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Eritean Fiat Seicento And Ethiopian Volkswagen

Fiat Seicento (and Cinquecento) was a cute Italian car whose old version is now antique. Driving schools loved it and favored it to any other car. Asmara had a considerable number of the car, Keren had one owned by Alamin, the famous driving trainer. Later on, Alamin trained my friend Yacob and made him a trainer.

In Addis Ababa, the driving schools preferred Volkswagen Beetle. In the nineties, the number of VWs (or Fau Ve, as the Germans call them) was probably bigger than that of the inhabitants of Addis Ababa. Does that sound like an exaggeration? Well, that is how it appeared to visitors like me.

In the past all you need to get a driving license was learning how to handle the steering wheel, the clutch, the gear shift, and the accelerator. Nobody needed to learn anything about the brake pedal, it comes natural. But if anything happened to the engine, drivers pretended they knew how to fix it and opened the hood and stared at the engine. If someone approached them, they murmured a few Italian street words, “Miseria, etta acceleratore….” Upon hearing the Italian words, the curious onlookers would assume the driver is a Mechanico Fino, but alas, “the car needs pezzi di recambio”, spare parts. It is not the driver’s fault!

The Fino Mechanico

In Eritrea, where the ratio of mechanics to cars was four to a car, if a Seicento stalled in the middle of the street, someone would certainly come and clean the battery heads, then tell the driver: “Etti cambio in-folle gbero’mo, ates’ayya. The car will be fine again, that is if it didn’t stop because the gas tank was empty.

In Addis Ababa, if a mechanic doesn’t speak Tigrinya they didn’t trust he was one. And they surely got a Tigrinya speaking mechanic from a bar on any corner of the street. The mechanic would sigh, “Mama Mia, nkhid bel.” They are never alarmed and downplayed the most serious engine problem. But once they open the hood, they would find a way to fix it, even by scavenging the street for a rusted coil, a crown cork—anything would be put somewhere under the hood and the car would run again.

In a garage of an Eritrean mechanic, I once saw a beaten up vintage Mercedes Benz in a bad situation. I felt sorry for it because I didn’t think anyone would be able to fix it, even the person who manufactured it. The mechanic told me it used to be one of Haile Selassie’s fleet—it was transporting sacks of onions from the countryside to the market in Addis Ababa. When the Derg detained the King, they took him away from his palace in the favorite Ethiopian car: Volkswagen Beetle.

The driving rule was simple: drivers didn’t need to know what goes under the hood, if they can drive, it was fine. The problem is, when it stops, they become helpless and were immediately possessed by Italian fury.

Autoscoula Marxista

During the struggle era, for the most part, political orientation and basic Eritrean history, with heavy doses of Marx, was a requirement before one carries the gun and joins the combating forces. The common orientation served as a reference whenever a debate arose, and it was settled based on the orientations the people received. If you express a different view, or question the orientation, your sanity, and loyalty, was questioned.

I sometimes wonder: what is the reference for the current struggle? Could the lack of a common orientation be the reason behind our fragmentation and disagreements? I do not have an answer, but I have a feeling something is missing.

Observing the state of the resistance (and opposition) to the Eritrean regime, one cannot help but think of them as people driving a Seicento, and who have no clue what is under the hood let alone how to fix it. Most of the activists, the leaders and followers, seem to be well trained drivers, but with no knowledge of how to fix the engine. If the the engine of the opposition car stops for a minor breakdown, they open the hood and murmur some Italian words hoping somehow it will be fixed on its own. And what is left of the old Tigrinya speaking mechanics of Addis are not as good as those of the old days. That is why you see all the VWs of the opposition stalled, parked on every corner of Addis, almost rusting!

In the Diaspora, the opposition have imported all the Seicentos from Eritrea: everyone who has a Seicento is stuck with his own car, and gives it a flashy name: Autoscoula Democratica, etc. And they can hardly take more than three people along with them—that seems to be the requirement to start a driving school. Unfortunately, no one has dared to import a SETAEO, or Hajji Hassen bus to take more passengers.

In the nineties the offspring of Seicento made a comeback “to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the original model.” The redesigned car is flashy, and cuter than the old one, yet, I cannot accept it as anything but a car fit for driving schools only; it cannot accommodate more than two American sized people; you can only pretend you are comfortable in it, even if you sit alone on the backseat and distribute one-dollar bill just like Haile Sellassie used to do. But the Seicento can serve the needs of Eritrean Diaspora opposition very well, we might not need more than thirty of them: Each Seicento can accommodate the leadership and the entire members of any of the organizations that were given driving licenses by the Ethiopian government. I could have wished for a bus, but as I said, the PFDJ has confiscated all the SETAEO buses!

Through The Streets Of Asmara

This ignites a nostalgic memory; I remember Edaga Hamus, busy with buses ferrying people to and from Asmara. I remember the Skunis, the pickpockets and the swindlers who stayed there all day to make an indecent living! A short distance from there, I remember the winding road of Abba Shawl, where women stood in front of doors selling, well, “meat”. On the opposite side, a short distance walk, rubbing shoulders with more classy swindlers, you meet pickpockets promoted to serious robbers, then pass by the famous Babylon Square, and proceed to the symbol of the Italian authority, Comisariato Hamasen, where you find classy women standing in front of more decent one-room houses, and selling, well, more meat though a bit expensive. A bit further, walking through noisy bars serving American servicemen and well dressed Eritreans, places like Wigwams, Copacabana and others where, again, one finds the usual crowd of swindlers, pimps, and women selling more expensive meat alongside liquor.

It is from observing these sights that I learned of the words Skunis, and Wedini. Incidentally, for some reason I cannot explain, I find the characteristics of Wedini and Skunis fits most PFDJ operatives and supporters.

Pressured by traditional norms, I never uttered the feminine equivalent of Wedini and Skunis, pending a serious study though, many already have an ideas about their female equivalents.

Sometimes when I meet older people I become curious and imagine what they did in their young age! I find out that some were nurses, footballers, carpenters, clerks, drivers, teachers, bankers and many other professions. I have yet to find anyone who would tell me “I was a pickpocket.” And I have yet to find any woman that would tell me, “I sold meat from a one-room house.” Where did all of them go?

Recently a friend asked why the PFDJ festival was dominated by women.Then he answered his own question: “Isaias’ has a considerable support among women.” But why is that? Do we just drive the Seicento or try to find out what is under the hood?

I posed the question to a few people whose judgment I trust. My question was specific: can you give me the profile of an Isaias’ supporter among women?

The following categories are what I found:

  1. Those who have toiled so much and invested so much on the PFDJ starting from the struggle era and they are not willing to throw away their financial and emotional investments.
  2. A few who have genuine conviction that the PFDJ is the best that Eritrea had and could have—true believers.
  3. Women who are harmless but, similar to the men, they are possessed by demons that demand dancing events where one can display glittering gold ornaments.
  4. The “silent majority.”
  5. The noisy and combative among them are the equivalent of the Wedini and Skunis in the men’s department.

The Deaf-Mute, Dead Conscience “Majority”

I cannot stand the mention of “silent majority” or silent men and women; I am not interested in silent people, majority or minority, because I do not have the obligation to wake people who consciously went to sleep. And I do not think the opposition or resistance can do much more than what has (and is) being done. Those who hide behind the “silent majority” veil do not need anyone to inform them about the situation in Eritrea, every Eritrean is informed enough to side with the forces of justice, or the PFDJ, or continue the slumber. Action starts from the self, conscience is within each person. No one is obliged to do more than his share, or his ability.

Activists cannot bear the responsibility of instilling conscience in those who choose “quietism” in the face of all the sufferings that Eritreans are going through. It is absurd to blame others for a choice one makes. No one owns the opposition or resistance, it is an open field that attracts those who are willing to fight against injustice. One can cooperate with others, and if not, they can drive their own Seicento, and not blame others. How about buying a loud alarm clock? Maybe the one on Catedrale!

Describing the failure of the opposition in attracting women, a now-deceased senior official explained that the PFDJ doesn’t engage women on the intellectual level, but they use the catch-phrase Addetat. Recognizing Eritrean women’s relatively low literacy rate and political consciousness, the PFDJ classifies the entire womenfolks as Addetat and addresses their emotions. He said, “women are the most disadvantaged social group and the most illiterate, marginalized, and the least capable of processing information.”

Another senior official explains: Messages focusing on freedom of expression and association reverberates less in the minds of Addetat and it is easier to manipulate them.

The organized political organization should worry about that and take it seriously. If they don’t, they will remain inconsequential and weak—and it will not bode well in the future. Those who are so worried about the so-called “silent majority” can form entities that solely focuses on waking the sleeping crowd: specialization. But activists who are in the fight to defeat the extortion and misrepresentation by the never-ending PFDJ festivals should carry the fight the way they carried it in Bologna, Germany, Sweden, the Bay Area and other places. But beware, defeating them shouldn’t be replacing them with the same mannerism, attitude, and values: limited to drums, dancing, and binge drinking! A person who goes out from the PFDJ festival into a gathering of the Justice forces should be able to discern the difference in the venue, not be confused on which is which.

The PFDJ’s messages are tailor made for different people and different classes, unlike the opposition that doesn’t have such segmentation when delivering its messages.

The situation in the Diaspora where women are generally more educated and more sober, is different than that of Eritrea. Yet, the opposition camp is a man’s land, women are absent; but blaming men for their absence is unpalatable. Unfortunately, though most Eritreans are timidly silent at best, and consciously bystanders at worst, not discounting the few vocal and effective and active elements, the PFDJ has made “The face of the [PFDJ drum] junkie … the dominant image of the Eritrean Diaspora women.” It is effectively exploiting and using them in festivals and parades. But those few junkies do not represent my mothers and all the other decent Eritrean women I know. They don’t represent the brave women I struggled along, or my allies, the women in the current struggle, so many to name. The cheap junkies represent their cheap self and cheaper PFDJ. Political and social outcasts cannot represent decent human beings, and they should be defeated just like any enemy. I am suppressing the urge to spell the words that describes them,  I am resisting it.

The strategy of the justice forces should remain as clear as ever: defeat the PFDJ everywhere. Just like the PFDJ festivals are being defeated decisively in most places, the few remaining outfits should also be defeated in order to defeat the PFDJ mother ship.

