Inform, Inspire, Embolden. Reconcile!

Why Democratic Coup Is The Best Option For Eritrea

Over the past several months, I have been posting disjointed pieces at the Awate Forum and on my Facebook page that are my vision for transition in Eritrea.  This edition of Alnahda is an attempt to consolidate my view for bloodless (or minimum bloodshed) transition in Eritrea.

I.  An Arguable Premise

Eritrea is car stuck in a ditch, a tire gone flat.  The driver was drunk-driving. What is the penalty for the driver, can we get diagnostics of the car, better training manual for new driver, better navigation system for the car, etc, are all important, but not a priority.  The priority is to remove the driver, push the car out by applying only enough pressure to get the car out of the ditch, use a temporary (donut) tire, go straight to a tire store to get one designed for more miles.

Similarly, whether Eritrea is where it is because of a “chauvinist culture”, our “superior attitude” borne from Italian acculturation, our “ghedli culture,” meaning the revolutionary ethos (the “root cause” argument) are all paralyzing.  This is because they were not built overnight and it will take years, maybe decades, to alter them.

Who is responsible? One man, alone, can’t run a grocery store, much less an entire country. So, Isaias Afwerki and his Enforcers are responsible. If you want to use a short-hand answer and say the responsible party is  “PFDJ”, go ahead, if that is based on the tactical consideration that everybody hates PFDJ.  But you will be stuck when Isaias Afwerki says he is dissolving the party.  Also, you are implying that there is an organization with a hierarchy based org chart in Eritrea when there is no such thing.  Also, you are a fighter for justice and the minimum requirement of that is that you don’t accuse people of crimes without evidence. The Isaias Afwerki Regime is a more accurate description; Isaias Afwerki and his handful of enforcers is an even more precise description.

II. What Should We Do?

Of all the options—waiting for Isaias Afwerki to reform; waiting for him to die; conducting a full-fledged civil war to overthrow him—the most palatable is a democratic coup.  What does “democratic coup” even mean: isn’t that a contradiction in terms? A democratic coup is an overthrow of an authoritarian to institute a democracy. It is a form of a “controlled burn” in the parlance of the fire department. It means that members of the Eritrean Defense Forces (EDF) demand the resignation of Isaias Afwerki and, failing his resignation, arrest him pending a duly-constituted court passing judgment on him. The steps:

(1) Members of the Eritrean Defense Forces, in co-ordination with Diaspora-based Eritrean change agents, execute the change.

(2) The role of the Diaspora Eritreans is two fold (a) Guarantors:  to give reassurances that we Eritreans have no quarrels with anyone who is not a voluntary enabler of the regime; (b) Rehabilitating: to take a group of people who have been conditioned from years of propaganda that their own people are Enemies of the State and to align their thinking.  (In special education, they call this “mainstreaming.”)

(3) Part of the mainstreaming includes conditioning any change on the formation of a provisional unity government that is representative of Eritrean diversity. And, no, by that I don’t mean just ethnic, religious, regional diversity but political diversity.  And, no, I am not talking a month after the democratic coup, but the day after.

(4) As all sorts of sharks smelling blood will be congregating, it is important that everybody agrees that we have ONE and ONLY one Eritrean Defense Forces.  All those with military capabilities must suspend their activities immediately—the way the ELF and ELF-RC did immediately after the EPLF entered Eritrea.

(5) The Chief Commanding Officer of the EDF is—provisionally—the chair of the committee that engineered the democratic coup. The chair reports to the committee and the committee is tasked with implementation of the 1997 Constitution provisionally (because we have to have law and order while drafting a new formula for law and order) and party-formation and electoral laws and securing the funding for the immediate (a) demobilization and reintegration of the National Service; (b) the repatriation of refugees as well as (c) drawing a pension plan for the aging civil servants.

(6) The Committee is responsible for the implementation of border demarcation between Eritrea and Ethiopia in accordance with EEBC, which, as the EEBC Judges repeatedly said, doesn’t preclude the two countries voluntarily swapping territories.  (What the judges objected to was one party conditioning the demarcation on territory swaps.)  This is followed by immediate normalization of relationship between Eritrea and Ethiopia.

III.  What We Should Not Do

The path we are on now says: the escalating abuse of the tyrant will be met with escalating resistance.  At the urging (or acquiescence) of the Nehna Nsu gang and arrogantly holding to the view that he can outlast, outfox everybody, Isaias Afwerki becomes more sadistic; and we in the opposition increasing our ranks and getting more radicalized and demanding more preconditions. Our neighbors—two large countries—Sudan and Ethiopia are, right now, not as actively involved as they can be.  The government of Sudan has essentially bought for itself security in its eastern border by placating Isaias Afwerki; the government of Ethiopia has essentially bought for itself a quieter northern border by adopting a strategy of disproportionate response to any pinprick from its northern neighbor.

But this may not hold out for long. If there is a change in Sudan’s policy—including as a result of change in government—Eastern Sudan may become unstable. If Ethiopia feels that it’s optimum time to conduct a “once-and-for-all” military strike then it is war and there is no such thing as a “neat war.”

Regardless of the scenario, whether from Ethiopia or Sudan, it means one thing: Eritreans are no longer in charge of Eritrea’s fate. It means more displacement, more war and more destruction.  It means the beginning of a cycle of violence and revenge. It means an utterly failed state simply because Eritreans have already become experts at one thing: mass exile.

It seems to me, that the strategy we in the opposition have now is a strategy of opposing and strategy of resistance. We are reacting and when one reacts, one does not control the agenda.  Those who say that, “we are not going to speak to anybody in the PFDJ system” should remember that in whatever else scenario—whether it is coming from a well-armed, well-organized opposition army, whether it is coming from Ethiopia, whether it is coming from American drones, at the end of the day, if we are not talking to those who are “in the system”, those who will bring the change will. And this is in the best case scenario. In the worse case scenario, then there is “total victory”—with the entire EDF/PFDJ/Government system completely collapsing, creating a total vacuum that will be filled by whoever is victorious.

(IV) Conclusions

While some of my views have evolved (with input from compatriots and developments in the world), one part has not: we are a small country and we have been, since 1970, on a continuous path of ostracization and we need reconciliation. This website has carried the mantra of “reconciliation” (even before it developed “inform, inspire, embolden”) and it has always been asked “who reconciles with whom” and our answer has always been “everybody reconciles with everybody.”

Our strategy should focus on returning Eritrea to a state of normality with as little bloodshed and as little disruption to the life of Eritreans as possible. This, to me, means a “democratic coup.”  Does that mean that if Isaias Afwerki was to tender his resignation voluntarily I would consider all our problems solved? No, but I would consider 80% solved and we can work, together, on the other 20%.

Pinterest
  • Hope

    sholla,
    We wouldn’t mind even if the Devil pops up but the concern here is that the pop ups are not honestly debating for an honest cause here except few of them.
    We expect some reespect and constructive debate rather thna unnecessary hallewlow and obsolete issues.

  • Mahmuday; I am back to business; I had enough fun aggravating the Tigryans. They are so weak and insecure, they go ballistic at anything. No wonder why they ignited the little skirmish to a full flagged war against Eritrea. lol I feel sorry for the Amhara and Oromo they have to deal with them.
    Anyway; let’s get back to it and I have a question for you.
    Since you are advocating for dialogue and normalizations; I do understand you’re well intentioned and for greater good but how do you see it benefit the little guys?
    Let’s no fool ourselves in here; when we say dialogue and normalization, we are talking between the Tigrigna speakers of the Highlander of Eritrea and the Tigrigna speakers of Tigryans of Ethiopia, End of story!
    If, so, dialogue and normalization between those two will create a powerful and dominating figure not only in Ethio-Eritrea but in the horn of Africa. Accordingly, how do you see this union of Tigrigna speakers towards the rest of Eritrea? When I say the rest of Eritrea, I am saying the Eritrean Muslims and lowlanders? Do you see them benefiting form this dialogue; normalization and the economic growth that comes as a result of this union or do you see it the Eritrean Muslims and lowlanders being marginalized and screwed to a second citizens on their own country?
    I will share my take after I have yours.
    Good day my man!

  • sara

    dave ,
    i also don’t understand why are they obsessed with eritrea?

    • Abinet

      When was the last time you read a comment by an Ethiopian that belittle Eritrean ? It is one thing to accuse the government of Ethiopia ,which is normal and we do it regularly . Belittling the poor and hospitable people is totally a different matter. What this thing is doing is just that which I don’t expect from an Eritrean with or without a functioning brain .
      Do you think it is Eritrean to belittle others? I don’t think so. If you agree with me you should be the one correcting him than defending him .
      Good luck

  • Tesfabirhan WR

    Dear Awatistas,
    Not a surprise actually but a means to come-over.
    When ever an article comes with ideas that is meant to solve the Eritrean matters or provoke us (for Eritreans) for further concerted discussions, the people from the nearby pop-up and try to wobble as trying to show a kind of professional calisthenics.

    ???
    hawkum
    tes

    • Rahwa T

      Hi Tes,

      Could you show us where specifically we disturbed? As far as I see you were having hard time with Serray (another critical thinker and great writer) and he is an Eritrean like you. I have seen no body from us disrupting your discussion. T.K. keeps popping up whenever his name is mentioned or else whenever he sees some twisted facts. Do some especial meeting with the moderators on how to avoid or exclude the nearby people from the normal flow of your “family” issue. One solution could be to put phrases like “Only for Eritreans”.

    • Hope

      Prof Tes,
      Well,that has been our cry—-but isn’t it part and parcel of the On-going Psyco Warfare?
      See below how they are proceeding well per their timetable while we are just we are barking and blaming the PFDJ rather than getting organized and having our timetable to save Eritrea as a Nation and Eritreans as a people.
      SAAY:
      Since you trust the Indian Ocean Letter,are you ready for the next war then to save Eritrea.
      Vet Mahmouday:
      Are you ready to dialog and negotiate with Gen Samora Younis now?
      Be honest and listen to your BFF Nitrikay,young but Super-Intelligent “YPFDJ” mind and persona.
      Addis banks on Afars against Afeworki…
      Indian Ocean Newsletter..n°1386 – 05/09/2014
      Addis banks on Afars against Afeworki
      Addis Ababa is not gearing up for war with its Eritrean neighbour in the short term, but is actively preparing the post-Issayas Afeworki era.
      Ethiopia’s armed forces chief of staff, General Mohamed-Nur Yunus, aka Samora, played a key role for the 4th conference of the Red Sea Afar community held in Samara (Ethiopia) from 9 to 11 August by the Eritrean Red Sea Afar Democratic Organization (RSADO, opposition). The conference was attended by Ismael Ali Sirro, the president of the Ethiopian Afar Regional State, as well as a number of other Eritrean opposition organisations. Its final declaration agreed to draft a new constitution for Eritrea, to set up a federal system of government.

      • saay7

        Cousin Hope:

        I thought that alternate Sal was bad enough, you mean there is also another SAAY?

        Because the saay that is writing you doesn’t trust Indian Ocean Newsletter at all. He trusts it as much as he trusts Africa Intelligence, about as much as the “Mule gives birth to Martian” stories in the supermarket:)

        saay

        • Hope

          Thanks Cousin.
          I just brought it to test the waters.
          We’eli handsome,le’ni’ush huka’tu dib Ad(sijin?) lehala?
          I take it back though,if you felt uncomfortable for my curious question.

      • Tesfabirhan WR

        Dear Yidan Hope,
        I am going on framing two articles with two different titles. 1. PFDJ and its Subsidy Economy, 2. Gurus of PFDJ mindset.

        kudan
        tes

      • Mahmud Saleh

        Hope,
        Sorry but I’ve made my position clear against foreign aggression time and again. I also said enough of dialogue: that it’s between the sovereign governments, in our case, it could even be pfdj. All I care about is more to be done to rest this case. It’s consuming our future. I hope that’s Clear.

        • Hope

          Merhabbbbbba Huyewe naye,
          Thanks—I have NO doubt about you and your position but RESPECT-for who you are and what you stand for.
          Yes,I am more hungry and thirsty than any one else for Peaceful Co-existence and Regional Reconciliation
          I wish we have very few people like you here ond across the Mereb River specially within the Leadership area.

          • Mahmud Saleh

            Hope,
            Shukran, now let me take my Sunday nap, I guess Rodab will make sure nitricc doesn’t abscond on his mission; you know the ball is on his court.

          • saay7

            Selamat Hope and Sem:

            I hope you are paying attention Sem. The ultra-possessiveness/endearment “Hawey natey” has gone multilingual with “Huye Naye.” I wonder if it has been adopted in Amharic “wendmye yenye”, English “my brother of mine”, Arabic.. Well in Arabic there is that “Habibti ana…”

            Your cousin of yours

            Saay

          • Eyob Medhane

            Sal,

            Amharic has already had that. It’s ‘yene wondim’, but at times it is used for a hostile, sarcastic or contemptuous conversation. It depends on how you use it….so see, we are way ahead of you… 🙂

          • saay7

            Eyob:

            We are not talking yene wendem, that’s ordinary. The extraordinary now is the equivalent of “yene wendmye.” Got that yet?

            saay

          • Kokhob Selam

            and do you read what adey Rahwa said on Jebena Saleh Hawey ?

          • Semere Andom

            Hi Sal:
            Yes but huka nayka Hope is not talking to me 🙂 But I have been obsessed myself lately by the none Tigrayit Tigriniya words in Tigrayit 🙂
            I criticized saay when he told huhu nayu Hope “aql wude”, I criticized Mamuday when he told me “dehayka” in his Tigrayt poem.
            But of all this, the worst so far was by a Tigrayit singer wedi Sheike who sang “hayet enta mnbedirka, itaQsonom”. I thought we want “egl naQsno egl abayna” 🙂

          • Mahmud Saleh

            SAAY;
            Ah! You spoiled my mood now. I get up from my nap, and here you bring in Semere wed Andom ጌና ካብ ወቕዒ ናይ ሮማ ዘይሓወየ ሓውና! Hello sem A. Anyway back to your trick, you just want to watch now SemA and Hope go linguistic!
            My feel: The white man (nitricc term) has created language for its speedy and utilitarian effect. Here they cared more about getting the message across as fast as possible, and never worry about the nuances that go with tight extended families’ kinship as is observed in developing communities. So, they have just one word “cousin” for some one from your uncle, on your mother’s side and from your uncle, on your father’s side. But we give more emphasis for family lineage and hierarchy and so differentiating which side we’re talking about and how far in the family tree that relationship is found is more important than the symbols themselves, like, uncle, cousin, aunt, etc. So, in Tigrayet, we have “wed Haal” ወድ ሓል your cousin born to your uncle from your mother’s brother; and wed ab ወድ ኣብ/ አብ your cousin born to the brother of your father. Tigre people also keep that degree of relationship to all extended families which could in theory encompass all the clan and /or the tribe. Now to your fascination with ሑዬ ናዬ, which could be translated to ” my dear/darling cousin” and I think the feeling in Tigrayet is stronger than the white man’s language (for foreign readers: the white man is mentioned here for softening effect, just for cracking effect).
            So Hope would put it this way: saay my darling cousin or;
            ሳልሕ ሑዬ ወድ ኣቡዬ
            ሳልሕ ሑዬ ወድ ሓልዬ
            ሳልሕ ሑዬ ወድ ዓመቼ
            ሳልሕ ሑዬ ወድ ሓልቼ
            ድግም ትጥዕም ምስልካ
            ወ ህጅክ ተስትህለካ
            ሽሓን ፉል ምን ብካ
            በራድ ሻሂ ንዓር እግልካ
            There you have it Ustaz (aka Hope’s cousin) ዘዋለደኩምን ዘቋጸረኩምን ደኣ የለን እምበር።

          • Semere Andom

            Dear Mahmuday here is my response to ጌና ካብ ወቕዒ ናይ ሮማ ዘይሓወየ ሓውና

            ሕዋይ እዩ ብልዎ
            ምእንቲ ነቲ ዝብሎ ከይሰምዕዎ
            ኣብ ዓዱ እንክሎ ጸሓይ ወቂዕዎ
            ኣብ ግዘ ንቀፈታ ድህል ኣብልዎ
            ንጽባሒቱ ኣብ ታባ ኮንኩም ኣማዕድዉዎ
            ብንጽሉነት ንነብሱ ኽጥፍኣ ትዓዘብዎ

            ምህሮ ሳሕል
            ትልምታት ትምህርቲ ካድር
            አይንሱ እንድዩ ዘብል ዕንክሊል

          • Kokhob Selam

            Lol. ዘዝገደድኩም :

          • saay7

            Ahlen Mahmuday:

            First of all, stop giving ዓርከይ ናተይ Sem a hard time about his picnic to the dark side of Rome where he encountered human beings being human and got shocked. It happens: I lived in Rome for a year, they have wine for lunch and they wear one leather jacket all year. It is a deadly combination.

            Then don’t be giving credit to ጻዓዱ for their simplification of terms used for kith and kin. I still don’t know (and don’t want to know: so all you smart-alecs don’t you dare come with your explanations) the differences between a step-brother and a half-brother. I have a built-in defect that refuses to understand it. Can you imagine us calling a brother a “half-brother”? Newri!

            Now then, whenever I see something strange and I get the sense that I am the only one noticing it, I feel like Bojack Horseman realizing that only he knows that Vincent Adultman is 3 kids in a trench coat (watch: Serray will surprise me and get the reference. The rest of you: google it.)

            Now, Mahmuday, if you want to see how strange this new possession language is, all you have to do is add one word to what you wrote:

            Saleh Huye wed Abuye NAYE
            Saleh Huye we Halye NAYE
            Saleh Huye wed Ameche NAYE

            There is no Hrkhrkh in your ears? 🙂

            saay

          • Mahmud Saleh

            saay;
            frQi-Hawey natey
            frQi -aboy natey
            natey naay beyney
            naay beyney nay bHtey
            Semere zeyblu
            nitric zeyblu
            Hope kaafi nKhulu
            Anyway, lazy composition, but enough to get us started. I have a theory about my good/bad friend Semere. This man has not only had a passing experience with Tigrayet (as he claimed), but he lived it; or he’s married to our woman. We need to investigate it. Yep, an investigation is needed. Just look at his last reply to me; he appears to know the language in its original form. There are some words which you expect from native speaker and he gets them. Yep, an investigation run by Gadi, he will flash him out. Semere get it right: seraye…then Asmara…then Sudan…then Abaay Canada…” No, I don’t really know much about Tigrayet…”, no buddy, you know more than you tell us. I expect another poem in Tigrayet wo semere wed Andom, HASSEBKA, NAYE!

          • Semere Andom

            Teg Mahmud:
            6 years exposing it in Sudan is not enough. It is all about love. And when I write because I am thinking about is I come across better
            No, as I said my Tigrayit impresses those who do not know it, but not the natives,

          • saay7

            Semere Arkey Natey:

            Whenever you refer to me as a “linguist”, please give ample warning to SGJ: because if he is drinking tea or smoking, he will laugh so hard he will choke, and you will be endangering the future of awate.com. One of his favorite things in life is to make fun of Tigrinya spoken by Keren-boys or Keren-exiled boys, which infuriates me because HE is the Keren boy and he has somehow managed to avoid the town’s influence on language:) I have never heard him say, for example, “እስ በዳን! እንታይ ትብል? ወትነግረኒ ወመጽእ ኔረ!”

            I am not a linguist, I am language-very-curious:) And more comfortable writing than speaking–in any language.

            saay

          • Semere Andom

            Hi Sal:
            I can understand Mahmuday and his conspiracy theories but you;-) I am just like you. I can converse in Arabic, but I am not married to their woman.
            The Keren boys I know speak Tigriniya and Tigre fluently of course with some Keren accent, but not in this manner, those are maybe from near by towns, who claim to be from Keren.
            My proficiency in Arabic and Tigrayit are highly exaggerated in awate comment section 🙂
            I know Gadi is a linguist too, I know one when I see him, but he has not written or obsessed about it like you did, if your rem you and I met in the PFDJ Tigriniya founding congress so you know my mutilated Tigrayit 😉
            when I went to Eritrea after independence my cousins thought I have no clue about Tigriniya and I recited some poems I remembered in Geeze because I loved Geeze too , now I will write some poems in Geeze, and someone will take the credit by saying I must be married to their woman named Agazit 😉
            Sem

          • saay7

            Hi Sem and all language fanatics:

            Have you ever watched a viral video (how viral? 12 million plus viewers!) entitled “What languages sound like to foreigners”? This extraordinarily gifted lady has a spot on impression of what Arabic, Japanese, Indian, UK English, American English, Russian, East Asian…. sounds like to foreign ears. Less than two minute long and, yes, there is a Part 2:)

            saay

            http://youtu.be/ybcvlxivscw

          • Mahmud Saleh

            Semere A,
            We will hash this out over Qahwa. May be later due to time constraints.

          • Kokhob Selam

            ማሕሙዳይ ከመይ ዝበልካ ሰብ እና ረኺብና ዘለና! ይገርመኒ እዩ .Lol ወይ እንዳ ዓዋተ : ተዓዊቱልኩም :

          • Mahmud Saleh

            Kokobay,
            TeHsho Abi seb, thanks.

          • Hope

            Ahlen Cousin,
            I meant to say :”Huye — wo– Naye”—eventhough still it sounds ‘ultra possessive pronoun”,which is so as I could not find better pronouns or adjectives to describe the charming Mahmouday.
            I used to be OK in Tigrayit and Ge’ez Grammar at one point eventhough I thought I was quite fluent in the Spoken “MiniAmir(BeniAmir) Tigrayat as I grew up with the BeniAmir of Hirkok,Damer,Ademat(AdiHammad),Mensura and surrounding–while we were roaming around in the endless Plains of Barka together with our Barka Goats and Begayit,during the Good Times,which I miss DEARLY.
            We are takling about almost 30 yrs ago and I have been unlucky to use my Tigrayat.
            Mahmouday:
            Our ” cousiness” with the Legend is real but complex and not essential to clarify further.
            Of utmost importance,to claim my “Cousiness” with the same Legend by default or by choice–for his Uniqueness as an Eritrean Citizen and Intellectual—etc—(hint: look for the strongest and the BEST Qualifiers Adjectives you could imagine) is,BUT,a blessing besides a Pride of no match.

          • saay7

            Selamat Hope:

            Well, I believe Eritreans have, at most, 2 degrees of separation. What this means is that Nitricc “the one-celled robot” is a cousin of every “toothless opposition” here but specially Semere T and Serray. Puts it in perspective doesn’t it?

            saay

          • Semere Andom

            Saay:
            “tim alaya”: therefore Semere T and Serray are also one-celled-robotos” by genetics:-)
            shukren cousin saay:-)

  • Rahwa T

    Dear Sholla,

    Take care of this guy. He (it) is a spoil middle-aged man who acts as a kid and specialized in insulting the Tigrians. Bad-mouthing is reserved especially for him. God knows why. So you have to be able to tolerate him ( or rather it).

  • Very funny. Why don’t you use your own name “ABEBE”? Once I heard Melles Zenawi called in a radio-tv station in pseudo name as ABEBE from Addis Abeba Ethiopia. I believe the tv show was being transmitted from DC. So, I guess ABEBE is over pseudo name the toothless Tigryans wanna be Amhara or Oromo. Anyway that is sad.
    I got a question for you: since you are barging giving shelter to Eritreans. Can tell us how much money are getting in the name of Eritrean in Ethiopia. Since you guys are masters at you know???? Adding the Eritreans case; bagging should be easy.

    • Rahwa T

      Are you using your real name Mr single-celled mammal? Why are you preaching something you never do?

      • Abinet

        Hey Rahwa
        This thing is funny.
        Amed beduqet sisq
        Libu benefas wulq

        • Rahwa T

          Dear Abinet,
          While I try all my best to avoid (it), it always brings something irrelevant and I couldn’t pass it. kebalegie gar mewal yihew new.

          • Abinet

            KeAhya gar yewalech gider fes temra tigebalech yibal yele ?
            Ketengro anagari yisewren.

  • haileTG

    Selamat saay and awatistas,

    Saay, I was a little tied up but didn’t forget your last questions in our exchanges, i.e

    – Let’s clearly define PFDJ

    – Ethiopia is awash with intelligence material as pertains the EDF and they might, at some stage, feel it is time to go after IA

    Both above are important and indeed need to be clarified before I proceed:

    – The definition of PFDJ

    PFDJ is the organized face of the the current regime that has brought Eritrea to its knees, destroyed the youth and removed pretty most of the things that would enable Eritrea to stand as a viable nation state. The public doesn’t go around with a name list of persons and entities registered as members of that criminal organization. EVERYONE and EVERYTHING that is connected, linked, contributes, aides and abets, promotes, is involved with or have anything to do with is a PFDJ’s organized existence. The only exception would be the bulk of the EDF. Mengisto inherited HS’ armed forces and in most cases the armed forces can easily switch sides and serve the state’s security needs without much ado. If Yemane Gebremeskel, a diaspora operative heading a PFDJ controlled community center or anybody or anything believe they can play “card carrying or not” game to absolve themselves of the heinous crimes they are organizing, aiding and abating against our people, then they are the fools at the end of the day. PFDJ, the organized face of the regime, exists in the minds of our oppressed people in its fuller existence of formal, informal and clandestine operations. The dismantling of the organization means, all of currently holding the torch for the evil dictator would have to seek redemption. The Eritrean embassies around the world would need to be vacated and all command and control operations linked to them from the regime disbanded. Let’s not kid ourselves to think there is no one to fill the vacancy, we have more applicants than positions. diaspora community centers would also be disbanded, all Eritrea based civil organizations either disbanded or completely re-engineered. PFDJ as a term would need to be a definition of the most sadistic and barbaric era in the history of our nation. We can neither fool ourselves or others to win the day. Truth precedes reconciliation, otherewise it would be a mockery to take the latter as a mantra for sheer expediency.

    The entity that would overthrow the IA regime, would hopefully be expected to draw the transitional committee from across the board of all interest groups (except the crime laden heinous entity PFDJ). All ex members, associates, advocates, support base and so forth of the PFDJ regime (those known by face and evidence need to clearance before interactions with the transitional committee – Dr Ghideon, Sophia, Dr Tesfay … need to face clearance or face jail terms pending court appearance if caught) All known leaders of diaspora and Eritrea based regime lead operations need to be taken to custody if apprehended inside the country or hunted down across the diaspora to face justice. Eritrean blood is not animal blood, it has already been shed and the train has left the station.

    The transitional set up can appoint roles and responsibilities in a fair, representative way only for the term of transition. If you were to be appointed to head our Embassy in DC then that would last till the transition. After that, the governing body in Eritrea can make all determinations about appointments and if you are linked to political party then I guess your party has to win elections to appoint you to head portfolios that you wish to work on (just an example, I am not proposing you saay would do that:) I hope you don’t think we are short of people, no. We just don’t have bold leaders, they are timid so far. Otherwise, if wedi Gerahtu (riesi akat ginormous) can lead our embassy in UK, why not Dr Sarah Ogbay be appointed to head that section for the transition? (Just saying so to point out to you that we have excess of people to fill jobs not the other way around). Regardless, we need to assertively work with the new leaders in Asmara, the benefits would be mutual, i.e. they stick to timetable and transitional schedule, we stick to mobilizing support and other political and material support from here. This would require all of the diaspora opposition having a conference to hammer out how they wish to partake in the transition as per nationally agreed quota for diaspora and the further breaking down of that figure. It might need complex formula to determine the fair and optimally stabilizing numbers 🙂

    On Ethiopia’s possible action:

    – Well saay, you said that the Ethiopians have high grade information on the EDF capabilities. That shows you that they are sensible at gathering information. And hence, the info to be gathered is not only on defensive or offensive capabilities, it includes assessing the popular mood. And the Ethiopians know that the current mood of Eritreans to Ethiopian occupation would be prohibitively expensive in life and material to them and hence you seem to be predictinc their actions from half of the info they gather. As I said, the other half (i.e. public mood – hostile or not) would lead them not to do as you fear. In fact, I believe Ethiopians mean well to as, just as we do for them, but if we were to assume that they intend to do what you fear (once for all attacks…) they would then IA is the best bet. As things stand, Eritrea is completely off world media, the youth have given up, the leading minds in the diaspora don’t want to take risk to speak up, the economy is demolished and the population isolated from the rest of huminity under the ruse “self reliance”. The nation is close to completely becoming ungovernable and nonviable and why would Ethiopia or Sudan interfere when the Eritreans can happily lose their country worshiping a festival crazed drama queen regime that lives off a photoshop authored images of make belief narrative. When Eritreans begin to realize what the responsibilities of having a country mean, then they might have a fighting chance of attaining all the things we dream about. But the next government is simply the undoing of the the current slow genocide and allowing the people to begin to have a country. As they move forward, they would demand more rights and start to appreciate what having a country means and the importance of taking responsibility to stand to defend it and not a walking dead dictator.

    Regards

    • saay7

      Haile The Great:

      You have broached two big subjects; let’s take them one a time. While you were taking a rest , I was busy here having fun with my Eyob-fill-in, T.Kifle. I have heard from very reliable sources that Eyob is traveling to the Denny’s equivalent of South America:)

      Let’s take this cross-discussion we are having where you have somehow convinced yourself (notwithstanding my repeated attempts to clarify my position) that I am in the “Tefaena! tewererna! Ethiopia metsiatna!” crowd. Goodness, just a month ago, when people were over interpreting PMHD’s interview with an AM station in Atlanta with that Ethiopian radio host who is a recovering Isaias fan), I said that this is not a new policy but a restatement of an existing policy and seen within the context of the very loaded question from the interview, it was more an attempt to placate the “Do Something Against These Damn Terrorists Everywhere” Ethiopian constituency.

      With that said, I can only repeat what I wrote T.Kifle:

      (Begin Quote)

      What I hypothetisized is actually “if Isaias continues to be reckless (enouraging the Eri-based Ethiopian opposition to conduct cross-border incursions, and if Ethiopia follows up on the strategy it has promised to deal with it…” As recently as just a month ago, PMHD reiterated the policy: one more attack, we are going after Shaebia directly. The point is if and when that happens, all the blueprints and roadmaps that the Eri opposition is drawing up won’t matter: Ethiopia will pursue a resolution that is driven by its national interest; and the Isaias Afwerki regime will react in a matter that elongates its life (even if he has to leave Asmara and trek to Nakfa, as he was willing to do in the last war).

      (End quote.)

      The point is quite simply this: while we in the opposition are looking for the ideal situation, things can overtake us and render us entirely irrelevant if the status quo is no longer acceptable to Ethiopia or if Sudan is destabilized and its Eastern Front is vacant.

      saay

      • Serray

        Selamat Sal and Haile TG,

        Sal, in some ways you are more of a tactical/strategical thinker than an ideological or a philosophical one. I have no doubt that you knew badme was a bad idea in the middle of the war, but you continue with it because it was tactically disastrous to switch positions in the middle. So you waited until it ends and darkness sets-in before you made your real views about the regime clear using an ironically named series known as twgah imo.

        I have a feeling you use ethiopia as ruse to reach those whose emotional strings are tight to it. It is a good tactic directed at those who are always terrified of ethiopia that if they don’t do something, ethiopians are is coming! What could make it work is that the ethiopian government has to choice but to play along. Horizon is right, the woyanes will never invade or overthrow the regime…they are simply having a much better time doing what they are doing right now; fetching the ropes for the regime to hung itself. With sanctions in place denying the regime arms and an intrusive financial accountabilities, there is very little incentive for ethiopians to spend human and material resources at a regime spiraling out of control. But they have to make those semi-annual pronouncement because they want to keep the pressure on. I know you know that because even I know it.

        The fear mongering, as good a tactic as it is, is based on what made eritrea a sick nation whose existence, whose identity is first and foremost driven not by its internal strength, but by a boogyman called ethiopia. Look at you and awate, while you almost believe eritrean identity is omnipresent, your hero is idris awate. Eritrea was never threatened since independence except by isaias. The Americans fix the american identity not on defeating british but on the constitution. A natiion that constantly guilt trip its citizens by making them worship those who fired guns and not brought peace, order, the rule of law is doomed. The sickening part about eritrea the nation is how most of its existence as a nation is defined by ethiopia; not only in the regime hemisphere but also in the opposition. If eritrea was an individual cancer survival, it would be this freak who carries around the medication used in his chemo and the surgical tools used to cut the tumor out to incentivize himself. It is a truly disturbing that 23 years after independence, we need a boogyman called ethiopia to drive home that we need change.

        There is also a huge risk to your tactically sound position; what if the mindset carried itself past the democratic coup? I know it is too leftist for you but I like Chomsky’s “Manufacturing Consent” and I saw it at work during the invasion of panama and the two Bushs of Iraq. When W decided to invade iraq for a completely bogus reason, it was fascinating to watch the art of manufacturing consent in the media, the politicians and finally the people work first by making war with iraq part of the vocabulary and then part of reality. What frightens me about romantics, other than you carrying the chemo medication and surgical tools called ghedli as a badge of honor, is you (not you Sal but romantics in general) can use war to rally support. If ethiopian invasion is part of the eritrean vocabulary, part of the discourse, then making war a reality is one short step away.

        To survive as a nation, not only do we have to internalize the idea of eritrea at peace with itself, with its neighbors and the world at large, but we have to make war mongering illegal just like the Germans made denying the holocaust illegal. The extinction project that is half way through started with badme. After 1991, we as people didn’t say “never again” instead we kept sickening paraphilia of the war: the tanks, the ugly shida in our square, and all the reminders of the bloodbath top and center of our existence. If you sleep with gun, wake up with a gun, you are more likely to use a gun. If you open sawa, you are more likely to use the products of sawa.

        Haile TG is not only right about ethiopia but if his point is not dominate post isaias eritrea, your democratic coup will give way to the continuation of the extinction project shaebia started.

        • saay7

          Selamat Serray the Sublime:

          I refer you to the answer I gave Hayat earlier; I am pleading the very convenient and arbitrary “it’s Saturday!” Suffice to say for now that your assessment is either wrong or incomplete or missing context 🙂

          Plus I can’t concentrate when I watch people falling down the stairs: you want to keep your eyes off it but it’s mesmerizing. T.Kifle, a prisoner of his own grievances, keeps slipping and sliding and unfortunately for him, he had opened (war metaphor alert!) two fronts. Don’t want to give up my front row seat for that show:)

          Eyobai, my condolences on the tough loss. Meet me in Camera 2.

          saay

        • Semere Andom

          A note to Serray:
          It would be easier if your register in disqus so we can follow you, I almost missed this exchange, just de-romantic to de-romantic 🙂

        • saay7

          Selamat Serray:

          (1) The Badme thing… it’s exactly the same argument as the “armed struggle took 30 years”. What I was writing has to be seen within the context of what Ethiopia’s Ministry of Information was writing (sometimes two releases a day) and that Eritrea had no presence (zero) on the Internet. What people tend to forget (mostly because of how disastrous the war was for Eritrea) is that that period can be broadly be divided into two phases: 5/98 – 2/99 and 2/99 – 5/00. In the first phase, Eritrea took an extremely cautious position regarding peace proposals arguing that Ethiopia’s intentions were not peaceful resolution; in the second phase, Ethiopia lived up to those predictions by dragging its feet on every peace offer. These are the facts and they can be easily accessed by anyone who is interested in facts.

          (2) The fear-mongering accusation is not based on facts. It is also selective. I tend to look at things on a case-by-case basis (the freedom of not being a philosopher:) and I will give you two examples. When PMHD told Al Jazeer that he is willing to go to Asmara to make peace, people like Eyob were super-excited and I explained that if you see the interview, it was just a case of someone ad-libbing because he was trying to drive a point home: it was not a policy change. Similarly, when PMHD told Ethiopian AM radio that Ethiopia has determined on going after shaebia, I said this is not a policy change, it is simply an interview-subject placating his interviewer.

          I tend to work on the premise that people and governments are rational. Right now, it is not rational for Ethiopia to attack Eritrea as it would interrupt its development priorities. But if the facts on the ground change and it perceives that Eritrea is interrupting its development priorities, then the rational thing to do is to attempt to rid itself of a nuisance. No, I don’t think Ethiopia just makes occasional speeches just for the sake of making them: whether it was during the Badme War, or the Somalia foray, Ethiopia first builds a case for war, then it executes (or tries to) because public opinion–African opinion, European opinion, American opinion–is very important to it, as it should be.

          3. I have to tell you this: if T.Kifle’s opinion here (the mainstream Eritrean is “irreparably damaged”) is shared by the TPLF elite and if what the TPLF elite believe is shared by what Tigrayans believe, then it is an extremely worrying sign. Clearly, their argument is not just with Isaias or PFDJ, but a larger pool of people that have to be rehabilitated. And it is not fear-mongering to say that if that kind of mind-set is backed up by war-artillery, then it is extremely dangerous for Eritreans. I am sure you noticed that in her mild criticism of T.Kifle, Hayat saw nothing to criticize in him calling us damaged goods because of Italian colonialism (which is different from all other colonial powers because, unlike the rest of Africa, we didn’t have a chance to have a post-colonial state.) So, when you and Haile TG are admonishing me (which I will take gracefully) do take the time to tell T.Kifle and company to adjust their dangerous thinking.

          saay

    • Dear Haile TG,

      As much as the final incursion by Ethiopia in to Eritrea to
      depose DIA and his regime is concerned, I have said it in the past and I will say it again that if Ethiopia ever contemplates to do such a thing, unless of course provoked with an all-out war (not a cross-border attack which will be handled by a proportional punitive measures), then, she must be EXTREMELY FOOLISH. There are many reasons for that.

      No one should attack a regime that is falling by itself due
      to its innumerable blunders. There is no sense in that. On top of this, Ethiopia has already won the military, economic and political warfare, for war on the battlefields is only one aspect of confrontation between two countries. Working hard to exceed one’s opponent on fields such as the economy, politics, social development etc, are equally important, and Ethiopia is doing well on these too.

      The Ethiopian government has too many issues to tackle, and
      its hands are full. Compared to the broad economic developmental efforts of the country, the yet unsolved problem with Egypt, the image of Ethiopia as an important African country with the headquarter of the AU in its capital city, its peace-making and peace-keeping missions, and finally as a country that is seen to be the bastion in the anti-terror war in the horn, which has brought her nearer to the political ideology of the West, with all the advantages that
      come with it; the Eritrean regime is no longer a priority in the Ethiopian agenda as it used to be in the past, and it is not a problem that should be solved by Ethiopia ASAP. Therefore, if there is any fear for the outbreak of war, it will come from the PFDJ side and not from the Ethiopian side, for Ethiopia has nothing whatsoever to gain by attacking Eritrea.

      Will the return of Eritrea to Ethiopia have any positive effect
      on the developmental endeavors of Ethiopia? Of course not. Is Assab as important as it used to be in the Ethiopian psyche and for the development of the country? Not anymore. Is DIA an Ethiopian problem? No, not at all. Then, why should Ethiopia start a war against Eritrea out of the blue, when there is no reason for war whatsoever. War is not a football game, where one goes to spend ninety minutes shouting and screaming to have fun, and then one goes to a pub to drink
      a glass or two of cold beer, whether one’s team has won or not.

      Ethiopia is resisting an invitation to intervene to depose the regime in Eritrea, for she knows that it will end in an ugly quagmire that will bring Ethiopia’s economic development to a screeching halt, and no Ethiopian citizen or government official would like to see that. She will be called an aggressor, and it is extremely counterproductive for Ethiopia’s image, and it will hurt foreign support and investments. Eritreans are not yet ready to accept an Ethiopian boot on the ground. Although Ethiopian can win the battle, she will not win the war; because she would not be able win the hearts and
      minds of Eritreans, which at this stage is out of the question. Therefore, she should not make the grave mistake to accept the invitation made by some opposition that would end in Ethiopia finding herself in a very difficult situation. An Eritrean
      problem should be solved by Eritreans themselves. Period.

      • haileTG

        Hey Horizon,

        many of the things you stated to rule out the possibility of war are correct (albeit understandably framed with an Ethiopian’s psycho-emotional perspective vis-a-vis Eritrea; kinda we don’t need you, things are working better for us than at any time…). True, that as it may, even if things weren’t to as they are in Ethiopia and Eritrea’s usefulness was to be more appealing, the historical background of both people’s wouldn’t permit an all out war beyond the border areas. It would be expensive and suicidal. It would turn the red sea basin into active war zone, the conflict would escalate far and beyond the borders of both countries and would plunge the region into the deep end of conflict and civil strife. Ethiopia has no intention of opening a new ugly chapter like that and your determinations also stand.

