህ :: ለማነኛውም በዚህ ጉዳይ የሚያጠነጥን ጥልቅ ሃሳብ ለማቅረብ እየተዘጋጀሁኝ ነው ::

          • Kokhob Selam

            Dear Amde,
            ሰዎቹ ከፈጥሪ ጋር ጠብ መያዝ ጀምረዋል :: ሰውን ማሰርና መግደል ኣልበቃ ቢላቸው – ከፈጣሪ ጋር ፍጥጫ ሆነ :: እና ምርጫው ራስን መፈልግ- ኣግኝቶ ሰላምን መሻት:– እንተባበራቸው ::

      • dawit

        SEM.
        Seriously, you should visit your shrink Horizon or Abi. Horizon’s advice to take your medicine three times daily and Abi’s advice is not to write when you are angry! You sound a mad dog infected with rabbis biting every one.

    • Fnote Selam

      Dawit,

      There are some examples in bible where God raised/elected leaders for/to some people in order to punish them. Looking at the record of IA, makes me wonder….

      Regards,

      FS>

      • Gud

        FS,

        Give example of those examples you referred above where God raised/elected leaders to punish people…..
        Remember, you are implying some things here:
        1. That God actually uses people to punish people (You seem to be lowering God to the human level). (You did not say, things are used to punish people for their sins, like floods, diseases etc. you said leaders (people)
        2. That the people deserve punishment. In your case (That suggestive question or implication, again) you are saying Eritreans are being punished by God, and because this is God, Eritreans deserve punishment. Punishment for what?

        • Fnote Selam

          Gud,

          The answer to your question is actually not that hard. You can answer it your self, all you have to do is just ask yourself whether you agree or disagree with Dawit’s assertion that IA is elected by God to rule over Eritrea. Then, the answer to your question will be very apparent. So, go figure….

          Best regards,

          FS.

          • Gud

            FS,

            Come now, talk straight. Think straight. dawit said what he said, we are holding you to what YOU said. What you said is clear, why you said it is not.

            Let us do it again. Remember to talk straight (Be Eritrean for a sec. :))

            ” There are some examples in bible where God raised/elected leaders for/to some people in order to punish them”

            Please point us where in the Bible the examples are located, where it says God uses people to punish people.

            “Looking at the record of IA, makes me wonder….[ if God sent IA to punish the Eritrean people]
            That is so clear. You are saying 1) that God is punishing Eritreans 2) Because God is, well God, you are clearly saying there must be a reason why God is punishing Eritreans, 3) Because God doesn’t punish with out any reason, Eritreans deserve to be punished.
            There is no ambiguity in what you are saying here. Absolutely none. The question is why you are saying Eritreans are being punished and why you said they deserve it.
            Common now, talk straight

          • Fnote Selam

            Gud,

            Unless you have restrictions on access to bible, if you can find a verse to justify that IA is elected by God to rule over Eritrea, it should not be hard to find an example where a bad leader was raised to punish certain people….I am not going to do your assignment.

            I hoped by now it would be clear to you what I sad in response to Dawit, I guess I was wrong. Perhaps, it will be clear to you once you find that example in bible….

            Good luck!

            FS.

          • PTS

            FS,
            It actually is hard to find a leader that punished his own people. There are plenty leaders that punished other people. On the old testament, God punished people along with their leaders by empowering adversaries or neighbors, not through their own leaders.

          • Fnote Selam

            PTS,

            Doesn’t that make it even more relevant to our situation given the roots of IA…..?

            FS.

          • PTS

            No, not really, unless you deny he led the force that delivered independence.

          • Fnote Selam

            PTS,

            It kind of does, unless you want to deny IA is presiding over the worst conditions Eritreans are living….

            FS.

          • Gud

            The roots of IA? Man, you really need to take a break

          • V.F.

            Dear Gud (wey Gud, I have to call you dear),

            Here is what Fnote Selam said:

            “There are some examples in bible where God raised/elected leaders for/to some people in order to punish them. Looking at the record of IA, makes me wonder….”

            Why have you twisted his words? When FS said “…in order to punish them…” the ‘them’ refers to the leaders themselves. So God will surely punish IA just as He did to Saul and Solomon.

          • Gud

            V.F,

            It is fascinating to see how you unionists look for each other:)

            Anyway, this one might help you:

            http://awate.com/bologna-italy-2013-eritrean-solutions-for-eritrean-problems/#comment-2290108013

            Where FS said this: ” But, one also can conclude (referring to the bible) IA was elected as punishment to the people.”. You still think your “them” and FS “them” are the same? 🙂

          • V.F.

            Gud, you are being tough on this guy. He is being very ambiguous and leaving everything open for attack. So in that post you referred, FS is saying that Dawit could only mean one of two things and those are that either 1) IA was sent to be good to the people or 2) bad to the people, hence a punishment from God. You guys confused him and now he is trying to put the onus on Dawit, which is what he was trying to do in the first place. Dawit is the one who needs to do some explaining. Given our predicament, what do you think Dawit could have meant?

      • tes

        Dear Fnote Selam,

        As we all know [from the Sacred Book], God does everything for a purpose. Then based on your lines and wondering, Do you think that Eritreans deserve punishment?

        Just wondering what will be your response?

        tes

        • Fnote Selam

          Tes,

          NO!

          FS.

          • tes

            Fnote Selam,

            Haha then stop wondering by that line. If you were courageous you could have just shared what was inside you while you wrote this kind of lines.

            Com’on and tell us what made you to write this?

            haha!!

            tes

          • Fnote Selam

            Tes,

            My comment was in reply to Dawit. Read Dawit’s comment and my reply will make sense.

            😉

            FS

          • tes

            Dear Fnote Selam,

            I read it and still it doesn’t make sense to me when you extended it to people. Just I want to know your wonder. Simple!

            tes

          • PTS

            tes,
            Based on dawit’s comment, FS was wondering if God enthroned Isaias to punish Eritreans, although he doesn’t think we deserve it.

          • tes

            Dear PTS,

            Thank you but here wwere my three possible points when I asked FS.

            1. Yours is one.
            2. As PFDJ believe, DIA could be the chosen my to lead the people firmly like an iron fist and the false slogan “hade lbi hade hzbi’ dawitt’s assetion
            3. Possible ill wishers and those who lost all hope and looking for Eritreans to be punsihed and DIA is the perfect toom. (extreme view).

            FS just said NO boldly. I know his one line response though.

            Thank you again

            tes

          • PTS

            tes,
            You are welcome.
            Btw, SJ thinks armed struggle and violent struggle are different. You buy that?

          • tes

            Dear PTS,

            Yes I agree with SJ.

            Violent struggle is violent Ex: Even terrorism is a violent struggle like that if ISIS.

            Armed struggle is different. In armed struggle, there are norms to be followed and the struggle should respect that to be legitimate. For example protection of civilians.

            tes

          • PTS

            tes,
            I disagree. Both involve blood and killing.
            Not to confuse with goal/reason/justification.

          • Saleh Johar

            PST,

            Stop there 🙂 I think talking about the difference is over indulgence.. however, the means of a struggle for rights is determined by the victim. What I said was discussing the issue from 25 hours flight away is silly. Now check the bible, the Kuraan, the Universal Deceleration of Human rights–I believe they all agree on the rights of the oppressed. If you don’t find, it, write your own bible–I will help 🙂

          • Fnote Selam

            Dear Tes,

            Ok, let me try again. Dawit’s argument is, of course, nonsense. But, if just for the sake of it we decide to play along, based on his premise, one can make two conclusions. Dawit’s conclusion, referring to the bible, is that God elected IA, presumably, for the good of the people. But, one also can conclude (referring to the bible) IA was elected as punishment to the people. And based on IA’s record, which one do you think is more probable…..

            FS.

          • tes

            Dear FS,

            PTS was much better to assume it in a nice way.

            Anyhow, I assume your take is the second. Then do you think that God is punishing Eritrean people? If so why? If not why then He elected DIA? When I say this I know what DIA does and what is happening to our people.

            Just a question for you. I have my own answer.

            tes

          • Fnote Selam

            Ayiii Tes,

            Can’t believe you are finding it hard to follow that line of argument….or r y just trying to mess with me?

          • tes

            Dear Fnote Selam,

            NO FS. I just asked for clarification. Your wonder can lead to those who hear your wonder to different world of interpretation. If we biblisize/quranize phenomenons (like dawit does), things have diverse meaning. Having this in mind, I didn’t go further rather than asking for clarification.

            Stay Blissful

            tes

          • AOsman

            Dear Tes,

            FS was challenging Dawit based on his line of thinking, not endorsing it. Strange that you tried to corner him to defend it. Dawit’s assumption could easily be challenged using the Bible, we should not be allergic or shy away to biblisize/quranize some topics. Actually, at times we need to have good understanding of the two books to easily debunk some misunderstandings that may influence or have implications on our way of life.

            In Eritrea both Muslims and Christians have conservative or religious values and do attribute some of the difficulties they face in life as direct consequence to their sin (aspects they have control off) – Hatyatna or Zembina bezihu yiblu. This can lead some to be fatalist and worse like Dawit go to the extent of mixing God Allowing with God Electing. On the other hand, the same concept of relating sin to fate could be used to take responsibility for our situation and make us confident that any good we do today will have an influence to our future predicament.

            In many political discussions, we do blame ourselves for allowing DIA to become was he is now (taking collective responsibility). That the total non questioning environment that DIA faced after independence and continues to enjoy from HGDEFites emboldened him to be full blown dictator (OK some go back to EPLF season – but it is the same). So you don’t misunderstand my point, the mention of collective responsibility does not mean DIA is absolved of his criminal responsibility.

            Regards
            AOsman

    • Dear dawit,

      in simple terms, what you wrote above is a blasphemy. God is love, compassion, and a good father, who is never vengefull. He is a shepeherd who is ready to leave behind the 99 to save the one that is lost. if hs1 said that he was an “elect of God”, it shows his ignorance and his cunning nature and that of the people around him, but also, how naive our people were to accept this bs. when you talk of dia as an elect of God, it is an insult to the injury of the eritrean people and the people of the whole region.

      if one has read john steinbeck’s east of eden, one can remember the religious teachers who sat together for days to translate one single hebrew word of the bible; what it really meant. i donot remember every detail but, they came to the conclusion that God said “thou shalt” and not “you should”, thus giving the choice to human beings to decide on their own between good and bad. that is why he gave intelligence and the social laws to human beings to live with. therefore, everything we do is a matter of our own conscious choice, and God has nothing to do with our blunders and our correct decisions. dia is not an elect of God, nor are eritreans a condemned people. simply they made the wrong choice, rather, eritrean elites made the wrong decision for them.

  • Nitricc

    Hi Abi, here is a gift for you. normally your commercials are toothless but this one, is, good. although the none Habesha are boycotting it.
    ” The Habeshas (Amharas &Tigres) and non-Habeshas in Ethiopia (Oromo, Sidama, Wolaita, Hadiya, Kambata, Afar, Somali, Gambella, Benishangul, etc) know well that Habesha values are different from non-Habesha values. Both also know well that Habesha is not equivalent with Ethiopia. ”

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9rEHKrixWEo

    • Ted

      Hi, Nitric, If they run this comercial everday. expect half the neftegna male die of liver failure;-)

      • Nitricc

        Hi Ted, i guess we should fund the commercial to run in every Ethiopian mass media and that way, all the Abi’s will drink to their demise. that way they can’t fight us? Ted, that is very bright idea. now we got the Neftegna out of the way and we don’t have to worry about the Oromo; i spent few hours with them and they are totally in, solved lol, now all we have to worry is about the Tigryans. what do you think we should do about the Tigryans?

  • T..T.

    Hi all,

    Just as the theme “Eritrean solution to Eritrean problem (ESEP)” implies, its political and public trust functions should be judged by the unconscious reaction of any anti-regime Eritrean and not by its intended political campaign strategy.

    The first reaction of the anti-regime Eritrean is to explore if there is any Eritrean opposition that proposes non-Eritrean solution to the Eritrean problem. If there is truth about the theme as “the only Eritrean solution,” then, what is woven into it to make it the only Eritrean solution that cannot be replicated by those opposition groups in Ethiopia?

    Is it because the ESEP as the only Eritrean solution is considered to be in the best interest of the Eritrean people? Was it voted to be so, or it’s best was only based on the political clarification of the concept? If ESEP is the best solution and conforms to the desires of the Eritrean people, it should command the support of all the Eritrean people and by default of all Eritrean opposition forces.

    Still, the question is: what is woven into the ESEP to make it the best solution? Is the group that framed ESEP is claiming the old Italian adage, “roba giapponese per un mese” (Japanese product is just for one month) leading to saying that the Eritrean solutions suggested by the opposition groups in Ethiopia are not safe solutions. Here, defining and judging the quality of the solution by source is not dependable or sound and such decision cannot be left solely to the ESEP framers, who expressed their unwillingness to work together with those Eritrean oppositions in Ethiopia. The ESEP framers have the duty and political responsibility to explain why they decided not to find common ground.