A few women activists lament, and a few male activists gloat, criticizing Eritrean women for not being outraged as they should while witnessing hundreds of children dying. They expect them to be as militant as the women of Argentina who made history by carrying images of their children, and forcing the world to pay attention to their plight. They forget that the general consciousness among Eritreans is not as high as that of Argentinians at the time, and that Argentinians were not uprooted Diaspora activists, but a social group living in Argentina. Regardless, it is sad (and not correct) that Diaspora women should be defined by the few outcasts who should be shamed and defeated.

About Saleh "Gadi" Johar

Born and raised in Keren, Eritrea, now a US citizen residing in California, Mr. Saleh “Gadi” Johar is founder and publisher of awate.com. Author of Miriam was Here, Of Kings and Bandits, and Simply Echoes. Saleh is acclaimed for his wealth of experience and knowledge in the history and politics of the Horn of Africa. A prominent public speaker and a researcher specializing on the Horn of Africa, he has given many distinguished lectures and participated in numerous seminars and conferences around the world. Activism Awate.com was founded by Saleh “Gadi” Johar and is administered by the Awate Team and a group of volunteers who serve as the website’s advisory committee. The mission of awate.com is to provide Eritreans and friends of Eritrea with information that is hidden by the Eritrean regime and its surrogates; to provide a platform for information dissemination and opinion sharing; to inspire Eritreans, to embolden them into taking action, and finally, to lay the groundwork for reconciliation whose pillars are the truth. Miriam Was Here This book that was launched on August 16, 2013, is based on true stories; in writing it, Saleh has interviewed dozens of victims and eye-witnesses of Human trafficking, Eritrea, human rights, forced labor.and researched hundreds of pages of materials. The novel describes the ordeal of a nation, its youth, women and parents. It focuses on violation of human rights of the citizens and a country whose youth have become victims of slave labor, human trafficking, hostage taking, and human organ harvesting--all a result of bad governance. The main character of the story is Miriam, a young Eritrean woman; her father Zerom Bahta Hadgembes, a veteran of the struggle who resides in America and her childhood friend Senay who wanted to marry her but ended up being conscripted. Kings and Bandits Saleh “Gadi” Johar tells a powerful story that is never told: that many "child warriors" to whom we are asked to offer sympathies befitting helpless victims and hostages are actually premature adults who have made a conscious decision to stand up against brutality and oppression, and actually deserve our admiration. And that many of those whom we instinctively feel sympathetic towards, like the Ethiopian king Emperor Haile Sellassie, were actually world-class tyrants whose transgressions would normally be cases in the World Court. Simply Echoes A collection of romantic, political observations and travel poems; a reflection of the euphoric years that followed Eritrean Independence in 1991.

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If there is anything Eritreans and Ethiopians (and beyond) agree upon, it is the fact …

  • Semere Andom

    bstay Araya:
    Araya:I agree with you;
    ሰብ አይ ክልተ ግዘ ክዛረብ የብሉን፡ ካብ በላዕቲ ክልተ ሲጋ የድሕነና አምላኽይ
    ልሳናይ አይቅይርን ሓንሳብ ምስ ሞጎተ
    ዋላ እቲ ሓቒ ጎሊሑ እንተተራእየ
    ዓይነይ አይዝምብለኢን ንዓኺ ምስ ጠመተ
    ዋላ ህበይ እንተመሰልኪ ዕድመ ምስ ድፍአ
    ፍቕሪ ሳሕል አይገድፍን እዪ ሓንሳብ ምስ ሓዘ
    ዋላ አረመን እንተተቕየርኪ

    ዛን ዛን አቢልክኒ ዕርቃነይ ውጺአ
    ሕጅስ ተርኪስና ህግድፈ
    ንዕናይ ንስሕልና ውርቅና ሽያይጥና
    ክነስተማቅሮ
    ፍቅርና አብቲ ዝጅመሮ
    በረኻ ሽንጥሮ
    ክሉ እቲ ምስጢር ዳግም ንጽሕትሮ

    • haileTG

      Good one Sem Arkey,

      ጽቡቕ ርእዩ ዘይድግፍ፡
      ሕማቕ ርእዩ ዘይገድፍ፡
      ጽራይ ገዲፉ ሓተላ ዝሕንፍፍ፡
      ክብሩ ሸይጡ ሕስራን ዝሓቁፍ፡
      ከም ሃመማ ዝዝምቢ ኣብ ጎድፍ፡፡
      ዝደኸመ`ኳ ዘዕርፍ፡
      መውስቦ’ኳ ዝዕጸፍ፡
      ጥንሲ’ኳ ዝኹለፍ፡
      ገሪሙና’ኮ ናይዚ ሃለፍለፍ፡
      ናይ እንዳ መን ደብሪ ምስኮነ ደአ ህግደፍ መንደፍ።

      BTW Araya has some terrible experience with alcohol consumption. May be he was brought up in alcoholic home or something; He once told me that my facts are ye Tela biet we’rie, he then told us the actors like Faud Alamin are drunkards in addiss so their art should be banned and he is now telling me I sound a drunken to him!! You think the guy have issues with alcohol or what????

      • Semere Andom

        Dear Haile TG
        Goodbye to the ravaged and senile groupies
        The most thuggish followers that you will ever see
        They once thought they were serverd well
        But as all sane people can see
        It is not what it used to be
        There is nothing the PFDJ can do any more
        Not protection from an Ethiopian drone
        The likes of Araya are PFDJ’s desperate cast
        Everything has become a mirage thanks to the skeletons of the past
        DIA attacked when the first ghosts came calling
        When former friends, the G-15 were so daring
        DIA and cronies attacked allegation with vendetta
        They stuttered, going in circles like the oxen in “mekeda”
        But ghost came one after an other causing lots of fuss
        Many cronies thrown under the bus
        Wed Temnewo came roaring
        Alena followed churning
        Eitreas expected their liberators to act wiser
        The ship is sinking yet the groupies cling to straw
        Sem

  • haileTG

    Araya: so to support once and to oppose later makes one suspect? huh…deceitful is you who never set foot in Eritrea, all his family in Ethiopia, spends all his hard currency in Ethiopia and supports the misery and death of Eritreans. People move in their political spectrum and the likes of you don’t because you’re in to chew from both sides of your mouth. My agenda is help the struggle to remove PFDJ and make Eritrea home to honest Eritrean than double speaking thieves. Ethiopians raised you and made you the person you are and now you insult them behind their back and eat off of their hand by exploiting their kindness to you and your family. Even if it was to be for nothing else, I would run away from PFDJ simply by knowing a person of your type supporting it. Eritreans are traditionally truthful people and you have none, I bet you’re shame to Ethiopians too because what a wast!! PFDJ attracted you because it needs your type to conduct thieving and human trafficking, immoral and self loathing delinquent.

  • Abinet

    Eyobe
    Sorry I don’t remember this person.i remember mostly Dr Abiy Kifle’s time. I remember a big protest by students when The Beloved Dean of Students, Dr Fiseha Haile was removed from his post.”Fiseha yimeles,Fiseha yimeles”students shouted. He was a father,a father,everything for the students. He went back to Eritrea unfortunately .he was one of a kind ! I don’t think he can work with the isayas administration. Very independent professional .
    Eyobe, I would love to know where he is right now. If you have any idea ,please let me know.
    And also Dr Haile G.Kidan at school of Pharmacy.He was a pharmacist and a medical doctor at the same time. He went back Eritrea after 1991.
    Any information?
    Thanks

    • Eyob Medhane

      Abi,

      Oh…I got there after (right around) Abiy Kifle’s removal. Many of my seniors used to think of him as a tyrant, I am not sure, if you had the same impression. ( also after the 43 professors were fired) but clearly remember Dr. Fiseha Haile. Your assessment of him is very interesting, because I know quite a few people, who really did not like him. (It could be the nature of hot headed politics of the time, though) I don’t know where he is now, but I read the name of Dr. Haile G/Kidan in a list somewhere that lists a group of people in Eritrean opposition.

      Aman or Sal, could you help us out with the where abouts of these people?

      • Abimet

        Eyobe
        You know our culture. If you are strict,goal oriented,principled …people specially the lazy ones always find something negative out of you .my point is he was the dean of students at that time and students loved him . Imagine in the derg times where students protest in response of his removal.

      • saay7

        Eyob:

        Yelekhulan:)

        Let’s talk money instead and confirm to you my “closet Ethiopian” status. The World Bank is recommending that Ethiopia devalue its currency. Side effects include inflation (for sure) and increase in export revenue (maybe.) Put on your minister of finance hat and discuss the pros and cons. Extra points for referencing what happened the last time Ethiopia did that and the recent announcement of increase in wages of civil servants.

        http://www.enca.com/ethiopia-considers-devaluing-currency

        saay

        * why do we have the politest Ethiopians here when Ethiopian forums are saturated with bigotry? Oh, never mind, because Awate is great said Aboy Feqadu baElom yina’adu.

        • Eyob Medhane

          Sal,

          There are more times the advice and recommendation of IMF and world bank has been ignored than heeded. One of their methods for their recommendation to taken up by Ethiopian government is to put out these kind of stories and float the idea to increase the pressure. They are doing that not only to Ethiopia, but so many other African countries also. Rwanda and Ethiopia however seem the only once who resist this kind of pressure. I sincerely doubt that there will be devaluation anytime soon. Particularly, when there is an election around the corner. In the long run though may be in few years, there may be some adjustment in birr’s value. My assumption is after 2018, when Ethiopia and Djibouti finalize their plan of merging their currencies. They have formed a committee that is working towards that goal.

          http://www.2merkato.com/news/alerts/3065-ethiopia-and-djibouti-preparing-economic-integration

          Your question why people are not polite in Ethiopian forums, well I have a theory. It might be a bit offensive, so brace yourself. Many forumers in Ethiopian websites are believed to be Eritreans pretending to be Ethiopians. Mostly Amiches, who seek revenge by planting a a seed of hate among Ethiopians for whatever wrong done to them, and feel loss of entitlement. Mostly they use a pretty identifiable phrases that would make them stand out from a typical Ethiopian behavior. The rest, who actually are Ethiopians are just jerks…. 🙂

          • T. Kifle

            Selamat Eyob,

            SAAY’s take on the vulgarity of Ethiopian forums is more than valid. There may be few shaebias here and there playing the spoiler’s role but fundamentally those who think they oppose the government are bunch of vulgar that employ foul, racist and extremely parochial languages, . Part of the problem is these forums are not moderated and have become a platform where anyone can say anything without considering the damage caused to the other end. I have almost no appetite to participate in these forums and that’s the reason partly explain my being here at Awate other than the attraction of the diverse and brilliant writers(I have the feeling that Awate also seems losing steam in this regard)

            The fact is the vulgarity transcends forums and have become a conventional means of communication in the opposition, the press and what have you.