        Eritrea is not under normal dictatorship, it is under a sinister and heinous acts of uprooting the population and emptying the country, to what end is very unclear. Normal employment is not permitted in Eritrea, business had long been killed off and even the regime’s diaspora supporters have no rights inside the country beyond visit relatives and wander the streets. Every single development opportunity in Eritrea had been swiftly turned down by the genocidal regime since 2001 and the whole country was turned into slow killing field for the youth and the wider population ever since. I recently spoke to an Eritrean asylum seeker who freshly arrived from the country. When he described the sadism of the regime and the gloomy situation inside the country, I was truly dizzied by the menace that he narrated about the situation. But Sadly, I really lost my faith in his capacity to even have a basic grasp of his situation, let alone be entrusted to solve it when he then continued and said “…the Ethiopians are supporting the Afars and their plan is to take over Asaab.” That was a truly sad realization for me that the man, despite knowing the hell hole the regime kept him in all his life, the worst part was that they really left him impotent for posterity to do anything about his sorry and miserable existence. Well I just to myself then “..good on ya, I see the Ethiopians would change their mind now that you decided to get your sorry behind from there…hmmmm”.

        The main reason for my tackling saay on this Ethiopia issue is that I wanted him to be mindful that the issue is a major political battleground between the diabolical regime and the Eritrean people. I prefer we either handle it the right way or not utilize the Ethiopia issue to advance our arguments. Ethiopia can’t invade Eritrea as things stand. IA went the furthest in removing all kinds of defense from Eritreans to defend as a nation not just Ethiopia but anybody. But, he is the fool in the end because regardless of his and his koboro junkies incessant onslaught, our commitment to see Eritrea stand in the end has only been shaken and not stirred. After all they have done and meted out on our people, there is no formula for them left to utilize to make us give in to his evil ploy. Hence he will be discarded for the garbage that he is and lived his life to be and Eritrea shall get up dust off and charge ahead. IA’s and his supporters latest acts of causing the mass deaths of young Eritreans is too late and too insignificant to dent the Eritrean resolve. I am sure there will come a time where Eritrea and Ethiopia would live together with mutual respect for the shared advantages rather than for reasons of one trying to maintain their advantage over the other. The world hasn’t seen the true Eritrea yet, just an ugly and criminal rear end a prolonged and difficult armed struggle.

        IA and his cohorts have their arm twisted and their faces tightly rammed up against a wall and headed to their demise. Anything can happen in Eritrea now (assassinations, coups, rioting and uprisings you name it…) the final joke is on them and Eritrea has proven that it can stand tall in better times, since it has shown how it can pull through such bleak misfortune of internal sabotage brought on it by internal enemy.

        Let the people of both countries prosper. We will take care the rest 🙂

        Regards

        • Dear Haile TG,

          I am sorry if I have given you the impression that I was sending the message “we do not need you any more”. No my friend, not at all. Simply, without Eritrea’s consent, there is nothing Ethiopia can do; and that is the core message of my comment. Ethiopia should always keep the door open
          for Eritrea. At some other point in the past, I had said that weak or strong, we always need Eritrea the friend and never Eritrea the enemy; and this still stands true for me and many Ethiopians. Eritrea should break the ice and approach Ethiopia; and up to now, she has refused to do so.

          If ever Eritrea ends up to be a failed state,
          which we all pray would never happen, history will blame DIA and the PFDJ for killing Eritrea with a lethal injection of Badme and demarcation. What I fail to understand is that, why four old men in the Hague decided to give Badme, the flash point, which is worth nothing either to Ethiopia or Eritrea beyond its symbolism, to the vanquished, while they know very well that for example Strasbourg (a contested city with a German name) had changed hands many times according to the wishes of the victor, and today Germany has no complaints whatsoever for losing the city, and it is living in complete harmony with France. I am sure that if Badme had been given to Ethiopia then, Eritrea would have accepted it, and things would have been completely different for Eritrea today. PFDJ would not have used it to kill the rest of Eritrea, and much more its people, and Ethiopia and Eritrea would have prospered together as two different countries.

      • Kim Hanna

        Selam Horizon,
        .
        You just wrote everything I wanted to say for a while in such a concise understandable way. Thank you for that. Not to make a turn here, but something you said opened the door that always bothered me. I hope you might be able to lessen my deep concern.
        .
        ….anti-terror war in the horn, which brought her nearer to the political ideology of the west, with all the advantages that come with it….
        .
        I know when we say the west, we mean primarily the U.S. I hope Ethiopia weighs its own interest only, as it did in the case of Somalia and not give too much undue deference to U.S. My favorite King of Kings, I wont mention his name here, (it might give epilepsy seizure to some) described the Americans in one glorious word, I have not forgotten that word.
        This was the time when his ministers were advising him to align himself with the U.S instead of Britain. Finally he was persuaded to get closer to the U.S for all the advantages THAT COME WITH IT.
        .
        The one word he used to describe the U.S was AYAWKUBETIM.(they don’t know how to handle things) It must have been valid then and it is valid today.
        .
        Americans are enablers of their opponents and challengers. As a matter of fact, I will go further and say they do it in direct reverse proportion to their friends. Anytime a small country deals with the U.S government it has to be aware that the 51% government they are dealing with comes accompanied with a formidable 49% opposition in the background. Often the 49% lurks and beats the 51% using you as blunt instrument. They do it at their appropriate time, usually that is when you are at the most vulnerable.
        .
        In addition to that the 51% knowing that the 49% is lurking around and an eye on them try to be ahead of them by needling you, shoving and down right insulting you and cozy up with your opponents and opposition. They talk about inclusiveness, proportional, space, stakeholders etc. just to make sure the 49% does not catch them unprepared. When everything fails they bribe, they call it some fancy name but just the same, before you know it they have enabled a formidable opponent for you.
        So what I am saying is yes be close but keep a little distance too.
        .
        I hope I am not seeing a boogie man where there is none. I hope you can assure me of that.
        .
        K.H

        • Amde

          Kim,

          I think you should be proud of saying his name. Haile Sellasie should be honored (among many things) for his epic behind the scenes out-maneuvering of British intentions to add Ethiopia to British colonial holdings after the expulsion of the fascists.

          I had never heard of this statement of his but, it is interesting that he was spot on as far as America is concerned. Remember, it was the US’s refusal to honor arms purchases Ethiopia needed to defend itself against Somali invasion that made a desperate Derg open itself to Soviet arms and hence communism. Not to belittle ideology, but in the end it was the logistical necessity that provided the push to jump into the Soviet camp.

          If you have the time, watch a Frontline documentary titled “Losing Iraq”

          Amde

          • Kim Hanna

            Amde,
            Thanks for the response and I will look for that documentary “Losing Iraq”.
            .
            K.H

        • Selam Kim Hanna,

          When the Soviet Union disintegrated in 1989 and early 1990s, the world was talking of the “end of history and the beginning of a politically uniform world”. It did not take long before it was disproved. In the morning of 9/11, humanity faced an Armageddon, and a formidable force tried to change the political landscape all over the world. It is none other than political Islam, of which the main representative was Al Qaeda.

          በእንቅርት ላይ ጆሮ ደግፍ፣ እንዲሉት ሁሉ, today we have a worse situation as the result of the ISIS movement,
          which has created havoc in the Middle East; and the world is extremely terrified because of its horrifying monstrous methods. Remember, we are included in the ISIS political cartography, as the “land of Habeshas” that is to be made a caliphate. With al shabab and Wahibists next door, (ISIS is said to be an offshoot of Saudi Arabia’s Wahibism), we are living near an active volcano spewing a boiling lava, and we should know on which side of the dividing line we should find ourselves on the days of judgement.

          The Americans are working for their national interest, and Ethiopia should do the same. Their cowboy politics is cumbersome, and it has been counterproductive in many countries. We are living in a ruthless world, where everybody tries to
          outdo the other, and the rules of the game are related to the situation. Nevertheless, we should not forget that Ethiopia is reaping the benefits of the
          new status quo, because she reacted to it in a clever way, by aligning herself with the West. I am of the opinion that Ethiopia’s development is not only the result of the right economic policies, but also the result of a situation that facilitates it; ie. the West wants a strong Ethiopia in the region to relieve
          itself of the burden of fighting al qaeda and its affiliates in the horn.

          In addition, we should know that we are a nation that feels the breathe of militaristic Islam on our nape.

          • Abinet

            Selam Horizon
            The leader of Al shebab in Somalia is killed by US drones . Good news for peace loving people in the world in general and Ethiopians in particular .

        • Rahwa T

          Selam K.H.

          Just for curiosity. How do you see your phrase “My favorite King of Kings…”. History tells us he was an emperor (forget the amharic title). Were there kings during the era of Haile Silasse?

          • Kim Hanna

            Selam Rahwa T.,
            .
            No, but I use his entire title when ever possible. Here, I use the shortened version of his title to avoid talking about side issues but..
            .
            Of all the Kings before him is what I meant.
            K.H

    • Peace!

      Hi HTG,

      Well done! Could you summarize the context (definition of PFDJ) in one word (noun or adjective); is it an organization? Is it a system? Is it a regime? Is it an ideology?

      regards

      • haileTG

        Hi Peace, I like the singularly focused question:)

        What one word would describe PFDJ?

        Answer: Front.

        Now don’t curse me yet, I will explain. I am not using the word “front” as in the traditional political meaning “Ginbar” rather to mean shielding the real dirty deals as in “front companies” that shield criminal networks. In practice the organization that was long set up to serve as a political organization in 1994 (PFDJ) had never had congress, never elects its leaders, never ratifies anything, its members are mostly killed, jailed or exiled and its charter had long been trashed and collects dust inside a dust in.

        Enter PFDJ the “front” for all the criminal activities of the regime:

        1 – The nation’s wealth has been (and continues to be) looted under the name “PFDJ” parallel organs.

        2 – The youth were made to work on next to nothing for PFDJ companies (that actually borrows externally through the state and siphons off the money by conducting frorced labor).

        3 – It controls diaspora money, resources and activities for the benefit of individuals but the name “PFDJ” is used

        4 – It is used to poison young minds in the diaspora and Sawa, Eritrea through so called “cadre training” in a manner that is an out right criminal (hypnotic indoctrination of the young with hate and bitterness under the influence of manipulative techniques)

        and much much more…

        This organization as it stands to day is simply a cover or front for the activities of the regime. Take for example that you find a retail shop that used its business status privileges to facilitate many criminal activities. Would you just take action against the criminals alone or also remove the business from the register and ban the owner from obtaining a license? PFDJ is a cover for the current horrendous crimes and when we go after the regime, we are not only going to stop there but ban PFDJ and revoke its rights to ever organize as an entity. The discussion about the shop in the example above wasn’t if the shop had sound business plan when launching and neither is about PFDJ’s initial charters, ideologies or systems. It is rather about the way the organization was involved in the notorious forced labor that has caused the youth to lose their years, dignity, hope and life. That was enabled, aided and abated by the full participation of PFDJ as the front of all of the crimes. The youth wasted their lives building villas for generals as part of PFDJ building campanies that relied on slave like labor. All the other crimes by the regime were rationalized, supported and exacerbated by that front organization that came to replace its original mission of replacing the EPLF as vanguard organization. The PFDJ has been prostituted in all of the regime’s internal and external blunders and it has NEVER raised a single resistance on grounds of its stated objectives.

        Hence, PFDJ is NOT a system, ideology, way of thinking, political theory or anything. It is much like the old segreto (underground booth and prostitution hide out) in Asmara. The front of the premises is innocent looking shop that sells OMO, sugar and lieka lieka (haha..). Step inside, you will meet fully stocked up bar and tens of young girls serving more than just the drink. That is PFDJ.

        In one word, PFDJ is a “cover” or “front”.

        Regards

        • Peace!

          Hi HTG,

          Thank you for the response! The reason why I ask is I am struggling to make sense out of the aggressive and loaded slogan Weed out/Dismantle/Eradicate PFDJ. Nevertheless, I found your short answer “Front” and its context totally inconsistent, so based on the context your definition of PFDJ is an organization, not only an organization, but also a domestic terrorist organization which even YG is a bit shy to put that way. If you think G15, wedi Ali and all other political prisoners, let alone our freedom fighters and martyrs, belong to the organization that you painted as a domestic terrorist, boy! we have a long way to go.

          No shocked all. “PFDJ is a domestic terrorist organization” is it a good strategy to weed out/dismantle/Eradicate PFDJ/Fron/Regime? Will there be a new front in Eritrea for war on terror should a peaceful transition failed? But one thing for sure is fighting injustice at the expense of sovereignty is a recipe for a disaster.

          Regards

      • Tesfabirhan WR

        Dear Peace,
        May peace be with the Eritrean people.

        PFDJ is an organization that works on system that developed a brutal and dictatorial regime lead by an ideology that ensalves the people.
        Haw’Ki
        tes
        + haile TG simply great as always.

  • While Awate.com performance is being reported by google; let me report the performance of land gabing by the Indians in Ethiopia. The Indians are so happy with performance; they brought their troops to protect “their” gift, land and they are feeding the Ethiopians.
    Do you think PIA will allow this? First, the Indians grab the free land and fertile land then they go to Adi-grat and feed people with their own food. Is there any more dehumanizing than this? The Indian military personal are in Ethiopia to protect their gift from corrupted and lazy government of Ethiopia. If you are an Ethiopian, you got to be ashamed of your self. Even more stunning is when the Tigryans talk about economic boom and all that bull-crap. Here, your people are fed by Indians lol. Economic growth my foot. shame on you ethiopians. i frame this pic. and whenever i deal with the Ethiopians i will place it on the table.
    the picture you see is Indian battalion serve food to local residents in Adigrat, Ethiopia

    http://www.unitedsikhs.org/UN_News_Events/images/unmee046.jpg

    • Hayat Adem

      “If you are an Ethiopian, you got to be ashamed of your self” says Nitricc.

      If you are an Eritrean, you got to be ashamed of yourself for lying” I respond to him.

      These were visibly blue helmeted UNMEE soldiers who were occupying what used to be the TSZ between Eritrea and Ethiopia (technically within Eritrea). The picture, whether it is in Adigrat or Adikeyh, must be from 2007 or earlier during which UNMEE was active in the area. Why this dude want to insert a decade old picture as if it is fresh and as if India has deployed soldiers to the region to protect its investment is something only known to him. That too must be a lie.
      His line “Do you think PIA would allow this?” is very funny. Where is he living? His PIA has allowed the best and the brightest of Eritrea to flee and perish. Hasn’t he heard about Libya, Malta, Lampedusa, or Senai, Gaza, Israel. This guy was being showered recently by Mahumuday and Emma with praises for showing some effort of rehabilitating himself from a sustained delusion to a grown-up club, and to the disappointment of those wise men, here we go he regresses again to his old habits.
      Hayat

      • I thought you are Eritrean? why not let the Ethiopians or the Tigryans defend it? lol i know once Adi-Grat was mentioned; all is out with no reservation.
        you are as phony as three dollars bill. learn from people like T-K who are proud for what they are. what a disgrace.

        • Hayat Adem

          A lie has no geography. There is not an Ethiopian or an Eritrean lie as such. T.K can not be proud of lairs. Neither do I. You should not be either. What is disgraceful is to be desperately lying and expect others to let you go. If you don’t want to be caught lying, don’t lie. That is it.

          • Let me ask my 70 years ols sister about telling the truth. talk about a lie, aren’t you too old to play this bull game? every one knows you are a Tigryan from deep in Adi-Grat. why pretend? here your boloved Indian gurding the farm.
            “India trained Woyane mercenary soldiers forcibly evicting 70,000 indigenous Ethiopian farmers from their ancestral land”
            http://humanosphere.org/files/2012/01/IrinDisplacement.jpg

          • Hayat Adem

            Hahaha…jumping to another tree. That is what you do better than the monkeys. God save you from yourself. Just don’t bring wild lies to this house and I promise you that will never be noticed by me. lol

          • Rahwa T

            Mr Mamush,
            You have been acting as a ‘teenager”. How could ‘a-70-years-old’ lady be your sister.

      • Serray

        Hayat, I blame the charger and the RAM. if it is not plugged or rebooted, any information stored is erased and defaults to bot mode.

        • Hayat Adem

          🙂 a good one!

      • Fanti Ghana
        • Kim Hanna

          Selam Fanti Ghana,
          .
          Now, this moment is the acid test of what Mr. saay. exalts Nitricc for: The ability to profusely apologize for such a monumental error on his part. I think if Nitricc does not then Mr.s….
          Thanks F.G,
          K.H

        • Rahwa T

          Dear Fanti Ghana,
          I kindly inform you that I don’t fit to be at the respected Peace Club as long as bad men and women such as Nitricc, dawit and Sara continue belittling my people. I am sensitive. I don’t have hard skin like yours. Your Nitricc should look the fake Rahwa (who posted, according to him, the negative comment on Eritrean Moslem) somewhere north of Mereb. Don’t try to defend him using the word “sometimes”. It is in his blood. 95% of the comments from him are full of unpleasant words. His hatred towards my people is endless. If you don’t feel bad with him, I think you can carry and protect him like little baby.

          • Fanti Ghana

            Dearest Rahwa T,
            Long story, but we will talk soon “እምበይቲ ዓይነይ”

  • Mahmud Saleh

    Abebe,

    Hey thanks, Abebe. Just for your info, I am not a fan of any deragatory language. I use wayane if specifically needed, here of course, I am exchanging with the great nitricc, and if you don’t use that word he sort of doses off. Anyway, the term/name wayane is within the political sphere, and as such, it should not bother you. Many Ethiopians call the Ethiopian government wayane, too. Ethiopian intellectuals and officials also refer to the government of Eritrea as shaebia. Both shaebia and wayane are historic names; they don’t particularly bother me. So, it’s essential we don’t use double standard. The overall message of your comment is well received brother, and your intention is clear: you said it all, ” Long live Eritrea and its great people.” I salute you. We have another Fanti Ghana from Mahal Agher. That’s wonderful. Long live Great Ethiopia the beautiful, and long live its peace loving peaople. Things will change for the better as long as peace loving people keep talking to each other.

  • saay7

    Danny:

    All your questions are excellent, and your skepticism well-warranted. Remember, what I am trying to do is to compare “democratic coup” with the other change mechanisms. These choices range from waiting for Isaias Afwerki regime to reform itself (evolution) to waiting for it to collapse through a combination of external pressures (accelerated automation) to direct military assault (revolution.) All have risks, all have benefits, and all have costs.

    saay

  • Hayat Adem

    Dear 187…,
    I’ve one curiosity-driven question for you if you don’t mind? What does your very unique nick name stand for?
    Hayat

    • Shum

      187 is murder.

  • Rodab

    Selam Sal
    While you are on battle breaks, ever heard of this bokhri- ezney “PFDJ II”?
    This from shabait today: “The 10th annual YPFDJ and PFDJ II conference in North America was conducted from August 28 to September 1 in Washington DC.”
    I wonder if yet another PFDJ franchise is being introduced to the public.
    The Tigrigna news went like this: ጉጅለታት ህግደፍ ቁጽሪ ክልተ…

    • saay7

      Kbur Engineer Rodab:

      So now there is PFDJ and PFDJ-II? Never heard of it until this years YPFDJ conference.

      Maybe that’s the Isaiasists idea of political pluralism. I think those in the medical field call it mitosis 🙂

      saay

      • Papillon

        Dear Sal,

        Maybe they are listening to other voices (read: SAAY) and it looks like your clout and influence is putting Yemane Monkey in jitters as the tyrant seems to heed your advice. As much as the PFDJ II is your brand, I suggest copyright should be respected.

        Haft’kha.

        • saay7

          Hi Papillon:

          It’s hard to say conclusively what Yemane G’s interpretation of PFDJ-II is and you can’t get any info about it from the official website of PFDJ, shaebia.org (dormant since March 2014), or YPFDJ (rarely updated.) If you go to the government website, shabait, PFDJ-II doesn’t even make it to the headline of the news about the conference. So, it might just have been an afterthought that they literally telephoned in (“YPFDJ trah zeykones, PFDJ-II dma smeya…”) But just from the Roman numeral suffix, it is safe to assume that PFDJ-II is a continuation of PFDJ.

          My PFDJ-II is different. It is (a) headless (no Isaias) organization that is (b) part of a unity government for (c) a transition period. The best way to think of PFDJ-II is this way: what would happen if there was a civil war, followed by a standstill while regional/international mediators shuttle back and forth to form a transitional, unity government. It would be made up of members of the opposition and the PFDJ-II, while the refusenicks (the Isaiasists PFDJ-I and the “Dismantle It All” opposition) boycott it. I am skipping the civil war and going straight for the solution:)

          saay

  • saay7

    Hey Rastaman:

    It’s been a long time, and welcome back to your home.

    When Morpheus offered the red pill and the blue pill, I took the one that doesn’t involve me knowing Isais’s grandfather’s name is Abraham Hagos Mircha, or assuming that Eritrean independence was mezaa tempo…because I can’t do anything with those:)

    DEMHT. My assumption is that they are a force that is a tool of Isaias’s hegemony ambitions and with Isaias gone, the ambitions go and the tools become disposable. Now, since they have no home to go to (they are wanted for terrorism in Ethiopia), they will resist unless an exit is design for them. And my exit strategy for them is to disarm them and give them safe passage to Sudan.

    saay

    • T. Kifle

      Z’wereda Sudan! 🙂

    • Rastaman

      Hey SAAY. DEMHIT has no other agenda other than protect their Emperor, DIA. What makes you think that they wouldn’t fight to their end? Aren’t they estimated to be 80K +? I firmly believe that only an Ethiopian Force should and can tackle them. It is Vietnam that stopped the killing fields of Cambodia and Tanzania that freed the Ugandans from Idi Amin. Unless I’m more paranoid than DIA, I wouldn’t hesitate to seek help of any kind from anywhere. I would rather face the side effect than witness the slow death of Eritrea. Sincerely.

      • saay7

        Irie Rasta!

        actually, whatever the opposite of “irie” is in Jamaican:) For every Vietnam and Tanzania case, one can find a Congo case. Have you noticed that in any conflict, that the first thing the UN demands is for external agents to stop interfering? Why do you think that is Rasta? I am guessing it is because the record of intervention is really bad, notwithstanding the case of Vietnam and Tanzania who intervened not to save their neighbors but to remove a security threat.

        Ethiopia at one point (during the border war) wanted the Findlandization of Eritrea. But better heads prevailed (one version) or its effort failed (another version) and thankfully, for now, it is not going to go North unless there is a real security threat. Message: seek salvation elsewhere:)

        I shared my view on DMHT. I say the EDF disarms and sends them packing to Sudan. If they fight back, we give their GPS co-ordinates to Harbeyna Weyanai and then, for 10 years, we deny that we ever did it:)

        saay

  • Kokhob Selam

    just cup of coffee . . . . ምእሳር ምእሳሩ :- . and . . . ልዕሊ መቓብረይ . . .and more coming today.

  • saay7

    Selamat TG:

    You know the story from our childhood about the salesman selling a trap? Salesman is talking about all the features of his trap and the prospective buyers are asking: can it catch a mouse? can it catch a rat? Whatever they ask him, his answer is yes, it can. One man asks, “can it catch a tortoise” and the man answers, yes it can. Another who find the claim implausible says “FaH Ila!”(ፋሕ ኢላ!) (let’s translate that to, “yeah, right!”) and the salesman, without missing a beat, says “FaH ila wn tHz iya!” ፋሕ ኢላውን ትሕዝ እያ፦ (It can catch “yeah, right” too!)

    The first thing I guess we have to agree on is: what is it we need, versus what is it we want; what is it that we can achieve very fast, and what is it that will require time. We all agree that Eritrea is bleeding and needs urgent care and when I talk about the clotting process: applying pressure and bandages, that’s all I am trying to do. That’s all we should do at first. Stop the bleeding without infecting or killing the patient. I have said this and some think I am being hyperbolic but I am trying to get Eritrea just to another poor African country: one that doesn’t chase its youth by the tens of thousands, one that has rule of law, one that has some pressure for dissent, besides leaving the country.

    I am afraid your minimum demand that the change must “bring the emotional and psychological freeing of Eritreans from bondage” is a tall order. Our traumatized people have and will have emotional and psychological bondage for some time to come, no matter how ideal the change is. What the change must do is begin by removing the head of the terror squad and if people then demand more, then a responsible transitional government must find a way to balance the need of the people for immediate justice with the responsibility for maintaining law and order. You cannot break this fear of the people by instilling fear on the people who carry guns (EDF.)

    The cannon fodder trickster… I like that phrase, but you misunderstood me. And you misquoted me, as has Harbeyna Weyanai TK by paraphrasing it with “If Ethiopia invades us…” When I was talking about Sudan and Ethiopia, it was to highlight the fact that we may have a tiny window of opportunity for us Eritreans to own the agenda for change, not to stroke animosity towards Ethiopia and Sudan. Let’s take Ethiopia as an example. Where we are right now is with Ethiopia having adopted a strategy that says that the next time there is any cross-border incursion from Ethopian opposition based in Eritrea, we are going after Shaebia. That’s the policy and it was recently reiterated by PMHD. If and when Ethiopia decides to do that (for real or imaginary reasons: hey, there are Gulf of Tonkins everywhere in the world), then no matter how many synonymous people want to use, the world will call it an “invasion” and it will be driven (as it should) by what is in the national interest of Ethiopia. How is it “cannon fodder” thinking to take people at their word? Isn’t this Ethiopian policy? And if it happens, won’t it happen on its timeline irrespective of what Haile TG and saay have drawn up in all their blueprints for change?

    saay

    • haileTG

      Nice one! saay, I like the joke. Thanks also for offering individual responses, I know it could be tiresome to read every single feedback and address it (I don’t mind if you sandwich me between paragraphs if it makes it easier:)

      Now to the point. It is true that we face as much complicated scenario in foreign relations as in anything else the day after. And hence many of the concerns you are raising are not to be underestimated. Even above and over what you covered, there exist many tricky issues as sanctions, foreign armed groups and dubious bilateral arrangements in security other spheres that we will need to defuse once the regime is over thrown.

      From the point of view of fairness and fundamental human rights, we are also duty bound to assume innocence until proven guilty with ex-PFDJ members as well as the issue of releasing political prisoners and determining who is who (mind you, there is no way to tell if there are individuals, albeit few, who may truly be national security risks…hmm very complex).

      Our difference (me and you) stems from the basic modalities within which your vision is set up. PFDJ is simplistically perceived as the face of the current crisis and all the injustices. This is so in the mind of the ordinary victims of the regime’s oppression (whom we wish to mobilize to spearhead mass uprisings at home and the diaspora). What purpose does it serve for your vision to introduce confusion by proposing unilateral recognition (not mutual recognition) of each others mitigating merits (or argue on its behalf). You may furnish an elaborate proof to rationalize your argument (which may even be true), yet you would open unnecessary front against masses of justice seeking (actively seeking:) population that is as entitled and justified to express the entity “PFDJ” at the root of its miseries. Could you not adjust the basic contexual modality of your vision into one that remains exactly the same in substance except condemn the PFDJ is affirm that its organized existance (not the people) be dismantled and removed.

      In reality, PFDJ wouldn’t be foolish to hang around the day after, however, saying that now would have framed your vision as the voice of the people seeking political change in Eritrea. All Eritreans must be united and engage to rule of law, but to ignore the undercurrent of volatile public emotions against the entity PFDJ would cost the core benefit to be had from your vision for the transition ahead. I think the need to stop the current bleeding everybody’s urgent desire, however the thrust the foregoing arguments to be advanced need to set out to win Hearts and Minds. The vision, as you have discussed so far, appears to provide only to the Minds.

      Regarding Ethiopia, we can only control our stand and perspective. It may be helpful to avoid second guessing the Ethiopian role in the most unfavorable light. When we project suspicious and defensive postures as in “if Ethiopia goes for a once and for all attack” betrays an assumption that they lack fundamental regard to the peace and stability of the region. I am not judging anything here, except to point out that “the monster called Ethiopia…” is a central selling quality of the current Eritrean regime to stock fear and promote the canon fodder psychology. Stepping into that territory is a mine field in a sense because it easily crosses over with the overall tone of the regime, albeit inadvertently. The vision, as you have it, can simply outline the most pacifying and independent path in external relations without echoing the misplaced and exaggerated sense of danger the regime exposes us to.

      In conclusion, my point of departure from the many valid points you made were the lack of full resolve to see PFDJ be dismantled as an organized entity and the opportunity missed in introducing the neighbors as part of the overall resolution than entities to worry about.

      Regards

      • haileTG

        Hey saay, last minute addition:-)

        You may rightly ask: how do you propose to remove PFDJ?

        Gosh, I forgot to add the following couple of lines:

        I am convinced that the regime would crumble under mounting pressure (external and internal – including lack of capacity to maintain prolonged control). The diaspora pressure needs to be unified and framed around one singular message “PFDJ ought to relinquish power”). The diaspora, regional and international pressure coupled with internal loss of control and unexpected eventualities would definitely trigger internal uprisings from the ranks. But the would be challengers need to get clear and consistent message that we want clean slate and dismantling of PFDJ is the popular demand.

        Many things are likely to unfold from here on as the status quo isn’t 2011/12/13 but rather an unsustainable and grim. The world community has clearly made up its mind, so has the region, and hence let’s give our consent to and make our message very very clear.

        Sorry to add it late, I thought it might be relevant.

        cheers

        • Saleh Johar

          Haile TG,
          Are you retreating 🙂 What is this “PFDJ ought to relinquish power” stuff? Relinquishing power is achieved by cajoling, bending down, and compromises. I think we better leave that to the politicians, if they reach that level. Those on the justice force should stick to dismantling it, Weed It Out Completely. That what the focus should be because if the justice forces gives in an inch, it will be a mile. No breathing space for anything PFDJ. It was begged to yield, to improve its behavior, to have mercy on the beleaguered Eritreans, many appealed to it and tried all conceivable ways for over two decades when Eritrea had a lot to save, not that they squandered a lot more and brought Eritrea to the brink of total collapse, why should this institution even be alloed to be any close to power, let alone lead the transition? Why should it be called to put off a fire it started? Pressure will certainly bring about results, even if it takes a little longer. But cajoling the PFDJ is a sure way to give it a new lease of life.

        • saay7

          Selamat Hailat:

          I appreciate your fleshing out of your ideas, let’s pursue it further and let’s remove all the built-in-communication gaps by translating, whenever we can (at least mentally) our messages to Tigrinya because that is the language of power in Eritrea in 2014. Let’s also be specific on WHO PFDJ is relinquishing power TO:

          PFDJ Ought To Relinquish Power to _________. Translate to Tigrinya:

          I take it we are also going to define PFDJ. Otherwise, all the powerless PFDJ are going to be shocked to learn that they have power (NUEYS, NUEW) and all the non-PFDJ with power are going to be relieved to learn that they don’t have to give up anything (government garages, and the entire parallel infrastructure that Isaias Afwerki has created.)

          saay

      • saay7

        Selamat Haile TG:

        Let’s delve further into “If Ethiopa goes for a once-and-for-all attack.”

        (a) While we in the opposition are trying to figure out what our message should be, who should deliver the message, what a post-Isaias Eritrea will look like, life goes on in Eritrea and Ethiopia.

        (b) One of those things that’s been going on is that Eritrea’s military capabilities have deteriorated to a shocking level as a result of desertion, degraded war machinery, and the general case of lions-led-by-jackasses. This is extremely obvious to Ethiopia (more than it is to me and you) because every deserter brings in fresh intelligence to Ethiopian intelligence services.

        (c) One of the other things that has been going on is that there are a large number of armed Ethiopians in Eritrea who do more than organize cultural troupes for songs and dances. Occasionally, they test their ability to conduct military missions inside Ethiopia.

        (d) One of the things that the Ethiopian government has said publicly, and reiterated recently by its Prime Minister (Radio Tsnat, August 9, 2014), is that it has adopted as a policy that the next time the Eritrea-based Ethiopian opposition conducts a military mission inside Ethiopia, the Ethiopian government intends to go not after the infiltrators (telalaki/Qtregnoch) but the Eritrean regime. (“…we are working on a strategy we developed that it is better to go to the source and remove shaebia itself.”)

        How is itemizing this, designed to highlight the fact that our window of opportunity to act is small and shrinking, considered whatever you and T.Kifle caused me of doing? Is it really unreasonable to expect that Isaias Afwerki will go on his suicidal mission? Is it really unreasonable to expect the Ethiopian government will pursue its strategy and it will do it (as it should) solely with pushing a goal it perceives is Ethiopia’s best national security interest? In both scenarios, who is absent as decisions about our own people are being made simply because we were given 13 years to do something and we didn’t?

        saay

  • Mahmud Saleh

    Hope Huye;
    As always, thank you for the treatment you accord me. Just for correction, I left Eritrea legally in early 1995 when things were going well. This doesn’t mean I absolve myself. It doesn’t even mean I would magically change things. We all screwed things up. For the record I believed the war was unnecessary, and argued for taking the earliest and safest exit which cost me my relationship with many tegadelti. Of course, things are changing now, but too late. I’m not a media person, Lampedusa got me out of my silence. Also consider my comments as calls of a distressed citizen. I’m not for political ambitions, I know my limitations. Take it as your average Mr.Doe opinion.
    Huka.

    • haileTG

      Merhaba Mahmuday,

      I will not take you up on the border because that is a topic I spent a good two years discussing here (it once earned me the name Mr border:). But the point I wish to correct you on is your point that “…I left in 1995 and this doesn’t absolve me.” Actually it does. Being a tegadalay should be an honor and accolade, not a liability. I had great respect to many tegadelti who tried to lead us to our final dream of Eritrea at peace with itself, the world and its region. Eritrea that would be a shining example in our embattled continent. Unfortunately, they were nipped in the bud and 13 years to the month, they have been caged just like the hopes and dreams we once had. I lack experience to judge them in their ordeals of the ghedli years, but I judge them by the product they brought. They were responsible to bring independent Eritrea and they did that with Flying colors. Period. This isn’t and can’t be a liability in the minds of Eritreans. What happened after was a liability and ALL of us were party to it. If you stayed till 2000 in Eritrea and protested what was happening there, you probably would have ended up as your other compatriots. And I am afraid we probably have acted towards your misery just the way we are doing towards your comrades. So, I think your exit not only absolves you, but your current endeavor to enlighten us with your thoughtful input also says much more about your character and integrity to the ideals of the nation we are still struggling to forge.

      With respect

      • Mahmud Saleh

        HTG,
        Thank you brother, I Hear You. Haylat, I know the distress many innocent tegadelti feel for letting our people down. The best course is to encourage them to join the fight. I believe the overall message of SAAY article was to that end. I have been reading your comments, and when you guys flush it out, we benefit. Thanks.

    • Hope

      Mahmouday,
      No offfense here but was trying to be sarcastic,and I guess, Idid knot know how to be sarcastic.
      No way Jose–that I would hurt your feeling in any form or under any circumstance.
      My apology if i did offend you though.
      My intention was to express that you are one of the few resources here who could do much better….as you are always serious and positive–
      You did beyond your ability like all your comrades-dead and alive.
      Rest assured though that you and your comrades will be rewarded—
      All the best.
      Hope

      • Mahmud Saleh

        Hope;
        Not at all. I value your comments, and you have not done something of that nature. I just replied to correct you. Thank you.

  • Rahwa T

    “…elaborate this comment in a formal Article”

    Selam Hope,
    That was what I thought few ours ago. It would be great article if converted to a full-fledged article.

    • Hope

      Yep,Girl.I have a serious reason why i said that.
      I ” hated” myself as an Eritrean after I read Mahmoud above.I was shocked as to why i did not pay attention to those few statements Vet Mahmoud mentioned.
      I thought I have known every deadly mistalke PIA and his “Yes-Sir ” men/EPRP have made thus far even since the Armed Struggle era including the silent massacre of real heros and real and genius behind the scenes Eritreans but I have never paid attention to the way Vet Mahmoud stated things about the “super-deadly”- mistakes the Leadership has made.
      Sorry rahwit–the following is for Eritreans–pls,do not feel offended–simple facts.
      -the Silence ,mishandling and ignoring of the unpleasant activities and suffering of our people at the Border-despite their cry
      -The unilateral mis-handling, reckless and irresponsible way of dealing with the Adi Murug incident-by the same PIA without consulting his cabinet/the Assembly and even his own yes-Sir men
      -The irresponsible way of handling the Badme issue
      -The reckless interference in the Somali Affairs.I was skeptical about the al-Shebab saga as an excuse to sanction Eritrea but after I read one of th ewikileakes talking about Gen Sebhat Efrem warning PIA to avoid meddling against the US Interest in the Red Sea–when PIA suggested to recruit “terrorists” against the US Interest in that same Red Sea.
      here is what Gen Sibhat Efrem said(Haile TG can easily find the link”:
      “If the USA finds out about our interference and role in this matter,the USA Gov might take a serious and unpleasant measure against us”.Mind you,this was reported to the US Embassy in Eritrea by one of PIA confidente,who was involved in that meeting where PIA suggested those plans…..I just found out belatedly about this from a close friend of mine.
      Here is my dilemma:
      Despite that we Eritreans and the top Officials have known about all these deadly mistakes that have led to the current mess–to the extent of putting the survival and existence of Eritrea and Eritreans ina big ??:
      WHY and how come then the same Eritreans who sacrified more than any other people or nation for their Eritrea and for their people,allow such a BEAST to destroy the very existence of the same Eritrea and Eritreans they have sacrified for?
      Hypocrisy? Dumbness,?Ignorance?
      Am I missing something?
      I am NOT making a U-turn and acting like Nittric but am asking the same Eritreans who have been barking -both Opposition and pro-PFDJ,about this and that.
      How in the world then the same Eritreans are adoring the same beast that has destroyed them?
      Well, I support YG in that aspect.
      May be what I heard and know are wrong ;other wise how come can this happen?
      Nittric,can you challenge what Mahmoud Salih stated above about the mistakes of PIA and can you tell me why you are not admitting the mistakes?
      Huh,typical Hope flip-flopping?
      Not at all.
      Profs Tes ,Aman Hidrat,SAAY,haile TG,Serray,
      Can you disect as to why the Eritrean people and Eritrean Gov Officials have kept silent to that extent?
      In order to cure the disease you have to know the reasons/cause of teh disease—and it looks like we either have not known the final Dx of the disease,which is not true,or ,most likely we have not find the medicine.

      • Rahwa T

        Hi Hope,
        Thank you and I don’t feel offended at all. What you are feeling and doing is something that is expected from a citizen who love, respect his people and country. Actually, I am surprised by the recent comment of MaHmud and your tendency to look at it positively. I wouldn’t say it is a new stand. I believe it was there in deep in his heart. Now I could see why he, FG and Ermias was proposing and talking the peace club. I was wondering what we could say in the peace club while we are repeating time and again our long held stands. (I hope Ermias has read MaHmud’s comment).

  • haileTG

    Selamat Awatista,

    Not to digress but stress the urgency. Can we see why our compatriots in Libya would wish to take the risk to cross the sea?

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OB0tpBVCEK0

    • Abraham Hanibal

      What a disaster! It’s heart wrenching to see Eritreans, in their hundreds, rammed in such a way in a warehouse at the mercy of unscrupulous smugglers. They are basically living among their rubbish. I womder where they eat, where they go to toilet, or where they take a shower under such inhumane situation?
      Those who are serving dictatorship, and their supporters in the diaspora need to see how much of sufffering their repressive policies are causing Eritreans.
      Is this the “reward” of a country that has come about by huge sacrifices to its people and youth?

    • Amanuel Hidrat

      Selam Hailat,

      Heartbreaking to see their situation. Why Eritrean in the diaspora become helpless to their ordeal? I don’t know. But one thing for sure these epic crises show us, how our social fabrics in side Eritrea is torn down to the extent to let themselves exposed and faced to such horrendous and torturous risk taking. My hearts goes to them.

    • Papillon

      Dear Haile TG,

      It is sad. I would say, the biggest threat to their lives is not the civil war in Libya or the awaited voyage on the sea, rather, it is communicable diseases which proliferate in closed and crowded places. The most notable ones are Streptococcus Pneumonia (Pneumonia), Gonorrhea Meningitidis (Meningitis) and T.B. These are potentially lethal particularly to children and to those who are immunocompromised. It is unbelievably heartbreaking to see them being preys of human cruelty (read: tyranny) and nature as well. May the Almighty God protects them.