    Transparency is an important component of building and initiating trusting communication with other opposition forces in order to reach a mutually acceptable solution to all Eritreans. If there were list of options from both sides, we would only need to match and dis-match in order to find out the real difference. Otherwise, in the absence of such lists the only choice is to test the two sides based on their relationship with Isayas. Who is closer to Isayasism? Who condemns Isayasism harder? The bottom line is, Eritreans may accept seeing the two side deeply antagonistic to each other for the sake of advancing the interest of the Eritrean cause but may not accept to see one side conspiring against the other side as some opposition members raise as a case in point: the persuasion of Wedi-Temnewo, as an invited speaker, in Wedi Ali’s Washington meeting to speak against the sponsors of the meeting. Such rampageous outsiders act representing the other side should immediately stop. The two sides should stop adding fuel to the fire and work harder to build trust. Yes, both sides should stop backstabbing and start working together to the fullest against the enemy of the Eritrean babies, the Eritrean youth, the Eritrean mothers, the Eritrean elderly and the Eritrean nation.

  • Gud

    Hi all,

    Abi’s great moments:

    1. Badme is ruled Eritrea, hence Ethiopia should give it back

    2. I [Ethiopia] am not going to die for you [the so called Eritrean opposition ] (who are good only at consuming kitffo in Ethiopia ). If you are in my country, you are my puppet and I can do only what is right and beneficial to my country

    3. You [13 yrs old dead meat] hate me because I don’t sing what you want me to sing : down with PIA

    4. Ethiopia is for Ethiopians as Eritrea is for Eritreans. Eritrea believes 1991 as the Independence Day, I consider 1998 Ethiopia’s moment

    5. Keep your Assab to yourself. I am not going to make the same mistake previous Ethiopians did, I am not going to die to get something which is not mine. I will not die to get back Assab. Assad is not mine

    6. I talk in terms of Ethiopia and Eritrea and not interns of pfdj and those who call themselves opposition. All Eritreans are the same to me.*

    7, Dabo first then democracy. I like how Ethiopia is doing it now. Right now democracy is a luxury. Dabo is the priority

    And many more….

    Abi is also, direct to the point, in your face with out any kelialem/megderder – in that sense he is more Eritrean 🙂

    * Not said openly, but it is obvious from the way he handles himself in this forum, always carefull not to pick side and not to step on people’s toe ( Perhaps a lesson to the ” Assab for badme” idiot)

    • Gud

      Cont….

      8. I opposed interference by both countries

      9. I don’t die for you to remove PIA

      10. I don’t want eritrea back doesn’t mean I hate eritrea

      11. I am not in the business of pleasing others.

      Cont…..

      • V.F.

        Gud, here is number 12:

        12. Unionists agenda is to ascend to Entoto and take away power from us hence they are the worst kind of Eritreans. They make me feel insecure.*

        *refer to Gud’s footnote above.

    • Nitricc

      Hi GUD, i mostly agree with Abi but at times, he contradicts with his takes. for instance, Abi believes in # 7 and at the same time; Abi was bragging to dawit by saying

      ” Gashe dawitThe worst is yet to come. There is going to be a net work of train all over Ethiopia. I believe it is over 8000 km”

      the truth is

      “By AFP,

      The number of hungry Ethiopians needing food aid has risen sharply due to poor rains and the El Nino weather phenomenon with around 7.5 million people now in need, aid officials said Friday.
      That number has nearly doubled since August, when the United Nations said 4.5 million were in need — with the UN now warning that without action some “15 million people will require food assistance” next year, more than inside war-torn Syria….”

      how about feeding your people first and then talk about your snail train? the toothless train took 17-20 minutes from Mesqel Adedbaby to Merkato. A good runner will beat the train in covering the distance. i am not kidding.
      feed your people then you can talk smack about it.

  • dawit

    What is the reason Ethiopian Athletes and Eritrean foot ball players run away from their countries, throwing away their future? I can understand why Eritreans leave their country but Why Ethiopian?
    http://www.diretube.com/articles/browse-Ethio-Sport-News-1.html

    • stewie

      Hi, Dawit

      Its called making up a case to get asylum in Europe. The competition too qualify is very tough in Ethiopian atheism. Its much easier to run for some western or Arab country if you are a mediocre runner. To be fair, their is a lot of corruption, mismanagement, nepotism and sexuall harassment inside the athletics federation also…

      • dawit

        Hi stewie,
        So can we conclude those who are asking asylum are mostly driven by economic and other social issues not related to political problems? Why would that be different for the thousands Eritreans and Ethiopian fleeing their countries taking so much risk to reach the greener pastures in Europe or America?

        • stewie

          Hello Again Dawitom

          Yes and no, their is a pull and push factor involve, economics being the pull factor and political and social oppression being the push factor. e.g., the lady in your link have both, her story seem true to me from what I know how the Ethiopian government requires EVERYONE to identify and participate in their own ethic political party that is supportive of the government. She also has the second factor, she wants to live in the west for better life opportunities…

          Eritrean case is much simpler and straight forward, The government is enslaving the youth. But Of course many embellish their stories and make up stuff. Not to mention, there is a big economic incentive for them to immigrate… In a way, It is a Symbiotic relationship where the Eritrean government oppresses the people very badly, pushing them out and Eritreans using that as an excuse to get asylum in the west. There is also a third factor that doesn’t get mention a lot, there is cultural element to migration, some are more likely to migrate than other countries in the same condition. This has to do with an existing migrations from that particular country in the past.

          So you have to take it all with a grain of salt…

  • Saleh Johar

    Asmera,

    I am sorry, but again, I do not debate arguments that are not factual and this will be my last comment to you if you insist on using hyperbole.

    1. Your information about the Eritrean referendum for self determination is wrong. The choice was not between “Freedom or Slavery” Check your sources, or your perception. The choice was between “Yes” or “No” for Independence.

    2. You think my promotion of stable relationship with Ethiopia and Sudan “is so crazy” and “it will not work anymore”? Would you be happy if I had said we need never-ending war between all the countries of the region? Reconcile it in your mind. I wish for war and you consider my wish “crazy.” Let me know what you want me to say. Also, please let me know if you wish for stable relations or war.

    3. In language, Slavery means a different thing than what you are trying to stick as an Eritrean statement. It is not. We fought against occupation and oppression. On the fight against oppression, all the EPRDF components were our allies. Do you have a problem that your present government took power after defeating the Derg?

    Sleep with that, please

  • haileTG

    Dear Ayneta,

    Your hypothesis has included the role of opposition, Ethiopia, PFDJ. Aren’t you forgetting some other party? I.e. the Eritrean people? Given your scenario and you throw in mass uprisings by the people, how would that change your predictions? It is true that the current confused state of the Eritrean people has paralyzed them to the point of being considered a mere statistics. But, all it takes is a simple trigger factor and things are completely changed in a matter of hours. I am afraid I can’t feel the fear you have but that is me, I don’t quite see my relationship with others from the point of view of what I could lose, rather what could give or help create. I don’t have an exaggerated sense of an all too powerful Ethiopia (they sure can demolish PFDJ in short order, since it is very unlikely or outright dumb for anyone to stand for PFDJ with their life). Ethiopia winning against PFDJ is simply winning a battle not a war, hence wouldn’t calculate like that. They obviously wish to finish off PFDJ one way or another but they are also aware of the sentiment of the Eritrean people, which is why they are less interested in taking the confrontational approach. At the same time, Ethiopians must be very knowledgeable about issues that impact their security and it is pointless for me to step on their shoe and speak on their behalf. However, a destabilized Eritrea is not something they would venture for. Frankly, they will wait to see what kind of administration will come post IA and decide how to proceed from there. The notion that Ethiopia divides Eritrean opposition is always questionable and it begs disbelief that Eritrean opposition actually need anybody’s help to be divided!! For starters, let’s pin point to the cause of one of the hundreds divisions that has been gone through and try to show that Ethiopia is what made it happen. Let’s own up to the responsibility that we aren’t the agreeable type towards each other (as whole, not us two:). The problem we still have is understanding that we are a sovereign state and not a band of militia always on the look out. PFDJ/IA has masterfully destroyed the self worth of the citizens, and the route through fear is not the best path to regaining that. Ethiopians may have bigger problem that they wished you or me could have helped with. But do you think we are in a shape to inspire anyone to come looking for help to us? We need to shake the devil in us and realize that we too are responsible to not only making ourselves better but also help others where they need, we too are endowed with the same attributes as others and it is time we respect ourselves and others, we too can lead when needed and can follow when we must. There is no one way to dealing with others and that is true both ways. Since weekends are free video time here in AT, here is motivational one for you (that I selected for you few days ago when you said ‘Berie karaju yihedal – us being the berie!!)

    Enjoy, have a blesses weekend

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K-09ZN86huI

    • Gud

      Hi Every one!
      Lick, lick and lick….it goes. Polish those damned boots. Shiny enough? Nope, not yet. Lick lick, polish.. goes the pathetic task…on and on and on….

    • Music Novice

      Greetings haile TG,

      In what you wrote, your assessment is very good. But near the end,you said: “Let’s own up to the responsibility that we aren’t the agreeable type towards each other.” But you shied away from pinpointing the root cause of this problem. What is the reason? Was it because yonting u couldn’t see it or you are avoiding a taboo issue

      • haileTG

        Selam MN,

        Those attributes of diversity have been there throughout our history. On the whole, it can be said that there is also a solid consensus on the Eritrean nation state (despite PFDJ’s shallow propaganda). They have sure been invoked unscrupulously for driving power ambitions of few but given the horrendous ordeals Eritreans are subjected to by the regime, we can safely credit that the diversity component of our national issue has withered the avalanches thrown at it. The core issue there is fair representation and share of resources, which under constitutional order, it can be realized judiciously. Hence, the root cause of the problem in our society is mismanagement and dictatorship on the one side and utter confusion and fear of the unknown on the resistance side. If we say the root cause is kinship alliances, we would have seen ethnic and sectarian conflicts by now, the fact that there isn’t none proves the opposite. I also have great respect for our nationals who are organized in ethnic lines as Kunama, Afar, Saho. Except that we are incapacitated from engaging them in good faith but many have borrowed a page from the Dergu and openly call them qitregna wenbediewoch (which is shameful). They have a legitimate cause to lookout for their folks but can always benefit from solid support and encouragement from the rest of their fellow country men and women. So, our main problem is something alien to our indigenous population that was bred by PFDJ through their dirty machination to hang on to power unlawfully.

        Regards

        • Music Novice

          Greetings haileTG,

          The term ‘diversity’ is a shaky concept concocted by loony liberal leftists in the West. This concept has never been seen to work in practice. Can you point out any country that is run on the basis of this concept?

          Kinship based society and the building of a modern Nation State are incompatible.

          You said: “The core issue there is fair representation and share of resources …”

          I do not think there is a problem of fair representation [in the ethnic sense] and resource sharing in Eritrea now. Are you of the opinion that these are monopolized by a certain ethnic group?

          You also said: “we would have seen ethnic and sectarian conflicts by now, the fact that there isn’t none proves the opposite.”

          This is faulty reasoning. Absence of visible conflict within Eritrea does not prove absence of division; just as it didn’t in the former Yugoslavia. In a society held by force, this also applies to Ethiopia, as soon as the force is withdrawn the component parts fall apart.

        • Mahmud Saleh

          Selam Harbegna HTG
          “Hence, the root cause of the problem in our society is mismanagement and dictatorship on the one side and utter confusion and fear of the unknown on the resistance side. If we say the root cause is kinship alliances, we would have seen ethnic and sectarian conflicts by now, the fact that there is none proves the opposite.”
          Very true, indeed. Ke and Arbegna saw yemiTebeQ tChet naw.
          HTG: The fact that the mentioned factions have failed to attract their “consituencies” in Eritrea and Ethiopian refugee camps tells us we have to be careful giving them credits and credibilities more than they deserve. You can say, no body has the right to give them recognition. That’s true. But it is also true that they have no right to speak on behalf of communities that refused to follow them. I have friends from the Saho and Kunama communities who have arrived from Ethiopia, some of them happened to be ex-combatants of those factions. The accounts I get from them is depressing, to say the least. They are led by inept mini dictators whose attitudes and running business would not be suitable for the change we aspire for.
          Then it occurs to me:
          1. Why is that we don’t hear the movement of Bedawyet, Nara, Bilin, Rashaida…even if gerography could be against them (away from Ethiopia, the incubator of ethnic factions), they could still work from Tigray in coordination with the other groups, because at the end they aim for the same goal.
          2. If we fail to listen to them now, what is the guarantee that we will listen to them when multiple opposition factions and ambitious individuals compete for power?
          3. Is the emergence of Kunama, Saho, and Afar- all bordering Ethiopia, by accident?
          4. Number three is not by mere chance. If the powers replacing PFDJ are not organized (domestic and diaspora), while the nationalists squabble for power space, Ethiopia will have secured its direct or indirect influence over Abay Dankalia. The Kunama issue is a coverup.
          Conclusion: Any grievance, political or otherwise, should be presented within a national framework. TPLF brought ethnic Federalism to suit them. As you said our problem is mimanagement and dictaTORIAL regime. The shortest way is to broaden ESEP in a way it includes decent members of PFDJ and all other Eritreans who are paralyzed by fear of a second coming of Ethiopian hand. Today’s Eritrean problems are manifestation of the PFDJ’s rule. We should not take them as intractable Eritrean problems.
          Why do I say those ethnic factions are TPLF manufactured? Because just trace back their origin, who is leading them for 15 years, (who are Haroon and Kernelios?); the fact that their own communities, including those in Ethiopian camps, have not really followed them…just as Jihadists were reppeled by our people in the northern border…
          Time to think new Haylat. Let’s widen our horizons. One can not complete a job using toolls that have demonstarted are not up to the job. Throw away those tools and try new ones. The new ones are:
          1. Reform the opposition (by opposition members)
          2. Reform PFDJ (by PFDJ members)
          3. dialogue between those reformed elements of oppsition and MEMBERS OF PFDJ.
          4. Working towards national consensus
          5. Executing change*
          Stay mindful of all eventualities. The faster we build national consensus the better to challenge eventualities.
          Naay lomi Hateta abzi ywdae. (sorry between chores, could be developed further).