          • Eyob Medhane

            T. Kifle,

            I certainly acknowledge that. I just divided the vulgar forumers in Ethiopian websites in two. The Shabians and some jerk Ethiopians. Those in the opposition usually resort to vulgarity, because they have lost any valid argument, idea and virtually anything to say. They are just lashing out. Their numbers is dwindling to hundreds before their eyes and that infuriates them. They lose control and they just lash out the only way they know. But it is easy to separate their vulgar style from the Shabians (largely Amiche Shabians). Indeed, the Ethiopian forums need heavily moderated…..

          • saay7

            Hey Eyob:

            You get “BeTam Tru” but not “ijig BeTam Tru” because you didn’t answer one question: you didn’t describe what the impact on cost of living or exports was the last time Ethiopia listened to the World Bank and devalued its currency. In 2010 which, incidentally, was an election year. 3 months AFTER the election.

            I think every African leader has read “Confessions of an Economic Hitman”, that’s why nobody listens to the World Bank.

            saay

          • Eyob Medhane

            Sal,

            Wow you are a tough grader 🙂

            I still didn’t read “Confessions of an Economic Hit man”. My much older brother, who himself also an economist gave me a “meh…” on it so I decided to prioritize some other readings over it. But I really do intend to read it and see what all the hoopla is about..

          • saay7

            Eyobai:

            Nah, don’t read the book. Instead find my brutal takedown (review) of the book which I very subtly entitled “The Problem With Confessions of an Economic Hit Man”:) For 5 years, to my shock, google analytics said it was my most widely-read piece (I still occasionally get email mostly from grateful right-wingers 🙂 I trust your awesome powers of research will find it. If not, let me know and I will find it via the way back machine.

            saay

          • Eyob Medhane

            Sal,

            No…that one is my immediate older. This one is much older than both of us…check your FB. I will introduce you.. 🙂

          • Eyob Medhane

            Sal,

            I am gonna end today’s discussion with this funny title of yahoo news… 🙂

            https://news.yahoo.com/ethiopias-herbal-high-struggles-foreign-ban-053508600.html

          • saay7

            Eyob:

            Related to the story you linked, this goes a long way towards explaining “the war on drugs”, the longest running failed war.

            http://reason.com/blog/2014/08/21/because-bob-tyrrell-prefers-scotch-marij

            saay

          • Eyob Medhane

            Sal,

            Did you check your FB, yet?

        • Papillon

          ዝኸበርካ ሳል,

          ኣደይ ከም ትብሎ “ባዕልኽንዶ ነገር ትጽውዓ”
          ኣብዚኣ ዓዋተ ህድሞና ሰላም ኣለና
          በጃኻ ገለመለ ኣይትጸውዓልና

          ሓፍትኻ

  • haileTG

    Selamat Awatista

    Interesting discussion was started between Eyob and saay (actually Eyob started it) regarding a planned visit by the high level Russian delegation to Ethiopia. Eyob perceives the event to be one that reflects his country’s soaring importance in the intl. stage and hence people in high places are taking the initiative to visit rather than be visited by Ethiopia. Saay takes the view that there may be UN res. related significance attached to the visit and may not be as Eyob thinks it to be after all. Abinet, Horizon, Amanuel H take the hospitality side of the matter and Papillon pulls a joke on the fact that the visit isn’t to Eritrea.

    Well, Eyob could be right, I guess. His view can only be verified with some inner knowledge of the going on, and considering he is on the diplomatic mission here, he may know more than he is letting out:) Saay could also be right, I guess. It would depend on what agreements would be signed and what would be said on the joint press conference after high level meetings between both sides. The hospitality argument is spot on because one has to travel to the end of the world to find any one as remotely as the Ethiopians when in making a visitor feel completely at home (we know, we are the Eritrean opposition:)

    Now, to some one like me with very little to be concerned about with such an apparent good fortune to my neighbor except give a warm congratulations, what would there be to add? Except, of course, consider Eritrea’s diplomatic predicament as it stands today.

    Eritrea at this time in its young history is fully and completely isolated from the world community. Sadly, however, many supporters of the current tyrannical rule are duped by illustrious flooding of stage managed news reports which sadly makes them think the opposition media are purposely focusing on “bad news”. So, let’s use the regime media for a change.

    Eritrea’s total and complete isolation had no where been reported more consistently and loudly than the regime media itself. To be exact, not by what it reports, rather by what it could not report.

    Google News/ AllAfrica: read all Eritrea related news by going months back and you will not find A SINGLE news reporting by any major news group that covers any form of interaction between Eritrea and the world other than via external mining companies indirect reporting. No single sectoral, ministrial, business, fisheries, tourism, regional issues…related reporting. At best, you would get a retired westerner talking about bringing it from “cold”. The rest is all about refugees, tragedies, sanctions, terrorism, destabilization.. Nothing of the sort you would find on any country even the likes of Somalia. Eritrea is simply shut out in the cold.

    Shabait: entire first page has nothing what so ever that reports any hint of involvement with the outside world. Digging, dancing, diaspora donation, diaspora denouncing the world on behalf of the despicable regime…nothing else. Entire first page of the main “Ministry of Information” has no information whatsoever of Eritrea in the world.

    dehai: a full front page and pages after pages has no Eritrea in the world. It taks of Somalia land, Ethiopia, Yemen, Cold war, ESAT … a hodgepodge of issues of neither here nor there and totally nothing to do with Eritrea.

    Tesfanews: absolutely nothing of Eritrea in the world. A whole front page of a dozen news and the closest to external news is Turkish or Qatar airways allocating a small plane to make bursts of flights once or twice per week. That is it.

    Madote: Exactly the same situation to Tesfanews.

    Eastafro: Nothing in its entire front page. Few stabbings and refugees news here and there. It is all about koboro was here, koboro is there and more koboro over there

    Raimoq: again no Eritrea in the world in its front page dozen and a half front page

    Virtually every single media outlet of the regime tells a consistent story of an isolated and forgotten place called Eritrea.It is all make belief dance and festival news, that they can come up and churn out. No head of state except Sudan ever visited in recent times. It is nothing short of diplomacy in deathbed. Pick any country in Africa or anywhere (except NK), it is very unusual that there is NOTHING going on with external parties. Eritrean regime has no such place to go. over 96%

    The regime of course knows that it is done over for good. The world had long decided that the regime must go and the sooner we push it out the better.

    Regards

    • saay7

      Selamat Haile TG:

      Your did not include a major diplomatic breakthrough that involved senior diplomats from the United States, Canada and Italy who attended the Western Festival in Oakland, CA just last weekend :)))

      http://www.gerset.com/index.php/hotel/13-news/23-the-other-eritreans

      Oh dear God, talk about scrapping the bottom of the barrel. The big guest was the “ambassador” from the US. He is a consultant and I figured I would find something he had written that would show a clear contradiction between what he values in leadership and how that does not exist in Isaias Afwerki. So I found his blog:

      http://samuelmahaffy.com/2014/06/leaders-messiahs-dinosaurs-review-relational-leading/

      And I am reading…and I didn’t get past this: “As Bob Marley famously states in his song: ‘The harder they come, the harder they fall.’”

      Well, no, Marley didn’t say that. That was Jimmy Cliff. Grrrr

      saay

      • haileTG

        Hello saay,

        ግደፍ እባ ብማርያም’ለካ ሕብኣየን እዘን ስእሊ!! ክንሸፋፍኖ ኢልና እምበር፡ ርኢናዮ እንዲና። ክንደይ ኪሎ ስጋ ክንቅንጠጥ ወደይ! Except for brave weight watchers ግናይ ህግደፍ ክዱን ብኣፈ ስላሰ ኢልካ ዊጽ ዋጽ እያ ዘላ እዚ ዓርከይ 🙂

    • Papillon

      Dear Haile TG,

      You’re a super-star! For real. You’ve no idea how much I get excited to read what ever you put your fingers on the key-board. If there is anyone who is smashing or tearing PFDJ apart singlehandedly, it is you Sir! As I have said it before, Isaias has managed to render Eritrea a “Leper Colony.” It sure is sad for us but for some sadistic aversion towards Eritrea, it is a day well spent for him. This is what he had to say to a bunch of PFDJ zombies sometime last year in Nairobi in the compound of the Eritrean embassy: ንሕና ምጋሽ ኣይንፈቱን ኢና ዓድና ኢና ንፈቱ ዓድና እዩ ጥዑም. Life coachers tell us to turn a disadvantage into advantage but in Isaias’ bizarre world, it is ቁስልኻ ሕባእ.

      Haft’kha.

      • Bayan Nagash

        You know what Papillon? If I were a leader in the opposition group, I would do anything to recruit HTG to my camp – he is as solid as they come. In fact, if I were in the opposition party, last week would’ve been an absolute opportunity not to be missed to let my platform known in that how receptive my party is to all Eritreans – I would’ve done everything in my power to gain individuals like Amal, NMS, and many others who were passionately articulating their ideas. Of course, what’s left now is for HTG to start his own opposition camp, and I will be the first one to sign up with, for I know, with him at the helm all will go well. Or, if he were to give us a synthesis of the top three existing opposition camps to help us in the decision making process, it would just have a great service and I am ready to get down and dirty with opposition politics as I have never belonged to one but I am tired of only talking the talk and not walking the walk.