      Haft’kha.

    • Serray

      Selamat Haile TG,

      Even after this ordeal they don’t say, kabizis adna yihshena. They risk death to get even further. And we have people who celebrate the whole summer for having a nation whose children avoid it like a plague. For these victims, eritrea is worse than the dump they are living in…it says a lot about shaebia’s eritrea.

      The most evil statement ever written at awate is by semere tesfai when he said he has a soft spot for ex-tegadelti who caused this. In semere’s eritrea, evil will revisit it over and over again because his eritrea is blind and unjust; it is a nation which doesn’t know the meaning of justice. His eritrea dismisses a victim if the perpetrator happens to be ex-tegadalai who fought and brought us the darkest and the most unjust nation on earth. Removing isaias is truly the first step; making whole his regime’s victims and incapacitating the perpetrators from doing harm again is where the hard work lies.

  • Abe z minewale

    You got that wrong.xxxxx moderator.ashebir abraha was ex Elf tegadalai not the one you mentioned you are abusing me twice. Amel hisabek, or don’t use the name awate my friend becomes my grandpa.what is your real name . There is no such name so called moderator.

    • abe z minewale

      Kubur mr. yonus
      this moderator needs to be moderated or he is the guy who is driving isaias’s car to the ditch

  • Abraham Hanibal

    Dear Mr. Saleh Younis,
    I completely agree with your outlining for the road map of bringing a change to the better in Eritrea. But I feel that at this juncture in Eritrean history, when the mere existence of the nation as a viable nation is in question, the role of the Eritrean opposition groups in general, and of influential individuals in particular has been largely absent. It feels as if there no one who cares to save the Eritrean people from the tyrany of Isayas and the PFDJ.
    Why are we Eritreans wasting time and letting the madness continue for such a long time? I think all the Eritrean opposition groups and inviduals have to suspend their individual political agenda temporarily for the sake of concentrating their efforts in the struggle to remove the Isayas regime. They have to co-ordinate and streamline their struggle with elements of change inside the country to facilitate the process of ending the Isayas rule. And as you pointed it out clearly, the process of ending dictatorship in Eritrea is neither easy nor viable, without the participation of the Eritrean defence forces. As I see it, the only ones who benefit from the status quo in Eritrea are, apart from the dictator himself, his handfull close associates, and his generals. The rest of the EDF members are victims of the regime, like all the people and they would be more than willing to engage in bringing change, the time they see a well organised movement. What is missing here is organisaton and leadership.

  • haileTG

    Selamat Serray,

    Ok I think I get better grasp of what you’re saying now. My perspective is slightly different. I sense that your core concern is the role those “diaspora” and “political opposition” might play in exacerbating the chaos amid delicate transition. I fear however, you tend to ignore their relevance in attaining comprehensive settlement. In deed, the political future of the country should be charted by the wishes of those residing within its borders. However, castigating sections of the population and blocking them off from any meaningful role would also lead to perpetuating the divisions and making the final settlement illusive. The leadership of EPLF managed to do that simply due to landing on massive (almost surreal) levels of political legitimacy, thanks to the victorious conclusion of the armed struggle. Sadly, it took the route of blocking off those deemed “liability” at the time. If you heard Seyum Harestay explaining it, he said the planned meeting was cancelled last minute by a phone call made to them from Asmara while they were due to board their planes. When you taint people with “liability” status that is the first course of acting as the agent of instability. All Eritreans, regardless of where they are or what they do need to have clearly defined rights and responsibilities. For example, participation in political activity leading to standing for election, requires certain years of residence inside the country and not having dual citizenship (if one has then they need to renounce their non-Eritrean citizenship). There need to be basic guidelines that promotes equality of access and guarantees rule of law. Parties based on religion and ethnicity (other than constitutionally agreed self rule of local constituencies – minority empowerment deals) would not be permitted under electoral regulations. And other similar rules intended to strengthen the political independence of the nation should be instituted and supported.

    The key is that me, you, someone in Eritrea or in Ethiopia, Saudi Arabia or Sudan must all feel Eritrea is open for them, it is time time to build the nation and use all of internal and external assets at the disposal of the nation must be marshaled to kick start nation building. There would be rules that would regulate my activities based on my particular circumstances and the same for others. My usefulness may end up being mobilizing the diaspora for massive support of the nascent transition to democracy with financial, investment, political and other support (Just example). Others may feel they wish to go back and live there in various capacities and the political opposition should also have a role that is dictate by the constituency that they can mobilize inside the country. The notion that this section and that section should be ruled out or ruled in is very subjective and looked through a tainted glasses of one’s own prejudice.

    For example, PFDJ has been utilizing polarization as the tool of political oppression, we have nothing to fear from each other and everything to gain by respecting everybody’s role. All moslems are not jihadists, but how did PFDJ utilize that to concoct fear in the minds of non-moslems? I am sure it does the same by fliping over to our moslem compatriots too. Half of Eritrea is one or the other faith group and we need to give space to one another, re-engage and recognize our shared identity as Eritreans. To simply draw arbitrary line and say such and such group should be excluded, such and such group would prove liability, such and such group is up to no good, is a liability in itself that would derail a peaceful transition. The nation would put specific rules for everyone to participate and we need to abide by that. If I elect to remain here and not go back permanently, then Eritrea will have a million and one other responsibilities for me to perform from where I am while residing where I prefer to reside. The huge diaspora is a huge opportunity for the future of the nation and its development. Responsible leaders would engage responsibly and would do their utmost to make them feel fully included and catered for.

    Let us not wear a narrow vision lens that PFDJ managed to fit us with. Eritrea is big, its potential tremendous and its dreams infinitely greater. The day PFDJ falls is the big home coming day for all Eritreans, wherever they are, what ever Eritrea means or ever meant to them, the nation would be open to receive her children with both arms and a mother’s tears. And of course, it shall be declared OPEN FOR BUSINESS. You’ll see fears subsiding, hopes rising, optimism will be everywhere and the heavens will smile for us.

    This are dark times in our history, and understandably we are forced to dark and gloomy view of each other. It takes the will power to surmount that and believe in what you wish it to be. A bad tree would give bad fruits but a good tree would give good one. Our arguments could serve divisive purposes or unifying purposes, we can only choose our arguments, the purpose they serve thus become a foregone conclusion. Let’s not reach to the mystic ball to second guess the intent or contribution of others. Their role given the opportunity is the final test to blemish or not. So far only PFDJ has taken its turn.

    Regards

    • Amanuel Hidrat

      Hailat,
      I don’t think Serray has inclusive mind, just from his argument. I am really doubtful that Serray has a space in his mind for that noble word “inclusiveness.” I will see how he will respond to your well elaborated concrete principles you set forth, as to how Eritreans accommodate each other.

      Regards,
      Amanuel Hidrat

    • Bayan Nagash

      I sure hope AT is taking note of this particular exchange that really deserves a corner of its own – these three giants (AH, Serray, & HTG) give me hope that the country will be in good hands once the menace is removed. The kind of civil exchange is where our horizons get expanded exponentially. In case the Awate Team is not taking note, the following of HTG’s assertion asserted with such lucidity is worth copying and pasting (absolutely a master of debate):

      “The notion that this section and that section should be ruled out or ruled in is very subjective and looked through a tainted glasses of one’s own prejudice.

      “For example, PFDJ has been utilizing polarization as the tool of political oppression, we have nothing to fear from each other and everything to gain by respecting everybody’s role. All moslems are not jihadists, but how did PFDJ utilize that to concoct fear in the minds of non-moslems? I am sure it does the same by fliping over to our moslem compatriots too. Half of Eritrea is one or the other faith group and we need to give space to one another, re-engage and recognize our shared identity as Eritreans. To simply draw arbitrary line and say such and such group should be excluded, such and such group would prove liability, such and such group is up to no good, is a liability in itself that would derail a peaceful transition. The nation would put specific rules for everyone to participate and we need to abide by that. If I elect to remain here and not go back permanently, then Eritrea will have a million and one other responsibilities for me to perform from where I am while residing where I prefer to reside. The huge diaspora is a huge opportunity for the future of the nation and its development. Responsible leaders would engage responsibly and would do their utmost to make them feel fully included and catered for.

      “Let us not wear a narrow vision lens that PFDJ managed to fit us with. Eritrea is big, its potential tremendous and its dreams infinitely greater. The day PFDJ falls is the big home coming day for all Eritreans, wherever they are, what ever Eritrea means or ever meant to them, the nation would be open to receive her children with both arms and a mother’s tears. And of course, it shall be declared OPEN FOR BUSINESS. You’ll see fears subsiding, hopes rising, optimism will be everywhere and the heavens will smile for us.

      “These are dark times in our history, and understandably we are forced to have dark and gloomy view of each other. It takes the will power to surmount that and believe in what you wish it to be. A bad tree would give bad fruits but a good tree would give good one. Our arguments could serve divisive purposes or unifying purposes, we can only choose our arguments, the purpose they serve thus become a foregone conclusion. Let’s not reach to the mystic ball to second guess the intent or contribution of others. Their role given the opportunity is the final test to blemish or not. So far only PFDJ has taken its turn.”
      Amen Brother, make that a million AMEN!

      Respectfully to the trio,
      Beyan

    • Serray

      Haile TG,

      If I had the ability, I would have said it the way you did but with minor modification. First please remember that I am talking about the immediate post isaias eritrea where things are still fluid and moving fast. Mine is a warning that those who brought the change will not cede any part of it to their former enemies. Yes, I did see harestay’s video (1992). I always wondered if he has said the same thing if shaebia allowed them to share power but still excluded the people? I don’t fault shaebia for excluding ex-jebha tegadelti from participating in eritrean affairs as much as do for excluding millions of eritreas. Here is my problem with these two ex-tegadelti, they think power belongs to them and them alone. You can’t create a democratic institution, a democratic country, from two institutions that don’t believe in democracy, don’t practice democracy and are antithesis to democracy.

      Haile TG, this time we have to be careful. The transition period should be used to prepare the ground for a democratic rule and not be used as a payoff for groups who proved to be ineffective in governing or opposing. You wrote, “Eritrea is big, its potential tremendous and its dreams infinitely greater. The day PFDJ falls is the big home coming day for all Eritreans, wherever they are, what ever Eritrea means or ever meant to them, the nation would be open to receive her children with both arms and a mother’s tears. And of course, it shall be declared OPEN FOR BUSINESS. You’ll see fears subsiding, hopes rising, optimism will be everywhere and the heavens will smile for us”. True but I am also mindful of, “We are firmly…avoiding talking to each other: the PFDJ don’t talk to each other (it is command and control operations), the opposition and individuals are all talking but not to each other, our people are not talking to each other but running away from each other, we are not talking to outsiders other than project mixed signals…” In the immediate post isaias eritrea, letting all this people come up with coherent platform of governing is going to be tricky. The responsibility of the democratic coup leaders should be to prepare the nation for a democratic civilian government: nothing more, nothing less.

      Let the diaspora come with all our diverse feathers but we should be respectful of the people inside who bear the brunt of the regime’s misguided rule first get a grip of the situation and breath before we speak with languages even we don’t know how to listen. That is all I am saying. I am confident most of us will do just that but I am not sure if those who think they are entitled to rule because they belong to this or that political group will control their urge.

  • Hope

    Good points and remember, SAAY forwarded few suggestions and are NOTcomplete and perfect by all means,hence,thrown to the floor for DEBATE!

  • Hope

    That is why I love him,even “adore” him for his relatively balanced and objective approach and he will succeed.
    Fanatism and extremism are not constructive and fruitful.

  • saay7

    Selamat all Awatistas:

    Happy September 1 to all of you!

    Thank you for all the feedback which I intend to address soon. For now, two things:

    (1) Yes, Scary-Smart Serray: the piece was originally twice as long. It listed all the other options in greater detail and listed the limitations of democratic coup. But one of the things I am trying to do is write shorter pieces, with the understanding that I can always participate in the debate that the article generates.

    (2) Going forward, I hope that my articles will have numbered paragraphs (like this one), to facilitate debate/discussion and proper reference/citation. For example, T.Kifle warned about a mind-set that assumes Ethiopian invasion, and Haile spoke eloquently about cannon-fodder psychology. All great points, but have nothing to do with my article:) (In fact, in preparation for our forthcoming debate, I invite them to cite where in my article I say that.) Simlarly, Hayat (Hi Hayat, whom I do speak to in the first person, occasionally) equated Diaspora with non-organized opposition and accused me of excluding the organized oppo..again: all based on presupposition on what I mean by Diaspora.(To my knowledge, notwithstanding all the announcements that come from allegedly Asmara-based organizations, all oppo, organized or not, is in the Diaspora.)

    (3) To repeat myself, from the last time we debated this issue, “democratic coup” should be compared against the other options. To enable us to advance the discussion just a little bit, I hope people will, as much as possible, use sentences with active verb and not a passive verb: “the PFDJ is overthrown” is an example of a passive verb because it doesn’t tell us who the subject is. I hope we will stay away from euphemisms and now meaningless words like “synergy”, “thinking outside the box”, “change our paradigm” “win-win strategy”, “holistic” or any other words that literally come from bulls@#t generator b-speak website.

    Engage!

    saay

    • haileTG

      Haha saay, a bit pressed for time, I will get back, but let me say on “Emotional soap-box pamphleteering will be severely ignored.” that how does one do the act of ignoring “severely” other than emotionally identify with such a feeling?? (isn’t “severe ignoring” emotionally loaded verbose? 🙂

      • haileTG

        Hello saay,

        The following is what has given me the feel that the context within which you formulated your vision is one based on prey-predatory relationship with those deemed “hostile” neighbors:

        ” Our neighbors—two large countries—Sudan and Ethiopia are, right now, not as actively involved as they can be. The government of Sudan has essentially bought for itself security in its eastern border by placating Isaias Afwerki; the government of Ethiopia has essentially bought for itself a quieter northern border by adopting a strategy of disproportionate response to any pinprick from its northern neighbor.

        But this may not hold out for long. If there is a change in Sudan’s policy—including as a result of change in government—Eastern Sudan may become unstable. If Ethiopia feels that it’s optimum time to conduct a “once-and-for-all” military strike then it is war and there is no such thing as a “neat war.”

        Regardless of the scenario, whether from Ethiopia or Sudan, it means one thing: Eritreans are no longer in charge of Eritrea’s fate. It means more displacement, more war and more destruction. It means the beginning of a cycle of violence and revenge. It means an utterly failed state simply because Eritreans have already become experts at one thing: mass exile.”

        Your vision came off too inward looking, fearful of outsiders and nervous to let go the past and embrace the future. Do you see a possibility that our country being in a position to live peacefully or is it under chronic existential threat from its neighbors? Notwithstanding that most of our people have found home in those two countries and are even travelling to and fro the diaspora to conduct their normal day to day business with no where the threat levels they would face in Eritrea itself!

        regards

  • Sarah ogbay

    Dear Saleh Younis,
    Warm Greetings

    A. It seems to me that you have oversimplified the present Eritrean situation where it is not easy to get many enthusiastic young members of the society that would be responsible for keeping peace and calm when change comes. The young is militarised and with the predominant mentality of ‘grab the opportunity’. You have not considered what and how the general civilian population would be protected. I hope you will not say ‘by the present EDF’. If so, then you have to consider that Eritrea civilians do not trust EDF and would not fill safe. Is the EDF capable of doing its primary job ‘defending the people’? This is where one needs to be careful that the country won’t slip into civil war.

    B. I do have reservation when it comes to the ‘reconciliation’ that is repeatedly mentioned as the sole solution in the post DIA Eritrea. Do we have a society or call it culture that can accommodate ‘reconciliation’ now. Forget the culture of reconciliation that was the prevalent problem solving strategy that was present when you and I were children. A lot of blood has been spilled by many who are and would still be in the country. A lot of hearts have been hurt and hardened.
    Lives have been shattered. Can we handle the ‘reconciliation’ without justice alongside? Who is to reconcile with who in the first place?

    Reconciliation! How can we expect ‘reconciliation’ to work in Eritrean where we have troubled society when we, in
    diaspora (in democratic countries), cannot handle it. We are targeting; blaming, belittling, humiliating etc. each other like there is no tomorrow. We have very little respect for each other. If we can apply it successfully, then maybe we
    can say that it might work back home as well but ….

    I think while reconciliation is our final goal/solution, we should consider

    1. Developing professional networking – professionals that would dive in and assist and contribute (professionally)
    in healing process the society, the economy etc.

    2. Proper investigating and documentation of crimes, and sensitive situations so that endless disputes and feuds
    won’t result because of lack of evidence etc.

    3. Working on the ‘just arrived’ refugees by providing them therapy (of all kinds) and sensitizing them so that
    they can develop compassion and nationalistic. They have become numb by the misery and ordeal they have been through.

    Etc.

    Just saying!

    • saay7

      Selamat Dr. Sara:

      1. The young conscripts are justifiably mad as hell at the State and whoever is the face of the State as it has stolen their hopes and dreams. I consider placing their need for demobilization and reintegration as priority and thats why I have listed it 1st of the top 3 things the new government must do. I am not sure I understand your question when it comes to agelglot and civilian security. Are you saying that the EDF won’t be able to keep law and order because the EDF have a “grab the opportunity” mindset?

      2. Reconciliation: I don’t know if you followed my discussion with Haile where he was talking about the importance of eliminiating our people’s fear and I said that one fear must not be replaced by another. A prey now fears a predator; that cannot be fixed with the predator fearing he will become prey and will be treated like prey. This is what Reconciliation means to me. Reconciliation has taken different forms in post-conflict zones (South Africa, Ireland) and it is likely to have a different form in Eritrea, but the process is similar: (a) get rid of fear; (b) take confidence-building steps; (c) build empathy: the victim listening to the brute explaining why he acted like a brute; the brute listening to the victim as victim explains how much s/he was hurt the brute’s actions.

      I don’t disagree with you at all that we in the Diaspora have not used the occasion to do this at all. We are quick to defame, marginalize, discount one another… everybody is looking for concentrated doses of ________ (patriotism/righteousness) and doesn’t want to dilute it by mingling with _________ (traitors/inhumane people with no conscience.)

      saay

      • Sarah Ogbay

        Thank you for the response Saay hawey.

        When I wrote about the young I meant the ‘agelglot’ with weapons. Yes, the present state has robbed them of their hopes and dreams. But most of all it has robbed them of their right to think and know anything other than what it wants they to think and understand about. You do better only whne you know better. Let me tell you about an incident I witnessed so that you would understand where I am coming from.

        I went to Sawa to visit my Nephew (whose mother and father are tegadelti, mum gone to Arab countries to work and father too busy in some remote area). Like most would do I took some home-made food. When I reached Sawa, I could not recognize my nephew, all look the same with dark burned skin; all sitting (abrikhom) at 3 pm listening to one ‘Abal’ giving instructions from a position in the shade. they sat there in the scorching sun for more than 2 hours. I cried when my nephew came running to after they were allowed to leave. But what really bled my heart is what I saw the next day. I invited all my nephews friends to come and share the food with us and we saved a little for two who were away, given some extra duty. Later, we saw them going with small cups of tea in their hands, and were stopped by one ‘Abal’. He asked them where they got the tea and they explained that since lunch was finished while they were on duty and the ladies in the kitchen did not have anything to eat, they gave them tea (nothing to eat). You know what the ‘abal’ did? he ordered them to throw the tea on the sandy ground. They did. When he went they laughed, but I cried. Their response was ‘beu-u zgedefena dehan’yu’. then another ‘abal’ come with a very thin young boy and orders him to use a tea cup to fill a barrel with the water in another barrel (full) within a distance about 2 meters, as a punishment for something he did, I presume. Can you imagine how long it would take? When I learned that these are common daily practices. I cried my heart out for the young Eritrean generation and for Eritrea.

        These young people have had their youth, life, ‘will power’, their ‘compassion’, their patriotism and what not, eroded. Some are angry and some are just numb. Some have accepted this is their fate and they better accept it. They don’t know that they are worth a lot more than that. I for one, do not think that my generation and older generations have not protected these people in Eritrea and outside of it. I do not think job of protecting the civilians in a coup can be entrusted into these young people.

        2. I am 100% with you on the importance of ‘Reconciliation’ and mostly the idea of “(a) get rid of fear; (b) take confidence-building steps; (c) build empathy: the victim listening to the brute explaining why he acted like a brute; the brute listening to the victim as victim explains how much s/he was hurt the brute’s actions.” I am not so good with computers but I will soon post you a recorded material/film which was used in workshop on ‘conflict resolution dialogue facilitation’organised here in Manchester for some of the Eritrean youth. It is called ‘Beyond forgiveness’. (The event was sponsored by ‘Initiatives of Change, UK)

        But are we ready to help our people back home through this? is one of my questions. We all know it is good but do we really believe in it? We know it can be done but are we ready to do it? We are so in the wrong that we cannot even understand and heal the emotional wounds of the young who come from the earthly hell in Eritrea and have been through unimaginable ordeal on they way. We can’t share ‘love’ with them. But we still expect them to be on the front line in the fight for democracy. We, my generation and the generations before, contributed something to them being what and where they are now and we should be there to undo this regime that exploits not the living bodies but even the souls of our people. So that is why I said ‘who reconciles with who?’ And why don’t we start it here in the lands of democracy and technology?
        The main problem in our camp is lack of harmony between the young generation and the older ‘I know better’ generation. We judge the young, we do not think they are brave enough. But they are more than brave enough; they know how to stay alive in adverse situations.
        Because of our being judgmental and selfish they do not tell us the horrific stories they know, experiences, and witnessed. We refuse to accommodate them in our political, social and economic space. I don’t know what to say! We are in a unique situation where “Eritreanism” is being wiped out in a systematic way to an irreversible state if we do not act genuinely now.

        • Hope

          Great comment, Dr Sara, and that is why I said-as a reaction to this Great and Inspirational Article -“Enehe meda,enehe feres for the Real debators on real Eritrean issues and problems for Real Eritreans Solutions”.
          My un-asnwered question is :
          ” Why all these atrocities?”.Who are these people committing these atrocities and for what purpose?
          is there something hidden agenda and conspiracy against Eritrea and Eritreans?
          After I have read the ” Discussion Paper” by Prof Medhanie Tesfatsion and the book by Amb Andebirhan, titled” Eritrean on Cross Roads”, I sensed something fishy and “confirmed” the suspicion lots of concerned Eritreans have expressed.
          Are the “real” Eritreans to that extent dumb,ignorant,passive,naive,etc—then to allow this silent Social Genocide of Eritreans?
          Shame on us all!
          ONE man against 6 million Eritreans?

          • hope

            Pls read “Eritrean on Cross Roads” as : “Eritrea in/on Cross Roads”

          • Sarah Ogbay

            Hi Hope,
            The people who are committing these atrocities are people with fundamental self confidence issues and knowing this DIA has numbed their compassion to humanity by giving them power they cannot handle and giving them wrong self image. Power in the hands of someone who lacks self confidence is a recipe of social disaster. They abuse their commit crimes against humanity using their power with out any accountability, they are on a slippery slope. These are the instruments DA uses against our poor people. And sadly these are the criminals we might be forced to forgive one day.
            Hope, it is not one man against 6 million!

          • Tzigereda

            Dearest Dr.Sara,

            You wrote”… and sadly these are the criminals we might be forced to forgive one day…”, which is true…

            Why reconciliation? We Eritreans didn’t have the opportunity to digest, work through and overcome the traumatic cruelties of the Haile Selassie and the Derg regimes. No, we had to make do with that a part of us survived. We pounced on to “repressing” (our feelings), stepped to condoning and forgiveness. Vindictivness was remote from and alien to us.The wounds inflicted on us were barely healed, we were hit again by a tyranny, a domestic tyranny this time. A tyranny whose tragic legacy is social, economic and educational poverty. A tyranny whose strength lies on spreading fear, subservience and corruption – in material and immaterial terms; with an era characterized by unjust imprisonment, murder, Exodus and Eskirna. An era in which self-confidence and mutual trust have almost become foreign words. A time in which Eritreans are aimlessly drifting and being driven towards “collective suicide”. And as if that were not enough:
            we are made to pay and get punished collectively by our neighbors (“we will teach you a lesson!”) for the malicious mischief of a dictator. The system of this tyrant has targeted every family: either by turning them to obvious victims or making the rest to his temporary tactical companions until
            they sooner or later fall victim to his sadism as in the Little Red Riding Hood and the Wolf. By its very nature and the “skills” it represents, it victimizes innocent citizens and destroys their protective instinct.
            So why reconciliation? The point at issue is what signal we in the Diaspora send. If we are convinced that change can and should come, for example in SAAY’s “democratic coup”
            way, then it is my understanding that people from the middle hierarchy should be involved to make a peaceful transition tangible and possible. At this point the participation of a representative, strong and united opposition (from the Diaspora) will be needed. We will need a national
            reconciliation that brings forward and engineers the healing of deep wounds in the society. Observing preliminary results of reconciliation in Rwanda where one million people were killed and 250,000 women raped,makes me think and firmly believe, yes we can, too. No doubt, this will not be easy to conduct. However, we have no better alternative means of achieving our objective in terms of keeping the loss of human life and damage the lowest possible. Reconciliation does not mean to sweep the truth under the carpet. No, seeking and establishing the truth is the
            prerequisite for reconciliation (see also Truth and Reconciliation Commission in South Africa). A national reconciliation will also not exclude judicial proceedings against charges in a new legal order. With all the suffering and pain endured by the thousands of individuals we can not and should not be pushed by emotional avenge, as this would lead to new injustice and thus not be a good basis for the new, free and democratic Eritrea we envisage. The path of reconciliation
            will help us to focus and devote our efforts to rebuild the socio-culturally, economically, emotional and intelectually shattered nation. Neither the neighbors nor the international community will in the first place care about what would otherwise happen to us. The challenges for us will be, once again, to start now with the task before “others” take an “action” which would neither reflect our choice nor our dream.

          • Sarah Ogbay

            Dear Tzigereda,

            What a wise comment, my dear. While I perfectly understand where you are coming from and going to in the ‘reconciliation’ issue, I would like emphasize my greatest concern. Are we
            ready to do it? If so why can’t we start experimenting it now by reconciling, and bringing together the fragmented opposition camp to a solid power that can fight back injustice? Now that probably half of the population is out of Eritrea why can we not have one national conference that focuses on reconciliation? What would it take for us to forgive before we ask others (victims) to forgive?

            AS for us forgiving our neighbors, did we really forgive them? I think that we are where we are now partly because of our hate towards our neighbors. Honestly, we concealed our problem, till it got too big and serious to be hidden, so that they would not be happy. Still now a significant part
            of the opposition camp is fight against each other on the issue of our ‘neighbors’ involvement in our struggle. It is baffling how long it will take us to keep going and looking back in time and being blinded by what we see there. What would it take for our love for each other to be grater that our hatred of our neighbors?
            The dictatorial regime is also feeding our people ‘hate’instead of food because it is an easier option/instrument to decimate the opposition.
            Thinking of reconciliation in Eritrea when our hearts are so hard towards each other in the diaspora; with all these arrogant, insensitive, burnout politicians we have seemingly leading inactive parties, is not practical, honestly! At least for now.

          • saay7

            Selamat Ladies:

            I don’t want to see a pattern where there may be none, but I sense a thirst for reconciliation from different quarters that is very encouraging. I see the clue to who should lead such a noble campaign is found in the grand history of our capital city Asmara. More on that in a bit:

            To me, reconciliation is all inclusive and even the skepticism towards reconciliation and insistence on meeting some prerequisites (the cyclical “can we reconcile before we reconcile?”) should be seen as part of the Grand Reconciliation. All that is needed is goodwill. Not even that, all that’s required is a “what do I have to lose by trying it?” approach.

            To me, the most important part is who should lead the project. Some of us, via our long paper trail or reputation, may have either self-disqualified. The process would get torpedoed even before it starts as side issues and demands to disown everything you ever believed ever would become prerequisites. Who should lead it are people who were not part of the long campaigns of defamation, people with the patience of Job, people who were not part of our longest-running drama of “men behaving badly.” I believe women have a civilizing influence on men (generally speaking) and that’s why women should lead our grand reconciliation project. Isn’t that how Asmara became Asmara?

            saay

        • saay7

          Selamat Dr. Sarah:

          The story you told about your nephew is heart-breaking. I have heard of similar and worse stories and our youth have every reason to be mad-as-hell at the predatory State and I consider making them whole as top priority for Eritrea, if we are not going to have a lost generation like their did in Cambodia.

          What I am trying to do is to get people to point the finger at the right party. Now consider this piece written by one of our greatest journalists who has, sadly, given up on Eritrea (I think.)

          (Begin quote)

          “As any wife in a similar situations will do, the young Kalthoum was fearful but didn’t want her apprehensions to affect her young sons (The eldest Adil was around 14). Together with her family and friends she begun frantic search for Mohammed Said all over the place—Police stations, Kebeles, Administration offices (Mimhidar), detention centers, Military camps. Every where. No one knew where Mohammed Said was; time went by without any trace of him. Sometimes there were flickers of hope: some one said that he saw Mohammed Said and other prisoners in the town of Ghindaa. Kalthoum would leave every thing behind and travel to Ghindaa to look for her husband; sometimes she spent months without any success. Another person would claim that he thought he saw Mohammed Said in Hagaz (nmohammed said ab hagaz zireakhuwo yimesleni). For the anxious and dispirited family, this seemed like a breaking news and Kalthoum and her sons will travel to Hagaz in search of Mohammed Said abdella, Ybba, as he was fondly called by his children. The lead would turn out to be useless.

          “Mohammed Said Abdella was a blood relation of the Eritrean police chief, Brigadier General Musa Rabaa. In a normal country, even in a traditional tyranny, you would expect the chief of the police to know a thing or two about the imprisoned and detained citizens. But Eritrea under the demagogue Isaias Afewerki, is not a normal country and the police chief, not only didn’t know anything about the disappeared citizen, he was not sure of what might happen to him the next day. He told the pleading young wife, Kalthoum Ibrahim: “Let me tell you the truth, stop looking for your husband and just concentrate on your kids. Let alone knowing about youre husband’s fate, we don’t even know our own fate.” ( Nnebsina ikwa ayfeletnan zellena)”

          (end of quote)

          The piece is by Milkias Mehretab, one in a series of awful stories:

          http://awate.com/tragic-tales-of-eritrean-families-mohammed-said-abdella/

          I agree with everything you said on the reconciliation issue.

          saay

  • Amanuel Hidrat

    Hey Nitricc,

    He is telling you what the goal of the strategy should be. Once we agreed on that, depending on the magnitude of our population supporting that goal, then, the how and what should are the tactics to facilitate the strategy. That will come from our collective contribution on a round table. This is not a children’s game, it is of high minded and well orchestrated by able men up to the task and lead the uprooting of the state of oppression. It isn’t to be disseminated in this form something regarding the operational task.

  • Fanti Ghana

    Hello George,
    No need to go on! that was more than enough. After reading your other posts I was already beginning to think that you may be a sensible person after all. Can you accept 75% apology?

    • george

      Accepted. Thanks.

  • haileTG

    Hello Nitricc,

    Oh man, that is late coming! 🙂

    1 – How do we do that – good question Nitricc. The answer is usually given inside cobra meeting rooms of those willing to pay the price to do so. Not in website forums and discussion boards. When the push come to shove my support is to those intent on dismantling PFDJ. Let’s not converse like generals, we are validating and invalidating ideas as they exist out there. If your point of view is that PFDJ is unshakable and hence we should be cowered to working with it, well you are not alone and best of luck 🙂

    2 – The Ethiopian attack – let’s be clear here Nitricc, Ethiopia didn’t attack Eritrea (that was 2012 BTW). Ethiopia went on hot pursuing of its opposition by going beyond the inl. border. In doing so, it announced to the world that the HGDEF army is irrelevant and mute and it would do as it pleases and there nothing the toothless HGDEF can do about. Actually they did and the toothless hgdef was just that, toothless. It was not an attack on Eritrea however. Just againt some warlords as IA, Shabab and ONLF hodgepodge.

    3 – Laws that bound nations – back in the days Eritrea was considered upstanding member of world community (not al shabab accessory) both Ethiopia and Eritrea were sanctioned, the world ruled equally. Today, HGDEF is only supported by invaders (Russia, terrorists and human traffickers) There is no law that binds or protects PFDJ. The border disagreement with Ethiopia was no reason to couse our youth to literally kill themselves in seas and deserts, but the despicable hgdef did it. As you saw it in the US-Africa, there is no seat for the outlaw militia/war lord IA. Period. Let’s become legit nation then we talk about laws.

    4 – If Ethiopia ever needed to invade Eritrea and take its ports or enslave its people, now would have been 100% perfect time. HGDEF is a dead man walking. PMHD was said to have remarked “if it wasn’t for consideration of our long term relationship with the Eritrean people, we would have bounced off HGDEf across the Dahlak Islands long ago…ditto?

    Dear Nitricc, Eritrea and Eritreans have forfeited unbelievable opportunity and development to accommodate a mad man and a party full of psychotic ideologues. Eritrea was brought to a zero from commanding heights that would have enabled her to charge ahead. Today, refugees and deaths is all we have to talk about, nothing else…sad 🙁

  • @ Mahmuday.

    I have a question for you. you have proposed to enter dialog with the Ethiopians which i disagree to the bone but let’s accept your proposal and we enter in to dialog. my question to you is this…

    1) if the Ethiopians, more specific, the Tigryans can agree and sign to uphold the out come of the international court and refuse; what makes you they can honor something you agree somewhere in back door in Mekelle? they refused what they sign in the front of the world what makes you they will uphold what they agree in a private dialoge?

    2) if you enter in to dialog with the tigryans; aren”t you dismissing what the court has ruled? doing so aren’t you endangering my generation and the future generation by neglecting the legal out come and replacing by toothless dialog? if we stick to the court decision; sooner or latter the lasting peace will come. if you replace it, at one point war will erupt. in short aren’t you punishing the future generation? once you take the matter out of the court veridict, it is a done deal, you can never go back to the court finding. so, don’t you think for both countries future this thing to be done legally?

    3) 20+ K paid the ultimate for this and if you dismissed the court decision and cowardly bend for useless dialog aren’t you slapping in their face? and you are telling them they died in vain?

    4) if you inter into dialog what does it say to Eritrean’s psych? aren’t we compromising our principal? our right and our land?

    Respectfully!

    • Mahmud Saleh

      Nitrikay,
      Are you going to pay me time and half? It’s still labor day, nitricc? Then didn’t we say border and the toothless stuff will come later? Iol. I will give you my take on those big questions. Patience, now.
      Respectfully.

      • I think you are forgeting that i have ADD 🙂 i know the reason i brought this now is the way and how you answer it will tell me if our debate is worthy our time or just a toothless one. So the qeustions mean sometging so take your time my freind.

    • Mahmud Saleh

      Nitrikay;
      1. First of all, when I say normalization and dialogue, I’m not talking about
      the opposition (and you know I’m a no-entity citizen). I’m merely airing my
      opinion; free citizens don’t need permission from their governments to air
      their opinions. So here, I’m talking about an ideal condition if the border is
      to be demarcated in a manner that ensures future generations’ peace and stability.
      Remember, the demarcation of the border should be seen as a herald of a new
      era; the demarcation of the border should usher resetting of relations, the
      realization of peaceful coexistence, cooperation, mutual respect and
      prosperity. The mission of putting pillars is not for closing doors and
      isolation, but it could be seen as a rite two adults should go through in order
      to respect each other and conduct business in a mutually benefiting manner, on
      equal footing. You surely know, when countries realize that they are economically
      interdependent and interconnected, they don’t fight each other since they know
      they are going to lose so much through fighting. Even if trigger-happy Generals
      and politicians push them to the edge, their legislative bodies and their
      people will refuse. I also believe you realize the fact that soon or later
      these two peoples will have to interact. And why not? So, the demarcation
      should not be considered as an isolationist strategy, but as a tool that puts all
      the misery behind and gets both countries to focus on rehabilitating their
      economies by complimenting each other’s deficiencies, and by focusing on what
      they are good at ( on what they have an edge of comparative advantage). With
      that introduction I will answer your question.

      a. Only a legitimate government decides issues of sovereign nature including border
      issues. So, I am not talking of any opposition dealing with sovereign
      issues. The opposition are not even united on this issue, and they have no
      mandate to enter in to negotiations on border matters.

      b. We should not be hostage of PFDJ propaganda, it shouldn’t be used as a divisive
      issue. I am talking about any recognized government. If PFDJ want to do it, I
      am more than happy to express my approval. But let’s see the record of PFDJ on
      issues of national security and sovereignty. Truth be told, nitric, and for a
      matter of accountability, it’s PFDJ which compromised the sovereignty of
      Eritrea. Eritrean sovereignty was attacked under the watch of PFDJ. For
      instance, When the environs of Adi-Murug was forcibly seized by Ethiopia, in
      1997, PIA did not notify Eritrean national council; he did not notify
      international bodies; he did not authorize EDF to expel them out (despite their
      requests); he downplayed administrations, villages and border guards reports
      that Tigray Cartography units was incorporating wide swaths of Eritrean
      sovereign lands; he publicly said there was no problem on the border. The two
      letters he exchanged with PMMZ and published as an exhibition to show what he
      had done to solve the border issues are laughable by any standard. In any
      country with a crude democratic governance, these acts are impeachable. Add to
      these, 1998 start of an all-out war. Badme is an enclave that during the
      struggle was let go to be administered by wayane (not relinquished, for an
      obvious and good reason), an enclave whose fate had been agreed upon to be
      decided after Mengistus regime by two legitimate governments; an enclave that
      did not participate in referendum, a place that had been administered by Wayane
      pursuant to previous agreements. Whatever the reason, including border clashes
      that cost EDF members, Eritrea should have never rolled its tanks to Badme
      without deliberations within its national council, lodging complaint in
      international bodies, etc. PMMZ did exactly that. He went to the parliament per
      Ethiopian constitution and also notified international bodies per international
      law. We were found guilty of starting the war simply because we attacked a territory
      that had been administered peacefully (it’s nothing to do with the
      disputability of the place, or how the claimants behaved). Who is responsible? PFDJ
      and its leader. This cost us many previously Eritrean villages and swaths which
      had never been contested to go to Ethiopia. If you check the ruling regarding
      badme, we are left with the bone (the village), and that’s if we can secure it.
      The rest the beefy land went to the toothless wayane. It turned out we lost our
      teeth in the fighting, too, we’re unable to regain even the bone the court
      awarded us. Add to it the despicable situation that’s been driving Eritrea’s
      defense labor (the youth) out. Who is going to fend Eritrea if the youth have decided
      that’s not for them? That’s the worst nightmare for any patriot. Therefore,
      PFDJ cannot posture as the sole entity which could defend the nation. I can
      mention many incidence in which PFDJ acted cowardly during the war, it almost
      got us to lose our sovereignty and ports, thanks to EDF and NS kids; they defended
      it heroically and died for it. So, normalization and dialogue is between
      legitimate government not by any entity behind the door in Mekele or Addis.

      2. Nitricc, Ethiopia and the world including the toothless UN and USA underlined
      it’s the final and binding. But the spirit and the letter of the ruling doesn’t
      preclude dialogue. We wish it all has been done. But things standstill where
      you see them for the last 14 years. The problem with EEBC is that it doesn’t
      have an enforcer. For a court to see its ruling enforced it needs a law enforcement
      agency. Let say, if a ruling is passed against you, you are expected to abide
      by it; if not police will come and arrest you (make you carry out the court
      ruling. In the absence of that enforcing agency, it’s only smart to explore
      other mechanism. If the dialogue doesn’t lead to just solution, or veers from
      the spirit of EEBC ruling, you can call it quit. If you are concerned about
      your generation (and I believe you are), work for peaceful coexistence, for
      sensible way of closing the history of war and bloodshed. I grew up in war, I
      know what war can do, and that’s why I am sensitive to anything which could
      lead to conflict and chaos. You know I have been taking hits on this forum. So,
      the sensible way to contribute to the betterment of your generation, and the
      generation after, is to live them in a safe neighborhood; in a thriving
      neighborhood. Do what it takes to materialize that, even if it’s entering in
      dialogue with your nemesis ( I believe democratic Eritrea and a responsible Ethiopian
      government will deal on this matter on a completely different atmosphere, a
      more cordial one, hopefully we will have forward looking leaders on both
      capitals).

