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Saleh "Gadi" Johar

Born and raised in Keren, Eritrea, now a US citizen residing in California, Mr. Saleh “Gadi” Johar is founder and publisher of awate.com. Author of Miriam was Here, Of Kings and Bandits, and Simply Echoes. Saleh is acclaimed for his wealth of experience and knowledge in the history and politics of the Horn of Africa. A prominent public speaker and a researcher specializing on the Horn of Africa, he has given many distinguished lectures and participated in numerous seminars and conferences around the world. Activism Awate.com was founded by Saleh “Gadi” Johar and is administered by the Awate Team and a group of volunteers who serve as the website’s advisory committee. The mission of awate.com is to provide Eritreans and friends of Eritrea with information that is hidden by the Eritrean regime and its surrogates; to provide a platform for information dissemination and opinion sharing; to inspire Eritreans, to embolden them into taking action, and finally, to lay the groundwork for reconciliation whose pillars are the truth. Miriam Was Here This book that was launched on August 16, 2013, is based on true stories; in writing it, Saleh has interviewed dozens of victims and eye-witnesses of Human trafficking, Eritrea, human rights, forced labor.and researched hundreds of pages of materials. The novel describes the ordeal of a nation, its youth, women and parents. It focuses on violation of human rights of the citizens and a country whose youth have become victims of slave labor, human trafficking, hostage taking, and human organ harvesting--all a result of bad governance. The main character of the story is Miriam, a young Eritrean woman; her father Zerom Bahta Hadgembes, a veteran of the struggle who resides in America and her childhood friend Senay who wanted to marry her but ended up being conscripted. Kings and Bandits Saleh “Gadi” Johar tells a powerful story that is never told: that many "child warriors" to whom we are asked to offer sympathies befitting helpless victims and hostages are actually premature adults who have made a conscious decision to stand up against brutality and oppression, and actually deserve our admiration. And that many of those whom we instinctively feel sympathetic towards, like the Ethiopian king Emperor Haile Sellassie, were actually world-class tyrants whose transgressions would normally be cases in the World Court. Simply Echoes A collection of romantic, political observations and travel poems; a reflection of the euphoric years that followed Eritrean Independence in 1991.

Confession From Outside The Bubble

Consider today’s Negarit edition mainly a confession booth; I hope the so-called “silent majority” would join me. But first let’s remember the phrase “silent majority” was popularized by President Nixon, who robbed the anti-war constituency of the credit for the decision to pull out of Vietnam, and countersigned that credit …

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Negarit Of The Broken PFDJ Pot

In reaction to an article about the Dresden demonstration in memory of the late Khaled Idris Bahray, and condemning his killing by racist criminals, a certain person wrote the following: “RIP Khalid – I find Awate and the likes equally as responsible as the few German hoodlums in this type …

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“Crusaders” Branding Others, “Islamists”

Today’s Negarit is about Yosef EFND, coincidentally, there is an Egyptians word that sounds like it, Effendi (افندي); it is attached before the name of a Western clothed and educated persons. In many countries, the mandarin orange is also called Yousif Effendi—I am glad I found a pet name for …

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Eritrea: Few Embassies, Many Chanceries

The democratic regime of Isaias Afwerki is known for its extensive informational (not propaganda) activities and thankfully it enjoys full monopoly over Eritrea’s airwaves and print media through which it has always been “Serving The Truth.” The nascent Eritrean free press was squashed in 2001, as soon as it began …

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Shortage of Nakfa Bills Reported Outside Eritrea

For the last few days, Eritrean money exchange transactions in the Middle East has been hampered due to shortage of Nakfa bills or difficulty in transferring money to Eritrea. The shortage of Nakfa supply has marginally increased its value. Agents affiliated to the financial arm of the ruling party and …

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Sheikh Hassen Died After Seven Years In Detention

Sheikh Hassan Ibrahim Salem, the previous head of the Department of the Muslim Endowments for Massawa, and later for Semhar region, died at Sembel hospital. He was brought from prison to the hospital in bad health only two days before he died on Wednesday September 24, 2014. Sheikh Hassen was …

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Reflection: Burying The Oldest And The youngest

[quote style=”4″ author=”Negarit“]At 90, Ustaz Oaman was the oldest; at 10, Hanan was the youngest. They both died a few days apart.[/quote] Ustaz Osman died at his home in San Francisco and was buried on August 30, 2014; Hannan died at the San Francisco Children’s Hospital and was buried on …

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Cadres For Holy Men; Containers for Churches

The warm sun enticed basking; it was a spring morning. I was sitting in one of the street cafes in Bole Street , Addis Ababa. There were more shoeshine boys than patrons around. Across the street was another cafe frequented by ferenjiaized Ethiopians and Eritreans showing off. But not my …

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Eritean Fiat Seicento And Ethiopian Volkswagen

Fiat Seicento (and Cinquecento) was a cute Italian car whose old version is now antique. Driving schools loved it and favored it to any other car. Asmara had a considerable number of the car, Keren had one owned by Alamin, the famous driving trainer. Later on, Alamin trained my friend …

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Catholic Seminary: A 1968 Article By Mesghinna Yassin

This is the third portion from the series of articles from the 1968 publication of Outlook Magazine that was published by the Keren Secondary School. The first of the series was an article by the late Melake Tecle, and the 2nd, was by Minister Ahmed Haj Ali. Catholic Seminary – …

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ISIS, Israel, Gunay and Gedli Defamers

When some people passionately tell lies, they hope the details will work out on their own because a repeatedly told lie gradually sounds true, so much so that people do not doubt its veracity. When we are engulfed by clouds of lies and deceit, we see a myriad of illusions: …

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Eritrean Marriage: A 1968 Article By Ahmad Haj Ali

Last week the Awate Team published a report entitled, “Eritrea 2014: Isaias Afwerki & His Musical Chair.” The report carried the following entry for Ahmed Haj Ali: ARRESTED. Served as Minister of Tourism and later Minister of Energy and Mining. He was employed in that capacity until 2013 when he, …

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Eritrea 1968: An Article By The Late Melake Tecle

Long before Microsoft copyrighted “Outlook” there was a high school magazine by that name. I am not sure if former students of the Atzie Dawit Secondary School in Keren can sue for compensation from Microsoft, but I wouldn’t. I am satisfied with the 1968 copy of the school magazine that …

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Shum Gedede & The Goatskin

This article is first published on Sep. 19, 2005 when the current trend of degrading and belittling the Eritrean struggle was unthinkable. I thought of bringing it up again to help us reflect. Its TIGRINYA TRANSLATION IS HERE ሹም ገደደን ቆርበትን (ሳልሕ “ቃዲ” ጆሃር):: This story is dedicated to the …

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Politics of Nouns And Topography

I had ruled out Medrekh as another Keremtawai mae’etot until I heard Qeisi’s interview with Amal Ali. I liked what he said; particularly his emphasis that the legacy of the struggle belongs to all Eritreans. His tone was right and proper. There was only one important question that he avoided: …

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The Eritrean Year of So Many Alis

[This edition of Negarit was first published on Nov. 29, 2010. I wanted to write about the Ali-Salim-is-Saleh-Gadi Hmbleel. But since my victimizers of four years are flooding me with messages of apologies (the kind of Tegagyom agagyomna–I think it will take me a week to read all their telegrams), …

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Medrekh: Another Winter Project

Another new “winter project” is upon us; Medrekh is its name. To its credit, Medrekh has introduced another obscure term to the Eritrean Diaspora politics: Monocracy. I hold the PFDJ tyranny is not mono; it  is being played in stereo. I have a long held belief that any thought of …

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