        Sincerely,
        Beyan

        • Amanuel Hidrat

          Ahlen Beyan,

          I have never seen a man like Haile who can synthesize so fast any conflicting ideas in his mind and transform (negate) to a new idea especially with the fast moving geopolitics of our area. Haile made a big strides to understand the intricate domestic and regional politics that are intertwined each other. One who followed in the last two years, could attribute to him as a game changer to our debate. And if I were to grade him, he is the only one who exceeds the expectation. Once he believe in the fight, he gives everything to the fight with full energy (God bless him). He is unflinching solid fighter against the injustice in our nation. I remember myself to say Halelujah when he turned his back to the evil regime. Saay was actually was right to give him the accolade “TG”. So when you say “I would do anything to recruit HTG to my camp – he is as solid as they come”, I couldn’t agree more.

          The only thing that I am still disappointed is, he couldn’t heed my advice to write all his adequately appreciated comments, to transform them into the front page of awate in articles and essay form to find the right place in the archives of this great website. Actually, I am encouraging our academicians and scholars to visit and make homage this website as the source of education and enlightenment. Haile as a candle of enlightenment should shine in the front page of awate.

          regards,
          Amanuel Hidrat

          • Fanti Ghana

            Wow! Hats off Mr. Amanuel,
            What a comment! I always admired you for your steadfastness about your beliefs and many other impressive qualities, but no one ever spoke my mind about Haile TG the way you just did.
            Fantastic!

          • Amanuel Hidrat

            Dear Fanti Ghana,

            Thank you for your gracious words.
            I remember when we were debating on the opposite side. At time our debates were flaring up to the extent we lose our temper and affected our core values . Saay came to intervene and brought us on line to the debate guidelines. Haile’s evolvement is really tremendous and fast and no one could match him to understand the unity of ideas and the struggle of opposites. Once he saw the evil man as “evil” no one is now fighting against that “evil core” so forcefully as him. What you need to do to Haile is only provoke him with idea and alternatives he discern it very well and very rare to the intellectual commodity of Eritrean minds. I hope Haile will keep the good fight not to make me eat my words.

            Regards,
            Amanuel Hidrat

          • Aman, tell me Haile’s shortcomings. You have told us the qualities Haile has but what do you think Haile’s shortcomings are? I am asking you for reason!

          • Amanuel Hidrat

            Hey Nitricc,

            Beyan gave you better answer than I could. The difference between you and Haile is, he has the people at the heart of his struggle while you have the government at the center of your defense. That is how I see both of you – A clear demarcation every one to see. No blaring at all.

        • Papillon

          Dear Bayan,

          The persona in Haile is a power to reckon with. A tremendous asset to us and a bulldozer to the edifice of PFDJ complex. Having said that however, realities of the day have rendered the very term “Opposition” an abstraction to those who can afford to juggle between the comforts and excesses of time. To be more precise, the reality in Eritrea and the way overdue responsibility that is awaiting us to shoulder is not to catalogue an Opposition and pick one to your likings and tastes, rather, it is a question of survival of a nation on a death bed. In all practical terms, we can not absolutely afford to talk in terms of Opposition anymore, for it is again, for those who have the luxury to entertain political platforms and political agendas. Make your hands dirty, pick up a placard and join the young people who are voicing their indignation. When others talk about “Eritrean solutions to Eritrean problems”; when others talk about their readiness to defend the nation should the Weyanes march on up North to remove the tyrant, it is a sad reflection of a mind set completely oblivious to the grave danger and a question of survival the nation is standing on a push away to and from the unknown.

          Haft’kha.

        • haileTG

          Dear Beyan, what can I say brother but thank you for your tireless work too and would assure you that I hold you in the same (even much more) esteem too and hence this is now a community of country folks who think very highly of each other 🙂 Let’s hope our nation becomes such like place too.

          Please don’t get tired of the talk (yet:) for there was first a word which proceeded all actions. It is good thing that we have found a voice and a medium to project it. However, what is carried with those voices over those mediums is still at what I call the “Nice to see you” or “ከመዓልኩም” stage. If you notice in our traditional getting in touch with someone to convey a message, more than 1/2 the meeting time is spent going through the routine greeting exchanges to all sorts of random topics involving cats, stray dogs, village skirmishes, dwindling moral values and what have you and finally, yes at last, you convey the message that you need the person for such and such things. In our opposition talk and exchanges, we’re still not hammering on the core message that has propelled us to be here, now and in such like settings. Our conversation is still very thinly spread across multitude of unpredictable topics. There is still a sharp disjoint between our dominating talking contexts and the prevailing realty that propelled the creation of the medium in the first place.

          You would be surprised to know that if you ask any regime sympathizer to explain the significance of any random current affairs relating to Eritrea, they would give you a point by point run through of the very exact PFDJ taking points on the matter. PFDJ has a voice, has a medium (doesn’t have to be internet and signal transmission only) and utilizes it to relay the very message that necessitated the set up as it controls it. We still haven’t mastered our talks to make them to serve our purpose. We still haven’t started to talk the talk that would propel us to the much awaited walk. We still don’t understand to impact of our talks on how they render our walks sluggish and staggered. Hold in there my good brother, we still have to get the handle of talking for us than against us before we start walking to where we wish to be rather than to where we are desperately trying to run away from.

          As we brave out of the bloodiest summers that took so many young and precious of our flesh and blood, we are not quite there yet to voice (hence talk) what needs be voiced. When the talk that would guide the walk starts from the right place, you will witness the masses raising and the biggest walks of all hitting the streets of Asmara, all of Eritrea and across the four corners of the diaspora. We will walk for freedom, we will walk for the promise of our fallen heroes, we will walk for the abandonment of refugee centers and heading BACK HOME, we will walk for an end to the deaths and miseries, we will walk for our dignity and an end to the misery. Let us talk the right talk that sets in motion the kind of walk we wish to see. The current talk has shown us what kind of walk it can trigger, a walk into anonymity. Let’s talk still more brother, what say ya 🙂

        • Hey Beyan: I was just passing by and you caught my attention when you said if Haile be a leader to an opposition camp; you will be number and you will get down and get dirty.
          Well, I agree with all Haile’s quality but Haile can’t be a leader. He breaks down often. He is too emotional. If couple Eritreans dies; Haile breaks down and goes all out. You can argue Haile is passionate but as a leader you must have some bones to ignore some tragedies and move on. Haile; it is cool you are giving him his props but be honest and tell him his short comings too. Haile can be an important asset for Eritrea but it is not as leadership. Here you have it.
          Haile; am I off on this one? If I am well, that is how I see it.

        • Fanti Ghana

          Hey Bayan,

          I agree with your observation of Haile and I believe he could do very well in any high governmental
          position of future Eritrea. I also believe that SAAY has unquestionable talent for foreign ministry or ministry of information type job (he knows everything about everything). What a team they would make!

          Regarding doing everything “to gain individuals like Amal, NMS…,” as you said, these are “very
          well-articulated” women who should, and they appear to, know the dire straits Eritrea is in today. Therefore, I like to believe that they are fighting PFDJ whichever way they think is best, but I am not sure how or to what purpose should “the opposition,” which they already are party to, have tried to “gain” them, really.

          • saay7

            Selamat Fanti:

            I used to like you. Ministry of Information? As old ladies used to say back home: “ኤህ! ኢለካ አለኹ!” Actually, don’t tell Eyob because he already has a big head, but I was really impressed when Ethiopia got rid of the Ministry of Information–a job that is, by definition, Orwellian. It brings bad memories of Ethiopia’s Ministry of Information during the Badme war.

            And no Foreign Ministry for me either. That involves dealing with foreigners, and I don’t mean Ethiopians. I would have to go to the AU, the UN and having small talk about nothing and pledging to “remained seized with the matter” when I have no intention to.

            saay

          • Fanti Ghana

            Hey SAAY, layten Ketren ms Eyob enaElelka dea entay silTan kibeka delikhani?
            I had to find a fitting position where many Eritreans can get easy access to your bottomless brain. I mean, I could throw in ministry of education too, which I know you can easily handle, but I think somebody is reserving that position to my other favorite; Papillon. It is tough being shimagle!

          • haileTG

            hey Fanti Ghana, I have a perfect portfolio for saay: Minster of underdogs 🙂 he is very good at helping people grow. I am not sure if he likes them once they grow and become a pitbull 🙂

          • saay7

            Hailat:

            Did you just call me a veterinarian?:) You know our people have a very low opinion of any doctorate unless it is an MD. SGJ has a funny joke about a guy who had PhD in forestry, btw.

            saay

          • Fanti Ghana

            Even without knowing the joke I couldn’t stop laughing! I can only imagine what SDJ would say to someone with “PhD in forestry.” May be something like “he should go to jail for wasting public funds?”

          • Papillon

            Dear Fanti Ghana,

            Another quasi-joke was, a guy got a degree in Pharmacy (Farm-acy) and his parents thought the degree was in ማሕረስ.

          • Semere Andom

            Hi Sal:
            The Sudanese are obsessed with medicine as well, you see smart students who get high marks but cannot make to medicine repeat again and again. And the joke was that girls would study hard and tell each other “sena al jaya, tib aw ketib”, next year either medicine or engagement 😉

          • saay7

            Hi Sem:

            Funny! You mean people could actually pick their major? I think in Egypt, where the prestige majors were doctor, lawyer or engineer (so people can call you “Bash Muhandes”), the university system used a lottery. I think. Her come now Egyptologists to correct me:)

            At one point, Khartoums University was so superior credits were entirely transferable to UK universities. I am sure it’s all gone downhill since then.

            saay

          • Semere Andom

            Hi Sal:
            if you are elite enough to attend the Wed Numeiri school, top 10 from each province are allowed to attend this prestigious school and if you score enough when you matriculate you can choose, most choose medicine. Second is engineering the rest are mostly assigned to agri and so on if you are in science. Agri is hated not only for lack of title but they say someone must die for your to get a job.
            Every Eid they say sena al-jaya inshallah fi tib or Oxford:-)
            Yes Khartoum U was the best.

          • Saleh Johar

            It was not Forestry Saay, but agriculture. The story was related to me by the late Dr. Jaafer Omran who was at the Asmara University. A relative asked the young doctor to check her ailments. He told he he is a doctor of agriculture, not a medical doctor. She looked him in the eye in surprise and said, “You spend all this years abroad to learn farming? You could have learned that here from your father!” Its translation is not even a fraction as good as the original Tigrayit. It’s hilarious.