      3. Normalization and dialogue of the two legitimate governments doesn’t throw the ruling. No,
      it’s not a slap to the face of our martyrs; it’s neither bending for Ethiopia,
      no. It’s actually, bringing the cause our martyrs fell for to its natural
      conclusion. Do you think now, when our land is occupied by wayane, for a decade
      and half, PFDJ is guaranteeing our martyrs cause? Where is the honor? We’ve
      been stripped of our pride and honor under this regime. Any normalization and
      dialogue aimed at concluding the border issue judiciously is another victory
      for the cause of our martyrs. They died to save lives, and any life saved is a
      victory. Here are other ways of really keeping our martyrs promise:

      – by establishing a country of rule of law, a country at peace with itself and its
      neighbors;

      – by holding the man who had caused all these mayhem responsible

      -by establishing a government that cater for all Eritreans, a government of the
      people by the people and for the people

      – by embarking on massive regional trade and commerce that could quickly
      rehabilitate our nation (countries of the region, as far as Tanzania and
      Ruwanda are working on integrating their economies, investment capital is
      flooding Africa; as a patriot it should concern you).

      – by giving our youth hope, and opportunity to look inward rather than outward, to let them unleash their intellectual and entrepreneurial capacity. You could go
      on and on, but that’s how we honor our fallen heroes.

      4. Believe me the street of Asmara would be bustling with
      festive mood. Our people are exhausted of these wars and mood of wars which
      benefit few crooked leaders. We are not going from the principle (if you mean
      EEBC ruling), but both sides can talk on its implementation. And if there is a
      better mechanism of settling it they are not beholden to it the ruling as long
      as both sides agree on it and the communities along the affected border accept
      it, but it should be mutually agreed upon. It’s the dialogue of two equals
      looking for a better future. I’m not naïve, there will be tough negotiations
      and arm twisting, but democratic Eritrea is stronger than PFDJ. I also believe
      the villages affected, the elderly and religious folks are more credible than
      the white folks in Hague who had hard time pronouncing the names of villages
      and ravines. So, if there is a will there is many honorable ways my friend. You
      know there are villages who had been Eritrean since the creation of Eritrea who
      went to Ethiopia according to the ruling. Don’t they have the right to get
      involved? Didn’t they pay heavy price for the independence of Eritrea? Why do
      they have to be screwed up by bureaucrats and white judges in faraway land? So,
      the issue is big, but I tried to put my answers in context. If you have a
      question on this one OK if not the next turn is mine. We don’t have to agree on
      everything, we can just underline our difference and move on. This is for
      citizens’ discussion, it has nothing to do with what could happen tomorrow; that’s
      out of our control.

      • Rahwa T

        Dear MaHmud,

        Here I see the peace-loving MaHmud who loves his people, his country and the love that traverse beyond the rivers and mountains of his nation. Thank you very much for the
        long, but very interesting view you shared with us.

        • Mahmud Saleh

          Rahwa,
          Thank you Rahwa, I won’t tell nitricc you dropped by.

      • Mahmuday thanks for blatted replay. I am sorry I make you work on Labor Day –)
        I read your post with great interest. Since you put the disclaimer (I deal situation) early on your post there is not much to disagree with. However, let say a few words and the stage is yours.
        I am not lawyer or anything like that but from my own commonsense; if you negotiate on something already decided by the court of law; I got to believe the ruling of the court is void, invalid and annulled. So, on that regard we might need a referee. I call someone to interject and enlighten us on this one. I don’t know why anyone will agree to negotiate on something already decided!
        So, your answer to my question which was, what guarantee do we have anything we dialog and negotiate with the Tigryans will uphold if they can agree and sign to final and binding and refuse AND you are saying let’s just trust them, no garatnee just trust the Tigryans for the sake of peace! Did I read you correctly?
        Fine, I agree peace is priceless between Ethiopia and Eritrea. Absolutely I agree with you; But-But -But you have overlooked or ignored the most obvious and dangerous point of obstacle to dialog and negations with the Tigryans. For Eritreans, peace is peace! There is no other alternative; option or choice but for the Tigryans that is not the story; they have a contingency plan, they have the rest of Ethiopia to play with. When weak or need too, they will mobilize (80 million) the Amhara and Oromo to subdue Eritrea to their liking. So, any dialog or negotiations are subject to the mood of the Tigryans. That is why I am saying let rule of law prevail so, the next generation won’t be at the mercy of the Tigryans mood. For Eritrea to enter any dialog or negations and for it to work; Eritrea must build and be superior militarily. Till we do that, I say let the rule of law prevail, so, the generation to come will be protected by it and won’t endure war and the clouds of war. So, take a note, we diverged on this one.
        Now, the stage is yours; unless you have something to say on this subject.

        • Hope

          Nittric:
          You are 100% right but the concern is that for how long is the status quo we are in going to last?
          The point here is:
          It is time to modify our Strategy so as to accomodtate our selves to the concerns you mentioned.
          In order to build a stronger Military Power to counter-act our enemies,we cannot live in the situation we are in.
          In other words, if we are not going to utilize our trillion USD worth resources by creating conducive envirnemnt, there is no way for us to build a stronger Military to defend our-selves.
          Things are more intricate than most of us think.
          We need to reflect on what happened and on what and why we messed up an dlearn from the past and move forward—
          The Badme issue is none but a diversionary issue—Think now–rationally -what did we achieve for the last 14 yrs by barking about Badme?
          Our intial Startegy might hav ebeen correct considering th eInternational Law and Justice but these things are fake and relative….haile Drue said it correctly in his last meeting with eritreans.
          We need, he said, to think and act the way the world thinks and acts for our best interest.
          Remember, Vet Mahmoud is an EPLF Fighter and he kowns what he is talking about and he knows about the concerns you mentioned.

          • Amanuel Hidrat

            Hi Hope,
            This time you are in the right direction, the way out is clear and you start to grapple with it. Stick to that rationale as there is no solution by confrontation.

          • Hope

            Thank you wedi Memhir,and you ,Memhir as well,as Deki Memhir mostly do NOT fail but rather do weell–mostly.
            Confrontation, in the right manner, is appropriate PRN,but mine seems not to be right/correct,which I admit–but it is only a matter of communication skills rather than personality issue.

          • Amanuel Hidrat

            Hi Hope,
            actually I wasn’t referring “confrontation” to your debate style. I was referring to the border issue…..that we could have solved by sitting on a round table. In any case I am following you these days, and your engagement is becoming matured than it has been. When you hear a new idea give it time for your thought to sort it out and resolve the clashes of ideas in your mind (between new and the old) until it create the process of negation. If we follow that dialectical thought process we can handle our differences.

            Amanuel Hidrat

          • Hope

            Wed Ustaz Hidrat,
            I agree totally with peaceful resolution of any kind of conflict.
            But in our case,I things things went wrong both ways.
            I do not want to dwell into the past and obsolete business but please consider the other Party’s Arrogant Approach as well.
            But as Haile TH said, no need to dwell into border issue now but the real Democratic Coup that works for Real Change.

            Let us not divert our attention other than working hard for a relatively peaceful Democratic Coup by any means possible.

          • Amanuel Hidrat

            Dear Hope,
            Again don’t be overtaken by the so called “democratic coup”. There are no those prerequisites on the ground that ensue in the Eritrea proper. I will come with an article why there is no room for “democratic coup” in our Nation. But the common known coups like that of African countries could emerge at anytime which no one can precisely predict when to happen. I am not that against the new concept where scholars of all types could not agree, but what I am saying is, it is unrealistic in the way our military is structured and where the civil disobedience inside Eritrea is non -existent.

            About 6 to 7 years ago even myself I call to the Eritrean defense force (EDF) to be on the side of the Eritrean people. They don’t know their duty is to defend the nation, the people, and the constitution (though the constitution on shelf is the constitution of EPLF). So again I just advise you to think about the reality on the ground and the article of Saay, if it has the needed factors are there to be feasible. Don’t rush to judgement see the reality and the consequence that might take us if any coup has happened. It is good wishes, but are the basic elements there to make reality to your wishes.

            Amanuel H.

          • Hope

            Aman,
            We are looking for some kind of relatively “ideal” situation with minimum chaos so as to avoid the nasty chaos we have witnessed so far and even to avoid the sudden Military Coup,with its collateral damages,which could be devastating.
            I think it is unfair and premature to abort the idea of ” Democratic Coup”,and rather,let us debate on its pros and cons,deficiencies,weaknesses and supplemental ideas and better options to it.
            I am anxious to see your take/option.
            I mean–we are talking about better options and all options need preparation and some kind of a base—–We are not talikng about an immediate ” Democratic Coup”.here.
            I am not sure exactly what your approaches other than ignoring all options presented here.
            While challenging whatever has been presented,we have to provide supplemental and or alternative options.
            It will take time….and we have to mobilize all Eritreans in all walks of life to debate on this past-due issue.We are way behind on this aspect of mobilizing and uniting all Eritreans of all walks of life.
            If the Eritrean Public is on the same page and united,who is PFDJ or PIA?
            Let us put aside our Political Theories/Metaphysics,put aside our differences,ego,ambitions,etc…and be realistic and talk the real talk.
            This is my opinion.
            Regards.

        • Mahmud Saleh

          Dearest Nitrikay;
          Kids home works have started; I was managed to reply to SAAY while my little buddy bugging me ( he turned 10, and has become a bit nagging. Today, he threatened me that he was going to nullify our agreement of BFF (best friends for ever) treaty. I asked “why?” He said I was concerned more about EEBC treaty. (Just for joke). I read your reply with interest, and you raised good challenging points. I invite you to read it with the following in your mind:
          a/ take out Tigray from the vocabulary and substitute it with Ethiopia. So, any dialogue is done with a recognized government of Eritrea with a recognized government of Ethiopia in the open and, if needed, with the help of friends.
          b, the dialogue is not to change or replace EEBC ruling but on its implementation ( you can get my view’s beef from the replies I gave you and a reply I have just posted for SAAY.
          So, if we clear those two things, I think both of us want the issue to rest judiciously and expeditiously. Both sisterly countries can benefit more by cooperation than by confrontation. We have already lost opportunities. So, if we are “OK” here, sweet, if not, it’s still fine, We disagree and move on with honor. SO, if possible, give me one more take. Next move is mine, you know that. OK, buddy, don’t spoil the steady move.
          Yours.

          • Mahmuday; it must be joy spending time with little once. Just remember, we all can wait they come first.

            “a/ take out Tigray from the vocabulary and substitute it with Ethiopia. So, any dialogue is done with a recognized government of Eritrea with a recognized government of Ethiopia in the open and, if needed, with the help of friends.”
            I used Tigray not in a degrading sense, but in the essence of the truth. The Oromo or the Amhara and the rest of Ethiopians won’t give flying hoot about Badime or any other worthless land on that part of the country. So, since the Tigryans are the driving force, that is why I used Tigryans. So, if that is making you uncomfortable, no problem, let’s used Ethiopia.

            “b, the dialogue is not to change or replace EEBC ruling but on its implementation ( you can get my view’s beef from the replies I gave you and a reply I have just posted for SAAY.”

            Hahahahaha Mahmuday; which on is it?
            you said “dialogue is not to change or replace EEBC ruling”
            and at the same time you are saying “It’s the dialogue of two equals looking for a better future. I’m not naïve, there will be tough negotiations and arm twisting”
            Mahmuday; you sounded Semere Andom for a minute lol. My point is if EEBC followed; then no arm twisting is needed.
            I am not denying that the two countries will benefit from mutual respect and cooperation. But dialogue was appropriate and necessary before the blood shade; before the destruction of properties and all that misery. But after the court has spoken what is there to dialogue for? Besides; dialogue is the term that created cleverly just to take the verdict out of the court’s hand. I guaranteed you, once you agree and sit to dialogue with “Ethiopians” they will kick you on to curve. It is tragedy to see all the so-called intellectuals in here blaming Eritrea while the Ethiopians are at fault; they are so dishonest. If there is to have some kind of dialogue; let the Ethiopians vacate the Eritrean land according to the court verdict, then and then we can have all the dialogue the Ethiopians want. Anyway Mahmuday; please proceed when you are ready.

          • Mahmud Saleh

            Nitrkay;
            Thank you for the reply; you said you’re not a lawyer, but you have got that knack. I have to tell you I am neither a lawyer not a toothless intellectual, I am just a working father, I see things from their practicality and applicability. So, we register our differences, but not to cheat each other (which seems out of our character, nevertheless, good to acknowledge the possibility), we will make it clear here that: both agree EEBC is final and binding.
            our difference: 1. I say it’s dead without some sort of normalization and dialogue ( I just don’t see how in the absence of impartial enforcers ( international or regional laws and or bodies) these two belligerent countries could accomplish the demarcation. EEBC ruling doesn’t prohibit or exclude normalization and the possibility of both countries sorting out sticking points provided both have agreed. Actually, the ruling appears to have been made under that spirit. If the government of Eritrea tomorrow declares that it will normalize, talk and or work to finalize this issue, I will be applauding it. so, I don’t care who does it, I care on its judicious and expeditious resting of the matter. Today, 25kms x~ 1000kms = ~ 25,000sq.kms are out of our control. Almost 21% of Eritrean territory has been made practical a war zone (the so called buffer zone). I know in reality it doesn’t exist, but that’s one of the pretexts Ethiopia brings in running away from its responsibility. In a way it says Eritrea violated the cessation of hostilities because Eritrea sent” troops” to it, it kicked out UN enforcing force of that zone…and on the other hand Eritrea cannot utilize that zone properly because it’s under the cloud of war. Many villages, even if they return, still are living on the foot of an “active volcano.” No war no peace state has consumed Eritrea’s opportunities; it has been used for the prolonging of repression; it’s been used for the endless service our youth are fleeing from; PFDJ used it as a cause for which it says trampling citizens’ rights is a price.” In general, the border issue has threatened Eritrea’s existence. It’s been PFDJ cushion in dismissing citizens’ calls for change. I care about the improvement of our people’s living condition more than democracy, I care about a decent recognition of rule of law where citizens are treated like citizens more than multiparty politics, I care about the exodus of our youth, the missed opportunities. If we are serious to end this trend we have to act bravely. The key is on bringing normalcy to the country. The key is on dialogue and diplomacy, normalization of relations. EEBC doesn’t rule this out.
            2. You said whatever the cost, no dialogue on implementing the border rule, you have good points, hard to dismiss them. I recognize that; and actually, that’s been my view until recently, not to open the Pandora box. But I feel the dire situation will demand upon us to be flexible without venturing to undoing the ruling. I have said enough about this, so I will proceed.
            Question:
            Let say you are PIA and I am a polite cabinet member ( there is no active national council), now I strongly argue for the need of opening dialogue on implementing EEBC or for the need of normalization with Ethiopia. Would you call me a defeatist or accuse me of treason, meaning would you send me off to Eila Ero? Why?
            Nitrikay, I am sneaking around after the kids have gone to bed.
            Yours,
            MS.

          • Mahmuday; let me clear it up for you. I do agree with you that the two nations is to their best interest to have normalization and peaceful existence; I am with you. What I am saying, however, is that in order to have honest relationship; durable peace and mutual respect is, if the normalization is done, based on and after the execution of the court’s verdict. The difference between me and you is that, you are looking at the current impasse and its consequences on the nation and the people of Eritrea. I am looking at the future; if this thing is not dealt properly and based on the international verdict; the danger and the consequences are much greater and deeper that what we are facing now. For the sake of the Eritrean children and for the sake of future generation; it is the only and the right way to conclude with the frame of legality and the rule of law. Once the Ethiopians vacate on a good show of faith and as commitment for lasting peace, then and only then we can sit, dialogue, talk, agree, disagree and if need to, eliminate the freaking border! I am all in. BUT they must vacate the land and let the rule of law be it and implemented. So, Mahmuday, Yes, you and I have diverged on this one. To be clear, the reason for our divergence is that; you want to dialogue with EEBC and I am saying, we can only dialogue, only after EEBC verdict is FULLY implemented, meaning get out of the land.
            You have said” Eritrea tomorrow declares that it will normalize, talk and or work to finalize this issue, I will be applauding it”
            Well if the government of Eritrea agreed to normalize without the implementations of EEBC verdict then the government of Eritrea will have committed treason and greatest betrayal against the children of Eritrea and against the future generation of Eritrea. There is no other way to describe it. i.e. I will be against it to the BONE!
            now, let’s address to your question; Mahmuday; you said
            “Let say you are PIA and I am a polite cabinet member ( there is no active national council), now I strongly argue for the need of opening dialogue on implementing EEBC or for the need of normalization with Ethiopia. Would you call me a defeatist or accuse me of treason, meaning would you send me off to Eila Ero? Why?
            Hahahah Mahmuday; I see what you trying to do, lol
            Well, I am going to stand to my true self and I will tell you no to dialogue, no to normalization and no to any adaptation, revision, variation or acclimatization to the EEBC ruling. Because it is the document that protects the future generation to live in peace better than that tanks, F-16’s and missiles couldn’t accomplish in protecting them. I am not going to agree, coincide and harmonize to endanger the generation to come. When I say generation it is not only for Eritreans but also for the Ethiopians. Let’s stick to the EEBC verdict to the end. Government come and government go; dialogue agreed upon and dialogue and also betrayed but internationally rendered verdict; they are to stay.
            So, Mr. Cabinet member, I see your desire for dialogue and ultimate peace and I wish I can share your optimism. Dialogue might worked back 1998 before the major conflict was erupted. Dialogue might have been appropriate and acceptable back in 1999 when the loss of lives was minimal. Dialogue might have been preferable back in 2000 before both countries went to the court. But after all what went through what good is to dialogue now? What exactly are we dialoguing anyways, Mr. Cabinet member?
            Then I will take a pose and I will call the guard and say…
            Guard, take this cabinet member to Eila-Ero. No, those days are gone with PIA. lol
            let me know when is my turn to ask my question.
            as always, you are the best.

          • Mahmud Saleh

            Nitrikay;
            Let me tell you that I am enjoying and learning from your company. When I was new to this forum, I sensed something about nitricc, and I said you reminded me of characters I grew up with; you remeber I didn’t have pleasant surprises from some forum members; I was lashed. Well, let’s leave that aside, perhaps they had reasons for that. We know that all, don’t we? But I have to admit, and have admitted it in my last reply, you have points. I also believe I do have points. I don’t waste your time since you know it, but that’s where the need of a democratic or constitutional government comes. What we are exchanging is huge, in democratic societies they debate similar problems in similar ways till they drop on the floor because of exhaustion. At the end “vote” rescues them, the majority wins, and everybody goes home safely. If we had a democratic government in Eritrea, similar debate would take place. But people would not be sent to prison. Many of the people I grew up looking up to are locked up for expressing their rights, and excercising their duty to their nation. Thank you for not sending me to Eila-Ero (saay’s candidate for a democratic coup?). By the way do you know what Eila Ero means? I will tell you that in our next exchange. I believe you’ve made a fair summary of our last exchanges, let’s leave it there. If need be, we might return to it sometime later. The next move is yours. If you could carry it on to the latest article, so that we don’t get left burried, that would be good. Start on the latest article, I will meet you there.
            See you there.

          • Okay Mahmuday; I got you. I will post my Q up there. For the mean time let’s celebrate our agreement on one subject that is, we agree on….

            http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-n9GD6SHZr7s/TwDGjmMCcTI/AAAAAAAABbo/SslfOG9dwzE/s200/iStock_000016401955XSmall.jpg

          • Hope

            Mahmoud,
            The long-standing issues are :
            -Trust building–Honesty issue
            -The five-point plan issue
            -As to why Ethiopia has never disclosed, as of yet,the details of five-point-plan/Points of Negotiation as a US diplomat lamented
            -What the heck has families and bla,bla,etc have to do with demarcation?The land belongs to us–hence, our families should take over and the other families should pack up.
            -Didn’t they deport more tna 80K bare-footed,the Ethiopians of Eritrean origin
            -Is the case of Nigeria-Cameroon similar in our case as Ethiopia is presenting as a reference point?
            -What will be the pros and cons of starting dialogue while you are officially invaded and with daily threats?
            -Can we specualte the contents of /motivation behind dialog and negotiation points?
            -On the same token,can we specualet as to why the GoE is concerned or “afraid of”?
            Nittric has a point,eventhough his view has been the propaganda of the PFDJ,which makes senne by the way,by any standard.the point that does NOT make sense is:” For how long is this going to be?”
            Practically ,there are only two options for us now:
            1)Accept the Ethiopian pre-conditions,no matter what,which might imply, as Nittric correctly said it,–giving up our Sovereignty and National Interest…or is it going to be like the case of Sinai9Egypt vs israel negotiation) ,which seems to be a different scenario?
            If it were to be like the scenario of Nigeria vs Cameroon with honesty and guarantee,which we have never seen with the TPLF an dits backers,I would take it.
            2) Forget about the Baduma and border issue for now–and let it be the Golan Heights of Eritrea and move forward and do our business inclduing fighting for a ” Democratic Coup”
            N.B.
            There is ONE fact that you keep skipping albeit purposely??
            -The dangerously ever-changing,flip-flopping and Opportunistic TPLF stand and policy
            Remember what your “BFF” Weyanay Teweldebrhan kifle said in his article in tigrionline,which is the Official Stand of teh TPLF and Tigreans:
            -“THERE IS NO NEED OF A DIALOG WITH A DYING REGIME”:Courtesy of Mr.Teweldebrhan Kifle: source: tigraionline.com./articles

          • Mahmud Saleh

            Hope tsaeda
            I wrote a long reply and somehow has disappeared midway, I guess I will have to use WP and paste next time. I thank you for your reply, I was going to try to comment on some of the points, but it’s gone. Anyway, I hope to touch on them next time.

          • Hope

            Take your time my own.
            I was blaming the Moderator ,thinking he deleted them ,for losing two long responses to george and Dr Sara.I guess diskus is weird at times as it happens to lots of people.

      • Amanuel Hidrat

        Selam Mahmuday,

        I don’t know whether such breath taking descriptive solution is new development or was in the evolving thought in your mind. But my friend, this one is like “write it on the board” everyone to read it. For years we have said, sitting on a round table doesn’t in any way make you lose your issue as far as you are negotiating on the interest of your nation. But the evil man and his cronies had played with the mentality of our people – he exploited the ultra-nationalism of Eritrean mind. The worst thing was even the erudite were drum beating for the war side by side with him. Foe sure you know the cost of a war…..and I sensed it in your comment. Wars devours everything and at time it takes including your honor and respect. I salute you for realizing this fact.

        The go forward is how to establish normalization to bring peace among ourselves and our neighbors for the sake of the young generation and generation that follows. History will remember the last 15 years as the darkest era of our history. So Mahmuday , again please frame it in article forum for posterity. Leaving the truth for our young generation is paramount than anything to our generation. It will be a learning moment for the young generation.

        regards,
        Amanuel Hidrat

        • Mahmud Saleh

          Aman H
          Inshaallah.

  • Haile WM

    hello saay and everyone,

    my take on the subject is that change is not dependent on how but, on when it will happen and everything is related to that factor.

    The longer it takes, the more the chaos for transition will be inevitable. For instance if change has happened in the 2001, right after the g15 were arrested, your idea of democratic change maybe could have being credible. Our society was still not damaged and we had social cohesion, our youth were willing to defend the nation and ready to sacrifice for the well being of the people and nation at large. Democratic coup might even have worked in the years going from 2003 to 2008 but the cost of it would have being higher due to the system consolidation and its apparent cracks surfacing as part of the consolidation process (remember the colonel Simon Gheberednghil incident ? )

    As time passed, over the years we all observed that the regime has done all it could to strength its grip on power and time after time it got even more brutal as the cracks on the system were widening to become big holes up to the current cliff over which an entire country might fall. Right now the regime is on the verge of imploding because of the unsustainable path it took and everything it does is designed to prolong its survival. Time is the only factor for the regime so lets not give it time. The same Time is the only salvage for or people before it takes the road to perdition. YES TIME is our only ally.

    In my opinion, change is inevitable the how is not relevant nor predictable (it will be painful either way) but the “when” is critical and I hope its going to be the soonest possible.

    p.s. The regime comprises the PFDJ, the majority of EDF officials and some of the civilians who right now benefit from the current system (the kidney sellers et all) or at least those who haven’t being directly affected (few.. see those who were clapping their hands off on independence-day’s constitution announcement.. ) if we expect that change is going to come from these people then we are day dreaming… it’s better we expect Iseyas handing power willingly than these people changing the system that benefits them.

    • Hey Haile WM. What up?
      I have been looking for you on this forum.
      The last time i communicated with you; i erronusly and stupidly shoot you down and attacked you about the leaked Ali Abdu’s asylum aplication. Sir, you were right and i was wong. I am sorry, my bad.

      • Amanuel Hidrat

        Hi Nitricc,

        I always salute you when you accept your errors. I think that is your hallmark. The best virtue that will make you beloved. I have also full hope to halt, that off and on sometimes you throw insults. Keep on my dear so many thing you will learn in this website.

        • Fanti Ghana

          Hello Mr. Amanuel,

          This is one of many reasons I like Nitricc. He is up front about his mistakes and beliefs. Everything
          he says comes from the heart. His willingness to learn, grow, and change is admirable quality. If he continues at this rate, he will make a formidable and dependable politician someday. Some of his recent posts are really a testament to his growth and direction. There are also other quality traits I noticed about him from day one, and so far I have been correct!

          I could have said these things to him directly, but I have observed you in several occasions trying to advice, correct, and discipline him appropriately and as necessary as a caring father figure should do, and this is my way of saying thank you for being a good example for the rest of us. Please keep up the good work both of you and thank you for teaching us.

          • Hope

            -Dr Fanti Ghana(You may or may not be an MD but what you did for my people as a Health Care Professional in the Sudan Refugee Camps is more than enough to label you as such–at least an Honoray MD Degree if you are NOT holding an MD Degree)
            —-and that is why also I “LOVE” DR Fanti Ghana—the way you say things ,whihc to me, seems to be from your depth of your Heart and I will stand firm on my atitude towards you ,No matter what!
            You and Mahould Salih–can break the shackles of mental slavery we are suffering from—Yes, indeed and why NOT.Ewe kikhewin eyu sile -mintay thei kewin….

          • Amanuel Hidrat

            Dear Fanti Ghana,

            Thank you for the nice words. I really love Nitricc because what he says is true from his heart. That is why I want to stick with him, and if I could make him the best person he could be and an exemplary to something and for something. I see him as my son from the hidden world.

            Regards,
            Amanuel Hidrat

          • Kokhob Selam

            I wish all PFDJ supporters are like Nitricc. two three years back he was here also standing tall. loyal for what he believe is right. and if you compare the the old Nitricc and the new you will find a lot of development. He has used this site unlike other supporters. If only he participate in PFDJ sites, I am sure no single person among them could have challenged him.

  • Saleh Johar

    Hi george, I just explained my take, and there are other examples that go against your view of Iran’s Musadaq in 1953. How about the removal of Hitler in WW2?That is not my point though. Before I continue,I kindly ask you to explain to me the following:
    1. You said my “CC like reply [was] amazing.” I didn’t know it was like that and didn’t know it was amazing. But please explain to me what a CNN like reply is so that I do not repeat it.
    2. You said, “Let’s not pretend like the West is [there] to promote democracy”. Who are you who thus believe? Certainly I am not part of that group, never pretended believing as your group did. And never will pretend simply because I don’t believe it and I never pretended it. I didn’t forget Bahrain, but it doesn’t mean every time I comment I have to mention all the countries of the globe. That is all.

    Thank you

    • george

      Saleh, 1. You said, ..”there are other examples that go against your view of Iran’s Musadaq in 1953.” And you would be the only one with that opinion. CIA, openly brags about it. Google it, that is all I can say. As of Hitler fought to liberate Germany from those who enslave them from debt caused by the money lending class. Repeating answers similar to that of Americans main stream media is a tool employed by those who are ignorant of the west’s sinister motives and or by those who are aware but chose not to mention it because it does not fit there narrative. Finally, if you didn’t forget Bahrain, then that is even more baffling because that is a blatant example of the west’s ulterior motive why they are bombing Syria for they would have bombed Bahrain.

  • Papillon

    Happy Bahti Meskerem everyone and happy Labour day!

  • Saleh Johar

    George, don’t be sorry for disagreeing with my take because I don’t think you are presenting facts but your perception. The objection of Russia, and other comments are made can be supported by evidence. But your comments are all based on your own perception, for example, your implication of Iran, Syria and the USA to create a weaker Syria, though widely believed, is pure speculation. Then no one said a homegrown struggle cannot be helped by others! The Eritrean struggle was homegrown but supported by many outside forces.

  • Peace!

    The debate is now coming down to Nicnames Vs Realnames which is Ethiopias/Eritreans Vs Eritreans. The problem is not that I am against using nicknames, or against my Ethiopian friends, but I believe sustainable solution will only come from within. Given whats happening in Iraq, in Syria, in Libya, and Middle east in general, violent approach has been tested and turned out to be an enormous disaster. One may ask what happened to the opposition of those countries? Why they have failed miserably despite the unconditional support from the US and EU, the most powerful countries on the earth? The answer is very simple non of the oppositions had a mass base inside the country. The Eritrean opposition is not any different; in fact, it is weaker, disorganized, and incompetent.

    regards

    • haileTG

      Hello peace,

      But the question isn’t “do we wish to have a sustainable solution?” Rather the question is “Do we have the means and conditions to have a sustainable solution?” In other words “Coud us (in reality) manage to avoid violence?” (we all know we wish for the better so no point dwelling on what we wish).

      On those countries you cited, did they elect to go down that route or things went out of their control? A weak and intransigent PFDJ is a recipient and easy target for violent challenge. Once that cycle starts, how do you stop it without satisfying every single gun totting fighter?

      Regards

      • Peace!

        Hi HTG,

        you said “Do we have the means and conditions to have a sustainable solution?” we don’t, but certainly it will only come from within. And the mere question is not whether we can avoid violence or not; it is about developing an alternative that is less risky, I am afraid it is coming down to choosing between “Bad” and “Worse.”

        On those countries I cited, yes of course the oppositions didn’t elect to go that rout, but at least they turned out to be wrong that they had believed weeding Saddam, Qaddafi,will solve the problem once for all. In fact, the violence exacerbated the problems and put the countries on the verge of disintegration. As for ” PFDJ is a recipient and easy target” many analysts said Qaddafi would have fallen without NATO bombing.

        regards

        • haileTG

          Dear Peace,

          I totally understand what you’re saying. In fact who wouldn’t want a “less risky” and “sustainable” resolution. My problem is that our current situation is rather dangerous and time is not in our side. We can explain to a person about the necessity of good nutrition and regular exercise in order to avoid the risks of heart attacks. But that is hardly the sort of advice or action we would need to utilize when that person is actually experiencing stroke and is down in the floor. The context of “solution” are fundamentally different in both cases, although are intended towards the same objective (i.e. combat heart attack). Eritrea and Eritreans are in a precarious situation. The regime is effectively rendered a lame duck, the popular sentiment for change is tainted by fear of the unknown, the opposition isn’t making the desired progress and the generalized crisis faced by our people is expanding. We are firmly (as people, not you and me) avoiding talking to each other: the PFDJ don’t talk to each other (it is command and control operations), the opposition and individuals are all talking but not to each other, our people are not talking to each other but running away from each other, we are not talking to outsiders other than project mixed signals (some say help us, others say stay away, yet others tell them they’re to blame…). In the midst of all this speaking but not talking, hearing but not listening and coming together but not trusting each other, the death tall rises, the nation disintegrates and when the fighting spills into the streets we are now where in a position to do anything other than beg outsiders to stop our mess. Every Eritrean movement has hadnet, unity, simret, solidarity…. in its stated objective (except PFDJ), yet we couldn’t be any further from standing as one in the face of the imminent danger. Every household is cursing everyone else behind closed doors but I fear that what we fear most may come to pass unless a miracle appears somehow.

          Regards

          • Abinet

            Haile TG
            If you don’t mind my interjection (uninvited) into purely Eritrean issue,I would like to say a thing or two.
            I disagree with your assessment of the “disintegration …fighting over the streets…” You seem to have forgotten the close tightness of Eritreans. What is the degree of separation ? I think it is 3-4.everybody knows everybody else. Who is to shoot on who? Moreover , since Eritreans are “chewa hizboch”,I like to compare them to Ethiopians than to people in the Middle East .
            If I may take Ethiopian case as an example,when EPRDF controlled addis on ginbot 20,1983 EC nothing major happened to the general public except there was some protest the next day. What is very interesting was people got back to work immediately after that and to anybody’s surprise ,salaries were paid on time .
            My point in short,we were sick and tired of derg as Eritreans are of pfdj. The sky didn’t fall on Ethiopia as derg wanted us to believe . I don’t think the sky will fall on Eritreans as pfdj wanted you to believe .
            The way I see it from a distance.
            Thanks

          • Rodab

            Good point Abinet.
            I see no basis for civil war in Eritrea. Clearly animosity is abundant, except it is that of the general public’s toward the PFDJ rule, as opposed to one segment of society against another. Individual fights among, say members of victims against the suspected victimizers or collaborators is a possibility. Also, scuffles of a certain degree at the whim of opposing army officials can not be ruled out. But a spill-over-to-the-street fights, as Hailat TG mentioned above, is a remote possibility. Very remote. Just my hunch.

          • haileTG

            Selamat Abi, TK, Rodab and Horizon,

            Horizon and TK have a good handle of the essence as I had it thought out (not that the rest is invalid but I think slightly different). Dear friends, making war is is a business venture for the few spearheading the whole activity. The many joining it may do so for all sorts of reasons, but the highest echelon of the war makers have personal interests factored in. Eritreans are peace loving and with in the context of everyday life even crimes against each other are rare. Within the context of personal gains, they have been seen committing horrendous acts of betrayal against each other. In Libya some Eritreans use to take money from pregnant Eritreans to take them across the sea and then use to call the police on them in order to make off with their money. Many Eritreans are party to the continuing endangering of our people at sea. organ harvesting, Sudan, Ethio refugee camps… you name it. Under different context, the people do act differently against each other. Removing the current leadership from power is an immensely profitable venture for those seeking power and control. The problem is that they would be counter balanced by equally self preserving group and so forth. I don’t honestly think that Libyans who stood behind Gaddaffi in 1 million person march were less united and more pron to massacre one another. Today we are in a sense in a better position that we have a single enemy to point at. However, PFDJ takes no responsibility of the people’s well being now let alone as it faces eventual crumbling. I don’t belive Eritreans with in the context of normal life would do what PFDJ has been doing. But, then again, within the context of the maintenance of power, the do so much crimes. So, let’s be on the same page on the kind of context that would probably make the situation out of control. Again, without prejudice to the good standing of the Eritran people.

            Regards

          • Dear Haile TG,

            You reminded me of the “Stanford Prison Experiment”.

            http://www.prisonexp.org/

          • Fanti Ghana

            Hi Haile TG,

            I believe Saay’s proposal is well thought out, and it does leave room for expansion and modification. The real value of this article is it is not an ultimatum and it invites a discussion. I believe SAAY watered it down a notch from his usual position for this very purpose. It would be a good idea to start building on it and keep refining it until most of the concerns voiced by you and many others are addressed (I am trying to warn against shelving off ideas even when they make sense).

            Therefore, assuming a successful internal coup, let’s consider the following scenario to avoid unnecessary civil war and bloodshed:

            Give Isaias a face saving exit including guaranteed amnesty for his die-hard followers. Let him appear on TV and make a short speech about why he is “retiring” and start the heeling process. Thank all the senior tegadelti for their life long sacrifice for their country. Discourage revenge seeking mentality. Those who demand and deserve justice will have to find solace on the knowledge that Eritrea is in the process of heeling permanently.

            Document and publish those who perished in the hands of their own government in the history books of martyrs. Let the new government acknowledge and apologize for any ordeal Eritreans had to go through. Make all Eritreans understand that this is a new nation in the process of learning how to walk. I have no doubt that the great majority of Eritreans would understand and accept the wisdom behind this type of gracious move.

          • T. Kifle

            Dear Abinet,

            While the culture of the Eritrean people generally supports peace prevail whenever there is a swift consolidated force that overtakes responsibility, we cannot discount the concerns HTG and many others are fearing would be a possibility. The 1991 Addis Ababa scenario can remotely serve as an example in the Eritrean case since no force with significant influence is around on which the public bestows on trust in the process of enforcing law and order. The world since then has also been changed as we have replete examples where international terrorists storm into such a vaccum from nowhere and hijack the aspirations of the local people. As to me the best likely scenario that might open a window of opportunity for change is the demise of IA. No other man have the influence to keep PFDJ intact like he does but such kind of strategy doesn’t make sense from opposition point of view and cannot be made available as part of the tool kits. As far as this man stays healthy and don’t play fire with Ethiopia, he will continue ruling without significant threat coming from anywhere. That’s what SAAY’s recommendation makes it impractical as it simply is a reflection of unsubstantiated wishes and urges.

          • Peace!

            Dear HTG,

            you said “We can explain to a person about the necessity of good nutrition and
            regular exercise in order to avoid the risks of heart attacks.” That sounds more preventive than curing. The current situation resembles more to as, if a patient told by his doctor he has few alternatives before he considers a major surgery with slim chance of surviving, of course the patient wouldn’t rush for surgery, and that’s exactly the dilemma we are facing.

            regards

          • Dear Haile TG,

            The majority of the Eritrean society is disgusted and tired of life in Eritrea under the PFDJ. Of course, they are afraid to manifest it in broad daylight for fear of repercussions, not only to themselves, but also to
            their families. No Eritrean supports shortage of water, electricity and bread for their children, rape of their daughters, incarcerations and murders; and
            the people of Eritrea had been living under this horrendous situation for a long time. A child born in 1991 is today a 24 years old man/woman, and he/she
            has seen nothing good but the heinous behavior of the PFDJ, and they are ready to risk their life to be as far away as possible from the hellhole the PFDJ has
            created.

            Pressure is building behind closed doors, as you rightfully said. This will result in a big explosion unless somebody releases the pressure in the form of a coup, hopefully democratic, for the PFDJ will never relinquish power simply because it has failed. The generation of liberation fighters who created Eritrea believes that Eritrea is their personal estate and Eritreans their serfs. Therefore, one might not be able to avoid confrontation between factions
            of the army (hopefully a skirmish that would not last long), between those who are paid to protect the regime, and those opposed to it, who are the majority, nevertheless scattered and confused and therefore vulnerable, due to absence of good organization. On the contrary, ordinary Eritreans will stay at home until one or the other achieves the upper hand. If the coup succeeds, Eritreans will
            come out of their homes in their millions ululating in support of the change.

            Unfortunately, anti-PFDJ forces do not seem to function within Eritrea and they are weak in the diaspora, and therefore, they have done nothing in infiltratιng the armed forces and make them change their allegiance. One of the reasons for the mass exodus is the absence of organized underground
            opposition within Eritrea, and therefore, the young have nothing to expect other than to run away.

            The point is, once you have caught the tail of the Tiger, you should hold it tight until you overcome it. That is where the problem is. There is nothing
            worse than an unsuccessful coup, in a country under a dictatorial rule. Is there the right situation at present in Eritrea and outside the country for such a serious endeavor? Some are halfhearted and uncommitted, others are completely scared of the brute’s response and do not want to play with fire and they accept the status quo, thus leaving it to God, and still others prefer the known devil than the unknown one. In addition, unfortunately, each for their own reason, many Eritreans still do not trust Ethiopia, and therefore they are not committed in their mission to depose the tyrant. Others simply want to go halfway, because they are afraid that an Ethiophile government could be the final outcome.

            All the above show that 23 years under the worst type of dictatorship, there is still difference of opinion if and mainly how to end the inhuman system, and unfortunately, this means that the PFDJ regime will still be around for some time to come, with all the drawbacks for the Eritrean society.
            (a viewpoint of an outsider).

        • Hope

          Peace,
          Your last paragraph said it all…, not just our perpetual fears but the facts based on facts ,reality and real time experience.
          God loves Eritrea so much that Eritrea has not gone thru the Libyan and Iraqi style.