          • haileTG

            Selamat MN and Mahmuday,

            dear MN: The term diversity isn’t a concept, rather a reality. It existed since the biblical times of the sons of Abraham. It is true that different approaches and perspectives were employed to handle it, but its very existence as a defining reality of man kind has been there all along.

            You can practically point to any country in Africa, Asia, and western hemisphere and find that their composition is diverse, yet many have built a modern nation state around it. In actual fact, the whole purpose of the Eritrean struggle was to create a nation out of diverse nationalities. It can be done in many ways.

            Fair representation and share of resources is a struggle in leveling the playing field, overcoming barriers, legitimizing and adhering to equal opportunities principles. That has to be demonstrably guaranteed for all through continuous progress and modernization even after the current regime. The current default position traces its history to complex set of events that transpired in the past and hence it can’t be considered fair and representative.

            The Eritrean diversity isn’t held together by a particular ideology (as communism in your example). PFDJ has no ideology that it can sell to anyone credibly. For example, on religious aspect, there would not be anything to stop the expansion of the nearby fanatical conflicts into Eritrea (all we have is a weak, isolated and corrupted regime against it). The fact that such movement hasn’t expanded its way into Eritrea shows you that we haven’t reached that level of conflict doesn’t exist.

            Saying all that however, I repeat that there is always a potential to manipulate is unscrupulously by few power hungry elites.

            Dear Mahmuday,

            I do understand you point, however, where I would like to center our focus is on recognition and engagement. The fact that the Eritrean opposition failing on organizational merits doesn’t negate the fact that there is a problem in Eritrea. Likewise, the fact that the leaderships or organizations of certain groups faltering or being held in a specific level of esteem doesn’t negate that there exist a problem that is responsible for propelling them into existence. I do agree that such issues can only be addressed at a national level through legitimate mechanisms, at the same time engagement and widening of the space for mutual understanding can effect basic agreements albeit at the level of principle. For example, the Kunama nationals you mentioned had shared their organizational woos with you, but what drove them to join up as combatants to begin with? ESEP has deeper meanings and underlying assumptions in relation to many facets of national problems. Consider the meeting that SGJ attended in California, it was said that he was the only Muslim speaker out of 21! So, how many were from Kunama, Afar, Bilin… may be none. So, in organizing a truly ESEP movement one needs to exhaust all avenues of reaching out and making alliances. That includes all stakeholders at individual or organized level. The PFDJ is currently engaged in highly abnormal and dangerous fashion and it would take a certain level of leap in faith to expect meaningful engagement. The rest of Eritrea is however much bigger than PFDJ and we can credibly agree to or dismiss conditionals from different stakeholders through meaningful and valid means of dialog and collaboration when warranted.

            Hence, we need to separate the actual problem factor from a transient vehicle being used at any particular time. If there are differences of opinion among our Kunama brothers for example, we need to calmly wait until they resolve their differences and are in a position to press for the interests of their folks in a unified and effective manner within the the State. The way we approach our Afar citizens need also be reflective of their everyday challenges, hopes and aspirations rather than at the means in which those themes are manifested organizationally.

            Regards Gentlemen, and enjoy your Sunday:-)

          • Mahmud Saleh

            Selam HTG
            This has been the best Sunday sermon, even better than dawitom’s sermon. I would like to tweak, and deepen the conversation, but I’m having some Sunday activities for today. I do agree though with the general narration. Very sound. The problem comes when we try to integrate or match our current political situation and its organizational manifestations into this general narration. And when I say ESEP, I’m not saying it in Confirmity with Bologna Forum or how they have used it. I’m using it as an all – Eritreans embracing motto. No Etitrean left behind. Whereever we may happen to be we are deqi-Ere. In that spirit, as you sai, the grievance of my Kunama, Afar… people is mine. Therefore, we need to listen to and engage them.Once we do that shaddy personalities will be out of business, and a truly national line will win. Where there is Eritrea, there is hope. Where there is Natey-natka, there is demise. Anyway, good Sunday

          • Music Novice

            Greetings haileTG,

            My question to you is that can you point to a country where the concept of diversity is used to build a stable nation?

            Diversity of competing narratives only creates division and discord.

            You said: “Fair representation and share of resources is a struggle in leveling the playing field, overcoming barriers, legitimizing and adhering to equal opportunities principles.”

            Do you believe that there is a dominance by an ethnic group in terms of representation and share of resources in Eritrea? If yes, by who? Personally, I reject this assertion.

            You also said: “The Eritrean diversity isn’t held together by a particular ideology (as communism in your example). PFDJ has no ideology that it can sell to anyone credibly.”.

            I think you are wrong. It may not have been presented in the form of a treatise or a neat Red/Green Book, but clearly PFDJ has a consistent ideology. This ideology is based on the narrative of national liberation, sacrifice of the martyrs and their commemoration, and self-reliance which can be generalized under the terms ‘Ghedli spirit’ or ‘Ghedli mode of thought’.

            Can’t you see that the tension between the PFDJ and the different communities arise because on the one hand, the PFDJ wants to build a unitary State/Nation based only on the Ghedli mode thought, this thought replacing all the other traditional, previous ways of thinking, while on the other, the communities want to cling to their old diverse way?

          • Gud

            MN,

            Ok, you got my attention. 🙂

            I hope you are not inching towards defaming/degrading Eritrea’s Ghedli or you are not inching towards mama Ethiopia. Are you? Otherwise you seem to be holding the mnia kolel Haile G by the nuts…..

            I am reading…..

          • Music Novice

            Greetings Gud,

            Where did you hear me degrading Ghedli? Ghedli is a fact of life.

          • Gud

            MN,

            I said “I hope you are not…..” And added “are you?” at the end. I did not say you are.

          • Ted

            Hi Gud, “mnia kolel Haile G” is giving us vertigo. I don’t know which; our bitter indignation towards TPLF or his unconstrained faith on them in our affairs. I hope to see a middle ground some day.

          • tes

            Dear Ted,

            Purified PFDJites well done defending PFDJ ideology.

            tes

          • Ted

            Hi tes, You swore by everything HTG, you blame PFDJ even he chops your head off. What happened to your ESEP Ayetahzuni Zereba.

          • tes

            Dear Ted,

            Hahaha, I am here. I will rather chop you into pieces soon. You know how I can do that.

            tes

          • Gud

            Ted,

            Vertigo?, ha! Now, why did not I think about that before? 🙂

            Ted, our bitter indignation towards TPLF is well justified. So it must be the other one. And the other one is not just “unconstrained faith”, it is acute subordination and the art of boot polishing :). Well, there is the art of using minia kolel as MO and hoodwinking people with long comments with beautiful words and what not, only to say NOTHING. Just pretend to say something else while all you doing is that boot polishing
            PS : Give tes some time till he realizes our mnia kolel is saying “no PFDJ ideology” 🙂

          • haileTG

            Hi MN,

            Let’s get this straight: diversity is NOT a concept, it IS a reality. I am an ethnic Tigrinya and Mahmuday is perhaps an ethnic Tigre (or he can correct me). That is we’re both Eritreans and we manifest Eritrea’s diversity in its ethnic make up. I am not a concept nor is Mahmuday a concept. We both are living and breathing human beings who belong to one diverse nation called Eritrea.

            Now to build a nation based on tolerance, justice and harmony for all its diverse segments is the bases for peace and stability. What concept you employ to achieve that is entirely different matter. You can use unitary melting pot, federal, autonomous provinces, multiculturalism (borrowing from the west)… whatever else the result of the political leverage you are working with. In a failed state, there may be no central authority and the approach may be different than in a constitutional and modernizing developmental state. But we need to be clear that diversity is not a concept, rather a reality. And we are not proposing one way or another to use as a ‘concept’ to manage it.

            The EPLF is what formed the TGE soon after independence. The EPLF was disproportionately highland Eritreans. It didn’t go to establish an ethnic based Tigrigna authority but its composition is predominantly Tigrigna highlanders. Hence, that remained a visible attribute of the regime it formed. Please consult Ahmed Raji’s research on this. However, such composition can’t be called an ethnic dominance because there is no rule of law under the regime’s system that transmits any benefits to the group it comes from. So. we can say that the current composition of the regime is highland dominated, while as I said that reality traces its origin to the configurations of the armed struggle days. If you reject such at compositional level, then you’ll have to counter Ahmed Raji with an equally comprehensive data set.

            Your idea of PFDJ ideology needs to discriminate between the superficial facade of PFDJ and its real deal manifestation. PFDJ also stands for “democracy & Justice”, how about that? PFDJ isn’t self reliant, it is one of most heavily in debt countries and it has no regard to martyrs nor commemorate them through any meaningful action. PFDJ says many things, including erecting Pushking monument in place of awate so have your say 🙂

          • Music Novice

            Greetings haileTG,

            So, you say: “diversity is not a concept”? A concept can be abstracted from reality. A reality and a conceptual version of it are mirror images of each other; they are not mutually exclusive. A concept is an abstraction or generalization from experience or the result of a transformation of existing ideas. The evolved ape, called Man, is different from other animals because he conceptualizes before practical implementation and vice versa.

            Earlier, I asked: “Can you point to a country where the concept of diversity is used to build a stable nation?”

            You replied: “Me and Mahmuday … That is we’re both Eritreans and we manifest Eritrea’s diversity in its ethnic make up.”

            I asked you to give me an example of a dynamic Nation/State where diversity is at work, but you give me a gimmicky answer.

          • Gud

            MN,

            This one is strange and funny

            “…can’t be called an ethnic dominance because there is no rule of law…”

            Ethnic dominance can only exist where there is rule of law?

            Rule of law allows ethnic dominance?

            Glee kizareb iu……

          • Music Novice

            Greetings Gud,

            I think, HaileTG is falling into logical traps because he is trying to negotiate tricky channels i.e. trying to be in the good books of different audiences.

          • Gud

            And “highland” is an ethnicity ?

          • haileTG

            Dear MN

            The reason I am mindful of the distinction between diversity being a reality and the way it is managed a conceptual framework isn’t for a mere red herring. It is an important distinction that serves the conclusion I wish to draw. For example, Apartheid was a conceptual framework for managing the reality of diversity in South Africa. Diversity, however, existed (since the arrival of the White settlers) prior to Apartheid, during its reign and after it has ended too. The fact that there are black and white South Africans is a constant reality, where as how that diversity is handled changed over a period of time with the rise and fall of various concepts. The concept of Multiculturalism [Banks, 1989] is another framework of dealing with diversity. This concept of Multiculturalism was later critiqued for various limitations and a new concept of Anti-Racism [Coehlo, 1995] was developed. It is beyond the scope of our discussions here to delve into each of those conceptual frameworks in detail, but it is clear that the reality of diversity has been handled through various concepts ranging from suppression, subjugation and exploitation all the way to celebrating it, empowerment, affirmative actions… etc. Incidentally, South Africa’s Apartheid was based on rule of law reserved to the dominant ethnic group ( I just had to mention that to help out some challenged readers:)

            Your assertion that one can’t build a modern nation state out of the concept of diversity is thus nonsensical (with due respect). You could argue that a certain concept of managing diversity doesn’t comport with modern nation state building. You could say ethnic based federal arrangement isn’t effective or you could say Apartheid based subjugation is a recipe for instability (these are just examples), but to say diversity can’t build a modern nation state is paradoxical in light of the reality of most countries. Do you see the confusion you’re trapping yourself in? Diversity doesn’t go away anywhere, it exists and must be handled one way or another. You have issue with certain conceptual framework of handling diversity and thus confusing that with diversity itself. The unitary system you mention is also one way of managing diversity and we can think of many other ways that has been applied elsewhere. Therefore, you need to be clear on what form of conceptual framework for managing diversity is that you have a problem is and consider not to be compatible with modern nation state building. Otherwise, the argument is reduced to absurdity when one claims diversity is can’t build a modern nation state! So, what do we do with the diverse people? Let them go across the border and join up their kinsmen?