          • Semere Andom

            SJG:
            Thanks and if Saay did not tell you owe me the best jokes ever 🙂

          • Saleh Johar

            Nope. He didn’t tell me anything. He is busy writing a book about Jokes, after he finishes Alweledem, and after finishing a book about the crazy people in Keren 🙂

          • Papillon

            Dear Fanti Ghana,

            ኣኽቢድካለይ nevertheless you’re so kind. This kind of assigning portfolios do prop up now and then here on Awate and Engineer Rodab has a remarkable knack for it. That said however, we have every reason to be grateful to the heavens simply because if the great minds (read Sal, Haile et al) were living with in the realms of Isaias’ fiefdom, they would have been six feet under long ago for the sadistic leader has an aversion to great minds and intellects. One of the reasons that keeps us on the silver linings of hope is that the said minds have more to give and offer in post-tyranny Eritrea. If I was to assign a Ministerial Portfolio, I would give you (Fanti Ghana) the Ministry of Foreign Affairs for you’re a peace-maker*.

            *Asserting foreign policy is not only about Realism, it is about asserting universal moral values as well.

            Haft’kha.

          • Fanti Ghana

            Hey Papillon, do you remember TK inviting you to a coffee in Addis?
            BejaKhiba Hshukh beliley!

    • Eyob Medhane

      Haile,

      I don’t think it requires to be in a “diplomatic mission” to figure out why the “Russians are coming” 🙂 If you followed the news, particularly in the last three years (Since the GTP started to be implemented) they were showing interest to take up some mega projects as contractors. Particularly, in railway development and mining. The north East railway portion, ( Woldia, Debre Tabor, Finote Selam, Bahir dar), because of the terrain proved to be very difficult to finance and Brazil and Russia are the only ones that have showed interest to finance it. (Please refer to the link)

      http://sodere.com/profiles/blogs/ethiopia-courts-brazil-russia-india-and-china-brics-for-rail

      This project and some mining projects on the way are their larger interest, as I linked their Afar region deal I linked in the earlier post explains. Their business interests in Europe is getting a bit cold, because of sanctions and frictions over Ukraine, Russians are looking elsewhere trying to duplicate China’s success in Africa and South America, to substitute their European business interest. The pay back of favorable votes in the UN is their least diplomatic concern in their relations with other countries (I believe). Almost more than half of African countries have abstained in that UN vote, but Russians are not paying them all visit, or if they do, they do it selectively….As you said, it is to be seen what will be said at the joint press conference, during the visit. But I have a feeling much of it will be just that. Business….

      • haileTG

        Selam Eyob,

        Let me start with traditional Eritrean note of good will “ቤት በረካ፡ ቤት ሽሻይ ይግበረልኩም!” I am sure that it is simple Tigrigna but we have our great brother TK to re-configure it into Amharic 🙂 It is most likely that the Russians see great benefit from the fertile and blessed country of warmth and hospitality. Your discussion also reinforces the salient points that I argued above. One can take any country (including Somalia) and can point to several multifaceted engagements at sectoral and comprehensive levels with the outside world. Such has been amiss in Eritrea for a long while and such a fact is no where more visible than in the regime’s own media outlets. ERiTV’s world news amounts to a carefully selected sampling of gruesome events in some obscure corners of the planet. In fact, I doubt if there is any media in the world that broadcasts death and distraction in its world bulletins than ERiTV. Nothing else to do with Eritrea in the world (which use to be a popular program of radio demxi hafash in ghedli era). There is none happening. And it couldn’t happen from now on while the regime in power, because the world has finally put (actually slammed) its foot down with having anything to do with the current status quo. Hopefully, this opens the eyes of regime supporters that it is really about making a stark choice of facing up to the reality even the regime is telling them inadvertently or meet the fate of all cults, i.e. perishing en mass. We have run the furthest and finally hit the brick wall…hmmm should we go back now or starve to death here 🙂

  • What the hell hahahahahah. if i was an Ethiopian; i will change my name and my nationalites. as the asmarino will say; talk about fara PM. lol the tigryans show no respect ethier. they look like making fan of the parrot
    https://fbcdn-sphotos-c-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-xpa1/t1.0-9/1606868_946003588760071_5413959823709578960_n.jpg

    • Papillon

      Maybe somebody can enlighten us who is who in this picture and who is more powerful.

      • Fanti Ghana

        Selam Pappillon,

        Until Eyob or TK notice your question I will tell you those I know.

        Front row from left:
        1st one is Abadi Zemo (aka wedi zemo), TPLF central committee, and my former boss in the Sudan. Very good man! I used to get away with many sins just by making him laugh. He lost his left arm in the early
        days of TPLF.

        2nd. Tigray President: Abay Weldu
        3rd. PM Hailemariam Desalegn
        6th. FM Tedros Adhanom

        I would imagine the Prime minister and the Foreign Minister to be no.1 and no.2 power wise.

        • abrham

          4th Muktar Kedir Oromia president
          5th Gedu Andargachew Amahara president
          7th Dr.Debretsion G.michael the only ex-tegadalay minster(Information & Technology)

          • Fanti Ghana

            Thank you Abrham,
            I see Muktar Kedir on ETV all the time, and I knew he was Oromo official, but I didn’t know his position. Why I didn’t know Gedu Andargachew is a mystery to me. I think I lost interest after Addisu Legesse (my favorite).

          • Eyob Medhane

            Dessie Dalke :- Southern Region President between Gedu Andargachew and Tedros Adhanom

            Fanti,

            Interms of hierarchy The Prime Minister, then one of the three Deputy Prime Ministers, that is Dr. Debretsion Gebremichael then the Foreign Minister Tedros Adhanom. 🙂

          • Rodab

            Abrham, Fanti,
            Can you also point to Harbegna T. Kifle? First row or second?

          • Abinet

            Hey Rodab
            He is the cameraman 🙂

          • Fanti Ghana

            Thank you Abinet, I suspected he wouldn’t be too far from that crowd!

          • Rahwa T

            Hi Fanti Ghana,
            I thought all Awatistas already know who T.K. is. He presented his both his picture and his profession. In fact he is the only Ethiopian I know in this forum with an easier access about himself.

          • Fanti Ghana

            Hello Rahwa T,

            I used to take long absences from the internet until not long ago, and I must have missed it during those times.

          • T. Kifle

            Hahaha, Rodab you would never see T.Kifle even after the 100th row. 🙂

        • Papillon

          Dear Fanti Ghana,

          It is fair to say that the genius of Isaias in the early years of his political life is his ability to cultivate a clear understanding about the power of gathering information and denying others from sharing. A friend of mine told me that, in this particular picture the most powerful are the men who control and condense information. The two men to that effect are–Dr. Debretsion and Mulugeta Alemseged (he is smiling with sunglasses on standing right behind Abadi Zemo).

          Haft’kha.

      • Kaddis

        The most powerful of course is the UK Ambassador to Ethiopia – the ferenj far right 🙂 In defence of Nitric. Kalegna man aleh 🙂

    • Abinet

      Ethiopians are smart enough not to worry about what is under his feet. We are more interested about what is under his hat.
      “Abba bebelu Emahoyn agesachew”
      Yilal yagere sew

      • Eyob Medhane

        Abi,

        I just don’t understand and beyond me why you chose to respond to this thing….there are better objects in this world that this thing. Please, don’t waste your time with it….

        • Abinet

          Eyobe
          You are right this thing is annoying . I will leave IT alone.

        • Eyob do you see how AT protects you. they let you say whatever you want. You can even call a human being a “thing” you get away with it. if I had to say Ante Lemagn Ye-weyane wusha; At will not happy. Why do you think? Lemagn.

    • Kokhob Selam

      Nitricc, what is on that? shall I put the picture of DIA here ? no I will not do that.

  • Eyob Medhane

    Sal,

    I just read this, and you know what came to my mind?

    hummmmmmm….. They come to us, we don’t go them… 🙂

    http://allafrica.com/stories/201408250678.html

    • Abinet

      Eyobe
      Let them come one by one . Bet leEngda bilenal.

      • Eyob Medhane

        Abi,

        What’s funny was Eritrean “Foreign Minister” and his baby sitter ‘Yemane ‘Monkey’ were shuttling to Russia, visiting Crimea (Russian invaded former Ukraine territory) and bragging that Russia will start ‘military training’ on the Red sea believing that “we will be shaking in our boots”, turns out, Russians are telling them…”Ah…well..sorry you don’t matter that much..” and Lavrov himself is swooping to Ethiopia…..I can’t wait for Shabia’s spin on this one… 🙂

        • Papillon

          Dear Eyobai,

          The news item probably meant to say, the Foreign Minister will visit Eritrea sometime in early September. Chronic delusions die hard.

          • Eyob Medhane

            Papi,

            Ha ha…That’s a good one… 🙂

        • Kokhob Selam

          መዓንጣ ኣህባይ ኩምትርትር ኢሉ ::

          የጦጣ ሩጫና ግብይት : የኢትዮጵያን የእድገት ጎዳና ኣይቀለብስም ::

          • Amde

            ሰላም ኮከብ ሠላም

            ነውረኛ አትበለኝና የጦጣ ሩጫ ያልከው ልጅ ሆኜ ያጋጠመኝን አሥታወሠኝ.

            የሠፈራችን ሴቶች በቀበሌ ሰልፍ ውጡ ተብለው ይወጣሉ. መፈክር እየጠሩ ሲቀባበሉ ቆዩ.

            “ኢምፔርያሊዝም ይውደም!!” – “ይውደም!!”
            “ፊውዳሊዝም ይውደም!!” – “ይውደም!!”
            ” ሥርአት አልበኛ ይውደም!!” – “ይውደም!!”
            “ተገንጣይ ይውደም!!” – “ይውደም!!”
            .
            .
            .
            ወዘተ….

            ተባለና… መፈክር አለቀባቸው::

            አሁን የሚባል ጠፋና ሠልፉ በዝምታ ትንሽ ቀጠለ.

            ክዚያ ከሠልፈኞች መሀል አንዱዋ ምን ትላለች

            “የእ*ሥ መነፋነፍ የቁ#ን ተልእኮ አይመልሠውም!” ስትል
            ሁሉም በጋራ
            “አይመልሠውም!”