          • Hope

            “Bo ghizie le kulu “.I guess.
            Consider ” 7 me’altat kem 7 ametat and vice versa …. when dealing with God

      • Kim Hanna

        Selam Haile TG,
        .
        There is another million dollar question to consider too. (see at the end) First of all let me say that Mr. saay presented the most desirable and efficient way to transition the country from where it is to where it should be. However, my feeling is with all the multitude variables contributing their share, “democratic coup” is impractical and unlikely.
        .
        In the environment that the country is in currently, where Sr. Gov. ministers are reduced to note takers and many military officers and their families safety and security is a daily ordeal, there is no room for cooperating to pull off a coup. That is too much to ask..
        .
        What is left and a more viable option that will show up suddenly is an individual, a military or security officer, for one reason or another motivated by personal or social reasons decides to accept death instead of status quo existence.
        He plans, make lists of things to do in his own head only. One suitable day he crosses the line of no return. At that moment he knows his life is not worth a dime.
        .
        He demands total obedience in one form or another from certain individuals to carry out his orders. His brutality has to be believed.
        .
        If he is blessed with intelligence, rare abilities of leadership and plenty of luck he becomes successful. His immediate success is not a guarantee that it will continue for hours and days. Within a short period of time he will have a new few converts of comrades to be able to more or less stabilize the situation , just enough to be able to breath. So much has to be done to secure himself and his new position. (the question and problem) He asks for TIME. Do you give him time with enthusiasm or not?
        .
        K.H

        • haileTG

          Hey KH

          I would personally err on the side of giving time that is conditional upon verifying their adherence to the agreed time table, True, we need patience and give time, but with a sense of responsibility to speak up when things aren’t working. As the main theme of my comments for today goes, we have developed a culture that doesn’t “talk” to each other and hence any one can get away with murder so long as they are quite they know no one would have the courage to say AGEB!…Koboro gud serihuna (koboro gud seran) 🙂

    • Saleh Johar

      Peace,
      Sorry, but wrong. The opposition in all the countries you mentioned were homegrown only they attracted other when the going got tough. The Syrians failed because Russia objected to the NATO interference and didn’t want to give it a cart Blanche. First it hasa base in Ladkia, a Syrian base) and then, it was pushed out of the Libyan maneuvere which Russia agreed to air blockade by NATO took it further (regime change) on its own without agreeing with Russia. As time went by, the Syrian crisis went out of control and it got a life of its own attracting many groups, regional countries interfered and it is where it is. So, Syria was all internal until it went out of hand. The same happened with Iraq: teh West removed Saddam but left the power in the hands of Shiaites. Naturally, as is went on, it attracted other vested countries and it became complicated… and finally with ISIS, the Syrian and Iraqi problem got intertwined. Time is essential, the more it drags on, the more complicated it gets. So, as the above countries show us, change cannot be predicted with certainty, no one know how the developments will go. Here we have to remember an Eritrean saying: Hlmi ferihka, keydeqeska ayHeddern 🙂

      • Peace!

        Dear Salih,

        Thank you for remind me that regional politics is also another dimension that need to be considered seriously. Of course the outcome would have been different had the syrians, Libyans, and the Irqes left alone to decide the fate of their own country. Will Eritreans be left alone to decide the fate of their country should weeding out PFDJ goes out of control?

        When I said Base I meant a Base in a sense of ideology that ignites change from within, not military or any other physical presence. The prime ministers of those countries were appointed by US and NATO and that’s the main problem.

        Regards

        • Saleh Johar

          Hi Peace,
          Right. But then what we wish and what will possibly happen could be totally different. I support the principle of doing what you can and pushing for what you want to happen. Without worrying what others are doing, though coordinated struggle bears more fruits and is less painful. No, Eritreans will not be left alone, that is another thing we have to acknowledge, we just have to be diplomatic, and wise enough to ameliorate damages.

          As for “Weeding Out The PFDJ Regime”, I will not worry about the PFDJ but the fact the PFDJ is weeding out Eritreans. Where we stand, I believe weeding out the PFDJ will clot the bleeding and prevent Eritreans from being weeded out. Don’t you think so 🙂

          • Peace!

            Dear Salih,

            Well said “Coordinated struggle bears more fruits and
            is less painful” Now, are we coordinated enough to bring a meaningful
            change? Needless to say, the answer is NO. And for that reason I prefer
            “worrying” over “Assumption” since the lives of all Eritreans are at
            stake.

            “As for Weeding Out the PFDJ Regime,” I am glad you put
            it that way because some people see PFDJ as an Eritrean identity driven
            from Ghedli, not as a regime, which is clearly an impediment to “coordinated struggle bears more fruits and less painful” analogy.

            regards

          • Hope

            Your excellency SJG(U deserve it),
            My apology for the interjection.
            I am with my own friend, george, on this take.
            Is this a simple PR gimmick or your real understanding of the Middle East Politics?
            Perception Vs Evidence?I beg your pardon?
            Let me stumble here and there with my limited ability and knowledge.
            Are you speaking for yourself or for the Syrians?
            If U need the evidence at hand without going back to old history of this and that, the Majority of the Syrians proved to be who they are and who they want,at least for now and they have made the BEST choice ever by picking up the BEST man for the BEST interest of Syria and Syrians..
            Russia blocked the CIA and Israel sponsored evil intentioned decison against Syria,not only for its strategic Interest but based on the facts it uncovered against the Syrian Rebels and their sponsors.
            The Russians were so dumb and naive when it came to Libya as they should have expedited the 5 billion USD Defense Pact with Libya and they should have sent their elite Navy STAT(immediately) before the West started bomabrding Libya for nothing but for the sake of weakening and destroying Libya per the new world order of the Zionists.
            Do U believe that Libya would have been in such a chaos had Muammer Ghadafi stayed in power or the Russians blocked the Zionist and the CIA sponsored destabilization of Libya?
            By the same token.,what guarantee do U have/not have if the fate of Eritrea is going to be like that of Libya or Syria if the same strategy of the Arab Spring is/was to be applied in Eriitrea?
            I think this needs an article by one of your experts to analyse the pros and cons of the Arab Spring Style messy Startegy in Eritrea.
            The extremist approach of ” Weeding out the PFDJ” by all means including the Arab Spring Style mess needs a serious attention and debate for the best interest fo Eritrea.
            By default, the Ali Salim(Younis Hussein or vice versa?)) arguement/concern about this issue seems to be very important.
            OK:
            R U going to ask me for “Evidence”? if so, then ask the Russians and the UN for the Classified documents provided to the UN by the same Russians you are ignoring.
            Do we need to talk about the specific roles of :
            -The Puppet Saudi Gangs
            -The Zionists
            -The Puppet Jordans
            -The Turkish
            -etc–
            Eventhough it is irrelevant topic,can U shed some light for us about the role,origin,sponsors and goal of the ISIS,please?
            Why is the USA striking the ISIS in Iraq but NOT in Syria?
            What about the Libyan experience?You wished PIA and the PFDJ the Libyan and Ghadfi’s style fate .But can U imagine about the fate of Eritrea and Eritreans taking into consideration the fate of Libya and Libyans–based on the facts–recent history –as we speak,history on the making?
            If you need your own facts and evidence,then that is your home work,not ours coz we already provided U with ours.—recent history–not that of 1950 0r 70..
            If we have to “interpolate” the reality of the Arab Spring and the Middle East to our Eritrea ,which has been attempted and sponsored by the same CIA,Zionists and the Weyanes,yes the Weyanes,well,histroy is the WITNESS and I am glad it has not materialized in Eritrea –and if U are going to ask us further for evidence other than our “perception”,then your unflncihng “Evidence” is the recent history,Not the ones from 1950 and 70s.
            But I hope U R trying to be sarcastic and kind of ” diplomatic” to avoid discussing” sensittive issues about the CIA, the Zionists and the weyanes as well.
            N.B. I mentioned the Weyanes coz they have been the failed Engineers of the Arab Spring Style Chaos in Eritrea, and I hope U r not going to ask us for some ” Evidence”,which will be your home work to dig it out.
            Conclusion:
            Based on the recent histroy and experience of our nearby neighbors, I think we have to rethink and modify our strategy about bringing change in Eritrea as your own SAAY–has suggested cautiously but partially,with which I agree–at least coz it was suggested by SAAY..

          • george

            Hope,
            Right on brother. Not because you agree with me but for elaborating the obvious, the Elephant in the room, as they say. In a nut shell, oppose but be real with the people, the average (like me). Thanks to internet once subject considered taboo, Zionist controlled, western countries, covert action are exposed. We the people know this.

  • dawit

    Is there ‘undemocratic coup’? Don’t you think ‘coup’ by definition is an illegal change of a government, regardless of its cover ‘Democratic or Dictatorial? Just curious to learn

    • Saleh Johar

      Your question is excellent. I think we use this: Democracy = +; and dictatorship = -.
      + (+) + =
      – (+) + =
      – (+) – =
      and you see the scenarios.

      I believe a coup would be the first leg of a solution but not the final. And the way it is going, that could be the most likely thing to happen. Forget democracy for now, it’s rather, “how would Eritreans likely react to the suffocation?”

      • dawit

        Hi Salih

        Based on your Math formula, the outcome is 50/50 gamble. You end up + if you are lucky you
        be better-off ++, if you are unlucky you end up worst i.e. – -. In the + – it depends’ most probably
        you end up where you are. So why take a gamble that gives you only 50% chance of success
        and 50% of disaster? Therefore Coup ‘democratic or undemocratic is not a best choice but a gamble
        with uncertain outcome of + and -.There is a saying in Amharic,

        ሰዶ ማሳደድ ካማረህ ዶሮህን በቆቅ ለውጥ.

        “how would Eritreans likely react to the suffocation?”, Well Eritreans are very
        resilient people. They adopt to situations with patient. If they are unable to
        breath oxygen, they go anaerobic and live without democracy and stay at home,
        and those who are desperate to breath they leave the country by any means. That
        was the history of our struggle for independence; I have no problem Eritreans
        seeking a better place to live at home or abroad. My only regret is that some
        of our young people are doing it recklessly putting themselves in danger on the
        process. የቸኮለች ኣፍሳ ለቀመች.

        Now I read your dialog with Peace and I don’t have anything to add to that. But I just to
        ask you how many countries in the world have become better off as a result of
        Coup?. Many countries in the world had several coups, from Greece, Turkey,
        Nigeria, Congo, Uganda, Central Africa, Ruanda, Burundi, Afghanistan, Burma, Thailand,
        Argentina, Panama, Honduras, Chile Haiti, Pakistan Bangladesh Somalia, Yemen
        Sudan, Ethiopia etc, As a young nation, should Eritreans learn from other
        countries experiences, before undertaking such risky project? Do you recall the DERG
        ‘democratic coup’ project of ‘Ethiopia First’ Promised reform without bloodshed which
        ended up which ended up with the most bloodsheds in the history of the country in Eritrea
        and the rest of Ethiopia, Is Ethiopia better now after the DERG or EPRDF coups?

        What about the coup of Field Marshal, Dr.Al Hajji President for Life
        of Uganda, Idi Amin Dada! He was supported and advised by Britain and Israel
        when he overthrew President Milton Obotte. Ugandan Danced on the streets at the
        time only to find their bodies floating on Nile River eaten by crocodiles few day after. The
        British and Indian businessmen who supported the coup lost their properties, confiscated and thrown out of
        the country just few months after the coup. Where is Somalia after Ziad Bare.?
        Theses are not fictions but real result of a coup, democratic or undemocratic.
        Why go through such ugly experiences when one can preserve his life without breathing
        ‘Democracy’? Why not “keep hope alive”? At least the dictator in Eritrea is not preventing the sun from
        shining on everyone, including those in its prisons. I like the song ‘There is a Time for Every Thing’, I am sure there is time for peace in Eritrea. But sure this is not a time for coup democratic or undemocratic.
        Peace

        የቀበጡ እለት ሞት ኣይገኝም. .

        • Hope

          dawit,
          Then give us better alternatives,my dear.

          • dawit

            Hope,

            My dearest friend Hope, thank you for the worm welcoming note. Actually I was on the road for sometime and also reading Awate.com. But I was not ready to write,because there was not a topic worthwhile to write about, after the writing of our Bishops. It was the same blind hatred of one man. I must say, You are one of the few free thinkers in this forum; most are regurgitating same thought year after year, and few don’t even care if Eritrea is burned to ashes just to satisfy their ego for power.

            My thoughts about Eritrea and its leaders have been crystal clear her at Awate forum, no need to repeat. Let time resolve it, in the mean time my advice to Eritreans is do not gamble. Gambling is addictive, once you are hooked to a substance or an idea it is hard to get rid of an addiction. Once Eritrea travel through coup, there will not be an end, a coup will breed another coup. Read the history of the countries I listed above after their coups, and check it if they became better countries after their numerous coups Nigeria, Argentina etc.

            Contrary to those take China as an example, there was Mao, who lead the country through a bloody revolution. China went a lot of havocs under his leadership, including isolation by major powers, border war with India and the Chinese people let him rule till his time ended naturally. After his death those who followed him in the leadership of the country changed the course while maintaining his legacy. In just few years they created an economic power of the world. They built that on the foundation that Mao laid in his long years of leading the country under dictatorship .I had a chance to visit China last year and witness the miracles the country is going through. This summer I saw thousands of Chinese tourists throughout Europe most of them young people.

            Avoid Gambling with coup. There is no problem that was not cured by Time and Hope. That was how Eritrea was created out of the ashes of centuries of colonization .Growing up as a child, sometimes when I became impatient for something my mother’s wisdom words were ” ሰብር ውደ ወልየ፡ ሰብር ውደ : ባዓል ሰብር እርድ እት ጸብሕ እግል ልረኣ ቱ። One can not force the night to end, it will endup naturally, the sun will rise up and ends the darkness of the night. So my dear friend Hope, “let us keep hope alive”.

            Peace!

            dawit

          • saay7

            Selamat dawit:

            Welcome back! You have a unique voice and it was sorely missed.

            I have heard “Znegese negusna: zbereqet tseHaina” my entire life and I have also heard criticism of it my entire life…until you came along. You were the first person to come along and defend it as an indicator of the wisdom of our people. Well, I had to pause and pay attention: that is an irreverent view!

            Now, then, while I readily concede that the danger with conducting coups (democratic coup, please:) is that it can be habit-forming because once the taboo is broken there is no going back, I want you to concede the danger of the status quo. Even if Isaias is allowed to rule for life (after all, znegese negusna…), can you share your view of the two dangers, using an example from a different part of Asia: the Cambodian/Khmer Rouge/Pol Pot model.

            (a) his rule may outlast the country. As he lives, tens of thousands of his countrymen perish;
            (b) a neighboring country fearing destabilization, occupies and rules the country for a decade.

            Wouldn’t the “zbereqet tseHaina…” also apply as the people passively accept it all as God’s will?

            saay

          • Semere Andom

            Hi Sal and dawit:
            Welcome back dave
            http://awate.com/poets-corner/

          • dawit

            Selam Saay,

            Thanks for the warm welcome note. Yes you have accurately described my stand. Now you declared “ an irreverent view!”.Relevant or irrelevant still working for the majority of Eritreans. It has prevented the nation from being plunged in a civil war like South Sudan! The majority Eritreans inside and outside the country are dancing with their government irrespective of relentless propaganda, of opposition leaders and neighboring countries and international coordinated opposition, military and economic isolation to Eritrea as a country.

            It seems you did not like my example of China, so you picked Cambodia! Well good how did Cambodia ended up in that Democratic Kampuchea (Khmer Rouge era) (1975–79), mess. Was it not due to the initial coup that removed Prince Sihanouk Government that sow the seed of neighboring countries and Super Power interventions to the country, where over 2 millions of poor Cambodians disappeared? So Saay, democratic or undemocratic coup is not a best option to Eritrea. Try other means to bring peace and stability to the country. I like you efforts trying to find a means to bring peace and stability to Eritrea, but please stay away from coups. Learn a lesson from Cambodians messy history of coups and armed insurgency when you overthrow a legitimate government, a democrat or a dictator.

            Peace

            dawit

          • saay7

            Selamat Dawitom:

            Ummm… I said “irreverent” and not “irrelevant.” They mean totally different things. Irreverent is usually a compliment.

            You have made a strong case against coups and I accepted it. Now, what I am asking you is to accept the risks of always staying with status quo. Were we right to wage an armed struggle or should we, as YG says, remained loyal to Haile Selasse who was the ultimate in “Znegese negusna…” because he had the blessings of the Church and called himself divinely appointed?

            saay

          • dawit

            Dear Saay;

            Please accept my apology for misreading and confusing the words “irreverent” and “irrelevant”. But as I said it doesn’t matter, my sand is clear. I am glad that you accepted the serious risk of coup for Eritrea. You asked me about the risk of a status quos.
            “Were we right to wage an armed struggle or should we, as YG says, remained loyal to Haile Selasse who was the ultimate in “Znegese negusna…” because he had the blessings of the Church and called himself divinely appointed”?

            Now Saay, you will not quote me to say Eritreans were wrong for taking a huge risk with armed struggle against Ethiopia under Haile Selassie. The Emperor Haile Selassie was not a legitimate king of Eritrea. He derailed the legitimate right of Eritrea to be an independent nation through, lies, bribery and violence, to steal Eritrea and declared himself King of Kings and Elect of God and all the jazz that came with it. If Haile Sellasie was an honest man he should have stood for Eritrean Independence at the UN, especial he owed it to so many Eritreans who gave their lives to liberate Ethiopia and restored his government. Ethiopia’s liberation would not have been materialized without the sacrifices of Eritrean Askari Soldiers who defected with their arms to fight Fascist Italy for five years and other Eritrean Intellectuals, who were mobilizing world support for Ethiopia. On the other hand, Isaias is a legitimate Eritrean leader who shepherded the independence struggle and was elected by Eritrean people to lead the country as President whereas Haile Selassie was a vulture who preyed on a poor struggling colony by preventing its legitimate and lawful right for independence. Therefore my friend Saay, you can not equate Haile Selassie the vulture and Isaias the Tegadali with the same scale, and apply the wisdom of our forefathers, “Znegese Ngusna”.
            If people like YG write trash to condemn our armed struggle, hiding on some Asmarino.com they are the children of those Eritreans who were eating from the troughs of their masters who were benefiting from Ethiopia’s illegal occupation of Eritrea. A dog barks, where it gets his daily meal. I am not impressed by the trashy writing of your friend YG even some her at Awate.com admired his trash and swallowed it and vomit it.

            In conclusion suffice to say Eritreans took a huge risk and paid so much to end centuries of chains of colorizations and that was right and that is why I support PDFJ not to squander the independence of Eritrea, even if I admit there is a dictatorial regime that still stands for Eritrea. Eritreans from all walk of life are jamping with their kebero and dance when ever they get a chance to celebrate their independence, despite the economic hardship they are facing at home and abroad after their national independence.
            Peace
            dawit
            .

          • Saleh Johar

            Welcome dawit, and thanking you for your clear position regarding the YG crowd.

          • dawit

            Thanks Saleh!
            dawit

          • saay7

            Hi Dawit:

            Well, it appears that your version of “znegese ngusna…” has a lot of fine print, so many in fact that the expression is useless.

            1. in your version, the act of being Crowned king is not sufficient to be followed; you must earn the support and have the consent of the governed. That is “ztemertse negusna…” and not “znegese negusna…”

            2. The expression of “znegese negusna WAS used during Haile Selasse’s reign.

            3. I don’t know how old the expression is, but whether it’s 100 or 500 years old, one fact remains: what came to be known as Eritrea or for centuries before the name was used, we never had anybody who governed with out consent, everyone self-imposed, all came and went without earning legitimacy. And throughout the period the expression was being used.

            4. Ummm… When exactly was Isaias elected and for how long?

            saay

          • dawit

            Dear Saay,

            I never heard of the expression “ztemertse negusna…”

            When exactly was Isaias elected, by whom and for how long? That will be a home work for you. I suggest you Google it. and discover how PIA became DIA for your next article before the coup.
            Peace
            dawit

          • Serray

            To recap: dawit started the discussion by saying, “Is there ‘undemocratic coup’? Don’t you think ‘coup’ by definition is an illegal change of a government, regardless of its cover ‘Democratic or Dictatorial? Just curious to learn”.

            Sal started the lesson by asking if dawit is saying znegese ngusna zbereke tsahana and dawit agreed and brought a number of examples as why it is so. Then Sal brought yg and ghedli and dawit did his 180 degrees, screeching…but haile slasie was illegitimate. Sal concluded the lesson by pointing out that isaias is also illegitimate. Far from leaning anything, dawit went into his irrational and isolated corner stomping, “That will be a home work for you. I suggest you Google it. and discover how PIA became DIA for your next article before the coup”.

            If dawit was the learning kind, he would have walked from this exchange reevaluating his stupid generalized statement that all coups are illegal and, therefore, bad. But he can’t. He supports an illegitimate regime (by his definition) that came to power with a coup that lasted thirty years and turned into one of the worlds most brutal and incompetent regime of murderers and human traffickers. It is telling that yg shook the very foundation of his a coup “is an illegal change of government” smugness into an uncomfortable place between a rock and a hard place.

          • saay7

            Hey Serray:

            It occurs to me that I didn’t answer dawit’s first question: is there a democratic and undemocratic coup. What Isaias did in 2001 is an undemocratic coup because the net result was to make the country less democratic (no private press, no national assembly, cancelled scheduled elections.) What I am proposing is a democratic coup because the net result is to make the country more democratic (bring back the private press, instate the national assembly, activate the constitution, draft party-formation and electoral law, schedule elections.) The adjective doesn’t describe the coup, but the intended outcome of the coup.

            And, no surprise, I have a different take on where YG is in relationship to the rock and the hard place:)

            Now, recall that I assume that people are rational beings and make rational choices. With that caveat, “Znegese negusna zbereqe tseHaina” is not an opportunistic or weak statement. It is a reflection of a value system, developed from centuries of living under kings who are completely unaccountable to their subjects, which says: be patient, the king, however unjust, will eventually die.

            YG and dawit are just selective of when to apply it. For YG, this dictum should have applied to Haile Selasse (we Eritreans should have struggled for change within the confines of Haile Selasse rule) because the cost of bringing change is prohibitively expensive. This dictum doesn’t apply to Isaias Afwerki (we Eritreans should do all we can, including soliciting the help of EPRDF, to bring his rule to an end) because the cost of no change is prohibitively expensive. For dawit, the argument is reversed.

            I am looking for someone who is a true believer of “znegesa ngusna…”: someone who says it was wrong to fight Haile Selasse and it is wrong to fight Isaias Afwerki.

            saay

          • T. Kifle

            Hi SAAY,

            Why is that you often tend to misrepresent YG in your arguments? The main theme of his argument is not that “the cost of bringing change is prohibitively expensive” but he believes the said “change” was unnecessary irrespective of the price tag.

          • saay7

            Hi T.Kifle:

            I think you and I have established a familiar tango. You make wild declarations, you deny you said them, then when I present proof, you don’t do the honorable Nitricc-like “I was wrong, you were right” statement but a very Harbeyna Weyane cadre double-speak on me.

            Now, before I invest the time to back up what I said, will you, when I present the evidence (clear-cut evidence to support my case) do the honorable thing and admit you were wrong. Otherwise, (and here’s the clue for you), the cost-benefit analysis says I shouldn’t even try:)

            saay

          • T. Kifle

            Selamat SAAY,

            I am not denying his cost benefit analysis and I save your time but that was not his main argument. His main argument has been the revolution was unnecessary and that at such a prohibitive cost and that for such dismal outcome.

          • saay7

            Aye T. Kiflle

            Your first sentence and second sentence say the same thing. Such a prohibitive cost = cost; such a dismal outcome = benefit. Are we actually going to do this?

            saay

          • T. Kifle

            Ok, it seems the theory of the “running away” have passed without leaving a mark. Enjoy your day my man!

          • saay7

            Thanks, T.Kifle, for the compliment. Most nonsense theories, like YG’s “running away” theory, leave no mark at all because they have no substance–but they sure make imperial Ethiopians (the paleo and neo variety) feel REALLY good about themselves:)

            saay

          • T. Kifle

            Oh, this is a bit weird. We have more than one reasons to feel good about ourselves. and for sure YG’s theory is non in the list.

          • saay7

            I think you are drive-by-reading now, T.Kifle. So you are, a Harbeyna Weyanai, adding yourself in the list of “imperial Ethiopians”?

            saay

          • T. Kifle

            Well, wasn’t that the method? I said “we” because it was by non other than the great SAAY that very name had been accorded to ,us, the Weyanes. Better pretend acceptance of the prejudice than crying over it. 🙂

          • saay7

            Kbrur Harebeyna Weyanai T.Kifle:

            There are two things I (used to) admire about Harbeyna Weyanai:

            1. Their epic struggle to liberate themselves from the yoke of oppression and, having done that, their ability to create a new template for governing Ethiopia that is far better than any of its predecessors in the history of modern Ethiopia;

            2. Their unflinching support for the cause of the Eritrean armed struggle and Eritreans right to self determination.

            In the late 1980s, I read “Qalsi hzbi Ertra kabey nabey” (in typical T. Kiflesm, you once made a categorical statement that I couldn’t have, a claim that you haven’t recanted and if you do it will be in classic weasly language.) In that book, Harebyna Weyanai criticized the way Eritreans conducted their armed struggle. (It also categorically absolutely denied any role in the ELF-EPLF civil war.) Fine, that is a criticism of the how.

            Of late, what I am noticing (not just from you T.Kifle, whom I consider the prototype of Weyane thinking but many others in this forum and other forums) is that you are no longer criticizing how we waged the struggle, but whether we should have waged the struggle at all. The modern Harbeyna Weyanai thought process seems to be, “sure, you had a right to do it, but just because you have to right to do something, it doesn’t mean you need to exercise that right.”

            There is also a disturbing pattern where Eritrea’s current reality is not seen from a narrow prism (dictatorship happened) but a much broader prism which, in the end, finds flaw with Eritreans in general. Sometimes this comes across in describing Deki MetaHit as “gun-toting” adventurers (sure, you apologized, but the sting remains); sometimes there is reference to Italians…its all very unsettling. So, yes, Harbeyna Weyanai has gone native and has adopted many of the arguments which used to be identified with the group we once called “chauvinists.” That’s why you gravitate towards every malcontent who considers it a fine sport to attack not just dictatorship but the entire Eritrean psyche and, when some of us refuse to entertain such low-rent crap, we are accused of living in denial.

            So, we Eritreans are often invited to evaluate ourselves. I wish you would too.

            But the admiration for Harbeyna Weyanai, on count 1, remains unchanged.

            saay

          • Semere Andom

            Hi Sal and TK:
            It seems that it is in the complicated relationship between Eritreans and Ethiopians that 1.0 is better than 2.0:-)

          • saay7

            Hi iTegadalai Sem:

            Of all the things that surprise me, it is when Harbeyna Weyanai adopts the “what’s wrong with you Eritreans?” attitude because Tigrayans, having gone what they went through, should be sympathetic to us and not buy into that argument.

            Now, historian Aregawi Berhe is Weyane 1.0. This is what he says about the people of Tigray before Harbeyna Weyanai rescued them:

            Begin Quote

            “The spiralling combination of foreign assaults, local wars and deadly famines left Tigray in utter destitution. As John Young observed, ‘In the period between the death of Yohannes in 1889 and the present day an estimated seventeen famines have struck Tigray, the biggest being in 1958–9, 1965–6, 1972–4, and 1983–4’.5 During these periods millions of people died and still more were displaced from their homes.

            “Subsequent leaders of Ethiopia — Emperors Menelik II (1889–1913) and Haile Selassie I (1930–74) — were not concerned to address or attempt to mitigate the dismal state of Tigray, but both fought extensive wars in this Ethiopian gateway, notably at the battles of Adwa (1896) and Maichew (1935) respectively. During Menelik’s reign, Gebrehiwet Baykedagne,a political economist of the time, wrote:

            “. . . there are hardly any Tigrayan youth left in their birthplace, Tigray. Like a swarm of bees without their queen, they are aimlessly scattered in four corners of the earth. Some people ridiculed their widespread poverty. Unfortunately, whilst other people live in tranquillity, Tigray has never been free from wars, leave alone outlaws and bandits.”

            End Quote

            Now I know that Aregawi Berhe is not on the approved list of authors by Weyane 2.0, but please note that most of what is written above is him quoting the saintly John Young (TPLF’s Dan Connell) and Ethiopian historian Baykedagne.

            saay

          • Serray

            Selam Sal,

            Most things are temporally right or wrong; even math and science evolve over time. You are not going to find “rational” people who consistently believe in znegese ngusna…because to believe it consistently is by definition to be irrational. Znegese ngusna is probably coined by one generation of our ancestors who saw one feudal hungry for power challenge a king and then, upon becoming one, turned into the worst ruler ever. As far as yg is concerned, both you and T. kifle are right: he said given the cost and given the relative cushy place eritreans held within the empire, the war that exacted so much blood was unnecessary. As it stands, time is on his side. If change doesn’t come as you are hoping it should, history, too, would be on his side.

            For decades communists argued that we are all equal and uneven distribution of wealth must be eliminated. But its application became tricky because we are not all equal in terms of creating wealth, value. The thing you accept at face value and refuse to challenge is, eritrea is still a nation that spilled a river of blood to make reality a resolution passed by despots in 1964 about lands curved out to satisfy colonial ambitions. The dismal failure of african nations is proof that the lack of any organic element in creating the nation-state is tricky. Yours is a point of view that still insists “but we are all equal” in the face of a continent that represents the worse about the modern man and women…a continent with more of everything that is bad and less of everything that is good. Your steady defense of eritrea’s statehood is actually the anticlimax of your capitalist position; the other side of your rational side.

            I was about to post the first paragraph when I saw your last response to T. kifle. Every time I read you, I have to determine whether you are wearing you eritrean hat or your rational hat. Your eritrea hat denies that Eritrea is a creation of two anomalies: colonialism and despots, and gives it an omnipotent presence and I can’t help responding even though that will make me a neo in your book because eritrea is a dysfunctional african state with everything more that is wrong and everything less that is right. Instead of despots and warlords in 1964 interested in the butchered shape africa, if we had far-sighted pan-africanists who argued for african union, the fifty or so dysfunctional anomalies would have been history.

          • saay7

            Selamat Serray:

            Something to consider: Isn’t the “A pox on both their houses” movement in the US, where people have 0% faith in democrats and Republicans and consider them both useless and refuse to participate in the political process a form of “znegesa negusna…”? And isn’t that, at least in the US, continuously validated?

            Actually, I didn’t put my Eritrean hat but my African hat. One of the things that I find most amazing in YG (and his supporters) argument is how they point to Eritrea and express (faux) shock at how it became a State when its history is similar to the history of every African state (Angola, Zimbabwe…) You can’t go to a mobile home park, point out at one mobile home and say, “look! it is a mobile home!” It is because I recognize that Eritrea is just another African country (on the verge of being a failed state) that my absolute minimum is to return it to the status of, say, Malawi or Tanzania, so we can work together on the challenges of being an African state on the verge of being a failed state without the exceptional one we find ourselves in, which is being citizens of a predatory State.

            Now, if someone wants to point out the absurdity of African states in general, or even the whole concept of nation-states, I would join the party. It is when people treat Eritrea as exceptional and deformed at birth that I consider their argument selective. This is why in none of YG’s long thesis you will see a single comparison to another African state. Go ahead, search:)

            saay

          • Serray

            Selamat Sal,

            Regarding your last paragraph, what makes eritrea an exception is that it fought for thirty long and insanely bloody years another african country while it so happens more than half of its people are intimately related in history, language, religion and tradition. That is why number one; why number two is, those who turned eritrea upside down to make a nation because of two anomalies turned out to be the worst predators the world have ever seen; predators who literally traffic on their young and drive the project of extinction. It is not always ethiopia agenda that drives this exception; what make eritrean nationhood an exceptional study of irony is eritrea itself…its unbelievable deformity. A deformity that is about to explode if things don’t happen according to the subject under discussion.

            But you raised a good point about yg’s take about the dysfunctional nature of africa’s family of misfits, I watch for it.

          • saay7

            Selamat Serray:

            Just one pet peeve whenever people mentions Eritrea’s 30-year armed struggle: the reason it was 30 years is because successive Ethiopian governments took a rigid, absolutist position that would not allow Eritreans to even hold an internationally observed referendum. Anytime somebody mentions our armed struggle was 30-years long, they should always mention “at Ethiopia’s insistence” and, no, I don’t buy the claim that we could have been independent in 1977-78: that was just Ethiopia distracted by Somalia.

            The amazing Fanti Ghana (ok, I am quoting him twice today) once made this observation (paraphrased) about Ethiopian government’s insane policy towards Eritrea: “if they are Ethiopians, why are we killing them? If they are not Ethiopians, why are we dying to keep them?”

            It is because Ethiopian voices of reason, like that of Fanti Ghana, were not heard that we fought for 30 bloody years.

            saay

          • T. Kifle

            Selamat SAAY,

            1. As far as one is a Weyane, they are just that. If one loses this fundamental attribute in any way, they often end up not in “Weyane 2.0” but in the ever declining chauvinist camp. That’s at least the picture as is. Does the Weyane change heart to wards the self-determination of Eritrea as of late? Absolutely no! There is no better example than having included the same principle in our constitution mainly intended as a means of emboldening the union and provide safe exit if things don’t turn to work out in a way to avoid the kind of armed confrontation seen to hold Eritrea.

            2. If you read the book, then you must have got the wrong message. It never denied the fact that it fought ELF. SAAY, I know you are a smart guy. In this particular argument you appear in your ELF hat you rarely volunteer to wear. TPLF never ever denied that role. What it did then and still holds true is that ELF played with fire, trampled on the toes of TPLF consistently and because you quoted Aregawi Berhe and you believe that he is “Weyane 1.0” let me put what he had to say in his book “The Political History of TPLF” subtitled titled “TPLF and ELF Never Went Along Well” from pp. 253-255, a long quote but clearly show the genesis of the ELF-TPLF saga

            “In April 1975, just two months after it was established, the TPLF dispatched a delegation to the ELF Seraye administrative unit (better known as No. 9) and made known its intentions to set up working relations with the ELF. This initiative was conveyed to the highest bodies in Barka, their base area. Soon after, the ELF held its 2nd National Congress, which delegates of the TLF and representatives of Ras Mengesha Seyoum (later the leader of the EDU) attended. The TPLF was not invited, despite its efforts to maintain contact. ” page

            “In November 1975, relations with the TLF itself suddenly ended. The TPLF forcefully subdued the TLF and put the surviving leaders under arrest. It was an unexpected turn of events for all parties, the TLF, the ELF and the TPLF itself. A few days later, the TPLF, confident of the righteousness of its measures against the TLF, informed the ELF and invited them to assess the episode for themselves. The ELF sent two of its senior officials, a central committee member and a division commander, to Tigrai to discuss the matter with the TPLF’s leadership. They also had the chance to talk about the matter in private with the TLF leaders under arrest. The delegation had nothing negative to say about the drastic measures taken by the TPLF. The TPLF demanded that the outcome of their investigation be reported in written form to all ELF members so that relations at all levels would be comradely. But top ELF leaders, who feared the exposure
            of their involvement in the TLF misdeeds, never released any such statement. It should be
            recalled that prominent members of the TLF, like Tekeste Wubneh, Yohannes Andebirhan, Berhe Tewldebirhan and Teklai Gebrezgi, were executed with the consent of Salih Shume and Mohamed Kiduwi, both leaders of the ELF at the administration unit no.10. The ELF delegation must have been embarrassed by this and related facts which the TLF leaders revealed.”
            And he went on

            “As a matter of fact, the initial warm relations between the TPLF and the EPLF had been one of the reasons for the bad relations between the TPLF and the ELF. From the outset, the EPLF had portrayed itself as a revolutionary front that would embrace and work with the Ethiopian revolutionary left, and was accommodating the EPRP and the TPLF. The first TPLF recruits were trained and armed by the EPLF, an initial indication of a serious alliance. Two long-time EPLF fighters – Mussie and Yemane Kidane (a.k.a. Jamaica) – who were both Tigraians by birth, were transferred to the TPLF for good. Mussie in particular was instrumental in maintaining the relationship with the EPLF when it experienced problems. The organizational name TPLF resembled that of the EPLF as did the TLF that of ELF. In the ELF camp, the rhetoric surrounding class struggle, socialism and dictatorship of the proletariat entertained by both the EPLF and the TPLF created the suspicion of a rising unified revolutionary force. This was happening at a time when the ELF was claiming that it was the only legitimate representative of all sections of Eritrean society. On top of that, the ELF’s perception of the EPLF as an organization of Tigrigna-speaking highlanders from Eritrea who were ethnically the same as the Tigraians in Ethiopia decisively shaped its attitudes towards the TPLF as an ally of its rival, the EPLF. Besides, the permanent presence of ELF cadres along the borders with Tigrai and their confrontational dealings with Tigraians living there was another area where relations were difficult. TPLF-ELF relations were,therefore, strained from the beginning by many factors and remained fragile all along, sometimes even turning violent.
            For the top ELF officials, who were always seeking surrogate organizations in Ethiopia, the liquidation of the TLF in itself was understandably annoying. From then onwards, the ELF invariably supported any organization in Tigrai that was in some kind of armed conflict with, and could potentially weaken, the TPLF. In 1976 and 1977, the ELF provided the Tigraian Movement Coordinating Committee (Teranafit) and its umbrella organization the Ethiopian Democratic Union (EDU) with military information on the TPLF. Since the operational areas of both the TPLF and ELF in many cases overlapped, it was possible for the ELF to pass sensitive military information to the Teranafit and the EDU on the mobility and strength of the TPLF. This had happened on
            several occasions, as the TPLF’s radio interception unit could prove, and indeed was a ‘stab in the back’ of the TPLF.”

            “Later, in 1978, the TPLF destroyed the Teranafit by waging a counter-offensive and also evicted the EDU from Tigrai. It seized armaments and ammunition from both adversaries that bolstered its morale and strength. The TPLF became a formidable force in western Tigrai and began full mobilization of the people without encountering any resistance from its former rivals, the Teranafit and the EDU. Once again, the ELF did not have any choice but to accommodate the TPLF, and relations between the organizations appeared to improve. By the end of 1976, the TPLF had managed to establish formal relations with the ELF but they only lasted for a brief period. This time the ELF gave the TPLF few arms and ammunition, which the TPLF needed but was not desperate for. It also lifted restrictions on the TPLF outlet to Sudan through western Eritrea. The ELF also assisted the TPLF on the diplomatic front, introducing it to Arab regimes such as Saudi
            Arabia, Syria and Egypt, which offered advantages to the TPLF. However, friendly relations did not last long. Despite the support the ELF was providing, the position of the TPLF as far as the EPLF (the former’s rival) was concerned did not falter and this must have annoyed the ELF. ‘The ELF also endeavoured to get the TPLF to accept its political positions over those of its rival, the EPLF, something the TPLF was reluctant to do’, (Young 1997: 113). The administration of Eritrean peasants who settled in the Tigrai region was another source of continuous disagreement which the ELF took as provocation. When the TPLF began to execute its land-reform policy which favoured poor peasants, Eritrean landlords living near the borders were seriously affected. The
            ELF stood up on behalf of these landlords and worked covertly and overtly not only to frustrate the land-reform policy but also the TPLF’s entire politico-military venture. It defended and offered sanctuary to feudal Eritrean or Tigraian elements opposed to the land reform and committed acts of reprisal against members of the TPLF or even ordinary TPLF sympathizers. The ELF protected such opponents of the TPLF by claiming that they were members of its organization. Repeatedly, its units obstructed the mobility of TPLF members or vehicles travelling to or from the Sudan through their territory.”