            The conclusion that I wished to draw by my focusing on the distinction is that we often make diversity the problem. When that happens, we reject engagement and collaboration because we identified the diversity attribute as a problem in itself. We criminalize those with legitimate grievances, we obstruct development of ideas to deal with fostering harmony amidst divers nation, the proponents are mistrusted and fear rules the day. The remedy is of course to understand that diversity has always been there and will always be there. It is not a problem. It does not hamper anything and there is no losses to be incurred from it. The problem is with the conceptual frameworks that are put in place to manage it from time to time and from place to place. That is a crucial distinction.

            PFDJ being opposed for its Unitary system by various groups is not true. That is simply garbed to give Eritrea’s problem the face of ethnic and religious rivalries to set the ground to annihilate its independence. We have dealt with YG’s ghedli onslaught and other proponents in the past. Our baseline foundation in understanding and validating Eritrea’s independence is rock solid and will not yield to overt or covert diagnosis or prognosis. We’re here to stay. Yes, the way we are, and the way we know best. Our diversity, our struggle history of the glorious Ghedli and our unyielding determination to correct the course we’re on will finally overcome.

            Regards

          • Gud

            Hey MN,

            Boy, your guy wasted the whole afternoon/morning/day explaining the obvious (the diverse nature of people) 🙂 It feels like child’s game or as if he is talking to himself or something 🙂

            By the way, ato A. Hidrat, this one is for you
            ” ( I just had to mention that to help out some challenged readers:) ” 🙂 He is still insisting you need rule of law to be ethnically dominant….

          • Mahmud Saleh

            Dear HTG
            Another whacking Hateta that beat dawitom’s sermon. You have grabbed the Chira (tail) of the topic discussion, its relevance to us (multicultural/multiethnic countries) vis-a-vis nation building. Diversity and how it has been conceptualized through recent history, and how those concepts evolve while the reality (diversity) remains relatively the same (at least viewed from its slow social change. Diversity is a reality that developed nations are grappling with. Diversity challenges that American policy makers face may be different than those faced by Swedish policy makers. Western diversity challenges may not be the same as those existing in developing world. Diversity could be cultural (within the same or different ethnic groups), it may be racial…religious…concepts evolve as our understanding of the challenges advance.

          • Music Novice

            Greetings haileTG,

            The concept of Diversity, as I said earlier, is the creation of liberal leftists in the West during the 60s and 70s. Diversity has Multiculturalism as its core. Multiculturalism claims that different cultural values are morally equivalent.The practical application of this concept has been a grief, resulting in hostile and violent ethnic and religious enclaves that live in parallel Universes, in Europe. The post-War left wing dream has already foundered.

            An idea that resulted lack of social cohesion in culturally strong and stable Europe cannot be good for Eritrea where the narratives from the different cultures are not only in competition against each other but can also become hostile.

            With some reform, the EPLF/PFDJ way of following the ‘Ghedli mode of thought’ (the narrative of national liberation, martyrdom and sacrifice and their commemoration, self-reliance and secularism) could be the least worst choice among a list of even worse alternatives.

          • haileTG

            Merhaba MN,

            Are you advocating for OPOH* model for managing diversity?

            Secondly, can you provide us with some literature reference/s that argues that “Diversity is the concept of the LLL (Loony Liberal Left)” or is that what you surmised from general sense alone?

            Regards

            *OPOH model stands for the “One People One Heart” slogan in the context of PFDJ mantra.

          • Amanuel Hidrat

            Selam Hailat,

            Rule of law is not a requirement to have one ethnic dominant government.. With or without rule of law, if the government is run by disproportional number of one ethnic, it is always marginalization. There is no other way we could go about it. If it is disproportional, call it marginalization pointblank.

            Regards,
            Amanuel Hidrat

          • haileTG

            Merhaba Aman,

            As I mentioned, the Sauth African case for example had a rule of law that transfers benefits from the exclusively white government to the white constituency. In other words, I am of the view that the highland dominated government isn’t transferring special treatment to the highland population. Its ethnic profile is the result of the configuration of the armed struggle era. I wonder what kind of representation there would have been had EPLF not been the one to win independence?

            The Marginalization term might need further demonstration that:

            1 – A group/s are systematically excluded so as to result in an insufficient access to social rights, material deprivation, limited social participation and a lack of normative integration.

            2 – That the factors identified as being out of reach to the marginalized group/s are normally accessible by the rest of the society

            3 – That the dominant group bears responsibility in maintaining and perpetuating the marginalizing environment through its exclusionary practices.

            Examples: Black people, the Aboriginal peopls in Australia, the Untouchables in the Caste System…. I don’t want to get into the African cases in order to keep the topic away from polarized politics.

            Now, are we saying that the entire country, except the Tigrinya highlanders, are marginalized? Could such be politically, economically and socially feasible? Or would that be the most efficient way to address the the diversity management challenges that we have?

            In any case, I would like to see how you frame the situation as marginalization or if a better term can be used to describe it.

            Ahmed Raji had done an excellent work in depicting the disparities as they exist among the Muslim and Christian segments of our society. My recollection of his earlier parts is a bit rusty right now (we only used the last few parts recently), how do you see the relevance/applicability of that document for the ethnic diversity ( as opposed to religious diversity) aspect of our society/

            Regards

          • Amanuel Hidrat

            Merhaba Hailat,

            I am afraid you are equating EPLF=Eritrea. Even if EPLF becomes the de’facto Eritrean government, all the civil service in the government “were and are” from “tegadelti and civilians” (how ever the civilians small they are). “Its ethnic profile (as) the result of the (organizational) configuration of the armed struggle era” will not exempt the government from the accusation from the other side of being marginalized. Unless some one disprove Ahmed’s account, the report snugly fits to the definition of marginalization. The statistics are “public and military service employment” (how ever low the salary might be) the profile shows a disproportionate of one ethnic dominance as reported. Whether the disproportionate are groups, ethics, religion or race related, and whether the action is a declared or undeclared it remains to be marginalization. Period. We can not escape from that.

            Hailat, as you put it, If “Its ethnic profile is the result of the configuration of the armed struggle era” which means EPLF was a tigrigna dominated organization, and as the same time, if Ahmed’s report shows that the government and the civil service employment is disproportionately dominated by one ethnic , it can’t be other than a systemic problem of the government. Doesn’t your argument entice to reflect its continuum of homogeneous make up as oppose to the diversity of our society. So until the government comes with excuses that are justifiable, you can’t disqualify the argument of marginalization which that meticulately documented by Ahmed Raji.

            Ahmed’s argument of marginalization is on religious bases Christian verses Muslims. My argument is always based on the marginalization of our “social groups” (the term I prefer to use in all my arguments than ethnics). Our social groups are the identities that reflect our multi-cultural diversity, and they are the building blocks of Eritrean society. Eritrean identity is the make up of our social groups. Therefore form Ahmed’s researched data, whether it is framed by Christian verses Muslim or theTigrigna social group verses the other social groups, there is a clear marginalization in the current Eritrea.

            Regards,
            Amanuel Hidrat

          • Music Novice

            Greetings Amanuel H.,

            I am afraid you are blindly, without reference to context, trying to apply the Western liberal leftist concept of diversity. This is the opposite of what is called a thinking and problem solving approach.

            You have never been to Eritrea, may be close to half a century, but now you speculate from a distance about matters you have not seen or experienced in their full context. Contrary to you, I have worked in Eritrea from 1991 to 1998 and have first hand experience of recruitment processes in my place of work. I testify that recruitments I have witnessed were merit based, without reference to ethnicity or religion, and I have no reason to doubt it will be otherwise in other departments.

          • Amanuel Hidrat

            Dear MN,

            Could you respond to Ahmed ‘s statestical report rather responding to me. Challenge to his account. I am not reporting I am debating on the report. No one has come to disprove him to his researched documentation. By the way have you read his artcles “the losr rainbow” in five part series. If your read I wanted you to rebut it right here. If you have not read it read and get back to us. let us see if you could come with statistics to disprove him. Otherwise I know it is enough to match his argument

          • Music Novice

            Greetings Amanuel H.,

            I have not seen any article. Under what condition is the statistics collected? Who is the source of the data? Is the original data in a neutral public domain? Is it a population census or sample based? If sample based, what is the sample size? Have relevant contextual information been considered? For example silly arguments about lack of diversity of University students cannot be acceptable.

            You said: “let us see if you could come with statistics to disprove him.”

            I am not a government department and I do not carry statistical data in my luggage. How can you tell if I disprove his assertions?

          • Amanuel Hidrat

            Dear MN,

            Go and read them (the articles) and help yourself first, before you argue with me or the author. You see you prove yourself that you are arguing without reference. Again the title of the articles are “the lost rainbow”. Even the title speaks a lot if you undrestand it.

          • Music Novice

            Greetings Amanuel H.,

            Now you are shifting responsibility.

            I am not desperately in a hurry to read a song and dance story. I have serious doubts about your claim as I have my own first hand experience in the areas of staff and student recruitment (better than anyone with the latter). What I may do, if I have the time, is just compare the story with my area of experience and see if the song and dance passes a litmus test; there is no need to go further.

          • Amanuel Hidrat

            Dear MN,

            Really serious doubts? without reading the articles that are the subject of our debate. Then you have a big problem as to how you make judgement on issues and understand on what people are debating. You have to change this attitude of defending without knowing the subject at hand.

            Regards,
            Amanuel Hidrat

          • haileTG

            Aha Emma

            Defending without being informed is perhaps the Ghedli sacrifice approach to diversity that MN is in favor of☺

          • Gud

            Hey MN,
            Looks like “take it up with Raji” is the new slogan 🙂 or this Hidrat is just copying the “mnia kolel” dude 🙂

          • Music Novice

            Greetings Gud,

            They have bought the entire Western loony leftist terminology lock, stock and barrel: marginalization, diversity and lost rainbow and all. The last thing you can accuse the EPLF/PFDJ of is discrimination on the basis of ethnicity and religion. This is a trumped up charge (alibi) designed to give oxygen, to give life, to the so called opposition who have been on life support machine for decades.

            Mr Amanuel H., who has not set foot in Eritrea for nearly half a century and lacks credibility, is now asking me to read some song and dance story about a subject which I know well from experience.

          • Music Novice

            Greetings Gud,

            I have already replied to you, but I do not know where it is.

          • Gud

            Hey MN,
            May be it is on its way, or may be it was diverted to where a couple of my replies to you and few others went. …..awate’s bin or ila iro 🙂

          • Dear Amauel Hidrat,

            when i read these words in your comment, “the language of a dying civilization”, to tell you the truth, i jolted in my seat, for it never crossed my mind that, what is happening to day in the arab world could be the the beginning of the death of another great civilization, reminiscent of the ancient Greek and Roman civilizations. could you please say a few more words (if you have the time), if indeed this is what you meant and why. it is an important conclusion that should make humanity to think deeply about the future the world. the intervention of Russia on the side of al assad is a worrying development. let us hope that the region is not going to be a battle ground for the confrontion of world powers; this time the players being themselves, nevertheless, on the back of the peoples of the region. the ultimate losers will be the local population and the death of their civilization, which the stakeholders themselves set in motion the machine of destruction.

          • Music Novice

            Greetings Horizon,

            Why would anyone, with a drop of sanity, associate with these Middle Eastern characters in any shape or form? Our region has enough problems of its own. One of the gravest mistakes being committed by the Ethiopian rulers is allowing any one with surplus cash from that region to come in do as they please.

            Perhaps I should have said a ‘walking dead civilization’ rather than a ‘dying civilization’. At first, these guys, filled with nationalist fervour burst out of their homeland, conquered lands left and right, up and down, spread their religion, language and culture and eventually ran out of steam.

            If you now visit these countries, you will see all the signs of modernity. They have all the famous brand labels of consumer goods such as fashion clothes, household electrical appliances, computers, mobile phones cars, modern buildings etc. etc. etc.; but they invent and produce none of these. At their core these folks still are tribal with kinship based mentality.

            Everything you see is outsourced and foreign built. This outsourcing had started almost a thousand years ago. Ever their favourite past time, war, had been outsourced and subcontacted. That is why at one point the Mamluks (white slaves and mercenaries) ruled Egypt and the Turks, who were mercenaries from far away Central Asia, ended up ruling the most of the area for about 400 years. You can see that failed region cannot even handle some small scale civil war and the ensuing refugee crisis. It is Europe that is expected to tackle the problem; outsourcing and subcontracting again.

            Rather than sitting up and investigating what went wrong with their system, they prefer to believe in superstition, conspiracy tales, and blame outsiders.

          • Music Novice

            Greetings Horizon,

            I have already replied to you.

          • Dear M. N.,

            i had read your post before i left home for some business. indeed, your post is no where to be seen now. any way thank you a lot for your time.

          • tes

            Dear haile TG,

            Now I love your lines. Every lines has lots of the actual values of the real haile TG we all know.

            I thank you

            tes

          • Amanuel Hidrat

            Hailat,

            I like it, a very matured answer. Eske Kemzi Natka hassab Ysesnu Zehawey.

            Regards.

          • tes

            Dear Mahmuday,

            You wrote, “Hence, the root cause of the problem in our society is mismanagement and dictatorship on the one side and utter confusion and fear of the unknown on the resistance side.” Do yo think that this is all we have as the root cause of our problem?