            ካስቀየምኩ ይቅርታ።

            አምዴ

          • Hayat Adem

            What?! Totally off color and very unbecoming of Amde! And a preemptive apology would never make it right. I guess there are days for everyone to become uncool.

          • Kokhob Selam

            I was going to answer in that level, but when you post I became shameful. I respect you and all so I am not going to say anything except ወይ ጣጣ!

          • Hayat Adem

            Thanks K.S. Likewise!

          • Kokhob Selam

            ተናግራችሁ የምታናግሩ : ወይ ጣጣ!

          • Papillon

            ኣቶ ኣምደ

            እንታይ ድኣ ምስ እዚ ኩሉ ክብረትኩምን ግርማኹምን ናይ ቀለልቲ ዘረባ ትዛረቡ በጃኹም ኢለኩም ነውሪ ዘረባ ንየው በልዎ

          • Hayat Adem

            Thanks. Back in to your usual cool stature.

          • Kokhob Selam

            great, thank you.

          • Kokhob Selam

            since Amede has deleted it I am going to delete also what I said all on replying to him now including this one withn 2mints.

        • Abinet

          Eyobe
          It was Hope that was telling us the Russians are coming with their navy ….

      • Amanuel Hidrat

        Dear Abinet,

        “Bet leEngda bilenal.” is one of my favorite statement, because it is a statement of hospitality. As a matter of fact Ethiopia is known for its hospitality.

        • Abinet

          Ato Amanuel
          Thank you for the kind words . You are honest as usual. When it comes to hospitality ,I think,both people are identical . Aren’t we all abeshas?
          I like to share with you a jock.
          It happened at the era of transitional government where parliamentary seats (wenber) were assigned almost based on ethnic basis. However,there were no seats for Amharas. So the Amharas said ” wenber leEngda new kanese enchemralen. “

          • Amanuel Hidrat

            Abi,

            That is a good one. The Amharas have cornucopia of jokes. Keep in mind you will be asked to grace us with jokes as needed when debates flared up as a soothing agent to the hot minds.

            Amanuel Hidrat

          • Kokhob Selam

            Yes friends we are just the same people, we have deep rooted common culture that no political games and differences can destroy it.if someone is in doubt tell him to visit the world and he will know how much attached we are.

        • Dear Mr. Amanuel Hidrat,

          Some years ago, I was visiting a European capital with a friend of mine. By mere chance we entered a restaurant where an Eritrean guy was serving at the table we were sitting. He came to us with a broad smile, and asked us if we were Habeshas. We told him that indeed we are Habeshas and Ethiopians. In a perfect Amharic, he told us that he is also a Habesha and an Eritrean.

          When he asked us what we would like to eat, my friend who had a knowledge of Eritrean cuisine, told him that we would like an Eritrean dish (I do not remember the name now). We could see in his eyes the happy and at the same time the sad feeling overwhelming him. With a smile he told us if he
          ever goes back to his country and opens a restaurant in Asmara, he would be more than happy to feed us to our heart’s liking with the best Eritrean dish.

          We stayed in the city for five days, and his was the only restaurant we went to. The last day we visited him, and said good-bye, we all tried to hide our sadness as we separated. I can still see him vividly as he was standing at the door and waving his hand. We felt that we were leaving behind a brother; and I am sure that he had a similar feeling.

          Mr. Ammanuel, Eritrean hospitality is equally great, similar to Ethiopian hospitality, because we are the same people. A thousand thanks for your kind words.

          • Amanuel Hidrat

            Dear Horizon,

            Yes indeed both people have hospitable culture. Not only that, they are also magnanimous people in nature, excluding the ruling class. Horizon, as your nick signifies, if we look the future with optimism, sure enough this two people will live at peace side by side prospering in short time. The potential is fully there if we cultivate our relation wisely and use it towards that.

            regards,
            Amanuel Hidrat

    • saay7

      Eyob:

      You don’t think it had anything to do with UN Res 68/262 and how Ethiopia (just like Eritrea, just like most of Africa) abstained from the vote on whether Russia’s actions in Ukraine amount to violating its “territorial integrity”?

      The real headline would be if Russia visits Nigeria which was one of the few African countries which voted “yes” on 68/262. Otherwise, this appears more “dog bites man” story:)

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_Nations_General_Assembly_Resolution_68/262

      saay

      • Eyob Medhane

        Sal,

        Eh…not really…

        This story has more to do with this (check the link)

        http://www.theafricareport.com/East-Horn-Africa/oil-and-gas-russian-company-signs-exploration-deal-with-ethiopia.html

        Thank UN resolution. As you said most African countries abstained in that resolution, but most of them are not getting to be visited (including Eritrea) by Lavrov. As you read on the new Lavrov is coming with “business people”, which is a blanket term for ‘mineral explorers’, since Ethiopia doesn’t allow foreign banks and foreign retailers in the country. Russians seems to believe (as it is indicated on the above link) they know Ethiopia better than anyone, because of their “close relationship” with Ethiopia for 14 years, during the Derg. They believe that they can take advantage of that knowledge, which westerners don’t have to exploit many potential the country has. Westerners are still strangling to get themselves out of the perception that they held for a long time that “Ethiopia is a basket case for charity”, and Russians and Turkish are taking advantage of the Western business entities lack of knowledge of the country to have a head start, before the West changes that perception and go for resource hunt…..I don’t give they give a damn who voted what way in the UN resolution, that did not make much of a difference, anyway…

        • saay7

          Eyob:

          They don’t care, you say? Didn’t you hear the “leaked” audio, conversation between the Russian ambassador to Eritrea and the Russian ambassador to Zimbabwe? Looks like they were disappointed by Eritrea’s “abstention” and happy with Zimbabwe’s vote…and they gave an “oh no!” that Sudan voted their way. check out video embed in this Guardian news story:

          http://www.theguardian.com/world/2014/apr/04/russian-ambassadors-catalonia-venice-scotland-alaska-annex-crimea

          saay

          • Eyob Medhane

            Sal,

            I can’t believe a man of your caliber would fall for that. Did they sound they were worried to you? They were laughing and just shooting the breeze. Probably bored being stuck in two isolated countries in Africa (Zimbabwe and Eritrea) having not much to do…Their discussion was not even political….”…how about we held a referendum in ‘Maiamiland’ nope ‘Londonland’ is better…” What does that sound to you? Big political decision makers in Russian government discussing their next move or two low level Russian ambassadors talking crap after few vodka…may be, if you here closely, you would have heard, “…hey, let’s make a prank call and scare the sh** out of Isayas..” ” No, you first…let’s do Mugabe, first. Isayas is may be sleeping or drunk..” 🙂

          • saay7

            Eyob:

            The laughter might be due to excitement: this was right after the roll call (notice how one is not sure whether he saw the vote of Mali or Malawi. They just annexed a territory and they didn’t have to use a veto to kill a UN resolution so yeah they were giddy.

            You know how China has only one question on its “friend or foe” quiz of Africans (“where do you stand on Taiwan”)? You think Russia will use the same approach with Africans, substituting Ukraine for Taiwan? If so, what would the government of Eyob of the Republic of Eyobia do?

            saay

      • Hayat Adem

        Dear Sal,
        Right: dog bites a man is a no-news. But if that dog bites a high profile person, it is a news. Ethiopia has become a destination of high diplomatic dispatches. There have been even higher-level visits from East and West. One way or the other, Ethiopia has managed to be an entry point to Africa, way before the 68/262. This one is only more of what was happening but it is interesting event when Eritrea visited Russia and the reciprocity is deflected and drifted to the neighbor. Whorish diplomacy- the catch phrase from my friend Serray- seems bearing fruits. Was then the monkey delegation promoting Ethiopia? Reprimand from DIA is on the way now.
        Hayat

        • sara

          xxxx diplomacy–quoting what was said by some one else will not make you clean , i am appalled to see a woman with such nickname (Hayat) has to repeat it.
          btw,don’t get exited- without going to details most of my people know the diplomatic history of your country from Menelik to Meles.

          • Hayat Adem

            Appalled to see Hayat repeating an expression in use? I would think I deserve better but I guess I’ll have to live with that.

          • Rahwa T

            daHan do ayneberan zen sebeyti

          • Rahwa T

            Dr Sarah,
            Few hours (days) before posting this comment, while exchanging ideas with Tes, you preached about individuals right to voice their opinions freely. And all of sudden you jumped and stood on the toes of this proud Eritrean lady and leveled her as Ethiopian and reminded her about ‘leaders’. It is weird. Good that Hayat ignored this light-weight comment.

          • haileTG

            Dear Rahwa T,

            You have mixed up Dr Sarah Ogbay, a prolific Eritrean academic with Sara who is the tea lady in hgdef mekete and writes few none sense here. This Sara is a PFDJ infected and her Ethiopia thingy comes from knowing her master’s master and getting all too claustrophobic about it. Ignore it.

          • Tzigereda

            Dear Rahwa,
            As far as I can see you are confusing Sara with Dr. Sara Ogbay.

          • Saleh Johar

            Thanks Tzigereda, I must also have confused readers by referring to Dr. Sara as Sara.

          • Rahwa T

            Dear Tsigereda,
            Oh yes, I thought the comment was from Dr Sarah O. and was surprised how two opposite comments could come from a matured person. Thank you for the correction and my apology to Dr Sarah.

          • Papillon

            Dear Rahwa,

            I am sure sara has taken a delight of the unexpected complement as she was confused with Dr. Sara. I am surprised you missed a PFDJ zombie from a distance.

            Haft’khi.

        • Amanuel Hidrat

          Selam Hayat,

          While we have plenty political argument that explains the PFDJ’s political nature and grinds their core belief and and tactics, why do you use their ewala-languages. I think you are better than them.

          Amanuel H.

          • Hayat Adem

            “why do you use their ewala-languages…”
            Do I, Emma? I naturally despise such a language. If you are referring to my use of the phrase, “whorish diplomacy”, it is NOT from PFDJ and I would say it is not an ewala language. It is a fitting expression for a cheap and short-circuit diplomacy. I’m you have read/heard before phrases like whorish press, whorish campaign, whorish art etc.
            Hayat

          • Amanuel Hidrat

            Hayatom,

            Whatever, however people use “whorish” it is a vulgar language. With all your English language command and your political prowess I don’t see you to go to their low level . Just an advice.