            “In the middle of all these tense circumstances, war broke out between the TPLF and the EPRP in April 1978. Once again the ELF was quick to grab the opportunity and use it against the interests of the TPLF. The EPRP army, which was operating in Tigrai, was defeated and driven out of its base area in Alitena and Assimba by the TPLF in a matter of days and fled to the ELF-held territory of Shumezana in Eritrea. It was unexpected for the ELF to act as a host for the EPRP because they had no formal relations and until then, the latter was known to be an ally of the EPLF, the ELF’s arch rival. But all of a sudden, the ELF gave the EPRP sanctuary in its base area near Augaro in western Eritrea close to the TPLF area of operations. The cooperation between the ELF and the EPRP put the TPLF under a serious threat of war. The TPLF wrote a number
            of letters of reconciliation to the ELF and in May 1978 leaders of both the ELF and the TPLF met in Barka. They agreed to work together and not interfere in each other’s administrative territory. They spelled out their differences, particularly on the nature of the Dergue and the Soviet Union – the ELF considered the Dergue and the Soviet Union as ‘truly socialist’ and ‘progressive’ forces, while the TPLF held that both were antidemocratic and anti-revolutionary. Yet they agreed that such differences should not hamper the progress of their cooperation as long as they were fighting against both of them. Subsequently, they went as far as putting together their forces to challenge the Dergue’s biggest military campaign on the Shire front in May 1978. At this time, the ELF rearmed the EPRP and began supporting the latter’s plan of establishing itself in Wolkait in western Tigrai. To accomplish this, the ELF had to escort the EPRP through TPLF-held territory in western Tigrai where it had created popular support. At the end of 1979, three ELF battalions under Tesfay Tekle, a member of the ELF revolutionary council, joined the EPRP forces to cross to Wolkait but they were attacked by TPLF forces at Moguee and forced to return to Eritrea. Reinforced by another fresh brigade, the joint forces of ELF-EPRP advanced to Sheraro, the popular base of the TPLF. But on 6 April 1980, they were intercepted by TPLF forces in the hilly terrain of Gemmahlo and suffered a heavy defeat. The troops of both defeated fronts were in disarray, each blaming the other for what had befallen them, although it was the endurance coupled with the TPLF’s better fighting tactics that brought about their defeat. Thereafter, the ELF refrained from attacking the TPLF in the western part of Tigrai while the EPRP made a long march of retreat to reach remote areas of the Wolkait region. The EPRP had difficulty reviving its forces and was then engaged in a survival strategy. The implication of this war was that it frustrated attempts by the EPRP to launch an operational zone in western Tigrai and Wolkait and to open a corridor from its bases in Gonder to ELF territory in western Eritrea and eventually to Sudan. Once again, the TPLF proved to be invincible in the eyes of its adversaries.”

            “By November 1980, furious ELF units operating across central Tigrai launched another surprise attack on the TPLF base area in Belesa-Maihamato. They chased away the few guards they encountered and looted the small base area before returning to their own territory. This was an unprovoked attack, and the TPLF was in no position to and had no intention of declaring war on the ELF. By this time, the former had emerged as the only formidable armed resistance force to the Dergue in Tigrai. The destroying and eviction of the TLF, the Teranafit, the EDU and finally the EPRP was, however, a message that the ELF had to consider seriously. The fact that it was now left without proxy organizations in Tigrai indicated its isolation. Confrontation between the TPLF and the ELF from then onwards became direct and had to be resolved one way or the other.

            The TPLF and ELF operational areas were adjacent. The ELF operated in many parts of Tigrai for military and economic reasons. The border claim and counter-claim and the exclusive right to operate in the border territories continued to be a constant problem in relations between the organizations. The policies on land, trade, the mobility of people and the forceful extraction of material contributions and recruits from Eritreans living in Tigrai continued to cause strain between the TPLF and the ELF. The ELF’s border security officers declined to discuss seriously the problems with TPLF cadres and seek solutions to the problems. The ELF wanted to impose their way and in the final solution resorted to killing TPLF cadres and trying to overrun their base areas. Conflicts became frequent, nerve-racking, and sometimes bloody. The ELF created a situation that was unbearable for the TPLF and even more so for the people of Tigrai along the borders, and, day in day out, they urged the TPLF to do something about it and to drive away any
            ELF unit. The TPLF had thus many reasons to remove the ELF. ”

            “At the very beginning of 1981, the EPLF, which since its formation had been in a similar – if not more hostile situation – with the ELF, sent a delegation led by Sibhat Ephraim, a politburo member, to the TPLF to try to resolve the lingering problem with the ELF. By this time both seemed to have had enough of ELF provocations and they agreed on organizing equal numbers of forces to deliver a decisive blow to the ELF. In mid-1981, combined TPLF-EPLF forces began their offensive from the Afar lowlands, the eastern base area of the ELF and swiftly advanced on the central and western bases. Without joint action, the war with the ELF would have remained an impossible task for the EPLF alone. Weakened by internal squabbles and stretched over a wide area in small units, the ELF was in no position to pose any meaningful resistance. In less than two weeks, the entire ELF force was forced to leave Tigrai and Eritrea and flee to Sudan following the impact of the joint TPLF-EPLF attack. Nharnet Team, an ELF sympathizer, described the situation as follows:

            The aggression on the ELA [ELF army] started and the TPLF of Ethiopia joinedin the fratricidal war declared by the EPLF that lasted till 10 August 1981. The ELA was forced to withdraw to the border areas in the Sudan where it faced many problems. During that fateful period of 1980-81, the ELA lost 1458 fighters martyred mainly in the destructive war provoked by the EPLF/TPLF alliance (Nharnet, 2005: Part VIII).”

            “TPLF-ELF relations had been rocky from the start and continued to be so despite the conciliatory gestures made by the TPLF. At last it had led to this bloody confrontation in which the ELF was defeated and ceased to exist as a viable organization. The defeat of the ELF opened up the opportunity for the EPLF to control rural Eritrea without a rival. The TPLF too had nothing to fear from behind for some time to follow. This was also a relief for the Tigraians living along the borders. Afterwards splinter groups formed, made up of dispersed ELF members, and they vowed to continue the struggle for independence. They were against the rival EPLF and even those who looked to espouse Marxian ideology took no time to establish a relationship with the TPLF. Later, the TPLF began to support the Eritrean Democratic Movement (EDM) and the Eritrean Liberation Front Central-Command (ELF-CC), better known as Sagem, as a countervailing force to the EPLF. A new alignment that would complicate relations with the EPLF was in the making.”

            This is what “Weyane 1.0” more or less would agree on. I know ELF dreads looking into its own internal contradictions but no unique as the same behaviour we read in EPLF too.

          • saay7

            Selamat T.Kifle:

            First, to reassure our newest awatista, Abebe from Addis, rest assured that a lot of the jousting we do with T.Kifle (affectionately referred to as Harbeyna Weyanai) is out of love: that of two brothers who love each other but keep disappointing each other.

            Now then, how do I prove to you that I wasn’t wearing an ELF hat? It will be cruel but here it is: I didn’t read the long quote you posted here:) Why? Because I accept that there are two sides to the story and I have zero interest in litigating the issue. It was way before my time as I am younger than I sound:) I even dismissed it as maybe a necessary lie as political organizations tend to have “an emancipated view of the truth.”

            The real issue is: did the book say what I said it does say or does it support your argument that it never denied it. One of us is wrong. If I find the book*, I will find the section and if I am wrong, I will unequivocally apologize. If you do have the book (I wonder if there are different editions) I invite you to re-read it and offer to make the same gentlemanly deal.

            Here’s my issue, T.Kifle. The TPLF was the only Ethiopian political organization that considered the Eritrean question a colonial question. It believed so strongly in it, it wasn’t just convincing Ethiopians of the case, it was convincing skeptical Eritreans! In an interview in 2007, Sebhat Negga (is he TPLF1 or TPLF2?) says this:

            (Begin quote)

            “… we exerted tremendous efforts within and outside of the country and more than any other Eritrean political organization that Eritrea must break away from Ethiopia – and achieve independence.

            “Therefore, the Eritrean issue is what we have paid for dearly, what we have campaigned for vigorously, what we have exerted tremendous efforts for, that made it our solid policy. We’ve written extensively. We’ve lectured extensively. We have left no stone unturned to isolate the question of Eritrea from any Ethiopian problems. The question of Ethiopia’s nations and nationalities was easy, simple to understand because most were affected by it. The question of Eritrea was different. It was different to understand it; it was difficult to make others understand it. For TPLF, which was struggling to stand on its feet on an Ethiopian soil, to promote such decisive policy on Eritrea was very difficult. In doing so, we convinced the Ethiopian people. Wherever we moved (as TPLF rebels), to persuade the society to accept Eritrea as a colonial question, was the most challenging of all political problems that TPLF set out to accomplish.

            “Nothing comes closer to the price we paid to promote the Eritrean question as a just demand for independence.”

            (End quote)

            Now, never mind Weyane: do you, T.Kifle, believe this? If you do, why do you write some of the things you write in these pages and why is it, in all your favorable quotes of YG, you never challenge him on this? Why is it that every pro-Weyane Tigrayan or Eritrean who writes on this forum quoting YG chapter and verse, never challenges him on that?

            saay

            * nzmelketo akal: Ita keyaH metsHaf teleqiHkuma alekhum: ktmelswa bt’Htna n’Hatet:)

          • T. Kifle

            Merhaba SAAY,

            If you believe in what you said you do, then, why you accuse TPLF as an agent of “Eritrean civil war”?. Did you try to find out the “two side of the story” before you pass that judgement?

            You asked me if I believe in what Sebhat had to say. My answer is yes. No other nation/nationality in Ethiopia had litigated the Ethiopian state in the UN platform. No other nation/nationality can claim like the boundary Eritrea and Ethiopia have as a colonial legacy. I also understand the failure of the king for his myopic intervention turning the already bad situation to just the worst. My theory is that given the same problem, the solutions are abound; depending on the shared values, culture, history, political leanings, geopolitical influences etc, We are talking about two sides that were under one administration but parted ways by colonial division. There is nothing wrong if they come together once the outside forces are gone one way or another provided that it’s the voice of the majority. Unfortunately, the assault the colonialists inflicted on the Eritrean mind has been irreparable and those who wished unity should have known better for that it would have saved us from all the miseries we are living to witness. Add to it the selfish manner the feudal gentry had approach the problem with.

            So, It has been my wish we remained as one. This partly could have narrowed the extreme polarization in the Ethiopian political divide. The problem is still latent, fluid, can explode any time the revolutionary democrats are unseated from power. The only difference been the “oneness” should come voluntarily. And when Eritreans wanted the opposite, I have to accept their demands and live with it. But that’s not a thing I go to the streets and celebrate. It’s a kind of choosing the lesser evil. The Eritrean fronts were not there to bring about choice to Eritreans in a rational manner. They were there to decide on their behalf. They left stones unturned to keep the distance as far as possible and they succeeded. They concocted myths why Eritrea under “feudal Ethiopia” is an anathema so tried to delete all cultural and historical ties that connect the two sides. Ghedli has become the beginning of Eritrean history for if they scratch a skin deep into it, it would lead them to the origin they deride most. The identity ghedli inherited from colonial Italy is so belligerent, bogus and is culpable for the state of affairs we have been put through and the current realities of Eritrea. It’s here where my view overlaps with that of YG’s. Why should I criticize him any way? He is stating the obvious. I know it’s inconvenient truth for those who are indulged in this divisive project but the rescue starts with acknowledging in this fundamental “deformity”. Deflate this hype of bogus nationalism and your problems are half-solved.

          • saay7

            Selamat T.Kifle:

            1. My claim is not that TPLF did not have a reason to engage in battle with ELF. My claim is that the TPLF engaged in battle and for a long time lied about it. You said, no, it didn’t lie about it. The book, when it is found, will be our judge. If you have a copy of it, scan the page for the readers to judge. It is that simple.

            2. Ah, we are back to psychoanalyzing how the “assault the colonialist inflict on the Eritrean mind has been irreparable.” Now, here is a list of all the African countries that were colonized, some for longer periods than Eritrea:

            Zanzibar, 1503 to Portugal
            Algeria , 1830 to France
            Comoros, 1843 to France
            Basutoland, 1868 to the United Kingdom
            Zululand 1879 to the United Kingdom
            Egypt 1882 to the United Kingdom
            Bechuanaland 1885 to the United Kingdom
            Eritrea 1890 to Italy
            Dahomey 1894 to France
            Rwanda 1894 to Germany
            Benin 1897 to the United Kingdom
            Burundi 1899 to Germany
            Ashanti 1900 to the United Kingdom
            Swaziland 1902 to the United Kingdom
            Fulani Empire 1903 to France and the United Kingdom
            Libya 1911 to Italy
            Morocco 1912 to France

            Do go on with your psych chair: are all these African nations infected? If so, what do we do about it? If not, why is the Eritrean case different?

            3. Now, help me out with how your views overlap with that of YG. I will construct a syllogism: feel free to correct where I am failing to understand:

            a. T. Kifle is a proud Weyane
            b. Weyane believes (believed?) that the Eritrean question was a colonial question
            c. YG strongly disagrees with the claim that the Eritrean question is a colonial question
            d. T. Kifle agrees with YG.

            Now if this was an excel worksheet, I would get #DIV/0! What am I missing?

            saay

          • Fnote Selam

            Hello T.Kifle and Saay7,

            I am not a good writer so I am just going to ask a question that hopefully will provide another dimension to the discussion about whether TPLF believed/wanted/planned for Eritrea’s separation from Ethiopia and get its independence. Here is the question:-

            Would it be possible for Tigray to secede from Ethiopia and get its own independence (which some ppl believe was TPLF’s plan B or plan A, depends who you ask) if Eritrea remained part of Ethiopia?

            Discuss….

            Thank you,

            FS.

          • saay7

            Selamat Fnote:

            Clever….but we have discussed this before and, just for fun, I will reply using T.Kifle’s voice and T.Kifle can reply using my voice:

            Excerpt for an extremely brief period of time, which can be counted in weeks if not days, TPLF never (ever, ever, ever) considered that it was fighting for secession from Ethiopia because, after all, the center of Ethiopia (Abyssinia) was based in Axum which is, lest we forget, in Tigray. This very (very, very, very) brief period that the TPLF entertained the idea of outright independence was exploited cynically by its enemies. The “Dewta” (standstill) of 1989-1990 where, according to Tigrayan intellectual Alemseghed Abbai, the TPLF, after kicking the Derg out of Tigray, was re-educating the people of Tigray that its real goal was democratization of Ethiopia and not secession from Ethiopia, is wildly misunderstood by people like the great SAAY.

            Victory to the masses (which was NOT copied from EPLF)
            Our struggle is long and our victory is certain (also NOT copied from EPLF)

            T.Kifle 🙂

          • Fnote Selam

            Hello Saay,

            If we give benefit of the doubt to the idea that TPLF, for the most part, didn’t plan for secession of Tigray, then we can assume that their belief in Eritrea’s Independence was genuine. So, I am really perplexed (and disappointed to be honest) why so many Tigrayans, nowadays, seem to question Eritrea’s independence, either directly or indirectly, by criticizing the methods we used to obtain our independence.

            Thanks again,

            FS

          • T. Kifle

            Hi Fote,

            The reason we have many Tigrean voices that are opposed Eritrean Independence is because they consider this issue as TPLF’a EPRDF’s Achilles heel. Eritrea is the single most issue that troubles the Ethiopian political space. These guys cannot oppose and make a dent short of accusing TPLF as a sell out, strategically hurting the country by making it landlocked. And some morons in Eritrea dances to this very tune which is quite enigmatic.

          • Fnote Selam

            Hello T.Kifle,

            Thanks for providing me with some insight into why many Tigrayans are cornered into opposing Eri’s independence. So, my next question is, how do we proceed from here as two independent countries with mutual respect?

            Thanks again,

            FS.

          • T. Kifle

            Dear Fnote,

            We are just two countries. We need to learn to live side by side notwithstanding our perceptions on one another. We are fighting too much for too little. I very much hope that PFDJ’s days are numbered and the one that succeeds it is expect to undo the major impediments we are currently facing. I presume that this time the cheerleading crowds and war mongers have learned their lessons the hard way. Only fools would choose to traverse the same perilous contour more than once.

          • Fnote Selam

            Dear T.Kifle,

            That is kind of a generic statement (which is important), but I was looking for more specific ways the two countries could live as good neighbors. For example, from your perspective, what does Eritreans (forget pfdjites for now) need to do to make Ethiopians (and now, including Tigrayans) to be more comfortable with having Eritrea as a sovereign and independent nations?

            Thank you,

            FS

          • T. Kifle

            Hi Fnote,

            If you push me to provide a template for a go forward, I have the following in mind.
            1. PFDJ must go first by any means
            2. Normalization and reconciliation immediately starts as the new government in Eritrea assumes power
            3. Demarcation of the border shall be negotiated taking into consideration the interest of the people residing in the affected areas in particular and in the border in general. If the people want to join Eritrea or Ethiopia, the lines must follow their desires. IF Ethiopia is willing to accept Eritrea’s secession, there is no point we fight on few acres of land that might go either way.
            4.Then, continuous confidence building measures be taken as we go forward, resetting cross-border trade and investments
            5.Avoid in any overt or covert activities that stake the strategic interest of either of the countries.

          • Fnote Selam

            Dear T.Kifle,

            Those are great points (I dont agree fully with all of them, but they are good start), but these are things that can, for the most part, done by governments. My question was, what can the common citizens could do? E.g., what do you (as a person) expect from the common Eritrean so that we can move on and live as good neighbors? From my point of view, I would, for example, like to see Ethiopians stop using the old Eth map (with Eri as its part) in social media and every where else. The biggest facebook page of Ethiopians has that map as its profile pic. I think that is disrespectful and wouldn’t help the two ppl move forward regardless whether PFDJ is in power or not.

            Thank you,

            FS.

          • Amde

            Fnote Selam,

            1. TPLF’s position on Eritrea was a strategic decision to secure Tigray’s (South Mereb’s) northern flank by passing power on to Tigrayans who temporarily believed they were Eritreans (North Mereb) but were “really” Tigrayans at heart. Hence, Meles Zenawi’s Friday night dates with Issayas Afeworki as listening to Issayas was more educational than reading a library of books.

            2. Tigrayan de jure “independence” was not necessary as long as the TPLF was the hegemon in Ethiopia and the northern flank was securely held by trusted ethnic brethren who it assumed knew their place.

            3. EPLFDJ had its own ambition as the regional hegemon. It was going to let TPLF know it and show who’s boss. Hence Badme.

            4. TPLF is back to fishing for a secure northern flank, but this time with a partner that won’t rock the boat.

            The common people are just grass.

            Amde

          • Shum

            Great. We’re getting psychoanalyzed by Ethiophiles about our syndromes and the likes on other forums. Now Ethiopians on this forum are telling us we’re Tigrayans at heart. What’s next? The grass getting trampled aren’t the common people. It’s common sense.

          • Amde

            Mr. Shum,

            I think you misunderstood me.

            I am stating what i believe TPLF was really thinking behind its alliance with EPLF, and the subsequent mess it made of the relationship leading up to the Badme debacle and beyond is a testament to it.

            I believe the author of “Identity Jilted” had it somewhat correct in this regard. I believe Kebbesans have proven they are more Eritreans first before they are Tigrayans. In contrast, the TPLF likely believed (and may still do so in some respects) that behind the veneer of an Eritrean identify, people really boil down to their ethnic identity, which – based on the criteria they established – meant they can only be Tigrayans as far as the Tigrigna speaking kebesans are concerned.

            The TPLF can believe this about an Eritrean identity because they believed the much older Ethiopian identity was fake too and amounted to nothing more than a hoodwinking elite presiding over many ethnic identities. The TPLF has built everything on ethnic identity being the alpha and omega of all social organization.

            Amde

          • Shum

            Hello Amde hawey,

            I think I have misunderstood you. My apologies. I remember reading Identity Jilted in my younger days. You have a point. They (TPLF) do seem to approach things from an ethnic perspective. I hope that mode of thinking never takes hold in Eritrea. It’ll only add to our myriad of issues.

          • T. Kifle

            Selamat Amde,

            You said, “The TPLF has built everything on ethnic identity being the alpha and omega of all social organization”, and i feel it’s unbecoming of a man of your calibre. Such blanket and lame judgements would hardly contribute to honest reflection and learning

          • Fanti Ghana

            Hello Brother TK,
            I was surprised too.
            Besides, if every repression in TPLF’s country was based on ethnic identity, what alternative method is there for social organization? This is a classic example of intellectual understanding of universality gone awry.
            Selam.

          • Fnote Selam

            Dear Amde,

            I would not say that what you are saying is not a possibility, but the most evidence that we have doesn’t support it, in my humble opinion.

            Thank you,

            FS

          • Shum

            Hello Fnote,

            If you encounter Tigrayans in person, generally speaking, you don’t see them questioning our independence. The Internet magnifies these kind of people. YG wrote some BS articles that attracted these CyberEthiopians and sadly, some Eritreans, that had them salivating at the mouth. Check out Amanuel’s latest article. They’re over there now throwing a hissy fit.

            As if they’ve never lived under dictatorships, they extended this “phenomenon” to all kinds of conjectures and analysis of our people’s deficiencies. In the process, they forgot they were playing Koboro during Dergue’s killing sprees. Ask them what they did to resist living in their dictatorships and watch them clam up. There were real fighters fighting for a real cause when their momma’s were wiping their nose. But hey, they can play brave citizen now by trying to poo poo on who we are and what we strive for. I wouldn’t take them seriously.

          • T. Kifle

            Hi FS,
            Sal has answered your question satirically. The secret of TPLF is that it had no secret at all. The “Tigray Republic manifesto” emerged in the mid of 1968 EC, had a life of 6 moths and been corrected publicly. There is nothing secret about it. There wasn’t such thing called plan B. Sal and me had discussed the issue at length elsewhere in this forum. The 1989 “dewta” as dangerous as it was had nothing to do with Tigray seeking a statehood. It had to do with the asymmetric sacrifice Tigreans had to pay in the process. EPRDF has been already formed after more than 9 years of negotiations with the then EPDM and now ANDM. Even if the tegadelties thought “since Tigray was freed there is no reason to fight for freeing others”, by what logic would one accuse TPLF as baptised at last moment?
            In conclusion, Tigray never ever bargains on its Ethiopian identity.

          • saay7

            Hi T. Kifle:

            Ummm… I think if you entertained being a country separate from Ethiopia for 6 months, you forfeit the right to say “Tigray never ever bargains on its Ethiopian identity.” For the sake of accuracy, you can say “Tigray hardly ever bargains….” It is the exceptions that disqualify the absolute statements, don’t you think?

            saay

          • T. Kifle

            Selamat SAAY,

            Haha I still stand by my statement. I am talking about Tigray not TPLF.

          • saay7

            MerHaba T.Kifle:

            My mistake: I assumed that Harbeyna Weyanai was the vanguard of the great people of Tigray, always has, always does, always will reflect their aspirations (99.99%) forever and ever, amen:)

            saay

          • T. Kifle

            Hi SAAY,

            1. On a basis of no time frame, I shall try my best to get the book and do as I am told. And the problem with the nitiric way is that the habit is recurrent just falls into another mistake before the words fly out of the mouth.
            2. This doesn’t need psychoanalysis at all. It has been an established culture among the mainstream elites for everyone to see. You see, Eritrea had not attained the nationhood while the countries you mentioned turned post-colonial states. Though it’s fairly possible to claim nationhood as a colonial default, Eritrea trodden a different path and become part of Ethiopia,, hence, the complication.

            3.
            a) true
            b) true
            c) YG disagrees on the “Ethiopia colonized Eritrea” thesis no more no less
            d) yes, I agree, I , in no way can see, Ethiopia colonized Eritrea.

          • saay7

            Selamat T.Kifle:

            Previously, in T.Kifle 101, we learned the following: “as far as one is a Weyane, they are just that. If one loses this fundamental attribute in any way, they often end up not in “Weyane 2.0″ but in the ever declining chauvinist camp.”

            We now resume our regularly-scheduled program but foreshadowing alert: we will use the previous lesson somewhere in this post.

            1. Let’s expand the discussion: does anyone have a copy of “Qalsi hzbi ertra kabey nabey”? If you do, could you please go to the chapter that deals with the ELF-EPLF civil war and just scan a page? Much obliged, y’all.

            2. Let me see if I get this straight. The other African countries who were colonized were unscathed by colonization (at least, unlike Eritreans, the colonial assault on their mind did not leave them with “irreparable” damage) because they had the opportunity to become post-colonial states. That’s what differentiates colonized Eritrea from colonized Africa. And who is to blame for Eritrea not becoming a post-colonial state? Let me guess: not Ethiopia, it is ghedli, right?

            3. If b is true (Weyane strongly believes (believed?) that the Eritrean question was a colonial question), if d is also true (T.Kifle agrees with YG that the Eritrean question was not a colonial question), doesn’t that, by definition mean T.Kifle has deviated from Weyane 1.0. And since we learned from yesterday’s lecture that “If one loses this fundamental attribute in any way, they often end up not in “Weyane 2.0″ but in the ever declining chauvinist camp” does that mean that T.Kifle has joined the chauvinist camp?

            And I don’t know what “YG agrees on the “Ethiopia colonized Eritrea” thesis no more no less” means. No more than whom, no less than whom? No more than Tekeste Negash?

            Now, I need your help Dr. Freud (it turns out every Ethiopian elite is a psychoanalyst.) Since I am, by the low standards of pre-literate societies part of the “mainstream elite”, can you tell me how has Italian colonialism left me with “irreparable” damage? I am genuinely curious and I am always up for a free session from my learned friends:)

            saay

          • Shum

            Well played saay. I never thought I’d ever see the day a Woyane imply he or she is an imperial Ethiopian. They don’t go together. I have to believe he misspoke.

          • dawit

            Peace Serray,

            I don’t know your reason why you picked this argument. I only imagine you must be hurt by the fact that I dared to trash your holy grail YG ideas. So you think Eritrean people revolution is a 30
            years coup? Waw, it is amazing how far people blinded by hate can travel! Do you think the American Revolution was a coup against King George of England? You will not dare to state that. The Eritrean people revolution started long before Isaias was born. Eritrean struggle to free themselves from the yolk of colonization went through many phases. It started as peaceful resistance, and when that did not materialize it went through armed struggle by ELF under
            the leadership of Hamid Awate in September 1,1961. The struggle continued for 30 long years with a lot of sacrifices and culminated in May 24, 1991 under the leadership of EPLF. The struggle was not to change the Ethiopian government as you implied. If that was the case Isaias would have sat at Menelik Palace to rule Ethiopia and Eritrea. The Eritrean nation was born in 1993 after a
            referendum approved by the Eritrean people by 99.8% margin and if you and your mentor YG did not vote, it is too bad you missed your chance to Keep Eritrea with your Big Mama Ethiopia..The Eritrean Assembly voted to elect Isias to be the President of the new nation. So my dear Serrai whether you like it or not the Eritrean government is the legally approved by Eritrean people and accepted by UN as the only legitimate government of Eritrean Nation. I hope I have shade some light into the YG brain washed mind..

            Peace

            dawit

          • Semere Andom

            It is certain that the current turmoil threatens the very existence of Eritrea as we came to know it, civil war, and breeding ground for the international terrorism threaten our nation. But it would be the second saddest thing that ever happened to us after EPLF entering Asmara in 1991, if we squander this opportunity of a life time. The delusion of the legality of PFDJ is so disturbing that we need to go back to the drawing board and chart a new beginning on foot impression of our last trek, to borrow from the title of F.W Deklark’s book. The opportunity to capitalize in this crisis is to weed out the notion that still exists: that IA and his government are legal. EPLF and PFDJ and I do not make a distinction between both, they hail from a violent past and that is the alien identity that they have rehearsed in Sahel and instilled in the ilk. Apparently “znegese ngustana” is like splitting the atom and is considered to trash” YG’s ideas. YG with the many fallacies, several unsubstantiated claims about ghedli gave you what the 30 year struggle deprived you from, if you can heed it, it is called to think for yourself and be prepared to pay the price with courage. If YG was in the third world country he would be stoned to death by the “dawits”, but they shudder to do that in the west as their fate will be to be locked up with gays and transvestite and no bribery will save them as t would have done in the third world countries.

            Sometimes many of us have referred to PFDJ and GOE as mafia that is a compliment, the mafia are cruel to others when stealing and committing crimes just like the PFDJ, but the mafia defends the honor of their families, daughters and wives, the PFDJ that dawit called legitimate does not even defend the dignities of its daughters, it humiliates them and when those daughters go the world capital of torture and rap, where dawit’s “legitimate” government domiciles the supporters cheer the rape of children, the wailing of the women in Karsheli as Dejen told us. And anyone who has some sense left would not say the Eritrean people legitimize this kind of government

            The opportunity that is swaddled in this crisis is we now know what ticks the dawits and all those who bless the suffering and humiliation of a promising nation on the break of becoming Somalia by legitimizing PFDJ, at any cost the PFDJ must be preserved. A nation that kills several of its founding fathers has slim chance of making it. YG bless his mind is the antidote of this smarmy self-serving confidence, whose underpinnings are the ghost of our ghedli that was murdered by the precursor of the GoE

            Wake up dawit, the woyanes won, they won the war, they won over the world, they won 25 km buffer zone, they won 14 years to invest it to lift themselves from poverty, they won the contract to guard Asmara (DEMHIT), also they make up the “legitimate” GOE. They when in MIT and they won when UofA was shut down

          • Rahwa T

            “…The struggle was not to change the Ethiopian government as you implied. If that was the case Isaias would have sat at Menelik Palace to rule Ethiopia and Eritrea…”

            Mr Ayalkbet ! What other surprise would you bring tomorrow?

          • Serray

            dawit,

            Am I to gather that you will support a revolution, a civil war, to overthrow the regime but not a democratic coup? By the way, Haile slasie and mengistu were UN recognized rulers of eritrea; it didn’t stop shaebia and jebha from fighting them. Why are yoi making recognition by the UN a seal of approval that makes a coup or a struggle illegitimate.

            Your post attracted my attention because you said you are “curious to learn” but when Sal schooled you, you run out stomping. Nothing to do with yg. The reason people like you diss him is part of the reason I think he is right. If people like you, people who think overthrowing a regime of murderers and human traffickers is illegal, start agreeing with him, then I will question him. What made me respond to THIS post of yours is, another lesson you failed to learn. You support a regime that made an art of dissing the UN. For thirty years jebha and shaebia accused the UN nonstop and yet you made recognition by the UN a condition for legitimacy. I know it is difficult to be principled when supporting something that completely lacks principle, but, hey, bringing the UN to support an argument that overthrowing an illegitimate regime is illegal is low even for you.

          • Semere Andom

            Hi Dave:
            Besides the fallay of the “znegse Ngusna” I agree, everyone agrees, even YG agrees that Eritreans took risnk to wage the war, but you spoiled that by saying that you support the dictatorship so not to squander the Indpendence, let me help you rephrase it for your:
            You are telling us that no matter what PFDJ doing to the country and the postery of the whole people, no matter the crimes that PFDJ match the colonize’s crimes in barbarity and scope, no matter the torture, no matter if the G-15 who most of them are founding fathers the struggle you admire, no matter how bleak PFDJ is making Eritrea, setting it up for failure, unsalavagabe dmage that us the very anthi-thesis if the ghedli you pick your “kobero and aytuhazui tible|

          • dawit

            Hi SEM
            You like it or not that is my stand.
            Peace
            dawit

          • Papillon

            Dear Dawit,

            Essentially, we are not opposing dictatorship. Yes you heard me right. Let me be more specific… history has proven beyond a reasonable doubt that, a country like Eritrea can do well under dictatorship. I am sure by now, you must have guessed where I am getting at–The Asian Tiger Nations. From the 1960s through out the 90s the Tiger nations (read: South Korea, Taiwan and Singapore) under authoritarian or dictatorial regimes scored remarkable economic growth where they transformed their respective citizens into middle class and upper middle class citizens. When the otherwise known as Washington Consensus (read: Cooky Cutter or One Fits All—Free Market and Liberal Democracy as a wand for development) prescribed otherwise, they elected to engage in a massive export oriented growth where they used the massive trade surplus in education, investing in human capital and building the main institutions that could essentially lay out the cornerstones for a free society in a long run. Moreover, the low wages among other things attracted massive foreign investment where by it injected massive growth to the already set in motion transformation of the society into a better future. That said, when the time was ripe to open up and allow the society to engage in free enterprise including all the elements of democracy, the nations were transformed not only economically but politically and socially as well.

            What we have in Eritrea however is not even a dictatorship or tyranny as we all came to know through the crude and refined definition of the terms. What we have in Eritrea is not even a regime. In short, what we have in Eritrea is a mafia group engaged in destroying not only what was left behind by the previous regimes but engaged in destroying the social fabric as well. Instead of investing in human capital (read: the productive and younger generation), it is destroying it beyond repair. Instead of encouraging foreign investment, it has rendered Eritrea a “Leper Colony” inflicted with a sense of morbid paranoia. Harping on Gedli glory in an attempt to put a lipstick on a pig is not only irresponsible but it is immoral and cruel as well. I can’t even imagine how in the world a smart guy like you and others who are under the charms of a sadist are failing to see the grim reality that is eating Eritrea up like a deadly cancer.

          • dawit

            Dear Papillon,

            Thank for your kind response on my thoughts and I am surprised for you to defend an idea that Eritrea could have done better under dictatorial regimes like that of Asian Tigers. I totally agree with that statement. In fact that was the dream of PFDJ when they started ruling Eritrea. However, that dream among other reasons was not accepted among our neighbors especially Ethiopia. Eventually designed was derailed by fabricating a border war. That war created havoc to the infant nation, including the disintegration and divisions among the leadership to the infant country. So Eritrea moved from a dream to become like Singapore to isolated country all designed to reverse the independence of Eritrea. All the programs that were put to guide Eritrea to become democratic and economically strong country in the Horn of Africa was shelved aside and Eritrea’s hope turned sour and the only remaining dream became to maintained and defend its independence against the relentless threat facing the régime. Like any nation survival and national security took priority over other goals democracy, free elections, free press etc. The Asian Tigers were lucky they did not have to deal with envious neighbors, who want to measure their progress by comparing to the misery of their neighbor. If Eritrea deteriorates they think they are progressing even if they trail at the bottom of the world standard.

            You wrote “What we have in Eritrea is not even a regime. In short, what we have in Eritrea is a mafia group engaged in destroying not only what was left behind by the previous regimes but engaged in destroying the social fabric as well.”

            Well my dear Papillon, you can call whatever adjectives you may choose to describe the rulers of the country, but like it or not they are the leaders of the country accepted internationally and supported by a vast majority of the Eritrean population. Now, the opposition in collaboration with the Ethiopian regime wants to change the Eritrean government by force. That is where I disagree, and why I support the Eritrean regime with whatever color you may like to paint them. They have stood for Eritrea to be an independent nation in the world. I don’t see any other alternative, independent group that is better. So I work with what I have accepting all the weakness and limitations instead of dreaming with what I do not have. To remove the dirt in my yard, I have to use the shovel in my hand instead of dreaming the caterpillar backhoe that I don’t have.
            Peace
            dawit

          • Rahwa T

            Sir,
            You must be sick man. You have corrupted understanding on the liberation of Ethiopia. You don’t have the slightest moral to say “Ethiopia’s liberation would not have been materialized without the sacrifices of Eritrean Askari Soldiers”. You are fabricating lies all your life. Please ask the Italians to give you the right mirror so that you would see your real image.

          • dawit

            Dear Rahwa T.
            Instead of refuting the statement I made with facts you rushed to insults. You know I have the historical evidence to back the statement I wrote. I know it is the habit of many Ethiopian like you to minimize the contributions and sacrifices made to Eritreans to Ethiopia. You even fabricate lies to accuse Eritreans for illegally exporting Ethiopian coffee to hurt Ethiopia. You deny that Eritreans sacrifice to overthrow DERG and put you in Menelik Palace. I challenge you to refute the statement with historical facts.

            Peace
            Dawit

          • Kim Hanna

            Selam Dawit,
            .
            ……….I support PFDJ not to squander the independence of Eritrea…..
            …………………..centuries of Chains of colonization……
            .
            ……………………………..Sacrifices of Eritrean Askaris..(for Ethiopian Independence)….
            .
            …………………………………………….Y.G writes trash….
            .
            …………………………………………………..Peace
            .
            …George Orwell?
            .
            K.H

        • Fanti Ghana

          Hello dawit,
          We were just wondering about you a day or two ago. It is nice to hear from you, and please keep it up. By the way I have “a thing” for September. Besides እንቁጣጣሽ’ና መስቀል being in September back home, my birthday and my wedding day are also in September. My best friend and best man’s wedding day is in September. His wedding day in American calendar and mine in Ethiopian Calendar end up on the same day. Everyone of my September celebrations are nicely spaced apart and they never overlap. And now, I am adding awate.com’s birth day to my list of things to remember in September.
          Happy September and welcome back my Friend!

          • Abinet

            Selam FG
            We used to celebrate Meskerem 1 a day “Eritrea wede enat agerwa yeteqelaqelechbet”. Gizew endet teqeyere ebakih?
            Melkam neger ayberektm.
            September is a beautiful month in Ethiopia with a lot of hope to the new year.

    • Hope

      Welcome back dawitom,my old friend!
      We are talking about time now….It is a matter of risk-benefit ratio.
      Nothing is for free in life-as the American saying goes on.
      The belated message by the Eritrean Catholic Leadership,endorsed by most Eritreans, spear-headed by this website,is what we have to consider.
      “Hawikhan/haftikhan abey alewu ” by now ,as we speak,and if we do not take the risk –any risk for that matter, where will be those haftikha and hawikha by tomorrow—when they are alomst gone by today?
      The Catholic Bishops asked, indirectly, the GoE :”If the problems are known,then why can’t we seek/work for solutions as a remedy rather than blaming the same culprit and the same reasons over and over”?
      Veteran Mahmoud Salih then clarifes it by saying:”The border is NOT an isuse for us Eritreans coz it is already resolved by the EEBC…..rather, we have to work—for—-(Read the rest).
      We could talk about the other factor but I am not allowed to say/ do so but I believe if there is a genuine and real change in a “safe” and coordianted way,the other factor could potentially be handled in a relativley easier way but as most Awatistas advocated prioritization is of ESSENCE and of UTMOST importance.
      As most of us belatedly figured it out,the fake border excuse and related drama is secondary and of less importance.
      If i do NOT follow my Bishops’ advice/Kenona after my Confession,well, then I cannot claim to be a Catholic by any standard.
      Wedehanka,
      hope

  • sabri

    Selam Tesfabirhan,

    Your comment is interesting. You are right EDF is part of PFDJ. In any undemocratic country the defense force is the tool of the regime. Nevertheless, we have seen in many countries change comes from this group. Military force under dictatorship can never be coherent. There is always crack. The question is how the regime is able to seal the crack. Until now the regime is able to seal the crack by tightly control the entire institution. But there is no guaranties. It can burst anytime.

  • Rodab

    Hello discussants,
    In our quest for change, the first order of business will be to put the President, his handful top advisers and saboteurs under arrest. As per the unimplemented constitution, put the minister of local government in charge and declare state of emergency until the situation is stabilized. Once we pass these early yet crucial hurdles, we will be better positioned to address the more complicated matters. What is most scary during the initial stages of change is the real or perceived power vacuum which will usher lawlessness and uncertainty. Top on my fear is not that we will kill each other (we won’t) but the mass exodus (both civilians and members of EDF) in a magnitude never seen before. What happens in those early few days will have an impact that will be felt beyond our generation.

    On Diaspora: my view is not that they shouldn’t have a say or involvement but rather there is no reason to give them priority. There is no reason their role will be required at the early stages, for they are a lesser stakeholders as compared to folks back home. Besides, how or who will determine who is invited for what and under what criteria…not only it creates divisions but also it adds complexity to the already extremely complicated matter. However, once normalcy is reigned, Diasporas’ involvement will be a must. As individuals, their inputs on wide-range discussions of the future will be beneficial. Their contributions in whatever they can contribute will be desired. As opposition groups, their participation in governance will be required in advancing a representative system.

    On foreign intervention: in the midst of all of this, we would be remarkably naive to not expect the United Sated, Ethiopia and Sudan’s hands to try to influence matters to fit their interests. As some would love to have us believe, these countries are NOT led by angels but by people. And when you are people, your interest comes first. In that regard, the best we can hope for is the interference is not too great as to not compromise our sovereignty. Having said that, owing to the secretive nature of the regime, the foreign or internal policy positions of individuals is not known, if they have any policy at all. This will help minimize the need for foreign intervention in support of one figure over the other. Secretiveness might have unintended benefit in rare cases!

  • Tesfabirhan WR

    Dear Saay,

    The strategy you have drawn here can only be tangible if and only if its objective is to “weed-out” PFDJ system peacefully. Before mentioning the short-comes of your PFDJ-(DIA + Enforcers) provisional government, I would like to emphasis some of the mentioned short-comings of your proposal (Am I write to say it a proposal, or it is a final solution???).

    1. Your proposal does not clearly delineate what really is PFDJ. You have just scanned thoroughly what others value PFDJ. Hence, first define who PFDJ is.

    Note: PFDJ is not DIA+ Enforcers+Ordinary members. PFDJ is an organization/front that works in definite ideology.