            I believe it goes far? There is a gradual and progressive cause that made mismanagement and dictatorship to flourish. Mismanagement and dictatorships were the effect not the cause. This is my argument.

            Waiting more clarification kindly.

            tes

          • Mahmud Saleh

            Selam tes
            The quoted part is not mine. It’s HTG’s. I agreed on his general conceptualization of the problem: that there is the regime and fearful mass would otherwise want to work and see change. Of course we have slightly differing definitions of what that regime is. I define it as a dictatorial in the way it is formed because no one elected it; and a totalitarian one in the way it runs things and the scope of control it exerts on every Eritrean life. I also believe it is a uniquely Eritrean in its origin. Of course that does not preclude the fact that it might have incorporated practices and cultures of other dictators. Some call it North Korea….others give it their own definitions. But that does not really bother me, it’s an academic exercise. We know it is bad, and it needs to be changed.

          • tes

            Dear Mahmud Saleh,

            I have corrected myself. I took it as yours but since you agree with it. It is fine if I put my question in that way and @hahaileTG will take the origin of that statement(the question also goes to him). Apology for misreading you.

            Saying that, you have put, “I also believe it is a uniquely Eritrean in its origin.” REALLY??? Do you think that this kind of nurturing is of Eritrean? I am asking this based on “… the way it is formed because no one elected it; and a totalitarian one in the way it runs things…. and the scope of control it exerts on every Eritrean life.”

            I agree with you that those who helped that system (to be in line with you dictatorial and totalitarian) is run by Eritreans. However being the enforcers of this system Eritreans does not necessarily mean of Eritrean origin.

            What history and our sociatal legacy tells us quite different. Almost all Eritreans societies had and still have people centered and traditional administration system. In fact during armed struggle, ELF and EPLF manipulated that tradition to exploit* the resources** Eritreans had.

            tes

            *Exploit here is not intentionally made for bad necessarily though the end result is a real exploitation without return. those who were exploited for good became now disadvantaged.

            **Material and human resources

          • Mahmud Saleh

            Selam tes

            I think if you consider this: “Of course that does not preclude the fact that it might have incorporated practices and cultures of other dictators” it will be clear. I am not denying the influences of other ideologies, after all our man is a student of Mao.
            The reason I say it is a uniquely Eritrean is based on the influences our revolution has had on tolerating such a dictatorial system, the culture of relegating most responsibilities to IA during ghedli; and the absence of true control and oversight of IA by the CC…the way the secret party was operating and its negative legacy on entrenching autocratic practices…the trust we put on the man, perhaps, because of our decades living under his leadership, and the sense of clinging together for a common good….probably resulted in the PFDJ rule we know. I mean the above by uniquely Eritrean.
            Regards.

          • tes

            Dear Mahmud Saleh,

            I thank you for the clarification. But still I have a question.

            If we do not consider that Eritreans on the other side had also seen that dictatorship growing and they wanted to fight against before it gets to its full maturity [ELF], then I could have said, yes Eritreans did nothing to prevent it and it could have been of Eritrean origin. But many knew that and fought against it from the very beginning, both within and from outside. In fact many who knew the working system of EPLF at that time didn’t stop sending the warning and fought against fiercely.

            EPLF as a totalitarian revolutionary front knew the opposition and allied with TPLF to wipe out the most frightening force, ELF. How can then we just say it is of Eritrean origin? I believe it is of EPLF origin and it is non- Eritrean.

            Let me be clear here: when I say it s of EPLF origin, EPLF is Eritrean but not the viseversa. To be Eritrean is much greater than being EPLF. EPLF is the subset of Eritrean. I am therefore addressing my question within this understanding.

            tes

            ++ today PFDJ has the other thinking. Eritrea is of PFDJ. PFDJ comes at the top then Eritrea and no surprise PFDJ is born out of the conceived EPLF embryo.

    • Gud

      Hi all,

      I see a pair of bright and shiny thing out there, what could that be? …..

      Wait, it is a well polished pair of shoe ….

      Yea, it is a boot – Woyanies shiny and polished shoe…..

      I wonder who is doing that supper job – no shoe polish is used they say. All natural, all organic , all human discharge

      A shiny pair of shoe….

  • Abraham Hanibal

    Dear Ayneta,

    Here comes the need for the notion of “Eritrean solutions for Eritrean problems”, with constructive partnership with outside forces that doesn’t jeopardise Eritrean national interests. You have made an excellent argument regarding the involvement of the Woyane regime in Eritrean affairs. Eritrean opposition groups should remember the adage “there is no such a free lunch” when dealing with the Woyanes or any other outside forces for that matter. At the center of their programmes should be guaranteeing Eritrean interests in their dealings with external forces. As you pointed out eloquently, the Ethiopians are going to try and shape the Eritrean opposition, and consequently, post Isayas Eritrea in their own image. Their destructive interferences, trying to multiply and fragment the opposition groups along ethnic lines is a good indicator as to what is in store for Eritreans from the Woyanes. That is why it is of paramount importance for Eritreans all over the world to unite and forge together formidable organizations that could safeguard Eritrean unity and territorial integrity now and after the fall of the Isayas regime.

  • dawit

    Dear All,

    Here is the latest news from our model country and a neighbor Ethiopia after scoring double digits economic development for more than a decade, still begging corn to feed 7.5 millions of its people. Sadly this the beginning of the trouble. I wrote in this awate.com about the coming of a great famine to the region, and many dismissed my observation and kept singing ‘double digits development’ etc. It is not difficult to predict rain coming your way if you see clouds far away, and listen to thunder, watch lightening flashing. Ethiopia’s one man Alamudi gursha economy is bound to collapse leaving behind a few glass boxes for EPRDF bosses in Addis and a light train. Soon taxi drivers would sit in street corners begging for food, in the middle of our opposition ‘kitfo’ capital.
    http://news.yahoo.com/7-5-million-going-hungry-ethiopia-crisis-worsens-142853303.html

    • Abi

      Mezmure dawit
      Are you saying the sky is falling instead of rain?
      Are taxi drivers in addis on hunger strike because of the qelal Babur ?

      • dawit

        Abi,
        I have told you before I haven’t seen a fundamental shift in economic, social or political in Ethiopia since His Majesty Haile Selassie’s time. It still caters for select few individual instead of the great majority of the people. It is still based on war mongering confiscating land of poor people for the benefit of few. I have told you I have travelled through out Ethiopia and Eritrea when ever I can, and have not witnessed a tiny change on the standard of living. Still land is not for the tiller. In Haile’s time land was for the ‘balabats’ and Derg time it was land for government and Woyane time land is for foreign investors.
        You know Abi, taxi drivers initiated the 1974 revolution because of increase in petrol price and who knows the next revolution could also be initiated by them as they loose their customer base as the qelal babur slides in the city.
        Cheers

        • Abi

          Gashe dawit
          The worst is yet to come. There is going to be a net work of train all over ethiopia. I believe it is over 8000 km. if I follow your logic that will make all those bus and truck drivers out of job. May be you do not mind since the industry is no more dominated by eritreans.
          Gashiye, your original country is growing faster than a bullet Babur. Expect hiccups.

          • dawit

            Abi,
            I wish Ethiopia and Eritrea develop at the speed of light and I believe they could do it if they work for peace. otherwise all the development will be cosmetic or a show case. We sent Ethiopian soldiers to help Koreans solve their internal conflict, the rest is history one is a nuclear power and the other is economic power in Asia, while we still killing each other.

          • V.F.

            Abiye Beka bezih be Solomon Tekalegn zefen eyetznanh tegna. Ayzoh hulum neger yalfal:

            http://mp3http.com/index.php?do=download&mp3id=bMu4pR6F4MU&q=Ethiopian_music-Solomon_Tekalign.___

        • Dear dawit,

          you told us that you have travelled throughtout ethiopia and eritrea, and you told us what you saw and did not see in ethiopia. now, can you please tell us what you saw in eritrea during your travel (if you have indeed set foot in eritrea) and your experience about eritrea (your childhood years and experiences, your adulthood experiences, your attachments, your nostalgies, etc, things that make you eritrean). tell us about your travel, the mini dams you saw (how big and how mini they are compared to ethioipian dams, the irrigation farming), the crumbling buildings of asmara, the dark nights, why the streets of asmara are empty and dia has no reason to worry about any revolt by discontented citizens, the millions of mosquitos that were annihilated, how farmers are snatched of their produce and they go hungry silently, the controband trade in petrol and other items which has become the basis of eritrean economy, etc).
          you know, i know and every body knows that nobody is going to believe what you are saying. you do not love dia and you do not love eritrea; simply you are obsessed in hating ethiopia. there is no cure for such disease. you people are a liability and not an asset for eritrea, nor is dia and his pfdj the answer for the so called esep, but they are the problem themselves.

          • dawit

            Horizon,

            I know you are in this web site to advance and perpetuate enmity between Ethiopians and Eritreans. Therefore, there is no use to entertain the list of questions from you. You are a fake Ethiopian dreaming for Abay Tigrai unlike me who is the original Eritrean and Ethiopian, if you can understand the difference. You can dream for the exchange of Assab for Bademe. እኔም ኣራዳ ኣንተም ኣራዳ ምን ያጣላናል በሰው ቀዳዳ፡ ይላሉ ያገሬ ልጆች ሲተርቱ:

          • Dear dawit,

            i remember, years ago i had seen a western (movie), in which during the american civil war between the north and south, an african-american had found a clever way to survive. he had with him both the uniforms of the northern and southern armies. whenever he saw an army from far away, he did his best to make sure, if it was a northern or a southern army. then, he wore the right uniform and hid the other. he lived this way throughout the civil war. at the end of the civil war, of course as expected, he chose the uniform of the winner.

          • Gud

            Horizon aka “Assab for Badme”

            Again you are opening that big mouth uncontrollably, straining that polluted donkey brain beyond its capacity. Wa!

            dawit is talking from first hand information, from traveling to Ethiopia. While you are sulking in your hate and coveting what is not yours.

          • Gud,

            it has become the duty of awatistas to remind you on a daily basis to take your antipsychotic medication, because of your continous hallucinations. today it is my turn, and i would like to tell you to take your medicine; remember, three times a day on an empty stomach and with a glass of water, as prescribed by your shrink.

          • haileTG

            Haha.. Horizon, very funny and very true:-)

          • Gud

            Horizon aka “Assab for Badme”

            The question here is, will there ever be any cure or medication for a disturbed donkey nut case brain that came up with things like “Assab for Badme”?

            That is really a worrisome

    • dawit

      Dear Moderator Great Editing, Thank you for protecting Awate.com readers from the latest Yahoo news source! But what was the reason?
      http://news.yahoo.com/7-5-million-going-hungry-ethiopia-crisis-worsens-142853303.html

  • Ted

    Hi Ayneta, I agree . Weyane is always on the look for Eritrean opposition to do their dirty job destabilizing Eritrea.
    PS. Don’t worry what people think of you be it PFDJ or Chauvinist.

  • Semere Andom

    Hi All:

    Sophia Tesfamariam has died. No “jignna” does not die, he/she get incarnated, so ST dies but she got incarnated to a male, she is dawit in the new life. We can discern that by the lies, accusation dawit is fond of. ST called Revrend Mussie, Meron Estifanos human traffickers in public and so is dawit when accusing SGJ for lots of things based on lies. This is not criticizing Saleh, they are cheap PFDJ inspired and the scary thing is not the protracted life of PFDJ, it is what remains after they eventually and inevitably got removed. The Eritrean citizenship will be share with the like of dawit and the others with shameful legacy because we cannot takeaway their citizenship. As the young forget, the old die these people will share Eritrean citizenship with us, This saddens and cringes

    • Gud

      All,

      If any one is to talk about death, then we should talk about that kid. That 13 years old Eritrean kid who died horrible death in Sudan. No, he did not physically die, worse! he was abused and damaged. No, he is not just damaged, he is damaged beyond repair. Some body should be held accountable for damaging that kid, that some one is most probably an ELFeit, who rum away from Eritrea to Sudan in 1981. This poor kid goes from Eritrea to Sudan and may be farther to US and Canada. May be Europe. His heart is filled with acute hate. His brain is polluted. Hate for Eritrea. Hate for the Eritrean people. Hate for the Eritrean government. Hate for EPLF. But, this is an acquired hate. I mean, how can you hate the country you barely know? How can you hate the government you were never under? Somebody polluted this kid. Some body damaged this kid. Horrible!

      Worst, his hate lands him in all the wrong places. Earlier he was in YG’s embrace, before somebody pulled half of him out. But this damaged kid is beyond repair. I said that before, right? You will find him now deep deep in Woyanie’s behind. That is right! Beyond repair

      Oh yea, Revrend Mussie & Meron Estifanos are indeed human traffickers.