          • Hayat Adem

            k. emma! who resists a wise advice except the fools. thanks.

        • “Ethiopia has managed to be an entry point to Africa” this woman is clueless.
          http://imageshack.us/a/img443/8701/33866451.jpg

          • Semere Andom

            You seem to understand Amharic and not that much Tigriniya, what is going on?I have theories about this oddity, but let hear it “kab af Feres”
            If Hayat is clueless, how about DIA, he recently said that Ethiopia has emerged as a superpower in Africa, this was his deeper knowledge as he never gives credit to anyone. So are both Hayat and DIA clueless?

          • Semere, it is not quantum mechanics. It is a toothless language; called Amharic. You can learn it too. I study the freaking and useless language not that it is my desire but it will come handy dealing with your cuisines in due time. As they say; keep your friends close and your enemy closer. As far as I am concern Ethiopia is the major and greatest danger to Eritrea’s survival and I am committed to deal with them; People like you are too weak and too coward to deal with the Ethiopians.
            . Now, do you have anymore question for me? Regarding PIA calling Ethiopia super power; do you mean super bagger? I know you can say that you are scared to that woman. I bet you pee in your pants when ever she shows her you know what. “Hayatina” what a man?

        • Abinet

          Dear Hayat
          Did you know Dr Duri Mohamed was bitten by a dog while leaving a meeting (late in the evening)at ministry of education ? It was a big news. Just to support you 🙂

          • Eyob Medhane

            Abi,

            Oh my God! I remember that. He was begging the private newspapers to leave him alone and quit telling that story……. 🙂

          • Abinet

            Eyobe
            When he was president of AAU people affectionately called him duriye.

          • Hayat Adem

            No I didn’t, Abinet. Was he a minister of that ministry then? The dog must have been very unhappy with the education policy tabled at that meeting.
            Speaking of dogs and education, I was told about a guy who had his dog (Max) registered for an online graduate courses. Unsuspecting of the deception, the university kept on sending the home work exam questions. The owner was dealing with them on behalf of his animal. Then graduation day arrived. Max graduated with flying colors. His owner get him dressed gown for the big day and took him to the campus. He was called up on among the Great Distinction graduates. When his owner walked him up to the stage to collect the certificate, everyone in there was freaking-out. The event was shamed and ruined. The university’s reputation was ruined. It didn’t take long for the university to go out of business due to that very single fateful day. It is true story and that happened somewhere in England, I guess.
            Asmara University run out of business because of other kind of dogs, but what happened matters more than how it happened, does it not?

          • Abinet

            Hayat
            That is an interesting story. That is actually one of the weakness of universities with out walls .
            Speaking of educational policy of Ethiopia ,there was this person at AAU who was very upset by the quality of students joining the institution .
            He said
            “Dro university yemigebut eregnoch nebrru. Ahun gin eregnochu qertew kebtochu meTu”. Professor Mesfin Woldemariam.
            So I don’t blame the dogs .sheperding is what they do best .

  • Kim Hanna

    Selam Abinet,
    .
    Points well made and taken.
    .
    K.H

  • Saleh Johar

    Dear Awatista (Haile TG, NMS, Amel, Tzigereda, Sarah and others)
    This should have been a message by the AT, but due to circumstances, I will not wait until I reach them. I am sure they will not mind me commenting on their behalf.

    This is dedicated to Mulu, the tireless Eritrean patriot from the DC area.

    Heated Debates: Over the years, we have seen bad tempers and exchange of unbecoming words and threats. At times, in a short time the Forum would be so overwhelmed by new members that one would conclude it is a concerted attack. In such instances, we understand how some people could be paranoid about it and blame the PFDJ for trying to infiltrate the forum. This is reinforced because the PFDJ did that in the past and will do it in the future. But not every new thread of heated debate should be blamed on the PFDJ. We have many unresolved issues and we have to accept the periodic flares as normal.

    Threats: We have also seen people in the peak of such debate throw insults on this website, make accusations, and threaten us– “netselay habuni, I am leaving” sort of threat. We know that no one is indispensable, not the members of the forum, not the moderators, not the AT, no body! The struggle that we are in is a million times bigger than all of us combined. We do not like it when people leave, especially when they leave on their own will for flimsy reasons, yet blame it on something else, particularly this website, the usual punching bag! Equally, we do not appreciate it when we see some people all gleeful when someone leaves, as if they are bored gate openers who need some action, and encourage others to leave. This happened several times, for instance, when a few members considered themselves referees, sometimes giving Ethiopians the red card and asking them to leave, sometimes asking women to leave, sometimes asking God-knows-who to leave. We state for the millionth time: this forum is open for anyone provided they adhere to the posting guidelines. We do not encourage bigotry and we are not exclusion of others.

    Nicknames: we know who is who in this forum, but for the last 15 years, we have never disclosed the identity of anyone unless they do it on their own. This has been one of the policies that we seriously adhere to. To us, it is a matter of personal integrity and professionalism. Having said that, we do not appreciate when people choose a misleading nick, that is far from their real identity. We discourage that, but we do not interfere to stop it. We advise those who are fond of guessing who is who, and are convinced their guesses are correct, to stop it.

    Mission: the mission of this website is primarily to defeat the PFDJ. To do that, we are guided by our slogan: Inform. Inspire. Embolden. Reconcile. It is an opposition website and airs the voice of the voiceless. Probably I do not need to say more because Serray has articulated it a few minutes ago what our priorities should be (less his usual Gedli bashing which is irrelevant here). We have priorities and we do not appreciate it when some people want to steal our agenda and impose their single narrow agendas at the expense of our mission that we guard jealously. That doesn’t mean we cannot entertain other issues, and you all know that we have raised many issues of common interest, and will keep doing so within reason. However, we believe the PFDJ is the main obstacle standing on the way of resolving other vital social and cultural issues as a nation of free citizens. We prefer to focus on the PFDJ, and on the main national issues: emancipating Eritreans from tyranny.

    Attitude: I was personally disheartened when recently a few persons came into this forum, for the first time, entered as cowboys slinging pistols in a saloon. They came as if they were here to occupy an enemy territory and pretending to be liberators. First, if you consider awate.com and its forum an enemy territory, we feel sad. Second, we do not consider you enemies, anyone who wishes good for his country and people, is welcome. For God’s sake, even those who do not wish us good are welcome. But the attitudes should be right. We hope you come here to convince, educate, and be educated and convinced. We hope you come here to expand you alliance and help in the overall task of uplifting the Eritrean moral and contribute towards finding solutions. Any topic is acceptable as long as long as the commenter adheres by the guiding principles, and decency. Naturally, you will get as much as you give. If your attitude is wrong, expect a similar response. We do not wish tempers to go wild and insults to be hurled. But it is important that we all be guided with a proper debating attitude.

    Recent issue: The debate about identifying the supporters of the PFDJ somehow became unnecessarily heated. Irresponsible words were hurled, disrespectful comments followed and it reached a level where I am forced to write this message.
    So far, we have received many messages from friends and non-friends. The complaints were against Haile, Amal, and NMS. It would be helpful if we addressed the complaints so that we bring this thing to rest.

    You may remember that Haile has evolved so much (he explained that himself here) that he earned our respect, and the TG title from a member of the AT that the rest of the team blessed. He has been dynamic in this forum and his contribution has been considerable. Honestly, he has helped us by providing insightful analysis and confronting infiltrators in this forum. We admire him for the way he interacts actively. Over the years, we have been blessed to have many like Haile who graced our forum–some made a short appearance and disappeared, others stayed for a long haul to the extent that they gained the respect of everybody.
    But Haile is not a member of the AT, he represents himself and AT never solicited him to do anything on its behalf except our open appeal to write articles for the frontpage, this will be followed with him privately. He doesn’t get any privilege; there are none to be given here anyway. But the AT has always been here to extinguish fires that start every now and then, Haile has been part in the fire that started recently; he lost his cool quickly on slight provocation, something that is not his character. This is an attempt to extinguish the current fire for good.

    NMS and Amal: From experience we know that new members tend to be combative in the beginning but slowly mellow down. Most of the time, they do not stay for too long, most are seasonal members who come, disrupt everything and disappear. WE hope NMS and Amal are not like those I mentioned and will grace us here for a longer time. This by the way is not gender specific, both genders do it (a topic of my next Negarit, God willing). But we cannot discount the intelligence of both NMS and Amal. I know both of them and I personally know how intelligent and passionate they are, one of them is still a close friend, the other has distanced herself from me for reasons we both know. In the episode we are addressing though, their combative and accusatory attitude has not been helpful, their single agenda driven comments, which they remembered to introduce here just a few days ago, has been debated and discussed every now and then, way before they graced this forum. But as I said, and as Serray explained, their main agenda can only be addressed within the broader issues, not as “drop everything else and attend to my anger” attitude.

    My biggest disappointment has been that in the middle of it all, we have transgressed on the personality of a few women I respect, Tzigereda that I know, and Sara that I hope to know someday. These are an asset to all of us and they should be heard, consulted and given the podium. They are qualified and educated women capable of helping put the struggle in its rightful path. They can contribute greatly in improving the effectiveness of the opposition and I urge them to consider my appeal.

    On this occasion, I would also like to apologize to every man who was accused of crimes he never committed, and to every women who felt insulted. We take the issue of Eritrean women (repeat, Eritrean women) seriously. And we have made so many attempts to remedy the imbalances in the Diaspora opposition forces, but faced hurdles by … (read next edition of Negarit). In the meantime, since we believe in equality, we are willing to execute affirmative action (feedback if it is needed, and how it can be applied) but we will not make gender deference in this forum, everyone will be treated as an adult regardless of their gender. If you have any idea or suggestion on how we can help move the gender specific issues forward, please forward them to us. We promise to help in every way we can, with pleasure, proudly.

    Finally, myself, my colleagues, and the members of this form, men and women, are all good people who have the betterment of Eritrea at heart. Such forum should be an opportunity to discuss our concerns in a sober manner and not make is a battleground that doesn’t serve neither our group agenda, nor our national agenda.

    I hope that we stop incriminating people we do not know based on our wrong perceptions. But if as far as those is in the PFDJ camp are concerned, as long as they support the regime, I believe they are legitimate targets. And I do not see how or why anyone would come to the defense the PFDJ structure for any reason at all.