    2. PFDJ has worked relentlessly to merge what they call in their box, “Three-in-One”, The people, the military and the government. How can then you take EDF as a separate institute and be an enabler in your proposal? It is possible that some sympathizers could exist within the EDF but to expect them as possible doers is too optimistic. EDF has stopped producing educated military commanders almost since 2001. They have closed the only existed Military college in Sawa, “Enda Mekonnat” Without educated military personnel EDF’s role can not be a democratic coup but just to remove a power that has sucked their life. The 2012 Militia that is composed of ordinary citizens is what we have in the forefront.

    Remark: According to PFDJ ideology, the mentioned three actors are ONE. 9According to Guru of this philosophy, x-general Sibhat Efrem).

    3. As Mahmud said, the border issue is dead. No file is needed to be opened and EEBC has done it’s job. It is up to the international community to respect the rule of law regarding Sovereignty. Opening an office that deals with such issue is just a bargain and in favor of Ethiopian political hallucination.

    Caution: No energy should be wasted on dead issues.

    4. Reconciliation: What is all this about? What ever disagreements exist within the opposition camp is just because of an absence to clear strategy. The rest is just personal. To give time for personal disagreements is unhealthy and it will end-up to more division and chaos. PFDJ is the enemy of all and all those who are in different camp should align themselves to this basic target. Even the old political dilemmas was centered on differences emerged in solving the problems that questioned for their own existence. Political differences do not need reconciliation but rooms to discuss and hence democracy. Beyond that it is just megaberya (መጋበርያ ሽማግለታት or በላዕቲ በጊዕ). Consistence, transparency and responsibility is what we can consider them as a conciliatory force.

    Note: All political diverges, disagreements, hates and skirmish are mainly because of breath taking.

    5. If EDF uses his ontime present forces ad then after is to rehabilitate them, what is the compensation? Isn’t like those who joined the EPLF IN 1990 AND 1991 and are said good-bye for bad intentions? What is the fate of the existing military strategy? What is the future of EDF? Remember transferring from a provisional committee to a one ministerial force will not be an easy take. Military men are camera mongers. Once they come on camera, they want to stay there.

    6. the 1997 constitution is to some extent fulfilling PFDJ system. To what level of guarantee is the “democratic-coup” ready to adopt it.

    Remark: There are a number of proclamations that are almost substituting and work as constitutional ways. What is the clear way of demarcating between these two legal systems?

    7. PFDJ has succeeded in creating a negative force. How can a democratic coup be different from this is still questionable.

    The list can continue but some of Mahmuday’s points can be added (thank you Aya Mahmud for saying it in a more powerful character).

    Finally, if handled and managed within a welll defined time frame, democratic coup, not what you listed but what your notion is is a possible premises for peaceful Eritrean future and that can give full guarantee for Eraitrean sovereignty and healthy diplomatic relationships with the outside world.

    Additional questions still exist for refining this potential strategic solution once we fully agree on PFJD is not only DIA and a couple of enforcers but a system that will even be hard to install a new democratic government. In addition, time frame for the strategy and in particular changing proclamations that were imposed solely to fulfill PFDJ ambition of enslaving the economic strata need a careful study. Unless favorable transitional governance is implemented, the day after implementation of the constitution is also another boiling dilemma.

    Above all, human resource that is well educated in this regard needs to be prepared, inside and/or outside.

    Finally, “Weed-Out” the PFDJ system as basic objective and to make it in a institutional way beheaded by “Democratic-Coup is what I am fully supporting to have a peaceful (at least with minimum chaos) transition to democracy. And on those who are ready to take this as a strategy need a concerted effort to propagate this Democratic Coup as a way of toppling the brutal regime in Asmara and among those who are having a PFDJ mindset.

    Hawka
    tes

    • Hope

      Welcome back wed Ad,
      U have been missed for a while.Hope U enjoyed politcs-free zone vacation.
      For the most part,U just repeated what SAAY said.
      BTW,the EDF is NOT PFDJ but its cadres and few leaders….The EDF already over-rided the PFDJ System but it lacks Strong leadership to act.
      Now what we know how the pFDJ system works,the solution should NOT be as complex as it may sound or seem.
      But one fact is simpler:
      The implementaion of the Ratified and refined Constitution will change the game,no matter what,no matter who and,irrespective of any System.
      Mobilization of the eritrean Public is the major challenge that we have failed thgus and if we succeed on that in a coordinated and concerted manner,then things will be ” Enehe meda,enhe feres.
      the Eritrean Public of all walks should be convinced that it is soley its responsibility to change things.
      First thing is First then other things will follow.The PFDJ system will easily collapse after few of its actors collapse

  • Hope

    Merhab and thank you ,Cousin,for finally listening to our cries and requests to bring up and focus on our real problems and issues;and for nailing it to the point,as usual.
    Enehe feres,enhe meda to the “Genuine Debators” on Eritrean Real Issues and Real
    Solutions.

    • george

      I like that you have hope. But I am afraid you are on the wrong website. Most so called debater’s are non Eritreans. The other one are lovers of anything Ethiopia. And the rest are a hodgepodge of clueless and bitter ruminants of ELF.

      • Fanti Ghana

        Hello George,
        Welcome to awate.com. Are you Ethiopian?

        • Shum

          Fanti hawey,

          Surely you jest. I’m willing to bet he’s not.

          • Fanti Ghana

            Hey Shum,
            Definitely not. He was being ridiculous, and (against my own rules) I was being silly. By his own logic, if most Awatistas are Ethiopians, then there is a good chance that he could also be an Ethiopian. His reasoning to solve Eritrea’s problem amounts to this: No Ethiopians, hate any thing Ethiopian, and you must not be x-ELF. In other words, you have to be PFDJ to solve Eritrea’s problem. The irony is that “george” is exactly the problem people are trying to solve here.

      • Kokhob Selam

        Sir,
        01.how do you know most of debaters are not Eritreans? 02. what is wrong to have other nationalists?
        03. instead of labeling people don’t you think tackling the idea is the best? 04. I feel this is the best site for everyone, just simple evidence is your own post above. what do you say?

        • sara

          first i really appreciate your civility , and hope many will follow your way.
          but going back to what you asked allow me join george in answering this tough questions you brought to the fore.
          1-simple, read most of what is written (commentaries) and in no time you will sense/feel there are many of them here or others who carry the same thoughts.
          2-hey, awate professes , eritrean solutions for eritrean problems , why invite those who bleeded us for 30+years to discuss our internal issues…and still we dont accept our neighbors to the west who have sheltered us for those long years and still do..with nothing in return.
          3-there is no wrong label here, it is true there are many who promote ethiophile ideals but tolerated by the good awate team. 90 mill “mkt” too much pressure to resist. 4-your feeling is right.. and realistic. tomorrow is awate remembrance day…of the that special day september 1 /1961 and on that days occassion i wish awate team will bring us a well versed
          written message of unity-prosperity and peace.

          • Kokhob Selam

            Dearest sara.

            01. “the same thought” this is one can’t show that they are from the same country. I might be from Eritrea or Ethiopia and still think for peace tranquility of people.

            02. I heard several times people who participate in Awate are from “Weyane” or “Ethiopia” I have a question here, why all Eritreans including those PFDJ supporters and even the leaders don’t participate. isn’t very democratic site? If PFDJ site allow me to give my comments I will and will not complain.

            03. “Eritrean solutions for Eritrean problems” who else can solve it? now, getting support from others is not a crime as far as you know how to use it and you are sure of your base. this is another nonsense thing, why don’t we show and work this way or the other.

            04. “there is no wrong label here, it is true there are many who promote ethiophile ideals but tolerated by the good awate team” awate team allowed people from Ethiopia to give their comments. in doing so the team opened the way to let people understand each other. that will have a great effect in the future mutual understanding. but they didn’t control our nation or our national dignity, like what PFDJ is doing with Ethiopian party inside Eritrea. this is “zehmqo aleni betrey habuni”.

            05. you said something about awate 1961. you are proud of Awate and sept.1961 I am proud too, awate team is proud, PFDJ is proud (although they have tried earlier otherwise) but now they will say it, they will start singing and dancing. we are proud of all historical days but we are not up to that. non of us has the quality of M-Edriss Awate. we just talk. I have 42 poems about Sept. 1 Lol.

            Sister we need to be practical people and work don’t you think?

      • Hope

        My george,
        I have to admit that I have had that perception and attitude as expressed in my comments.
        That has been my challenge
        But I finally learned how to differentiate the “sirnay from Kirdad”;Bi fri’om kitfeltwom ekhum.”
        Mr Amanuel Hidrat also advised me as to how to deal with them.
        1)Challenge them and hit them hard reasonably and objectively when they bark too much and irrationally and when they cross the red line.
        2)Ignore them when they bark for the sake of barking and as long as they do NOT cross the line.
        Nothing is perfect and nothing is new about the Psycological Warfare as it has been going on for 15 yrs now and it will just fade away.
        Remember:
        “Never kneel down but when praying to the Lord and when shooting at the enemy”–Ex-Minister Ali Abdu.
        “kalsina newih eyu,awetna ghin nay ghidden eyu” at the end of the day.
        We have done it AGAINST ALL ODDS(Dan Connell)
        It is a matter of time:
        Here is what my cousin SAAY advised me yesterday:
        “Sebir wide be’al sibir ewut’tu”-Vet Artist Al’Amin Abdel’letif

  • Semere Andom

    Sal and all
    Thanks this will save us harvesting Sal’s sporadic comments since the gestation of the good coup.
    First the article assumes that there is one well organized army that can stand up to DIA there is none, the EDF is impotent and is littered with informers an collaborators, a landmine for any fickle attempts to execute this democratic coup. Besides that there are bout 7000 well-fed, well-trained who benefit from the current misery and are sober enough to defend the drunken driver of Eritrea.
    Think about it, the 10,000 prisoners who are languishing in prison for a decade or so are being guarded by Eritreans, there is no single prisoner freed by the EDF, the EDF mostly is corrupt impotent and have not shown any single attempt to free any freedom fighter, a founding father. I am no trying to trivialize the wedi-Alis but as I commented before, this idealistic group never learned from past and history is both repeating itself and is rhyming. We cannot discuss this colossal failing without making a segway to EPLF, whose tegadalty were unflinching heroic in the battle field and impotently docile in front of IA and his enforcers and collaborators, but instead committed suicide. This is painful to all of us but that heroism in the 20/20 hindsight seems more of a suicide than gallantry. EDF is the rightful inheritor of those traitors. Look at Wedi-Ali, a veteran of the armed struggle since his underage years and he created the opportunity to make it all the way to Forto, fully cognizant that he will make his daughters orphans and yet he succumbs the same follies his predecessors suffered from
    Democratic coup is beautiful, but it is like the theorist and experimental physics scenario
    The Great Ismail Omer Ali point blankly once wrote and warned how a dictator can be reconciliatory when cornered. I know DIA will be imprisoned in this beautiful conjecture, but the alligators, the men waiting for their turn can use us to ascend to the chair and then turn around and slaughter us. Numeiri did it, Mengisu did it.
    The disbanding of the military of the opposition, a big mistake, not learning from history when dealing with dictators. On the contrary it must be strengthened, we do not have to use it because we have it, but it is our bargaining power when dealing with EPLF. I know DIA is eliminated in this succinct scenario, but it is all a matter of culture, EPLF culture that steeped all its members into the culture of corruption, mafia kind of intrigue, regiona politics should not be trusted to the point where we disable whatever military the opposition has managed to scrape together. For sure our aim should be bloodless but we should not be that naïve like the G-15, who were for the most part betrayed by their comrades and not just IA.
    When we say PFDJ we mean every collaborator and enforcer, willingly participating in this heinous crimes, and not what SJG calls “the adey Tabetus”
    This is the best scenario if we can pull it together, but it will expose at to the risks of the sharks who will use our yearning for democracy to legitimize themselves first as by disabling the military we fall under their mercy. By coming from a point of strength we can guarantee their safely if they truly cooperate and help and we can sand to them if they want to pull the rug from under the democratic process. On the reconciliation conclusion, I cannot agree more, we should not search for revenge and our revenge as the saying goes is living well, succeeding in peace and democracy, which evaded us as people and we have not delivered them yet. But we should not confuse lack of revenge with holding hands with the devil(PFDJ) criminals must be brought to justice, justice for the countless agony and due process and legal proceeding for victimizers. Avoiding revenge and serving justice are two related concepts that influence each other, but they are not the same.

  • Serray

    Selamat Sal,

    If things unfold the way you hoped, then it might work. A bloodless democratic coup is the best option. Anyone who doesn’t want to see a bloodless democratic coup is beyond conceited. Let us evaluate all the options to see if a coup by the EDF is one of only two possibilities.

    First, the world. Anyone hoping that the world will free the eritrean people from shaebia regime must take a very good look at the world. The world is almost paralyzed to point of inaction. With Putin, ISIS, Libya, Syria and the drama queen called Israel hugging all the attention what happen to us is not even in the picture. Plus, even though shaebia doesn’t respond to a carrot, isaias responds well to a stick therefore his regime will never reach a threat level for the international community to mobilize and try to get rid of it. Second, as you point out, Ethiopia and Sudan are happy with the status quo; specially ethiopia and because it is those who depend on it to bring change are even more delusional than those who pray the world would. That leaves change from inside in the form of a coup or a civil war (there is, however, one last scenario and that is the regime surviving indefinitely – a very unlikely scenario).

    A coup is a real possibility but so is a civil war. The regime has disfranchised so many people it is very difficult to tell which one is going to happen first. Maybe the third time is a charm and this time shaebia reformers/coup leaders will get it right and not ask isaias to behave first before they had him under arrest. A coup has always been a possibility; that it hasn’t happened to date is a miracle. It is truly amazing to see people who still believe they liberated a country sit and watch a modern slavery system imposed by their comrades while they wait for crumbs to fall.

    Sal, my problem with a coup, democratic or otherwise, is it might not be the end of the story. There are many players who can derail it including those who led the coup. The opposition in ethiopia, the radicals (in diaspora and eritrea) and the reformers. Each one of these is a danger to the future of eritrea. The organized opposition simply doesn’t have the respect or influence needed; the radicals, whether they want to sweep pfdj regime out or dismantle it have shaebia tegadelti as enemies and the reformers have the youth, the disfranchised, the abused, basically the PEOPLE as enemies. This is good because none of these groups deserves to hold power by itself. Whether we like it or not, shaebia’s deaf and mute system will be replaced by loud, obnoxious and messy system. If we are lucky, it will be a loud and messy democracy.

    As you mentioned, what will tie everything together is the 1997 constitution. The constitution is the one that will save the nation from a civil war the coup leaders, the reformers and the radicals can usher. My advise to those who hate the constitution because they have a fetish for another type of constitution is to hold their noses tight like we do and be prepared to accept shaebia directed and ratified constitution. And to those who are bothered by its shaebia footprints, well, you call home an Italian colony turned into a nation by shaebia, so get over it. But I have a feeling that is easily said than done.

    Sal, why do I have the feeling that you cut a big piece from the article?

    • Shum

      Excellent response, Serray. I felt the same way about him leaving something out. something tells me he wanted to get it out quickly so we can debate on it. That being said, there’s something that you said that keeps worrying me. You said “the organized opposition simply doesn’t have the respect or influence needed”. The key word is needed which is to say they have made some gains but not enough and not where it counts most.

      I suspect that if the organized opposition did have it, we would see their influence in the internal affairs of our country. I haven’t seen any evidence of that. That influence would probably have expedited the democratic coup. Here are the biggest obstacles I see for the opposition to have influence

      1. Fragmentation- we have different groups with political programs as if they are political parties getting ready for elections we don’t have. I remember how federalism was proposed from one group and then another group or persons talked about another system,etc. it’s so pointless to have a group on these platforms at this juncture. Then you have various “youth” groups with people my age and older. All we need is a forum and organization that seeks to bring law and order to our country by removing PFDJ. These political party groups can stake their positions when there is a free Eritrea. PFDJ is a very centralized operation. That’s not always good, but it helps them stay in power.

      2. Image- say what you want about PFDJ and YPFDJ, but one thing they are always mindful about is presenting a good image of Eritrea. Before everyone rains down on me, I’m well aware they also present a false image. But as an opposition, we have to be careful that while we will hold PFDJ accountable for the problems our country faces, we also have to provide an outlet and activities that celebrate our national symbols, our accomplishments and provide artistic avenues to express that. We don’t have artists coordinating and coming together to create an album similar to what Yemane Barya and others did during our Ghedli. He wasn’t all doom and gloom. It was a message of nostalgia, longing for homeland in addition to the bad things that were happening.

      3. Leadership- who is at the helm? How are we attracting people to the cause? How was Wedi Vacarro able to have the halls packed and come out of nowhere when some folks have been in opposition for years?

      4. Autonomy- As long as those groups stayed cooped up in Addis without any transparency of who is making the decisions, then the Eritrean people will continue to be suspicious and see them as, to borrow a phrase from Nitricc, toothless. They have mishandled this from the start. They should be understanding to people’s sensitivities about it. And the fact that they have not taking advantage of Addis as being a central and key capital in Africa where numerous international organizations and delegations meet, makes Eritrean people question what the hell they are doing there.

      • Serray

        Selamat Shum,

        You are right about the factors that contribute to the lack of influence of the organized opposition…fragmentation, image, leadership and autonomy. It is also helpful to remember how the opposition was constituted in 1999 in the middle of a popular but misguided war. Meaning, what brought the opposition to life is not the demand of the people (because the war was immensely popular) but something else…a short-cut to power in case isaias flees if the woyanes made it all the way to asmera. And they are still waiting for that; I don’t think they ever considered doing SOMETHING to make that happen – be it organizing/agitating the eritrean people to rise up or acquire the needed force to shove the regime out of power. The arbi harnet folks have a million times more contact with the eritrean people in one friday than the opposition sitting in ethiopia in all these years.

        Their path to power has turned them into an ineffective group. Ethiopia was and is an asset but it will never do what they have been waiting for her to do – overthrow the regime for them. So in favor of a rolls royce they have left the VW to rust and die. Here is what bothers me about them, they can still turnout to be the biggest liability to our people when the regime finally implodes. A pent-up sense of entitlement bottled for so long can turn deadly when what they dreamed for so long but never acted upon finally comes true. Of all the players in post isaias eritrea (the people, the military, the reformers) the political organized opposition can be the ones who will introduce instability. When I was in college in Addis Abeba, there were these country boys who fell hopelessly in love with beautiful city girls; having no means, no experience, no guts to express their love, they follow them around until one fateful day when their insatiable love turned them into nut cases or monsters.

        There are two groups who should have the least input in the immediate post isaias eritrea: the political opposition and the diaspora. I can picture the diaspora (the human rights group and the silent majority) to be relieved and allow the nation take its time to breath but I can’t see the organized opposition doing that; their sense of entitlement can overwhelm them and make them forget that those who risked everything have the first say.

        Is it me or all the ethiopians commenting on this topic have been unhelpful…as if they are standing on the sidelines telling us “you’re screwed” over and over again without providing any meaningful context to the conversation? I guess when it comes right down to it, they only share our nightmares and not our dreams…or hopes.

        • Semere Andom

          Selam Serray:
          The organized opposition was always there, some banned their military wing and DIA cancelled their highly anticipated arrival to Asmara. The reason they blossomed during the war was not they suddenly were motivated but it was because the Ethiopians stopped hunting them to give them to their mistress PFDJ as a sacrificial gift after their intense adulterous love ceased. The majority of Eritrean people were not interested in the agony of their children they were cheering the dictator who was insulting them, killing and raping their kids. We are all prone to demonizing the organized opposition while we did not heed their call when the Cassandras like late Seyoum Harestay made prophetic warnings as early a s 1992. We are reaping what we sow and the opposition as weak as it is, to their credit they warned us and what did the people do they became the rats for DIA and hunted the leaders of the organized movement like G. Zere and others. I know this is history, but it is like de-romanticising Ghedli so we do not repeat it. We cannot just feel sorry for the people who are victimized by PFDJ without bluntly telling them that many were the “jewasis”(rats) who gave their own to the monster like Jews did to Jesus when Pilot gave them a choice. With all its current weakness and failings the organized opposition did appeal and did express their vision of Eritrea and now we the people cannot turn and excessively bitch about “the opposition this and the opposition wanted power by hitchhiking on Woyane tanks. We the people of Eritrea do not deserve PFDJ by any stretch of imagination, but we have collaborated, conspired and cheered every heinous action the PFDJ committed and until we come to grips with this and access it with brutal honesty PFDJ can jug along for what will feel eternity.

          • Amanuel Hidrat

            Hi Sem,

            Spot on my friend. The fact is, they can’t be also an alternative, except bashing to those who attempt with their limited know how and resources. But that in itself shows they are no better than them. I wish they were better but not. Nay Eritra Neger Miwirizay Tray eyu. Judging from your comfort zone using pen names doesn’t make you to be judge nor does it make you real rational person. People who can’t overcome their fears can’t be worth of anything.

            regards,
            Amanuel Hidrat

          • Serray

            Selamat Semere,

            They say the spoils goes to the winner. There is no credit for trying or thinking, in politics, one has to deliver. My take is the political opposition will be judged harshly for failing to help the eritrean people, the youth, the victims of human traffickers, organ harvesters and refugees in many concentration camps. The eritrean people will be hard pressed to come up with a single act of rescue by the organized opposition. I think everybody will confront them asking what they have done for them in their entire existence. “Woyanes wouldn’t let us” is not a good answer for people who come looking for power

            Personally, I don’t like to see any of them in power. They are ineffective squabbling bunch. Just like they have crippled the idea of opposition in the last 15 years, the will cripple the transition and usher chaos.

          • Amanuel Hidrat

            Selam Serray

            How about you Serray? what do you except spoiling here and there. What do you do for the victims of human traffickers your self? No body gave them responsibilities to do that. What ever they are trying to is, be it small , are just dictated by their conscience. What is your conscience to doing when you see the horrifying fate in your eyes? What is your contribution to help the oppressed Eritrean people who are leaving in droves? Just tell us your contribution we know theirs. Miwirzay Gedofo until you do your share.

            Amanuel H.

          • Serray

            Selamat Amanuel,

            You sounded like a cornered pfdj there. When you tell the regime supporters that shaebia is destroying the nation, their answer of last resort is, iska ke intay gerkala neza adi. That is their way of shutting you down and as member of the political opposition, when you are confronted with a blank sheet of achievement, you turned just like them. All of a sudden, one has to pay to play.

            The difference between the political opposition groups and I, other than not doing anything meaningful to help the eritrean people is, I have no ambition for power. I don’t sit around in ethiopia doing practically nothing other than rehearsing and waiting for power. And if tomorrow a power vacuum is created, I have no intention of banging heads with those who created it. What have I done? So far I am trying to help navigate my relatives, just like any aritrean with relatives running to escape the gift of independent eritrea, to avoid the butchers, traffickers and organ harvesters. Somebody has to because the princes in waiting are too comfy in addis. I know that is not enough for you because you are an organization man who sees virtue only in collectivism.

          • haileTG

            Hello Serray,

            Please don’t mind interjection here:)

            – Opposition vs humanitarian activism: actually to become an opposition all that one has to do is not support PFDJ. That is opposition in PFDJ parlance. All of the work of activism done in regards to refugees and so forth (however much value you rate it with) is with in the context of opposition movement, it is done in opposition of the current system and yes all of Eritreans working on those fields have long been targets of incessant PFDJ attacks and blackmail.

            -When you try to link an organized opposition to a humanitarian ventures, it is rather tricky and not generally viewed positively. An organized opposition has an agenda and its ultimate objective is to boost support. Yet, even UN charters on human rights and war crimes, it is requested that civilians in distress not be subjected to forced political indoctrination. So, over all it is best avoided that organized political movements be involved in this kind of work. The issue of doing something or not is an issue to the conscience of every Eritrean irrespective of their affiliations. The refugees come from across the society and the whole of the society is responsible. If you remember last time there was assistance to the PFDJ abandoned Eritreans in Djibouti, the involvement of political organizations create a lot of unnecessary friction. People in distress need assistance and don’t mind who offers it, including PFDJ. So let’s straighten our view here that no particular segment carries greater responsibility than the other (apart from the regime that is forcing the flight in the first place).

            – As in your final perspective, what is it:-) Since you are on record saying:

            = All traces of ghedli must be eliminated (the exact opposite of what shaebia is must be instituted)

            = All organized opposition must be eliminated from filling the vacum

            = All diaspora must be eliminated

            = All Ethiopia influence must be neutralized

            So, who exactly does this leave? This sounds literally a call to all out chaos and abandoning of Eritrea for good, because in one hand you are aware of the brutality of the regime (which you take all the way to ghedli) and on the other you wish to strip the people any form of room for maneuver by assigning some kind of blame to virtually ever section except those in dungeons and under the iron grip!

            In reality, however, the pace is gathering momentum and PFDJ will soon start to pay the price in equal proportion to that it exacted from our people. If you agree that the regime is progressively weakening, its support base shrinking and the opposition against it mounting then I would stop there because stating the natural logical conclusion would spoil the hide and seek game that has become popular all of the sudden:-)

            Regards

          • Amanuel Hidrat

            Serray Hawey do Kibleka,

            And sure you are my brother. My point is don’t accuse to those who are trying to do something whether they are incompetent or otherwise (even just to oppose the despot in itself is positive). No body gave them the responsibilities whether they are capable to do it or not to lead us. They are like you and me. To oppose in itself is one step in the right direction.

            Second everyone is cornered everywhere as far as the regime with its institution do exist. If you are really in to the politics of Eritrea ( I believe you are) whether you look for power or not, please know the existing groups that is viable or not……. and then you will know whether your approach is correct or not. In the current struggle whether they are viable group or not, they are all an added value to the magnitude of our struggle. Third please if you are part of the struggle show some contribution to the overall struggle rather undermining to every group that existed. Fourth, at this stage where we are you are one of recognized elites we have, come on to the real world and nothing you could lose my brother. Fifth with your background (at least in my personal judgement) and my reading from your debating skills, please focus to solution rather to endless criticism.

          • Serray

            Selamat Amanuel,

            You made it seem as if I am always putting down the opposition, I don’t. In this particular topic of “democratic coup”, I want them to stay out until the dust settled. Whether you admit it or not, the political opposition brand is damaged. Having them compete for power in the immediate post isaias eritrea is a liability the nation can poorly afford. And, yes, I hold them responsible for damaging the opposition brand.

          • Amanuel Hidrat

            Selam Serray,

            Regarding the “democratic coup,” not that I am against it, but I will try to prove it, that the so called “democratic coup” in Eritrea is unrealistic, right after my recent article is published. Of course the familiar coups like of those of African countries could happen, but “democrat coup”, humm, it is an “Utopian dream”. Second, What is “the opposition brand” in the Eritrean political landscape? who are they? who to whom has incurred damage? Reality check please?

        • Shum

          Great analysis once again. I guess some of the fragmentation exists because of these groups that popped up around 1999. People created their own organizations because they saw them as political opportunists. I like the Arbi Harinet concept but I get the impression that they are targeting Asmara only. I now have Saleh Gadi’s voice constantly in my head about how to market to your audience. We can’t assume that what works for Asmara will work for the villagers or other cities in country. We have to reach them somehow on the things they care about. I certainly applaud them for their bravery with the leaflets and other campaigns. But how do we get to the whole populace?

          As to your take on the Ethiopians on this forum, I got that sense quite a few times on other postings. I dare say it reeked of shadenfreude, though I don’t think that was the intention. As for this post, I gather they haven’t provided much input because this is an Eritrean issue and we need to sort this out. Whenever I discuss Ethiopian politics with my Ethiopian friends, I’m mum when they talk about what needs to change in Ethiopia. I’m not a constituent. All I can do is wish and hope for the best and pose questions. And I never go to Ethiopian forums to share what I think of this and that group. If someone writes a comment for Ethiopia to intercede as a solution, then I think you will see them reply more. As for me, writing an article where you advocate for Ethiopia to invade is not an opposition point of view. It’s wishful thinking that there’s a “get out of jail” free card where we don’t have to do anything and just navel gaze and twiddle our thumbs.

    • saay7

      Selmat Serray:

      I am only responding to those who disagree with me but in your case… I am making an exception despite the fact that we don’t disagree on much, if any.

      One note on the 1997 constitution. Here’s my amendment:

      Serray’s argument: “And to those who are bothered by its shaebia footprints, well, you call home an Italian colony turned into a nation by shaebia, so get over it.”

      Bad, bad, bad at so many levels, I stopped counting.

      saay’s argument: “And to those who are bother by the constitution’s Shaebia footprints, remember, during the transition, the penal code that will be used for law and order will be the one that Haile Selasse drafted in 1957, so get over it.”

      This pride of authorship run amuck is called “Not Invented Here” in computer science. Wikipedia explains: “Not Invented Here is the philosophy of social, corporate, or institutional cultures that avoid using or buying already existing products, research, standards, or knowledge because of their external origins and costs.”

      saay

  • Amanuel Hidrat

    Dear Hailat,

    Well articulated my friend, and who can say it better than you. The take away for me today is: “We should not be beholden to the notion of being on a stand by for a war not declared, a conflict non-existent and animosity that has no basis.” Brilliantly put.

    Amanuel Hidrat

  • Mahmud Saleh

    Hello Awatistas
    So, here Ustaz Saleh comes with his most comprehensive vision concerning the “how” and “what after” dilemma that Eritreans seem to disagree on. Basically, SAAY has put together what he’s been expressing in disjoined comments on the forum. I wish SAAY the great told us why he thinks EDF is or could be up to the task at this time. I don’t mean it could not or would not happen, I am just bringing this to alert participants that when SAAY says ” this is the best option” then, I believe, he thinks EDF is ready or, with some coaxing, could be made ready to carry out that task. Indeed, that’s still what I wish should happen, but mine is a wishy-washy plan, I have no indication that EDF, as an organ, is ready to undertake that honorable task. Here’s why:
    1. EDF has deliberately been made a piggyback of PFDJ. It has not demonstrated itself that it’s a professional army that guards the sovereign of the nation and its constitution (no constitution to guard, anyway).
    2. Its top officers are ex-tegadelti who are benefiting from the system; its junior officers are either ill-educated national service or liberation fighter who have not been trained to differentiate the security of PFDJ from the security of the state. For an army to remain neutral in political turmoil, you need a well educated professional officers’ class. This is important, because when a time comes where these officers have to decide whether to continue defending a hated commander-in-chief or side with their people in order to save the nation, professional officers will definitely side with saving their people and nation. That’s what they give their allegiance to, not to a corrupted and despotic mad leader. They carry the orders of the commander-in-chief only as far as the political dynamics in their nation is functioning ( the checks and balances). Egypt was saved because of these professional officers. The day the sate ceased to function, they sided with their people. All the indications show that EDF officers are trained in the same ” Nakfa Social Science) or cadres school; they have been politicized, they have been indoctrinated to believe the army is the guarantor of the party, the party is the guarantor of the president and the president is the guarantor of the nation.
    3. One scenario where SAAY’s vision could happen, and that could lead us to a better “after tomorrow” is the inclusion of and the infusion of energy from:
    a/ Ethiopia based armed and non-armed groups
    b/diaspora justice seekers, and particularly the educated class (mentioned in say #1 and #2 of SAAY, but he should have elaborated on how that could be achieved). My take is this: as we continue our deliberations ( Eritreans all inclusive discussions, consultations between organized entities…the need of linking up diaspora opposition to domestic forces will even be more clearer. Yes, as long as Eritreans own their agenda, foreign technical assistance is not a problem, including Ethiopia. But Eritreans should plan and execute their homework.
    4. A force that comprises these three entities (EDF, diaspora armed and organized groups and intellectuals) could spearhead the transfer period. EDF including its chairman, and all armed groups shall immediately cease any military postures other than defending the state, and the defense of the state should be the sole responsibility of the EDF. Upon the formation of provisional government, the chair/president of that committee will be the commander-in-chief of armed forces;executive power will be defused to committees to avoid what happened in 1998.
    5. EDF and other armed groups status movement and deployment will be defined on maps and physical features, lines of communications will be established, foreign countries will stop assisting any stakeholder, a regional or international body will monitor the political transfer process and the statuesque of the armed groups. EDF’s job will be guaranteeing the security of the nation. No political role.
    6. an internationally monitored national conference will be held. It will draw a road map, all criminal elements of the past will remain in jail till a especial court of law is established. From here political dynamics take over, there will be bitter debates, squabbles, intra-fighting, coalitions and splintering of groups.
    7. Border issue is not a priority for Eritrea to enter in to dialogue with Ethiopia; we need to be honest. EEBC ruling is dead. But make no mistake, Ethiopians want to settle the issue too. Both countries will benefit from establishing a new chapter. The border issue needs to be dealt with in an atmosphere of normalized relations, societies and villages along the border need to be included…etc. But that’s not a priority for Eritreans at this juncture, and it should not be used as a divisive tool.
    8. PFDJ as it stands should be disbanded, should not be allowed to even participate in decisions that carry weighty matters which will decide the future existence of the nation. PFDJ was given ample time, it messed our nation and, hence, should be remembered as the entity that decimated our hopes and as the menace that devalued Eritrean person. Should future Eritrea leave a room for rehabilitated PFDJ? That’s is not our priority to ponder on. And frankly it’s beyond the mandate of today’s opposition. That fate will be decided by the forces that get majority in the period of transition; there will be similar objectionable programs and parties that will need to be decided through the constitution (religion and state, regionalism, tribalism ethnicity…).
    Finally, it’s obvious there are three groups with the interest of our our nation at their heart ( just lb bel nitric), there are those ultra nationalists who jump at anything that mentions foreign involvement ( in whatsoever level), there are those who are pragmatic, who care about the nature of relations and the job to be done (establishing a relationship with Ethiopia by itself isn’t a sin; but the nature of it is important); and those who are completely dependent on foreign relations ( those who have given up on their people). I believe as we go forward, number two will gain acceptance by Eritreans. SAAY is a man who has been at the cutting edge of ideas; he’s provoked our notion and I have to say ” Indeed bold as ‘ fars wed farsotat'” for putting together your ideas. What’s needed now is for the other parties to come up with their ideas. Mine is detailed above, so I have done my homework.

    • Amanuel Hidrat

      Hey Mahmud,

      Please frame it in an article form and shape your argument as an alternative. It looks better by far from Saay’s prescription. Please do so.

      Amanuel Hidrat

      • Mahmud Saleh

        Ahlan ya Ustaz;
        No commitment, but will see if whatever I exchange on this article could show me I have the stuff to put it in an article format. Also read my reply to solomon.
        Hawkha.

        • Amanuel Hidrat

          Ahlen Mahmoud,

          You have the staff. Formulate your argument as a political solution. Just few reading to support your argument. That is all. I read your reply to Solomon. I like your position in respect to our neighbors. Eritrea and Ethiopia should stand together for economic development and regional security. They have the potential to change the region. The border issue will be resolved with normalization. Have a nice grip on it and don’t lose it. The right way to go.

          Hawka,
          Amanuel Hidrat

    • Solomon T.

      The following entry in your post is true and thanks for having the courage to tell it like it is…I believe you will take a hit for it from some quarters but it is the only sensible way to handle the border issue… BTW I wasn’t expecting you to take this position from the limited exposure I have to your ideas posted on this website…

      “Border issue is not a priority for Eritrea to enter in to dialogue with Ethiopia; we need to be honest. EEBC ruling is dead. But make no mistake, Ethiopians want to settle the issue too. Both countries will benefit from establishing a new chapter. The border issue needs to be dealt with in an atmosphere of normalized relations, societies and villages along the border need to be included…etc. But that’s not a priority for Eritreans at this juncture, and it should not be used as a divisive tool.”
      Solomon T.

      • Mahmud Saleh

        Dear Solomon;
        Eritreans squandered an opportunity that rarely comes; on our south, we did have a partner in Ethiopia who took hits by sticking to its original program regarding the question of Eritrea, and, frankly, Ethiopians and Eritreans at large seemed to have put all the bitterness of history behind and moved on. On our north and north west, we had the Sudan which we considered our second home, the rest of the region and the world was also favorable to our case. Eritrea was in a better place compared to Ethiopia in order to launch a political and economic rehabilitation. We didn’t have a fragmented political and social resistance as that which EPRDF had to overcome; when EPRDF was fighting to gain legitimacy, that hurdle did not exist on our side; even organizations which had opposed and at some point in time had fought EPLF were ready to participate in the political process. Eritreans, as people and nation, were fired up, more united than ever. We blew it up. All of us, the liberation fighters, the business people, the educated…all those who shielded wedi Afom by ululating and practically making it difficult for individuals and groups to challenge him. From his invasion of religious space to his quashing of political and civil opposition attempts, we all Eritreans gave him a green light. We squandered a rare moment in history which is hard to repeat. That sickens me. What now? We need to be realistic and pragmatic. The world has changed and so the situation around us. If Ethiopia refused when it was weaker ( which was bad), there is no hope that it will accept it now when it’s politically, economically and militarily in a better negotiating position. It’s been 12 years since EEBC rendered its verdict. It’s unlikely that the current government will settle it; it’s even disadvantageous for Eritrea when this government settles it, because if it settles it, it will be because of fear of its survival, under pressure and duress for the sake of saving its power, and that’s not a solution that I wish for Eritrea. When we have existential urgency, the calm border should not be a sticking point that hinders our coming together. Strategically, Ethiopia will be our most important partner in the region, and I am sure Eritrea will be the most important country for Ethiopia. We have lost 16 years of growth opportunity and counting, sensible opposition entities should think to shorten it. Today, rule of law and economic rehabilitation is of utmost importance for Eritreans. Democracy is second in the continuum and is a natural continuation of the two. Peace and normalization with Ethiopia and Sudan is a mater of life and death for us ( the relationship with Sudan is a ticking bomb that could explode at any time, it’s well known that Sudan entered and keeps managing it at gun point), if we really think and tune up ourselves according to today’s global world.

        • Hope

          Shukren Ya Habibi–
          That is what we call Real Gut and Courage!!!
          The Wedi Metahit/Wedi Semhar style —ACTION!
          Sorry–no regional politics here but spitting up my gut.

          • Mahmud Saleh

            Hope;
            Your cousin saay promised that he will treat you with shaHan ful and berad shahi, I guess we will take this article as a “cousin’s gesture.”
            Hey, thank you for the words. It’s a matter of real deal for us Hope, I really think looking the other way is like hurting our nations twice. We messed it up ones, let’s be real. Our past glory is not going to be bread for the hungry, justice for those languishing in dungeons, and a matter of soothing and security effect for our fleeing young people. You’re an Expaedia of facts, just use it in unifying our ranks. It won’t solve our problem if you spend it on debating our Ethiopian friends on border issues, neither of us have control on border issues, none. Even not the great nitricc with all his good-for-something teeth. Let’s take issues that we have no control over out of the equation and debate on issues we can do something about. That’s the strategy I am pursuing.

        • haileTG

          Hello Mahmuday,

          you’ve stated so many well argued points in this topic that there is little to add or take away. I just wish to make two points (mere highlight of the obvious stuff) and isn’t intended to critic any thing you said (in case you end up saying “….hmmm and what happen to be you question?” I have none:)

          1 – On your well covered comparative advantageous position of Eritrea, I also wish to add the one main glaring advantage: the economic contribution of the Eritrean people. Eritreans went all broke to give everything they had to the new EPLF government. The country was awash with in flow of hard currency by the diaspora and boasted upto 30 private Forex exchange centers, diaspora remittance was equal or exceeding Ethiopia’s annual coffee earning, large number of people were hoarding machines and other business assets before their feasibility study was approved, the people cushioned the effect of the border war, even business paying full salary to those at the front line, hundreds and hundreds of millions dollars was given by the diaspora and and all in all it was an unbelievable show of commitment by Eritreans to their nation. After all that, the disrespectful and ungrateful PFDJ led by IA not only started to do as it pleased in looting the nation in every sector. The commercial bank today can’t close basic balance of end of month payments in nakfa. Everything is hoarded to the privately owned HCBE (banki abayti). The youth were used to complete projects that the regime financed through loans and grants and yet they were not paid, despite part of the funds that the state borrowed was for civil works in every single one of those projects. And here we are now staring on a nation skidding out of control in front of our very eyes.