      • Semere Andom

        Hi All:
        I would have called this commenter the world but I was advised not to for the sake of civility to people whose only acquaintance with civility is only reading a civil website.
        There is one entity that traffics human being and it is PFDJ and by extension its supporters and their collaborators the Rashaidas.
        Father Mussie was nominated for the Noble price, an accolade that DIA and his close stooges will never be honored with The men and women who are defeating PFDJ more tan the gun hugging members of EDF will be honored in Eritrea, in the real Eritrea, this is not a threat. It is a prophecy

        • Gud

          Hi all,
          Something really stinks here. I guess that dead 13 years old is out from Woyanie’s you know what, for a breather 🙂
          Satan Mussie and that Meron are Human traffickers alright. But it is a thin like and no body would expect a damaged-beyond-repair-old but still 13-deat meat, to understand. For this damaged 13 years old, Eritrea is a hateful country. To this damaged old but still 13 , the Eritrean people are hateful people. To this dead 13 yrs old Eritrea and its people might as well be some aliens. What does this damaged kid know about Eritrea? What does this broken soul know about the Eritrean people?
          Of course human traffickers are his father. Of course Woyanie’s back side is his home.
          Something surely stinks here.

          • Music Novice

            Greetings Gud,

            Who are the Eritrean people? Isaias, you and his bodyguards only? What a delusional silly billy! You really are deep in Isaias’ b-u-t-t.

          • V.F.

            MN, he is playing the devils advocate of the worst kind. There is no intelligent Eritrean as he is who defends PFDJ and IA the way Gud is doing.

          • Amanuel Hidrat

            Dear awate team,

            For God sake how do you allow such insults to be posted, I have no clue. I hope to check out such individuals.

            Amanuel Hidrats

          • Gud

            Amanuel,
            Dude, who is insulted here?
            – dawit or the 13 years old?
            – Sophia Tesfamariam, or the Human traffickers Mussie and Meron?
            – Eritrea or Woyanie?
            – PFDJ or woyanie?
            – PIA or Woyanie?
            What is insult to you old man? If you have to be aboi Keshi, (If you insist, God! how many times do you want people to tell you get off this kishinet thing, because truth is not your thing).
            I remember you saying good bye last week, so why are you raising your hand now? or may be this has to do with ELF, 1981 and the crime you did on the 13 yrs old?

          • Music Novice

            Greetings Amanuel H.,

            You should respond to a street boy in a language he understands best.

        • Nitricc

          Hi Semere, why is it every Eritrean, Ethiopian and in fact, most African immigrant are given MUssies’s phone number by the notorious human traffickers? why? sometimes, you go to do the right thing even if it is against your political view and stand. Mussie, Meron and Elsa Churm are human Traffickers. take that to the bank. it may depend what your definition of human trafficking is, but if the bottom line is gaining at the expense of immigrants, then, look no further. if PIA is fair enough to stand accountable to the G-15 and everything that happens, then, this three better believe it they will be hold responsible for the death of hundreds of Eritrean refugee. did you see how we can look at one issue and you can see those people are dispensing humanity and care for refugee and i can see it as a crime against humanity and simply they are human traffickers as who they are?

          • Semere Andom

            Hi Nitricc:
            How do you know the traffickers give them the tel number of Mussie and Meron. Father Mussie like any good Samaritan injected himself into the med sea crisis when he saw that lives were lost and then every wannabe sea crosser had his tel number and gave it to their friends. Meron is an activists and so is Elsa, so you better not accuse these ppl as human traffickers, unless you stopped your free thinking and want to inhale the lies of Sofia and PFDJ wilfully . I expect better things from you, am not patronizing you cus I am impressed by you lately. There is not grey definition of human trafficking Nitricc, it is black and white
            You can accuse all thee in the court of law but be prepared by stamped of young ppl in their defense, I will accuse IA of his crimes against humanity and I will face the hauntingly empty court room siding in he his defense
            I have friends in Italy and they are overwhelmed by the calls of help they get from ppl they do not know who are in distress, but the human traffickers do not have their numbers, friends gave it to friends and the number spread, that is how the phone numbers of Mussie, Elsa and Meron is given.
            Are you saying that Mussie was nimibated for the Noble prize for his human trafficking contribution to humanity?

          • Gud

            Nitricc,

            There is no question the priest and those fake activists like Meron are human traffickers. What people easily overlook is the percentage of migrants who safely made it is way way bigger than the unfortunate ones. So, the stress stuff is drama. The diabolical priest and that horrible woman are deep in the ring.

            What the dead at 13 and others who migrated in 1981 fail to realize is, unlike them other people talk from experience and first hand information. And besides the human traffickers do not come to you, people go to them. A family member and the immigrant themselves contact them, just like what they do with the satanic priest. And of course no one accuses the human trafficker who helped him/her to go across. So the dead- at 13 is bluffing when he said people would defend the traffickers Mussie and Meron. Have you ever heated of any immigrant who accused any human trafficker he contacted and paid himself?

            Besides, what is the difference between a thief and and the fake Eritrean so called activists?

          • Nitricc

            Hi Semere, anyone who opposes PIA is nominated for everything. I don’t think you understood the hypocrisy of this world. and the attitude of the western world toward Eritrea in general.

            but here an Ethiopian guy talking about Mussie.

            ” there is no refugee who doesn’t have aba Muse’s telephone number”
            why is it, evry one has to have this man’s number?

            http://www.tubechop.com/watch/6826102

          • Semere Andom

            Thanks Nitricc, I have seen that before, there is not doubt people are getting the Father Mussie’s number, but there no scintilla of evidence that points of human trafficking to him
            Your skepticism is healthy but please do not get stuck in the fallacy of the west is there to screw Eritrea and do not accuse your compatriots of trafficking while the trafficking is at home as all evidence of survival testimony points to PFDJ
            if you apply the same skepticism toward PFDJ then you will be great , just do not be selective about it
            And I am willing to concede defeat to Sal about our several bets:-)

          • dawit

            Dear Nitricc,
            It is simple with he and his friend Elsa, they contact the relatives of the victims to arrange transfer of ransom fund to be delivered to the Human Traffickers, of course with cut for their services as middle men. They provide the telephone numbers of victim relatives, so that the traffickers can call victims relatives in the west to listened to the plight and agony of their loved ones. Both individuals are connected in raising the ransom funds.,

          • Gud

            Nitricc,

            “Any one who opposes PIA is nominated for everything ”

            That must be the quote of the week

    • dawit

      Hi Semere,

      Yes Sofia Tesfamariam is Jigna! She does not change her colors like chameleon. Your heroes, Revrend Mussie, Meron Estifanos human traffickers whose hands stained with Eritrean youth blood. PIA is protected by Eritrean people and GOD! Twenty-five years lies have not stained his character, because lies cannot outshine truth. I have replied to your boss, just scroll down and you can read it.

      • tes

        Hi dawit,

        funny! you don’t deserve more.

        tes

      • Kokhob Selam

        Dear dawit,

        why is that? በቃ ኮይንካ? ካን – ጻሕ ኢላን ትወድቕ !

        • dawit

          Dear, Kokhob, TES and SEM,

          Yes I touched and challenged your god SGJ and you could not control your emotion.የኣይጥ ምስክር ድንብጥ። Sofia, PIA, PFDJ are not in your league, they are way up in the sky, you cannot touch them with your defaming words. Keep singing and clapping “Isaias Dictator” “Eritrea North Korea of Africa” etc So chill down.

          • Semere Andom

            Hi all:
            I have asked you a question more than a year ago, please answer that. I am not going to repeat it her again, it has to do with your god and the sacrificing you must provide him, sacrifices in harem.
            I have no god except God. You can tell non-truth until the kids from Sawa come home and it will say more about you.
            But when PIA leaves you in the cold like other dictators and that image haunts you and Sofia, PIA and PFDJ are below the league of these people you mentioned because their are common criminals and thieves and so are you, You have no honor, to see how much honor you got, ask your kids, am sure they will be ashamed of you if they read your commons that I am sure you write when they are not around

          • dawit

            SEM,
            Why do you bring my children in our debate? Shame on you!

          • Gud

            dawit,

            “I have no god except God”

            Just in case you missed it, the “God” in this case is “Woyanie” Now , re read the comment again with that in mind and you will see it is really a tiny mind – 13 years old abused mind 🙂

          • Kokhob Selam

            Dear dawit,
            what do you think if I ignore this one?

      • PTS

        Dawit,
        Not only is Isaias character stained, in less than a year he will be slapped with crimes against humanity charges. Too bad he missed his last chance to participate the UN gathering. This time next year he will be like Albeshir, banned from traveling abroad.

        • dawit

          PTS,

          That is your dream for the last 15 years. Do you think hiding behind Ms. Sheila Keetharuth, skirt and singing and clapping “down, down’ Isaias” in street corners of Europeans capitals you can bring down PIA? When you clap down! down, Eritrean people are jumping with their kebero singing Up! Up! PIA, Nsu-Nhna, Nhna-Nsu!. Let alone a law level UN employee, The US UN Ambassador Suzan Rice, armed with Vito power could not touch PIA. Believe it or not it is not PIA who will visit UN in New York, but UNSC members and the Secretary General coming to Asmara to ask for apology!

    • Abraham Hanibal

      Selam Semere A.,

      In fact, I do not worry about the future when it comes to Isayas-diehards like Dawit, Gud, etc. First, the people inside Eritrea know exactly how hellish it is to live under Isayas rule, and I’m confident the likes of Dawit and Gud inside Eritrea are never to be found. These Isayas-fanatics think as if Eritreea is Isayas; the day Isayas dies, they will disappear in thin air with him.

      • Gud

        Hey Abraham,
        Nice try, but there is no way I can put you in the same basket with the lost souls such as the broken 13 year olds, the aging ELFietes like aboi keshi Hidrat. No way. They at too woyanie puppets. Move away from these lost souls. This is a hobby for them. They have been doing it since 1981. They don’t care about Eritrea nor its people.
        Move away from them

        • Music Novice

          Gud,

          You said “too woyanie puppets”. Are you trying to say ‘two’?

          Between 1980 and 1998, clearly, Isaias was a “woyanie puppet”. It is also claimed, by some, that he is a lifelong CIA puppet. Gud, whose puppet are you?

          • PTS

            Greetings MN,
            Isaias being a woyane puppet is bokri ezney. New. Fresh out of the oven.

          • Music Novice

            Greetings PTS,

            Do you accept the claim or not?

            What about a lifelong CIA puppet?

            Isaias’ recent tantrums against the USA are similar to the emotional theatrics of a jilted girlfriend.

          • PTS

            Yeah, CIA I’ve heard before. There could be some truth. He himself said when he was young he spent his time going to Kagnew to “read books and magazines”. At the time, Kagnew was American property.
            But Woyane puppet? You realize he created them and not the otherway around, right?

          • Music Novice

            PTS,

            I do not accept that Isaias created the Woyane. On the other hand, the Woyane not only saved his skin on many occasions but they also influenced him all the way up to 1998.

            As far as the CIA connection is concerned, I am not talking about Isaias reading Newsweek, Time and a couple of John Updike books in Kagnew. But, I am taking about secret meetings in Kagnew with CIA handlers when he was in Ala.

          • Amde

            PTS,

            I think MN might be referring to this video… the poor snake tries so hard…the cat is just amused until it get bored

            https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qGUtHkObRr4

        • Abraham Hanibal

          Hi Gud,

          Just do not try to sway my opinion in one way or another as if I’m a child. I’ve my own understanding of issues and my own free opinion as well. Although I believe the Woyanes have their own share of contribution regarding the problems facing Eritreans; my firm belief is that it is the Isayas -regime that is responsible for most part of our predicamnets. And hence it is the Isayas-fanatists, esp. in the diaspora, and not the “Woyane sell-outs” that are inflicting the greatest damage to our country.

          • Gud

            Abrham,

            Again, I am still reluctant to put you in the same basket with the dead meats. So asign yourself whatever age you want, adult or kid

  • Amanuel Hidrat

    Merhaba Saleh,

    Since you re-posted your article which we actually had debated on it, I will ask the same question I asked you back then, which you don’t address them at that time.

    I have researched how oppositions who reside in foreign countries or who work clandestinely are handled by the countries who wanted to support them. My experience and my research show that the are handled by the intelligence institutions or ministry homeland, or ministry of interiors – all with no exceptions. So could you please help us or enlighten us if any opposition to your knowledge, be it armed struggle (revolution) or peaceful, that their relationship with the host country is or was with the foreign office of the host country?

    My experience: During our armed struggle (ELF and EPLF), we had not any relationship whatsoever with the ministry of foreign office of the Sudanese government. Our affairs was handled by the intelligence/security apparatus of ministry – that includes the peace talks and other organizational activities of the two fronts. The same in Egypt, Iraq, and Syria.

    From my research: The US government always establish and deals with any resistance fronts and movements, or clandestine movement for that matter by the office of CIA. During the bipolar geopolitics, even the Soviets were handled by their security apparatus KGB. The same with the Ugandan movement who overthrow IDI- Amin with the help of the Tanzanian government were handled by the ministry of interior of Tanzania. The same the East Pakistan liberation movement were handled by the ministry of interior of Indira Ghandi’s government. And the list go on. So why should it be different with Ethiopia, when the norm and conventional way of handling for such movements and liberation fronts are dealt with the security office of those countries that are implied to support them. Why Ethiopia should handle differently by the foreign office to our case. The foreign office can only deal with legitimate countries and government. That is my recollections regarding how countries handle the issue of liberation movements. If there is any data that indicate otherwise, we here to learn.

    regards,
    Amanuel Hidrat

    • Abi

      Selam Ato Amanuel
      Very enlightening indeed. so your struggle was handled by the interior ministries of Sudan, Iraq, Syria, Egypt and many more Arsb countries you did not mention because the list is too long. To be honest with you your struggle was Arabic solutions for eritrean problems. Now it is time for ESEPA.