          2 – When I think that Eritreans inside Eritrea are not up to the job, I kind of think that they are way too over powered by the conditions around them. What they have gone through is above and over to be enough to trigger the change of ten regimes after regimes. But, almost half a million (most the young reproductive section) to abandon the country, absolutely feel they could do or say NOTHING in the face of a regime that refused them pay, removed all their rights, forces them to walk @5 am and wardia at night, receives human trafficking ransom right inside Asmara???? It takes a leap of faith to believe that we are dealing with anything remotely conventional. If you see how old and young men run in the streets when street corners are blockaded by giffa and how people move around with their cell phone flash lights in the night hours. You would really get a sunken heart sensation and a feeling that you are looking at a nation that once was and now long died of its core attributes. Some what Eritreans haven’t seen it worthy enough to do anything for it except leave it there dying and clap and dance from afar. Something is terribly wrong. I think it is some deep seated fear, but I am open to consider alternative explanations. PFDJ isn’t supported, the opposition need to go further to tune up and get well organized, yet the people don’t seem to talk to each other about their conditions, they are together yet apart, share common activities yet never common out comes, they seem to be highly guarded against each other and least guarded from outsiders. This situation must be understood and broken.

          Regards

          • Mahmud Saleh

            HTG salam;
            Thank you I agree on both points. I am also first hand witness of point #1 and you elaborated well on point #2 since you visited our country recently. Who else could describe it better than HTG? The devastating psychological and social impact you explained in several of your recent comments, including this one, is just worrying. For a nation to exist there ought to exist citizens who believe in it, as a sustaining habitat (both economic and security). During my generation young folks flocked to mieda (both from within and from diaspora), the center of gravity was the idea of liberating our country believing the next generation might live in peace. And today, we see what’s happening. The center of gravity has become the idea of fleeing that country. PFDJ has succeeded in one aspect: killing Eritrean aspiration.

    • Mahmud my man:
      I disagree!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! with strongest term possible. wow!
      I never thought i will diaverge this much with you; my man. let see how i can present this thing.

      • Mahmud Saleh

        Nitricc;
        I am really interested in co-writing an article with you. Here is how I think it could be laid out: both of us agree on thorny issues that we are passionate about (no use of Tigrean, master, good-for-nothing…), no venturing into your love/hate relation with Rahwa, Fanti will be invited to reconcile some differences, No semere, ermias, or tes, I know how those guys make you jump. Once we agree on the issues, then you present your side and I present mine. You can’t get a more moderate person than Mahmuday! SAAY has already put you on the habitual offenders watch, who else? You think Abinet will be a better partner? What do you think nitrikay?

        • Mahmud i am fine with that plan. I read it three times and i thought that was written by Aman-H or Semere. I have no problem going dust to dust and point for point with you on this issue. I am at lose how you can slap on the face on the 20+ brave souls who fought for their country. i am at lose how you can invite the hyaenas in to our bussines and internal issues; the list goes on. we can’t not negotiate and compromise on our principals. NEVER!
          i mean i couldn’t find a single take of yours i can agree with. screw the internationals and screw the Ethiopians we are capable of solving our own issues and we will. like i have said, let me think how i can present my case. but i well come any discussion and debate on this issue.
          lets get it on!

          • Mahmud Saleh

            Dear nitricc: So we will raise questions and then will give answers each of us will alternate the chance of raising the question. I will start it now, then give your answer and present a question pertinent to the topic, answer it and post it answered, We will cut and paste as we go so the dialogue becomes coherent.
            1. Do we need a change and why? from where?
            my answer: yes we do, because we owe it to the martyrs to improve the lives of our people and to establish a state where the law rules. It doesn’t matter where it comes from as long as Eritrea’s national integrity is not in question ( this includes its territory and its inhabitants). As a citizen I can’t create pretenses for a regime that creates havoc in a country that had paid so dearly to give its people liberty.

          • Mahmud my man; i wish you know how much love and respect i have for you. but on this one, we can’t see eye to eye on this issue. like i have said, let’s talk, discuss and debate and let the readers judge. for me, we paid to much to bend for anyone let alone for freaking Ethiopians. NO!
            we will talk, get ready Mahmudey -: ) Nitricc is coming to get you lol
            i will answer your ? tomorrow

          • Mahmud Saleh

            Nitrikay; (That’s how I would say your name endearingly in Tigrayt)
            You know you have my love and respect too; the game is on. I’m waiting for your reply to my questions. Let’s do it nitric, let’s show semere that you could disagree on ideas but remain civil. For now we won’t go to Ethio/Eritrean relation, but I will tell you why I have cleared my stance on it.

          • Rodab

            Mahmud,
            I am afraid Nitricc is done with this engagement. He has made it a habit promising to come back but….
            Scroll all the way down and see if there is a similar pledge:-)

          • Lol Rodab, I did not know you stopped reading. I said, let me hear what AMAN and Semere has to say and i have read what Semere has to say and i am waiting what AMAN’s take.
            at any rate, i am discombobulated to no end by some people’s take. but first thing is first and let me settle my beef with Mahmuday : – )
            reading all the responses; it is not hard to understand why the system exsited this long and why should continue to some fisible future and it is clear why some decent people chose to stick with the system. and reading it all, if i was PFDJ, ex-Tegadaly and a change seeker; screw the change, i will stick with system to the end. as far as the fall of PFDJ, well, don’t quit your job and take care your health.

          • Mahmud:
            You asked: do we need a change and why? From where?
            Yes we do, because we NEED too.
            You don’t change for the sake of change. You don’t change because you want you too, you change for reason. You change because you NEED change.
            We need change because the current system outlived its usefulness.
            We change because the current system failed to move and progress with speed of the real time and the new and up coming new generation.
            We need change because our government failed to provide us the least any government should provide; the rule of law!
            We need change because we need accountability, responsibility and transparency.
            I shall stop You get my drift if not, I will be going till tomorrow this time.
            However as bad as we need change as good as the reason we have, it does not mean change at any cost and by anyone. So, the change should and will come from the people of Eritrea. No ifs no buts the end of the story. If we have to Wait another 50 years for the change that should only come by Eritreans, from Eritreans and to Eritreans so, let it be.
            So, let me recap for you so, there will not be any ambiguity.
            Do we need change? Yes!
            Why? For reasons I have listed and we NEED too.
            From where? From Eritreans, by Eritreans to Eritreans.
            If you feel I did not answer to your satisfaction please let me know.
            Next!

          • Mahmud Saleh

            Ahlan nitric;
            Now we agree: 1. the need of change, that it’s been overdue; 2. we agree on the why: including justice (rule of law), by the way you explained it way better than I could; also, that the government has outlived its usefulness, spiraling down of living conditions…and other destructive policies. 3. We both agree the change should come by Eritreans. I don’t think you disagree with me if Eritreans seek international assistance as long as they are the owners of their agenda ( for now we will put hold Ethiopiachen). Clarification: Yesterday, When I said change from any direction, I meant change by Eritreans, just for your information. Personally, what’s important is who owns the agenda. Eritrean revolution, as you know,had many foreign helpers, including Sudan, which was used as a launching pad and as a rear base for our foreign activities, heavy machinery garages, mass organizing offices, “consulates” an access to the outside world. There regimes in Sudan would change their relations with our revolution depending on regional and Ethiopian pressures, but since Eritrean revolution mainly depended on its people, and its command and control centers existed inside Eritrea and was a force to reckon with, the Sudanese would not really affect our ghedli agenda. I am looking at similar arrangement when I say foreign assistance is not that bad if Eritreans own their agenda. So when I said change from any direction, I meant change from within by Eritreans, change with a combination of domestic and diaspora (by Eritreans), change by a combination of EDF and civilians from inside (by Eritreans), change by pressure on PFDJ by Eritrean uprising (still by Eritreans). So, just to clarify, otherwise, you gave more than enough explanation, I am just explaining myself, we can proceed. The next turn is yours. Raise a question, then answer and post it, just like what I did yesterday.

          • Amanuel Hidrat

            Hello Nitricc,
            I saw a big stride in your thinking. And that is the desire for change. Big one. The rest is a matter of exchanging ideas the could bring the change we all collectively look for. Slowly but surely will come as far as you are part of the on going struggle for change.

    • hailezeru

      My message is to Mahmud Saleh and SAAY,

      I have to admit Mahmud’s ideas make better sense than those of SAAY. It seems SAAY is regressing. May be he is tired after all these years of unending misery of our people.
      SAAY, it is not the weakness of the opposition that determines the struggle for democratic change, but the repression and inflexibility of the regime. The way it looks now is that the repression has gone beyond any imaginable ugliness. While the opposition to it remained as weak as it was . Well… almost.
      After all this mess to think of PFDJ elements to chart the road to democratic change is wishful thinking. SAAY, no one will give you a knife to stick it in his chest. That is what you are expecting from the generals, coronels and merahti hailitat of EDF.
      You wish they hand you a constitution, that is the law (the knife). And you want to prosecute them based on that. What else would you do if you have the law at your disposal? That they are criminals they know it better than you and me. Knowing that why would they enact a democratic change. I know what you might be saying. All generals conerels and merahti hailitat are not criminals. Maybe….

      • Papillon

        Meles Zenawi once famously said, ዝኻኣለ ይሳለ ዘይካኣለ ይታኣለ

        • T. Kifle

          Nice papi,

          little help, 🙂

          ዝኻኣለ ይጉየ፣ ዝደኸመ ይሳለ፣ ዘይከኣለ(ዝተሸኽለ) ይታኣለ። actually the word in the bracket was the one in use

          • Semere Andom

            Hi TK and Papi
            Is this in his speech: “እንቓዕ እንዳ አማትኩም አይኮና፡ ነንቓዕ አማዕዲና ንቕንአልኩም አይኮና”

          • T. Kifle

            Hi Sem A.,

            No, this had been TPLF’s organizational motto after the 1985 renewal.

          • Papillon

            Alora Semerile,

            I actually heard about it not long ago. And I am not sure where and when he said it. But of course it is deep and practical.

            Haft’kha.

          • Papillon

            Dearest T. Kifle,

            I knew I was missing out a couple of words in between and thanks for the correction. I just can’t believe he is gone. May his soul rest in peace!

            Haft’kha.

        • Amanuel Hidrat

          Dear Pappi,
          Could you please make it clear the said quotation and in what relation you said it? I hope it isn’t in relation the article. If it is, do you really think this prescription as the panacea to our ills?
          Hawki,
          Amanuel Hidrat

    • saay7

      Ahlen Mahmuday:

      Thanks for the constructive criticism and the alternate vision you put forth. Let me see if I can tackle or piggy/back on them:

      1. Let’s take the two institutions: PFDJ and EDF. Now, for the longest period, the leadership of the EDF were members of the Central or Executive Committee of the EPLF and later PFDJ. Moreover, the senior leadership of the “civilian government” were also senior members of the PFDJ. That is, there is a perfect overlap between senior PFDJ and senior government/senior EDA. But since 1994, many of the PFDJ party executives, have died and been exiled and killed. In fact, statistically speaking, (and I know people’s see red when I say this) the PFDJ leadership has been as victimized as the people. The EDA leadership (beginning with General Oqbe, has also been victimized.) There are some exceptionally powerful people (at least on paper) in the government, like Yemane Gebremeskel, who are nowhere in the PFDJ or EDA hierarchy. So, isn’t the accurate statement that the EDF has been made the tool of Isaias Afwerki, just like the PFDJ was made is tool, and just like we the people were?

      2. I agree, word for word, on this para. What I am saying is that there is nobody in the EDF or the PFDJ hierarchy that is living the life of a winner. The one who are living on the spoils of war are living that way because there is no exit for them at all, beyond exile. We have an incentive to penetrate and win them over and come up with an exit strategy for them because they have lots of guns. The only other option is to outgun them and defeat them militarily. This appears to be so far fetched that I have yet to see a single political organization pusue it as a strategy.

      3. How I envision the mainstreaming process is this: (1) an exiled opposition from EPLF background is the go-between the EDF and the non-EPLF background exiled opposition. (2) the exile EPLF oppo tells the EDF that, (a) no, the opposition is not full of treasonous sell-outs; (b) no, the “Weyane” is not coming after Asab (he is coming after Somaliland and Puntland, thank you for your concern; (c) The US really doesn’t care all that much about Eritrea, put away your “bab-el-mendeb haluma jera fairy tales”; (d) no, all the people carrying Nehna Nsu are not the majority at all; (e) no, nobody is paying 2% taxes; (3) the EDF tells the exiled EPLF that (a) no, we are not all human traffickers; (b) we are worried what will happen to us if the opposition takes power; (c) you can’t come here and start from scratch just because we built something; (4) the non-EPLF oppo tells the EPLF oppo (a) we are not going to take a “trust us” answer because the last time you EPLF-types were given total authority, you were all about excluding us; (b) we want to be part of every decision-making process; (c) we will defer to you (because the Asmara-based dissidents are a known quantity to the Westerners who have to support us) but only for a day, not a month or a year.

      5. The most important thing is find a clot for the bleeding. To reverse the exodus and before the youth can find solutions from gunpoint, top priority must be (a) demobilization and integration of youth in civilian life; (b) find a pension plan for many “PFDJ” who are tired, exhausted and just want to make a modest living with some sense of security; (c) returning the hundreds and of thousands of Eritreans stranded in Sudan and Ethiopia. The goal of the new government is to stop the bleeding and to inject hope.

      7. EEBC ruling is NOT dead. EEBC is in the interest of Ethiopia and Eritrea. As you know almost all of the common border’s demarcation is agreed upon. The new government must give assurances to Ethiopia that they are people they can do business with: their objective will be to get security and freedom of movement for Eritreans and Ethiopians in the shortest possible time (which means EEBC.) It will mean that the focus will be not in humiliating or scoring points (Isaias’ Badme obsession) but finding a utilitarian system: one that pleases the most number of people who live in the common border. Again, the EEBC judges did NOT say that the lines must be demarcated per the co-ordinates they drew; they said that both parties must agree to change of co-ordinates and there is no reason at all why the new Eritrean government should not. It doesn’t have the luxury of philosophy, it has to be driven by getting a deal done ASAP. The three steps are: confidence building, demarcating, normalization. The confidence-building stage (demarcating the Eastern border will completely kill all empty talk of “they are after Asab”): it will also very quickly accelerate the free movement of free people.

      saay

      • Papillon

        Dear Sal,

        I absolutely agree with you that the EEBC ruling is not dead and I don’t think there is some sort of statutory limitation to it. Having said that however, my question to you is, when you said, “…The new post Isaias government must give assurances to Ethiopia that they are people they can do business with: their objective will be to get security and freedom of movement for Eritreans and Ethiopians in the shortest possible time (which means EEBC.) It will mean that the focus will be not in humiliating or scoring points (Isaias’ Badme obsession) but finding a utilitarian system: one that pleases the most number of people who live in the common border…” Can it be construed as the DIALOGUE the Ethiopian government has been “demanding” for the last decade or so? If it is, the Ethiopian government shouldn’t have any reason to second-guess the rapprochement offered to them in post-Isaias Eritrea. If you could please elaborate on that.

        Haft’kha.

        • saay7

          Selamat Papillon:

          It is absolutely dialogue. But dialogue whose intent is to bring about (a) permanent resolution to the border issue and (b) one that facilitates free movement of free people. The sticking point here is not going to be the land adjustments as that will be fairly easy, but that spoilers will insist on adding irrelevant issues by introducing innocuous sounding words like “root cause”–let’s discuss how the war was triggered so you can go on record and blame yourselves for your predicament. (Refer to Hayat’s posting.)

          saay

          • Papillon

            Dear Sal,

            Thank you!

            Haft’kha.

      • Mahmud Saleh

        Ahalan Ya AbusalaH;

        Warning: My introduction is going to be long. I have no technical tools and skills to shorten it. It’s not meant to lecture you or anybody else; please skip it if you have no time. (lol). Actually, I don’t disagree with your article, it’s, as usual, well organized, written and to the point. I just want to highlight the pros and cons of any military overtake, the status of EDF, and to repeat what you said, Mahmuday version.

        The concept of Democratic coup de’Etat is controversial if we don’t consider that each military overtake, although similar in nature, have distinct characteristics due to societies and time in which they take place. Another factor that invites me to entertain this idea is the reality that we don’t see better solutions in the horizons. For instance, if we are to take the familiar country, Sudan, Suwar Alzahab lcoup lead to a civilian governance after overthrowing JaEfar Nimeiry. That democratically elected government was later overthrown by Omar Albashir. Numeiry himself came to power by overthrowing a civilian government of Ismael Alazhari. If you ask Sudanese who they would want returned back to power, you would probably get mixed messages. This is to say that a coup may be expeditious but not a panacea to political and social ills. There are some benefits and liabilities when considering a military coup.
        Benefits: stability, stability, stability. ( I brought it purposely since you don’t like cliches); but that’s what it is.
        liabilities:
        a/ no guarantee the new military leader will honor his word of transferring power to civilians, almost all of them don’t.
        b/ his rule could actually be worse than the regime he overthrew.
        But not all military coups are equal; some have inf act brought a relatively prosperous life, a thriving middle class, and left out a public space where citizens could exercise their right of self expression to some degree. In many cases, particularly in Muslim countries, women gained a greater freedom under these military regimes. I know the concept you raised is a democratic coup, a totally different concept, young and untested, but there are certain traits that are universal to all military coups; therefore, we need to factor them in and show how they could be neutralized in our case. The other point is the fact that we don’t have another feasible means except civil war, and that’s what makes your concept more attractive to me. Simply: we don’t see other more feasible options short of bloodshed. For our envisioned coup to be ” democratic”, I’m counting on changes the world has undergone, the exhaustion of Eritreans from militarism and their experience with the rule of mieda. These will hopeful prompt some honorable officers, with the help of diaspora potentials, to work towards “making history,” towards answering the pleas of their people. That’s the premise on which I supported your proposal. The only thing I wish you elaborated on was the feasibility of this ordeal. My assessment, as you also detailed it, is that the Eritrean army has not been transformed into a modern army. PIA, like in all branches of governments, developed his own parallel administrative apparatus. The Major in the spy agency (National Security Agency (hagherawi deHnet) is higher in decision-making than an army General in maters of defense. The political wing of PFDJ is stronger than the defense ministry in matters of defense. You described the nature of our government and lack of institutional system correctly.
        ” So now, the State is The Man, and The Man is the sum total of his mad contradictions. This was done by creating parallel infrastructure: illicit and informal.Because members of this illicit and informal infrastructure are themselves rotated in and out of jail, their loyalty is to one man: the president.” I agree. Now, this doesn’t rule out the other side of the debate that PFDJ is enshrined on discernible value systems ( Hello, Aman H?). PFDJ is an institution based on ghedli values which developed and were utilized during a different era; and with the end of that era they should have been morphed into state values. During ghedli it was fine, but state calls for a different set of values. By clinging to the old values PFDJ has become a monster that has deprived Eritrea from chartering venues that lead her to statehood. During ghedli, those values served the movement, with the movement ceasing to exist, those values have become instruments of aborting statehood in Eritrea; they have become instruments that gave one man the status of the total sum of what is Eritrea. He owns it; he is it; including its government apparatus, as you correctly stated ( I’m paraphrasing what you said in your speech, I watched it and I read the transcript). Issayas perfected the arts of ruling in total chaos. The economy is managed on emergency mode,like QuTeba of mieda, transportation, including the Queen Bee, like Muwfar mekain of mieda, the army is still organized and prepared in mieda style, still labor intensive with no known technological introduction. All ministers and Generals are his messengers (ጦፍ/ጦፋት). You remember the dispute between him and Beraki in the information ministry; between him and Mesfun Hagos, Br/gherezghier…in defense; and there are many examples of junior and Senior officials who lost their lives, prestige or both, because they said, ” please give us space, let’s do our job, let’s build institutions, lessen your grip and intrusions, etc.” Central Bank Of Eritrea is under his direct watch. It can’t do business as a business institution, it has no independent existence (courtesy: Ambassador Andebrhan). I am saying this not to enlighten you, but if it could help other readers ( I gave you the warning earlier, I am not here to tell you this; you know more than it). So, the army is compartmentalized in a way that discourages trust between units and commanders. The sole purpose is not military readiness but controlling mutiny. But we cannot rule out the explosion of this over exploited and extremely oppressed and neglected segment of our society. Now, comments to your comment:

        1. I totally agree as explained above.

        2. “[…]The one who are living on the spoils of war are living that way because there is no exit for them at all, beyond exile….[..]”

        Saleh: I will assume you meant the junior ones. The big guys have plenty of options. The honorable option would be to listen to your call to take down the dictator and usher a new beginning for their country. They have the means and the clout. They are not doing it because they see no life without the dictator. Your proposition that we try to lure them out of their comfort zone with options they cannot turn down will yet have to bear fruits. I have no trust on them (M. Gen, and above). They are looting the country.
        3. A very plausible and even feasible scenario with all its detailed steps. The only thing missing is the mistrust that has been built against anything related to EPLF. Look how Medrek and Andebrhan have been treated, and how ex-EPLF tegadelti are looked at with extra caution, including you), It’s sad. That’s why people of good heart need to come together and put the interest of our people first. We have many hurdles to cross,our history, in a way, has become our enemy. Awate and awatista could serve as a model of tolerance. So, we have a lot to do in order to foster trust among the opposition, remnants of the historic organizations and others before we can talk about shuttling messengers between EDF and ELF related organizations. But as an idea, it’s possible, its mechanism is clearly presented. What I like about the person SAAY is that you are on a mission to show us alternatives, hints of unexplored aspects of a debate, etc. Thank you.
        5. I agree. What’s frightening is the fact that in a decade or so almost all of those hundreds of thousand of public servants will enter retirement. It’s going to be disaster. So, the worsening of the situation is accelerating at a staggering rate. The deficit of what a nonexistent economy could support and the demand of these retirees is mind boggling.This is in addition to other social burdens, including returnee refugees, internally displaced people, war disabled heroes and their families…it’s a huge challenge. Anyone who speaks of change should highlight where we are in terms of these issues, why are we where we are, what can we do to stop the down-spiraling of this situation. So, again, I agree. Sorry for the lecture.
        7. The word “dead” could be controversial, I should have used a different word. I explained myself in my replies to nitricc (real debate, really), anyway, I saw it from its practicality. I said that with the understanding that:
        a/ with both current governments in place, it’s unlikely that the ruling will go in effect. PFDJ is using it as a red herring and black mailing.
        b/ EEBC ruling stands. When I said negotiation I meant on its implementation (and I think that’s what the Ethiopians are calling for). Why don’t we see what they want to talk about? We can at any time pull out if the ” talks” go out of the word and the spirit of the ruling. You explained it nicely, so, just to say both of us are about the same.
        c/ I also believe demarcating the delimited border under normalized relations makes it more expeditious and less confrontational. It shows both countries’ intent in demarcating the border is not for scoring points but for a better future.
        d/ I really believe the dialogue could unleash our Kebesa tradition of good neighborliness. Villages could help sort out their fate ( there may be villages which could be divided according to the virtual line, there could be Eritrean villages which find themselves on the other side, and vise-versa; elderly people and religious figures could assist. This would be more helpful in areas whose inhabitants’ demography has not been disturbed intentionally.
        Wow! I don’t know if it’s readable.

        • haile zeru

          “The only thing missing is the mistrust that has been built against anything related to EPLF. Look how Medrek and Andebrhan have been treated, and how ex-EPLF tegadelti are looked at with extra caution, including you), It’s sad.”

          Interesting statement Mahmud. Do you know that trust is earned? It is not the other (the people) that give the trust. It is the subject (Ex/Pro EPLF/PFDJ) that should earn it by his/her deeds. Why would any body trust Ex, Pro or full blown EPLF/PFDJ member? They never did anything to earn the trust of the people. On the contrary they did everything to earn the mistrust.They precisely earned themselves the mistrust. And I say they deserve it. People observed for 40/50 years EPLF/PFDJ. The cumulative result is hate and mistrust. One needs more than nice words to change that.

          I am sure you will say, how does that serve the purpose of democratic change? It does not serve it at all. Giving trust that is not earned is equally, even more, destructive.

          • Mahmud Saleh

            Hailez,
            Let each of us do a better job. I’m sure next time you will come up with a better view. If not, you could be considered alone wolf who doesn’t represent the mainstream opposition.

  • ShaHanful

    Haile,

    This guy is clueless and completely and absolutely out of touch. The last time he has been to Eritrea was twenty plus years ago. He knows the present reality in Eritrea through bits and pieces of fragmented information fed to him through his “I know better” ego. You will have to forgive him.

  • T. Kifle

    SAAY,

    This notion of “democratic coup” as undemocratic as it is also seems impractical. The million dollar question is,
    1. Who will bell the cat?

    This question may not necessarily stem out of the proverbial fear of the rats over the marauding cat but because, pragmatically, there is little incentive for the commanders to task themselves in tightening the noose round their own necks. If the suffering of Eritreans is what it takes them to side with the people, that suffering must be inflicted by somebody else out of the group hoped for effecting the coup or there should be strongly organized , clean officers close to the power that look for better treatment and reward in post PFDJ Eritrea. If the army acquiesces to the whims of IA on matters like transferring or demoting their defence ministers any time he feels like doing it that means the defence institution is wimp incapable of checking the excesses in the government like we see in Egypt and Pakistan(sometimes for sheer want of hegemony) .
    2. The dictatorship in Eritrea is abnormal(courtesy of YG). It leaves no chance for emergence of any sort of cabal group that serve as a catalyst for effecting the said change as everyone spies over every other one. Notwithstanding the unpredictability of the outcome, it’s almost impossible that discontent will form and gain traction in a system extremely tight surrounded by discrete society.
    3. You also hypothesized like “if Ethiopia invades Eritrea…”. My friend when is it going dawn on you that Ethiopia never invaded Eritrea? I will no more going into this matter as it might rise the epinephrine in some.

    • saay7

      Selamat T.Kifle:

      1. I actually consider the democratic coup the most practical but since you say it is impractical, can you suggest something more practical. After all, we are not talking about choices in absolute terms but relatively. All the examples you give about Egypt and Pakistan are bad–but the same risks exists whether change comes via democratic coup or a revolution.

      2. Forgive my cycnism but YG description of Eritrea’s dictatorship as “abnormal” (what is a “normal” dictatorship, by the way?) is reverse engineered form the conclusion: change cannot come without EPRDF.

      3. Well, no, sir, I didn’t hypothisize “if Ethiopia invades Eritrea…” Quote please? I like how you misquote me and then get righteously indignant:) It’s ok, Haile TG did it too. What I hypothetisized is actually “if Isaias continues to be reckless (enouraging the Eri-based Ethiopian opposition to conduct cross-border incursions, and if Ethiopia follows up on the strategy it has promised to deal with it…” As recently as just a month ago, PMHD reiterated the policy: one more attack, we are going after Shaebia directly. The point is if and when that happens, all the blueprints and roadmaps that the Eri opposition is drawing up won’t matter: Ethiopia will pursue a resolution that is driven by its national interest; and the Isaias Afwerki regime will react in a matter that elongates its life (even if he has to leave Asmara and trek to Nakfa, as he was willing to do in the last war).

      saay

      • T. Kifle

        Hello SAAY,

        1. The thing is not that I discount your proposal as one of the possibilities. The difference we seem to have, I think, stems from your fundamental axiom which goes like every other leader in Eritrea bar IA is a victim of the PFDJ system in one form or another. Then, its corollary is: given opportunities, these guys could be useful weapons in fighting the injustices not necessarily as benevolent services or patriotic duties in response to the appalling situations the Eritrean masses are in but as interest maximising strategy; reliving the distress they have been subjected to under the-one-man-system that they have no control over. My view is that these leaders are there by choice. The national slavery, the human trafficking, the pervasive rapes, the thousands of prisoners that never seen their day in the court of law and God knows how many of them are alive as we speak, the mass exodus and deaths dotted all over the places,are all perpetrated under their collective leadership. That’s why I said earlier risking a coup by these guys is tantamount to tightening of a dangling noose round their necks: it simply is just against their self-interest.
        If your target group is the low-ranking officers, it still is unlikely to form and or thrive unless there is nation wide insurrection which involve the wider populace capable of rendering tremendous pressure on the regime which could ultimately result in forcing the leadership to give in. That’s what happened in Mengistu’s Ethiopia though we all know the revolution still went astray, turned out to be our worst nightmare. Indications are that there is no such mood among Eritrean masses. The disjointed attempts that might come from such disadvantaged group wouldn’t fare much better than the failed attempt of Wedi Ali’s group. If the military brass is desired to be the change agent, on the other hand, it necessitates that it has a formidable clout and influence over the establishment, command the respect and trust of the people, should be relatively clean of the heinous crimes Eritreans have been put through which is an antithesis with the reality on the ground. In both counts, not only that the coup is unlikely, but also there is no guarantee it would relinquish power to its true owners if being executed in the rarest of rarest scenarios. Do I have alternatives? I Don’t think I ever have. I see nature would take care of its course. The PFDJ is at a point of no return . It is highly unlikely that it would reform itself, and reverse the situation. The youth will flee out of the country unabated. And over time it will collapse under its dead weight. Then with little help from Ethiopia and/or Sudan(or some involvement of the international community), Eritrea would stabilize and stand on its feet. I expect the outside intervention would be short-lived and Eritreans would author the fate of Eritrea. There could be glitches here and there but over all I foresee the transition would be smooth.

        2. If I understand him correctly YG’s assertion has two facets. (a) he holds the perilous situation in Eritrea should be dealt with in extreme sense of urgency lest the population will be hollowed out and in order to save the nation the brink of failure. (b) since Eritreans seem incapable of undoing that state of predicament, he urged Ethiopia gets involved in the matter as he thinks a failed state in the north is strategically consequential. Therefore, YG’s take is still valid excpet you would simply disagree as you do in many of the issues pertaining to Eritrea and its ghedli.
        3. As per your latest explanation, I tend to agree.
        regards

  • haileTG

    ah…hate typo correcting after submission. Hi saay my reply will show up soon, seems swallowed up by disqus now..

  • Although a possible scenario, nevertheless, “democratic
    coup” as hypothesized by Mr. Sal, does not seem to tackle the problem of dictatorship in Eritrea at its core. Dictatorship is a malignant tumor that needs radical excision. A palliative treatment most probably would replace one dictatorship with another or might even fail altogether, with a nasty backlash.

    Removing from power only DIA and his so-called handful of enforcers, will leave intact the great majority of the offshoots of the dictatorial regime that enabled the system to function at a grass-root level and above, and they will work hard to help the PFDJ party to have the upper hand, to be able to continue the same political ideology. Change should come at all levels, top to bottom, and the PFDJ system, which I do not believe is a one-man system only, should be weeded out and replaced with democratic forces. Salvaging the PFDJ (minus DIA) is equivalent to sustaining the present dictatorial system. It is a mistake to expect the PFDJ would mutate to a democratic force, because the leader and a handful of top officials have been removed. Democracy is their nemesis. It is democracy that would make them lose their lucrative positions, put them in prison, and deprive them of their amassed wealth.

    The opposition is cut-off from the EDF, and the head of the
    military is to chair the provisional government. How can one be sure that the military would transfer power on a silver platter to the opposition? A good example is Egypt, where people’s revolution was hijacked by the military, and nobody is sure that Sisi’s Egypt is any different from Mubarak’s Egypt. Unless the old guards in the military are removed and young officers who are usually
    democratic by nature take the initiative, change in Eritrea will remain elusive. (a viewpoint of an outsider)

    • Hayat Adem

      Horizon, a view point of an outsider nevertheless spot on and helpful!

    • Amde

      Horizon

      I agree. The transition out of the EDF hands is the weakness here. Saay is stating the committee will be implementing constitution 97. It is quite as likely they will just continue to suspend or scrap it unless incentivized otherwise. I always think Issayas is just one deal away from being able to resolve most of the major issues with no “democracy” or political pluralism. The same can be said of a military junta who would take over.

      Amde

    • saay7

      Selamat Horizon:

      The risk that a democratic coup will just replace Isaias by another dictator is no higher than a revolution replacing PFDJ by another group of “people’s representatives.”

      Change SHOULD come top to bottom, I agree, but there has to be some stabilizing force so the country doesn’t rip itself apart as it is undergoing through this change. When Ethiopia was going through its change in 1974 and then again in 1991, there was either an existing military institution or a new one: cohesive, highly disciplined. Thus, there was never a power vacuum.

      Your last para: excellent question. And the answer is, we don’t know at all. But again, that risk exists whether you are with the EDF-external agents alliance; or with an all-opposition alliance.

      saay

      • Dear saay,

        Let us all hope the best for Eritrea for she deserves it.

  • senay

    It is good idea in some parts, except the fact that the people who suggest such idea are not capable of doing this on their own terms even if they get the chance to do. they will never ever do it because they lack every thing , and also all the diaspora so called democratic fronts also lacks basic understanding of democracy and the way it works , so what is the benefit of posting such loose idea. I have been reading awate.com from side view in case they could find good way to show how democracy really works and educate our people but they lack on such too. do you remember the post about eritrean leader hijacked Qatari air ways ????? lol just to remind how low the news is these days and i forget the one about the choosen man dejen by tesfe , who is just collecting a lot of words juts to fill the page , and begging people to read his writings all over the net . To conclude we need a constructive idea that can mobilize the Eritrean people inside ,that we should ask change on open air . Because to win against HGDEF from outside is fruitless and i can say this with confidence the eritrean forces out side eritrea are born to die fruitless.. To my dear Awate.com owners , can you please try to see from different window because politics and propaganda of 21 century is quite open and complex.

  • Hayat Adem

    Nitricc and the rest, until Aman and Semere come, here is mine:

    I’m going to address Sal as a 3rd person because he has recently stopped addressing me direct. On his “democratic coup” policy, I’ve some takes. I have no doubt Sal has the best interests of Eritrea and Eritreans at heart when he proposed this. He knows change is what is needed now
    and urgently by the people and he is offering what he thinks is the best way towards that as he sees it. He understands the status quo is not sustainable and he also understands short of the needed change, things will go worse. But I think he has it wrong.
    The scenario of his premise is too oversimplified and leaves out one important factor. Removing the drunk driver and attending the car is then a wrong remedy. That drunk driver is well protected guards armed to the teeth. You will not be able to touch him before dealing with them first. And dealing with them demands some level of capacity. You need to build that capacity or fetch it from somewhere. Capacities can be built, borrowed or bartered for certain selected purposes.
    But the most serious lapse in Sal’s proposal is that he is not centering his thoughts on policy matters. For example, how does Eritrea go from centralized and militarized footing to one that is civil, inclusive and liberalized? Sal seems to have envisioned what would happen in the immediate days of the successful “democratic coup”. There is nothing he said about addressing the grievances of minorities, rebuilding confidence and trust with neighbors, ending international isolation etc. Even on the border and normalization, he seems to have endorsed the known PFDJ positions almost line to line: demarcation first, normalization next. It is a no brainer the border issue can be handled in 1000 better ways if both countries are at peace and normalcy. Even the EEBC way is not a bad one if both countries want to implement it. But we know Ethiopia is dragging its feet to hand over Badume before any talks. Sal’s proposal, demarcation-then-normalization, sticks with extending the border crisis post Isaias. And that is wrong. Both countries should give priority to normalize first and then they can fix their borders creatively without leaving permanent marks of bitter sour on the ground. Borders are best settled when the two bordering countries are first under amicable relations. Badume would never matter whether brought to Eritrea or left in Ethiopia if it was demarcated prior 1998 when the two were at peace and cooperation. The last border conflict was the consequence of other irritations not the cause. Solutions should focus on the causes instead of consequence.
    Sal also somehow lost touch with me when he chose his main actors of the change (military and diaspora) leaving out the entire masses and all opposition forces. He even went as far as suggesting the real déjà vu of what ELF and ELF-RC [and I think also ELDM] did to themselves for a self-incapacitated state of stay when they demobilized their armed units in 1991. That gave exclusive free ride to EPLF/PFDJ to monopolize everything under the Eritrean sun. To propose to offer round2 blank checks, when the first ones have left you with countless scars, is neither serious nor reasonable. I think any conceivable real change should involve the entire Eritrean people and more so from inside, and the process should be steered by the opposition and the civic orgs not by the remnants of PFDJ.
    Sal, as recent as yesterday, said this: “…I think it made sense to recommend that PFDJ handle the border issue with some creativity in 2004. Not sure PFDJ can handle a two-car funeral procession, much less serious issues of national sovereignty, in 2014.” If PFDJ is bad enough for funeral procession, it must be bad enough for any sort of reform.
    Hayat

    • Amanuel Hidrat

      Hayatom,

      Good fodder for the time being. Well said.

      Amanuel H.

    • Kokhob Selam

      very perfect Hayata.

    • saay7

      Selamat Hayat:

      The bodyguards protecting Isaias Afwerki are members of the EDF. And the ones who will engineer the coup are also going to be members of the EDF. There is nothing unique about Isaias, as dictator, being overprotected by bodyguards: all dictators are protected and in every coup, the protectors have a choice to make: to side with the dictator, or to side with the coup leaders. In fact, every “people’s revolution” always boils down to that choice–its not like the people “storm the bastille”: it is always one group of armed men demanding that another group of armed men stand down. There is no need “for capacity” because the EDF is not a ragtag militia, it is a well-trained, battle-hardened, well-disciplined army. It is simply wrongly-motivated now.

      I didn’t go past day 1 and 2 of the coup; a 100-day plan would include everything you are mentioning. When I say “mainstreaming the EDF”, I am talking about getting them out of their warped worldview: that the Weyane, our blood enemy, is knocking on our doors; that all the opposition are Jihad-TiHte Hagerawian, SheytTi adom; that many in the opposition are secessionist. This requires education. But it is mutual education: the Diaspora have to teach the EDF that many of their assumptions are wrong; the EDF has to teach the Diaspora that many of its assumptions are wrong.

      The way I see the Eritrea-Ethiopia issue is simple: confidence-building, demarcation, normalization. Confidence-building is the reset: new Eritrean political actors tell Ethiopia that our position is picking up where we left off and we are determined to resolve it. Part of the confidence-building is to demarcate the 95% of the common-border that there is already agreement on. This will marginalize all the spoilers and all those who have a vested interest in stoking the conflict. On the remaining 5%, there is nothing in the EEBC ruling that forbids the two parties from making adjustments and corrections, so long as it is done with mutual agreement. Then, the normalization that comes will be sustainable and irreversible.

      The military-diaspora drivers of change, I think you have interpreted diaspora more narrowly. The point is that as the great (RIP) Seyoum O/Michael used to say (paraphrased): “we want to come to our people with solutions and not problems; we want to come with a diverse ideology, not a diverse armed forces.” I don’t know why you call the EDF “remnants of PFDJ”. (Well, I do, but I don’t agree with it at all: that arguments is always made by people who see salvation from Ethiopia: people, it ain’t coming; Ethiopia is far too busy developing.)

      saay

  • Aman and Semere; here you have it, SAAY told you in black and white. Let’s hear it your take. Please stop losing your readers by going north to south. Explain your take clearly as SAAY has done it. This going to be fun. The break dance is on or is it ShetaHtah time.
    I will have my take on this one. This is what we should talk about. Thanks SAAY.

    • Amanuel Hidrat

      Selam Nitricc,

      I am glad after complaining for years to focus on solution, Saay came with what he believes a “solution” to our national crises. I solute him for that. And like what you have said, this is the kind of topics we should debate on – debating on solutions and alternatives solutions, to come to what is feasible to our people and our nation. I have certain things I could agree with saay, but it sounds, half cooked. As half cooked bread doesn’t taste good to your mouth, half cooked politics sours to our mind also. God wills I will try to synthesize some of his view with my view and come with alternatives. First thing first, let me finish my rebuttal to YG.

      Have a good day,
      Amanuel Hidrat

Enough to the Cruel Man in Asmara

22 Nov 2017 Hannan Abdullah Comments (77)

The need of good governance inspires us to say enough to the cruel man in Asmara. It is the historical record…

The Case of “Business and Human Rights” In…

21 Nov 2017 Tesfabirhan Weldegabir Redie Comments (31)

Companies have an obligation to conduct due diligence of their Business activity and this article is a case of “Business…

To Nobody's Surprise, Sanctions on Eritrea Renewed

18 Nov 2017 Salyounis Comments (74)

(1) The Security Council voted to extend the mandate of the Monitoring Group on Somalia and Eritrea (SEMG) and to…

One More Nonagenarian Star 

15 Nov 2017 awatestaff Comments (58)

His name is H. H. Abune Makarios, an inspiring and pious church leader. In 2009, His Holiness Pope Shenouda III,…

Music

Cartoons

Links

Follow Us

Email
Print