      • Amanuel Hidrat

        Dear Abi,

        The issue on my comment is, which ministries of government manage the relationship between liberation fronts or opposing political organizations with the host countries, be them Arab countries or non-Arab countries. Don’t forget the Arab countries are our neighbors and the stepping stones to other countries of the world during our revolution, Sudan being the primary and the proximity to launch for all our diplomatic relations at that time. TPLF had the same strategy at that time to launch their diplomatic effort to establish relationship and get the needed help. So Abi at one point you have to accept the realities and move on. Hate will not quench the progress you are immensely hungry for.

        regrads,

        • Abi

          Ato Amanuel
          What reality are you talking about. The reality that you have been running from one handler from one arab city to the other in another city collecting AK47 ? These are the external handlers. There are also internal handlers running house to house, office to office, church to church, school to school in mobilizing the masses in the heart of addis.
          “Yalteneka gilgil yawqal.”
          No wonder why you always worry about trust among the stakeholders.
          I think I have to move. I heed your advice.

        • Abraham Hanibal

          Selam Amanuel Hidrat,

          Do you really think the bulk of Ethiopians are here for “progress they are immensely hungry for”? My friend, let’s not be misled; Ethiopians like Abi are not here for constructive and meaningful discussions with their Eritrean counterparts; they are here to bash at Eritreans, to insult and humiliate, and demoralise Eritreans. My proposal is not to engage these chauvinistic bigots; Eritreans simply do not have the time and appetite to take such distractors seriously.

          • Semere Andom

            Hi Ab Hanibal:
            I agree with you about Abi, I am disappointed with him and that is why I once called him the Nitricc of Ethiopia, but to be fair Nitricc is way better now
            But when you mention Ethiopians here think about Fanti and Amde and Rahwa T as well. Amde is honest, he admitted he was not aware of the crimes of the previous Ethiopians rulers and also many Ethiopians were shielded from it. It is up to us to enlighten them and leave those who deliberately ignore the crimes and like PFDJ tells us Ethiopia built roads and schools and Eritreans were admitted to Winget and Addis u.
            Also TKifle believes in Eritrean sovereignty. It is ironic that some Ethipians mean well to Eritreans the Eritreans like Gud and dawit and PFDJ supporters at any cost

          • Abi

            Hi Sem
            Why are you disappointed at me? Because I don’t say death to PIA ? Because I support eritrean independence and want to keep eritrea away from ethiopia? Because I don’t propose this or that for eritrea as you shamelessly and arrogantly proposed Arabic as our official language?
            I wish all eritrean opposition parties are out of Ethiopia by tomorrow. The reason being they were our enemies 25 years ago. They have no shame just like you to go back to a country they fought for 30 years. They should be in Sudan or any arab country from the list provided by SGJ and Ato Amanuel. You see it took two people to name all the arab countries who bled us to death. They are not trustworthy. If they get a chance they won’t hesitate to attack us again.
            If they insist to stay in ethiopia, we should use them to our best advantage including assigning their leaders. We should make good puppets out of them.
            Now I gave you more reasons to be disappointed. Go ahead cry.

          • Semere Andom

            Abi
            first basic honesty is required to debate. Why would have sufficed instead unleashing your bottled up whatever.
            You do what ever you with the opposition parties, but I assure your they will not pull Molla
            As to who bled your, your bled yourself
            And you are wrong on me shamelessly and arrogantly proposing Arabic, it was a passing comment, you are pulling dawit, that passing comment, your become so irrational and u plunged the form to the gutter we witnessed
            and what is that supporting Eritrean independence to do with being my reason for disappointment,
            If you stick to facts of what I said and stay away from pulling mezmur dawit, we are cool

          • Abi

            Hi Sem
            Don’t write while angry. You are all over the map.
            Your beloved Ghedli didn’t delineate the people from the regime. Actually it put everything in one basket. ” Amhara ” was the word. Not even ethiopia.
            Amhara meTabih, Amhara yibelahal…..

            You have got nothing to be disappointed at me.
            I support your independence. ( finally)I want it to keep it that way.
            I opposed interference by both countries
            I don’t need your land.
            or your port
            I don’t die for you to remove PIA
            I don’t want eritrea back doesn’t mean I hate eritrea
            keep crying. Your proposal of Arabic was not a passing remark. Your comment was as long as an article and well thought of. You also argued for it.
            You can say anything you want about me . I care less. I am not in the business of pleasing others.
            PS
            I know your problem with me. It is about my stand against the arabs. Sorry to disappoint you.

          • Semere Andom

            Hi Abi:
            To be honest, I never debated with you while I am angry, do not confuse my anger with others,
            Your bible and we will talk later, calm down.
            You need to be educate on many things, and you got couple of things right, but work on the truth just on notch

          • Gud

            Hi abi,

            Thinking and searching very hard to find a moment, even a single minute when that damaged 13 year old ever was NOT angry, NOT bitter and NOT full of hate?

            Am sure every one is banging his head on the wall

    • Saleh Johar

      Hi Emma,
      Mostly, intelligence outfits deal with foreign opposition groups. That is what you stated and it is true. It is called statuesque. However, we do not have to bless arrangements just because everybody does it. Unless it is a divine code of relations with an opposition group, it is man made. And man made rules change, evolve depending on how productive they are. Let me give you an example: if you did a research, you will find that all information is run by ministries of information. Is it a must that they keep doing it that way when the world changes? No, they don’t. And that is why Ethiopia has almost scrapped the ministry of information, its TV is now run by a corporation. In America, healthcare is almost private, so is transportation–ministries and departments are limited to control and supervision.

      We had bitter memories of intelligence interference in our struggle. Remember General Abu Alaa of Iraq Baath Party who threatened the Labor Party not to elect Herui Bairu in the 2nd congress, and if they did Iraq will stop its support, and what that interference created of chaos and resentment among the ELF? Remember Ba Habri of Saudi Arabia, and how his open interference finally brought down what remained of the ELF which was crippled beyond repair? Can we justify that by stating “it’s how states deal with foreign opposition groups”? No, if it is wrong, it is wrong–regardless of the norms.

      One thing you have to remember: I do not have power over foreign governments to tell them what to do; I have power to express my views, and that is what I am doing. You can rule it out saying it will not work. I can only appeal to all Eritreans to fight against docile stature and accept any condition simply because it is how every country does it.

      Another thing: all dictators follow a system of oppression–that is how all dictators do it! But does it follow we have to stop fighting Isaias because “every other dictator does what he is doing”? Activists are about expressing what they perceive to be true. And it is known that there are intermingled political (in fact partisan) interest that make the relations worse. Some groups might benefit from such arrangements, but in the long run (not very long anyway) I feel the interest of Eritrea is at risk.

      I believe relations should be respectful, and not humiliating. I will leave you with a quote from the speech: “We have a lot to give in our relations with Ethiopia, we shouldn’t see our hand as the lower one.”

      I hope you see where I am coming from

      • Amanuel Hidrat

        Merhaba Saleh,

        Lets leave aside for a moment how the Ethiopian government handles to the opposition and let us come to the mechanics how states function, and the norm of their relationships with “state actors” and “non state actors”. With “state actors” they set their diplomatic relationship on equal footing by exchanging their diplomatic core, because they are sovereign states recognized in the international forum. With the “non-state actors” the relationship is different. The state actors have upper hand and set preconditions to the help they offer. Then it is up to the non-state actors to act with their realities until the change the momentum in their countries and harvest the diplomatic acumen to upgrade the relationship in to a mutual benefit. Otherwise, I don’t like it, is not an answer on how we deal with the countries they want to help us (zeb-ey kisae zidelwos Yehinkis endyu negeru). The Eritrean revolution has passed through those tough decision, and we managed it not on equal footing, we accept with which institution of government they told us to keep our channels of communication with them. Assume if we are going to tell them that our channels should be with their foreign office to all countries they want to help us, as opposition against the “state actor” in Eritrea nation, do you think your strategy will work? I don’t think the international rule of diplomacy will allow them to do that. It is not what we want, it is also how want it as to whether it is relevant with the international norms and international relations. So we have to accept as a norm, and deal with the realities, as far as we still remain “non-state actors.”

        Now back to our internal squabbles on Eritrean politics. If you really believe Ethiopia is making pressures (which I don’t believe***), the council and the organization has the option to leave the country and reside in other countries and do their business. Why yourself and other who believe to be so made an official call to them to do so boldly. I wish the Eritrean problem was Ethiopia as it is perceived now. That in my book, is the most easiest problem we can deal with. The solution for it will be to leave Ethiopia as simple as that. Unfortunately it is not, Instead we have a heck societal problem we need to deal honestly rather obscuring behind accusing any foreign country to our ailments.

        *** Two incidence I saw (a) the leadership of EDA, for simple thing easily manageable, to give six seats from their seats allotted to them initially, to some organizations who participate in the congress, they went and asked help from Ethiopia as to which organizations of the EDA members should give the seats ( very sad to hear but actually true) (b) When the council divided on the issue of the Kunama – the leadership went to help them how to handle it. Fortunately the official told them, that the issue is their internal issue and must be handled by them which finally decided by the chairman and throw the case in to the next congress. And keep in mind because of the internal squabbles, the three year term of the council expired with no light at the end of the tunnel being divided socially and politically. So let us not throw our incompetence to the Ethiopian government. Let us clean our house before we complain to foreign forces that has nothing to do to our disunity.

        Regards
        Amanuel Hidrat

    • Mahmud Saleh

      Selam Emma
      1 . EPLF case was not handled by any foreign entity. Actually, Icould say Sudanese Eastern region security was under EPLF “pay”, that’s how we survived during the 6th offensive when Numieri kicked our offices out of the Sudan and blocked our access to the world through Sudan, Even allowing Mengistu to launch a far-flanked attack from within Sudanese territory. There may have been diplomatic and political relations but not security or military handling.
      2. BTW: you asked for the conventional way of handling. I understand that the conventional way is not to arm rebel groups against another recognized country. That’s what international conventions say.

      • Saleh Johar

        Ahlan Mahmoud,
        In fact all dealings with neighbors in the seventies and eighties was conducted through intelligence outfits. The EPLF had to deal with them in Yemen, Saudi Arabia, Iraq and Iran, and the USA. The security of the Scandinavian countries were delegated to church and charity organizations. But I agree, the EPLF was more assertive of its independence compared to the ELF, and it’s own security apparatus was so disciplined no information leaked out of the inner circle, unlike the ELF, which didn’t handle its affairs in a military manner, the EPLF did. The ELF was chaotic and information of its affairs was available everywhere particularly since there was a partisan rivalry between competing ideologies, that was a no-no in the EPLF which effectively quashed dissent. ELF couldn’t quash dissent which ate it from the inside.

      • Amanuel Hidrat

        Selam Mahmuday,

        Until ELF was ejected by the EPLF/TPLF allaince, I am absolutely sure and am eye witness that our issue is handled by the ministry of interior and it was the only channel of communication we go through for any of our activities (both EPLF and ELF). Yes true there are many instances the government of Nemieri blocked our activities, but that doesn’t tell that we had other channels. Tell me if they had other channels when we left. other than that, I saw it and was told that our channels was through ministry of interior when I was there. Please check my second response to Saleh which follows to this comment.

        Regards

        • Mahmud Saleh

          Selam kboorat SGJ and Amanuel
          I get it. I was responding with the scope of involvement of the Ethiopian government in the Eritrean groups there in mind, because our great sawra could not be brought as a parallel example to explain the heavy-handedness Ethiopians are exerting on these factions. Ours was a revolution that existed as a defacto government, actually more powerful than the Sudanese army. I would say, both ELF and EPLF were independent in setting their agendas. They were not financed, directed or influenced by any entity. Whatever assistance out revolution obtained was not attached to any strings. Both organizations, and particularly EPLF, after ELF had left the field, were waging a classic war against a well armed and run regular army. Their bases (both logistical and supporting constituencies) were inside Eritrea. I agree with Amanuel’s explanation, though. At protocol, licensing of offices and businesses…could have been handled by the interior ministry for Sudan’s security sake. It’s also true EPLF didn’t entertain factions like Baath and labor…that found a foothold in ELF. While it’s intolerance for diverse ideological currents was legendary, its fierce stance of guarding its independence and its focus on action also was legendary. I don’t know how democratic ELF was, I leave it to those who lived in its ranks. However, ELF Fighters were joining talaQu EPLF in group and individual fashion.

          • Amanuel Hidrat

            Mahmuday,

            You throw some sentences that provoke to debate on the two organiztions. No and I will not do it,. I know why you said the way you did. Thank you.

    • PTS

      Selam Amanuel
      In Eritrea’s case, there used to be ministry of interior. It is no longer. So who handles demhit and other opposition groups?

      • Amanuel Hidrat

        Dear PTS,
        I believe Issayas and his security. But I am not deadly sure with their system.

  • Kokhob Selam

    Dear SGL,

    እቶም ሓሙሽተ ሰባት ኣብ ሞንጎ ሞንጎ እናዕለልና ኣንቢብናዮ :: እንታይ ከ ‘ሞ ኢና ክንብል ? ቃላት ኳ ስኢነሉ :: የቀንየልና ሳልሕ : ክብረት ይሃብካ : ናይ ዕድመ ጸጋ ይሃብካ : ጽኑዕ ርገጽ ::

    • Saleh Johar

      Kokob,

      Thanks a lot for reading it.

      What five persons? I didn’t understand that part. But

      • Kokhob Selam

        Dear Mr.Saleh,

        “Thanks a lot for reading it.” I have to learn a lot and still get thanks massage. what a wonderful world we are in !

        Sir, I understand you can’t remember everything we write here. in 2010 I wrote that I have a group of people reading every article in this site. we can do that every week once or twice .

        after reading we also discuss and get more explanation from one of us who is fluent English speaker. every one of us reads as soon as the article is written some time one or two among us will wait for that day (if they are busy or any other reason). that is interesting method of understanding the entire article.

  • Asmera

    Dear Writer,
    I read your article, I am really shocked to read an idea Ethiopia and Eritrea will live together. This idea is very dangerous. Let take you back just 20 years when 98% of Eritreans said living with Ethiopia is meant “Slavery” you have chosen freedom. How come today the history is charged and you wish to live with Ethiopia.

    The best solution is not what proposed by late Meles. But to build Electrified fence between Eritrea and Ethiopia, this will solve the problem at once. Just imagine how Ethiopia get rest after Eritrea secession, dramatic development is achieved already which never seen in Africa history, and also just imagine if Ethiopia continues for the next 10 years what will happen in Ethiopian.

    For the case of port Djibouti is waiting only for Ethiopia and the integration between these two countries is also dynamic. Djibouti has been constant friend country to Ethiopia, during so challenging eras too. However, Eritrea was siding to enemy.

    Do you think you respect your neighbours?

    • Saleh Johar

      Hi Asmera,

      Before you attempt to engage me, please read what is written carefully, understand it, and then have a say. I don’t know what you are saying, quoting parts might help me. Please try that.

  • dawit

    Dear SGJ,
    There is no way that one can come with a positive message, based on extreme hatred towards one individual or a party. In reality Isasias and PFDJ is an ‘Eritrean Solution for Eritrean Problems’. Eritrean Pride? I cannot believe coming from a person who has devoted himself and his website to ridicule every Eritrean social, political or economic policies, worked hard for UN sanctions against Eritrea. It was a taboo to announce even the few Eritrean athletic achievements in Awate.com or celebrations of Eritrean Independence or a construction of a small dam. I am surprised you mentioned PMMZ for using Tio as a port to benefit Eritrea and Eritrea! A person who devoted his life to the destruction of his friend and Eritrea after betraying his pledge to Eritrean people on the eve of Eritrean independence, the man who ignited border war and worked day and night to isolate Eritrean people; the architect of no-peace no-war! PMMZ went to his grave without apologizing for what he did to Eritreans, and now you want to whitewash his crime?

    • Saleh Johar

      Hi dawit,

      You religiously try to fault my position, which is fighting one-man in defense of a nation. Yet, you think it is all right to religiously defend the same one-man at the expense of the nation. And funnily, you think you have an upper moral ground, when you proposed here to sell Assab for $1! That cheap dawit! At least you could have put afew zeroes after your $1 .

      Stay good my friend, but I don’t think you have the credentials to fault me.

      • dawit

        Hi, Saleh,
        You habitually misquote me as usual. I never proposed selling Assab for one dollar. What I wrote to Abi, as part of our humorous jocks that I proposed Assab for lease for one dollar if Ethiopia agreed not to bother Eritrea anymore and leave Eritrea alone and Ethiopia mind its own business!. Now there is a big difference between ‘Sale’ and ‘Lease’. Since you always distort Eritrean policy and PIA speeches for whatever hidden agenda you may have, you again misquoted me. If you don’t know the difference between sale and lease, please refer to Webster English dictionary.

        • Music Novice

          Greetings dawit,

          What is the mainstay of PFDJ run Eritrean economy?

          What does Eritrea export now?

          What is PFDJ run Eritrea’s economic ambition for the future?

          What economic progress has Eritrea made under PFDJ between 1991 now?

          When will the PFDJ open a new University in Eritrea?

          Could you give precise answers to the above, even by saying ‘I don’t know’ when you do not know the answer?

          • dawit

            Dear MN,

            Funny you ask those questions. I told you before to watch ERiTV, you could have found all the answers to your questions, however, you are blinded by propaganda lies spewed daily from Eritrea’s enemy news sources. So you keep singing ‘Eritrea the North Korea of Africa’ etc, etc.

            Now compared to her neighbors, Eritrea has been doing exceptionally great in the last 25 years, even with all kinds of obstacles thrown on its way. As the Eritrean singer put it “Eritrea an island of peace”. Look what is happens and happening in Sudan, Split into two, South Sudan in the middle of Civil war, Ethiopia bogged down in civil war, Ogaden, Gambella etc. Somalia a basket case and Yemen what can I say. What do you think the monetary value of Peace? Hard to quantify in $$. Here read your model country Ethiopia after a decade of double digits economic growth, still begging for food in 2015! Sad but that is the reality.
            http://news.yahoo.com/7-5-million-going-hungry-ethiopia-crisis-worsens-142853303.html
            You know MN, Eritrea could name her seven colleges in the country as Seven Universities tomorrow if that satisfy you for having so many universities as a measure of a country’s progress. Stayed tuned with ERITV and Hadas Eritrea. Eritrea exports, gold and copper and soon potash!.

          • Music Novice

            Greetings dawit,

            You failed to answer my questions.

            I asked you about PFDJ run Eritrea, but you talk about Ethiopia. Is this a Freudian slip?

            By the way, I used to watch ERiTV but I stopped because it sounds like Derg TV. It tells lies with a straight face. I am telling you this from experience.

          • dawit

            Dear MN,

            You asked questions and I told you the direction where you could find the information. As a teacher I don’t spoon feed my students, I give them direction where they could find the information by themselves, once they go through discovering the information, they will remember the location for their future enquiries. What is wrong comparing Eritrea with its neighbors? No Eritrea, does not force people to sing or vote for a fake election under the gun! Enjoy the song. I know you missing a lot about Eritrea. Here is the latest song complement of ERITV. I don’t think that was a ghost city, spontaneous celebration.
            https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CZDtwhh7Kto
            https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RpKzD8PBT4k.
            I don’t have to relocate to Eritrea physically. I can be involved in its development from where I am. I travel when ever I can and share my knowledge with folks at home. Who knows I may relocate permanently.

          • Abi

            Mezmure dawit
            One day I was talking to Gedion and asked him why he doesn’t relocate to eritrea? He gave almost the same answer. I know Prof Gedion from Aqaqi Adventist boarding school. He is much older than me . I know you are much older than him. He finished high school in 80/81 ?
            My question is do you get your answers from PFDJ office ?

          • Gud

            Hey Abi,

            Where is this “PFDJ” coming all of a sudden? You got Horizonized or something? 🙂

          • Abi

            Hey Guad Gud
            I have a ” wedaj” , a big time pfdj supporter. His answer and dawit’s answer is almost identical for the same question. I don’t know dawit, I know Gedion very well . They have the same answer for the same question. What is common is pfdj. There you have it.
            Do you want to be included in the list?

            These days I’m into bible. I understand your frustration.
            “YeAmlakin sim bekentu atiTra.”
            I promise not to mention pfdj bekentu.
            What do you expect from a bad Abi? None!

          • dawit

            Abi,

            You should not be surprised for getting identical answers for the same question. Personally I don’t know your ‘wedaj’ Gedion, but many Eritrean went through more or less same experiences. MN had asked me if I want to relocate to Eritrea earlier and I had told him my reasons, what you heard was a follow suggestion by MN. You know Abi I would have relocated to Ethiopia or Eritrea, if there was a peace between the two countries. I had a plan to build houses one in Addis and one in Asmara and live in both places prior to the border war so that my children can learn both languages and cultures. Before the border war I had no plan to take U.S. citizenship.

          • Gud

            Abi,

            “YeAmlakin sim bekentu atiTra.” is a big guiline, don’t use it “bekentu ” 🙂

            May be the truth is the thing in common between the two of your friends 🙂

            Here is something you should know and may be use it as a rule of thumb : pfdj is the walk the walk kind, the work hard now for better result tomorrow, the do it yourself kind – hence a pfdj do not have time to waste on a God forsaken imaginary world full of Woyanie boot lickers and other funny creatures 🙂

            A pfdj supporter as a wodaj, huh? Interesting. Into bible, huh? Interesting. Don’t forget to pray for us sinners 🙂

          • dawit

            Abi,
            The answer is no. Are you a graduate of Aqaqi Advetist school? It is a great school, I had several friends who went to that school. Let me do a wild guess. Do your parent come from Debre Tabor, Begemidir? Pastor Tebeje was a good friend of my father.

          • Abi

            Gashiye
            No I went to Bole high school. Paster Tebeje?
            I know Prof Niguse Tebeje , his son . A good friend of my father. I know many eritreans who went there . We used call them the” Bokray clan”. They used to own Sidamo Tera in Addis. Their parents lived in Sidamo. All of them are much older than me but there is always a connection. My mother’s father was a big time business man with many N3 trucks among other businesses.
            There were also so many Gonderewoch in that school.
            We are getting closer. Small world.

          • dawit

            Abi, Yes small world and we getting closer. I don’t know Dr. Niguse personally, but he was the boss of my wife when she was doing her Zemecha assignment . She always talks about him very highly. The last time I went to Ethiopia, she wanted me to meet him, but I didn’t get the chance because of time constraint.

          • Music Novice

            Greetings dawit,

            I need a clear, precise and direct answers to my questions. But none seems to be forthcoming.

            You said PFDJ [= Eritrea ] doesn’t force people … under the gun So the people must have volunteered to be arrested, be sent to prison and shot at the borders.

  • tes

    Dear Saleh Ghadi Johar,

    Amazing and an immortal article.

    The last line that reads, “Let’s stop bickering and extinguish the fires of our petty squabbles. I am Eritrean; and I say it with pride. The way it should be said!” made my heart burning out of pride. I thank you. Very inspiring and far looking piece.

    tes

    • Saleh Johar

      Tes,

      Pride is our own, we can’t pretend to be docile–we are not. Even in times of difficulties, it’s un Eritrean to lose composure, but always dignified without being arrogant.

      Thanks

  • Mahmud Saleh

    Selam Ustaz Saleh
    You see my dear friend, some ideas just never die. Some articles serve as references for perpetuity. As always, you have mentioned topics that are not dared by some because they are seen as thorny; and you tackled them with eloquence. Eritrean-Eritrean relations (political or social issues), modes of struggle, opposition and Ethiopian relations, Ethiopian influence on opposition, the wish of all of us that Ethiopia and Eritrea relation returns to normalcy…And I believe, you put the Eritrean Solutions to Eritrean Problems within a comprehensible context. This is a masterwork. What’s interesting is you saw the problem coming and you urged Bologna Forum to do better at clarifying ESEP. My personal take is contained in my reply to Fnote Selam which, incidentally, agrees with the theme contained in this article. I read this article when it was first published, but I really digested it now better, probably because of tthe discussions that Miriam’s article arose. Thank you for reposting it.

    • Kifle N. Teklemichael

      Mr. Saleh Quadi
      Please keep up writing this kind of analysis, for it enlightens anyone in the opposition. I think your type of writing is far sighted that lays suitable ground for unity and success. I am ardent reader of the articles you post on your website. Eritrea needs such responsible, far sighted and devoted activist I repeat again, keep this good work and prescient ingenuity, which our on-going struggle needs desperately to regain our country and people. I pledge to practice your sample initiatives one has to uphold to reflect the true struggle for unity based on our golden diversity. Wishing to hear many more similar articles,

      Kifle Nerayo

      • Saleh Johar

        Thanks Kifle,
        I am elated to hear that you are pledging to practice the Eritrean sample initiative. And don’t listen to anyone telling negativeness about Eritrea. We are going through tough times but we will prevail–just like we did in the past.

    • Saleh Johar

      Mahmoud Pasha,

      Sometimes I see debates that remind me of how much water has gone under the bridge. When I see debates repeated as if they were just discovered, I cannot help but remember the Wata who tried to cross the river. I re-post old stuff to help people give context to the reawakened debates. I think we have failed to create a lasting knowledge base–we seem to repeat ourselves without moving ahead. We treat information like a hewing gum that we use and throw instead of internalizing it and using it as a reference. In short, we have re-invented the wheel a million times 🙂

      Pasha, what good is my writing if I shy away from raising thorny issues, just pray for me 🙂