    If anyone is offended, apologies is in order

    Thank you

    • haileTG

      Selamat SGJ ( and saay and and all of the AT too)

      Thank you for the candid intervention. Personally, I would like to apologize for giving in to some avoidable situation (I try to remember saay’s old advice that we should avoid responding before we cool off:) In any case, I need to acknowledge that the burden of making this great place available is carried by you and it is the least I could do to help in managing my conducts. I hope you understand that what happened over the last few days was spontaneous (from my perspective) and not intended to undermine the overall work that the AT is engaged in, fight against tyranny.

      I shall do my best to keep out out of trouble and wish to sincerely apologize for the unfortunate turn of events in the last few days.

      Best Regards

      • Semere Andom

        Hi Hail TG:
        Well, I think it was your turn this time, but I must acknowledge that when I got all worked up about whether to celebrate May 24 or not, like the hairy lesbians of today I used the gay parade analogy and you were the cool head and the rest was history, again when I went through the roof over the lady who recited a poem about the martyrs , I think, you were the cool head again, I am sure we the justice seekers (sorry Sal, coin a new one).
        Hade hade ayrekbo diyu said a woman 🙂
        Sem

        • saay7

          Hey Sem A:

          Kab behalius degamiu. There are three phrases that were used in this whole exchange that I never want to hear in our forum and you just used one of them. It is an American construct: a phrase that the radical right uses to make fun of feminists. Let’s please move on.

          saay

          • Semere Andom

            Good morning Sal:
            I knew this was serious when you started with Hey Sem:
            I know, we moved, did not we? I hope you understand what I was trying to say. The debate between you and Haile was civilized, that was my intention
            Thanks
            Sem

    • Rodab

      Well said H.E.
      It is ok if debates get heated once in a while, God knows how boring things could be if we didn’t have that. Specially on weekends.
      Also I wouldn’t worry about my favorite lady and a veteran Awatista, Tzigereda. She is not going anywhere. The question is when will she write a full article.

  • Amal

    Such a shame that you believe it’s ALL about you.

  • Tzigereda

    Dear Serray,
    “ዛዚምናዮ ክንብል ተቀልቂልካ”…but be assured “መእተዊ ኢዩ ነይሩ”. Welcome back!

    The last days we focused only on one issue namely “the role of women in the opposition camp”. Am sorry, I will make it short. I would also love to stay away from “politics” (opposing the tyrant system) but it is a necessity, it is “not even a choice”, it is a must to raise my voice. I see no other alternative. I hear, see and read the tragedies day in, day out.
    ብዙሕ ብድሆታት ከምዘሎን ከምዘጋጥመናን ናትና ኢልና ሒዝናዮ ኢና።
    I like and agree with what you’re your ex said (am sorry for your loss) “we let you have that until we decide it is time to step in…”, and many are stepping in. Let me add this :
    One of the reasons why many are not yet part of the political organisations is that they don’t want to be part of the unnecessary squabbles which is hindering the urgent needed progress in building a “representative opposition” ( sorry for repeating it). This is the voice of the Eritrean women (and also MEN)*, they are trying to enforce it, yet it seems not heard. And I have no doubt as soon as this homework is “done” (and it should be done, not tomorrow, but yesterday) እቲ መዓልታዊ ብኽያትን ሓዘንን will be substituted by “ኣይንኸሎንዶ ኢልኩምናየ እቲ ውራይና”, which they are
    singing it quietly. Do you hear them?

    *http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jN05UEK2FKc
    At the demonstration in Rome after the tragedy in Lampedusa.

    • Kokhob Selam

      this young lady already knew what is going on, those 70 years men and women are still really infants, children if they are are not brainless.

  • Amanuel Hidrat

    Tesfat,

    1) First PFDJites will not dismantle the system by themselves. No body should expect that.The justice seekers from inside and outside Eritrea have to do that. If we can’t do it, then the system will be there until we are able to do it, and the struggle will continue. I am talking only when the stock of our nation falls on the hand of justice seekers.

    2) If the justice seekers have not the upper hand on the transitional period, PFDJ will not relinquish power to the people. We should be absolutely sure that the power is snatched from the organization. I am absolutely clear about my statement and reassure you again as to my understanding, and that the power of our people should be strong enough to effect the rule of law and If the PFDJ refuse to follow rule of law, the law should act upon them accordingly.” Remember all the other factors I mentioned earlier or other post few months ago, must accompany with it to assure the enforcement of all the elements needed.

    3) If the system is dismantled, the guilty faces the court of justice, the innocent are given the right to exercise their rights, they wouldn’t attempt to be the same as the old PFDJ, which is totally abhorred by the general public. Chances are to rename it with “new identity”. The Eritrean people have enough pain with old system and they know it very well. But if they want to come with their value system, it will be self-suicidal. Keep in mind all the resources that is collected or the company’s in the name of the party should be return to the state. A party shouldn’t own any kind of property. A parties should exist by the contributions of their members. As a matter of fact this is one of the ideological difference they had with EPRDF early in their honeymoons. This is part of the dismantelment. Disowning the resources from the party.

    Tes we are talking how the framework of the dismantelment shoul be. The detail the what and the how can not be addressed at this time in this format only discussing on round table.

    hawka,
    Amanuel Hidrat

    • Tesfabirhan WR

      Dear Amanuel H.,

      Hope you are patient and continue to answer my questions.

      Your responses are leading me to another puzzle. Make things very clear and simple. For sure, I am understanding what you are saying but I found them self-contradictory. That is why I am keeping my questions to flow.

      1. PFDJ can not dismantle its own system. I do not know how you interpreted my lines in that way if you are giving a response to my question. Abzias zidekemka timesil aleka Aya Amanuel. Again, my question remains unanswered. I am waiting a response to that. Surely, no one is expecting. Some might expect for Reform within but to dismantle within? Do you mean collapse? Dismantling and collapse are two different terms in politics I think. I believe that PFDJ is a collapsed institution. Only the ideology that he invested hugely to stay in every Eritrean mind is surviving. This is what we are fighting for now.

      Question then: 1. To whom are you warning when you say, “No body should expect that”
      2. Once Eritrea falls in the hands of Justice seekers, what is the fate of the already dismantled system? Are you going to allow them to form a party? If so, why there is a need to dismantle the system?

      2.1 You wrote, “We should be absolutely sure that the power is snatched from the organization” I found this statement to be one of the weakest argument since I engaged with you. Snatching I think has a different meaning to that of the opposition approach and the opposition camp is working on. According to http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/snatch definition, the word “Snatch is defined as “to seize by a sudden or hasty grasp” Then, could you elaborate what you mean? I think dismantlement is not a one day achievement. It is a gradual and progressive process. See the communist countries, what happened to them. To me belief, we are not fighting to snatch power but to install JUSTICE. Could you then clarify what you mean.

      2.2 You wrote, “…, and that the power of our people should be strong enough to effect the
      rule of law and If the PFDJ refuse to follow rule of law, the law should
      act upon them accordingly.” I think you are mixing statements. Keep your lines clean please [Very kindly].

      3. You said, “… the innocent are given the right to exercise their rights, they wouldn’t attempt to be the same as the old PFDJ,..” If so, why then you are working to dismantle the system if you think that PFDJ is a system and the system has no innocence within it. What I believe is innocent people are only enslaved. And indeed PFDJ is an enslaving institution. Slaves are only freed. They are not meant to return their old hostage again.

      I think, you are just repeating using “figure of speech” for the already said statement by Saay, just remove the bad boys and let do what ever they do and we will do what ever we want. Aren’t you allowing “Rule of the Jungle”instead of “Rule of Law”?

      Your responses are more diverging than converging. I hope you will not end-up by saying “we have different eyes to read what is written hear.

      Hawka
      tes

  • Amal

    Dear Sarray

    You are still calling me Alam 🙁
    The meaning of my alias (Amal) is Hope (singular). Alam (the name you gave me) means Pain (plural). Just to let you know, I am more of a SweetChilli mix or Helew Morr 🙂

    Let’s get into our discussion.
    I hope it’s clear by now for the commentators on this topic, that; Tzegereda, NMS, The View and moi are not the same person, because simply we are saying the same thing but expressing it from different stand points. I can only try to explain my position on the topic at hand. Haven been a political activist in the opposition for a considerable period of time, coming from a family that have given Eritrea it’s all for the last seven generations: I certainly don’t need a license from anyone to have and share my opinion on anything Eritrea. Coming to discuss on this forum about the topic am passionate about, is part of my activism.

    As an activist for as long as I have been, it’s impossible not to reflect on: why we as a movement are unable to defeat our enemy for the past twenty-three years and counting? That line of thinking, led me to the conclusion that our problem is the society that gave birth and nurtured the PFDJ. It amazes me still, that there are people in the opposition that believe, by just removing PFDJ all will be just fine, and we can live happy ever after, by taking: a Constitution Pill, Law Pill, and a big injection of Democracy. Totally ignoring that all of the things we ask for as the opposition are about a process of social evolution, they are the result of hard work by a conscious society. There is no guarantee whatsoever that we would not have another tyranny in Eritrea after PFDJ because we refuse to challenge the mentality that created it to start with.

    The same way I think it’s a luxury for us to ask for democracy when what we need is basic human rights. Here too, to ask for gender equality when we don’t have an emancipated Eritrean mind, can seem like a waste of time.The struggle for Eritrean women’s participation in politics and leadership within the opposition, is an integral part of defeating the mentality and discriminational cultural attitudes that make us look like a carbon copy of our enemy. The average Eritrean from the majority turned off, can’t tell the difference between us, except for who has political power and who hasn’t. If the opposition is ever going to defeat the PFDJ it has to stop being a resistance and start opposing. Until now it’s the PFDJ calling the shots, we are just reacting and being a reflection of it’s cruel policies in side Eritrea. If PFDJ does something against a specific language group or region, in the opposition one would notice how the divide and rule manifest itself. All the power struggle in the opposition is in vacuum and a mere reflection.

    The mirror is for all of us, not only men. Certainly we don’t want nothing to be given to us as women, and we are aware that we have to fight (again) for our position but this time we will make sure to protect our legacy. Eritrea is a “Adi Abo” Fatherland, as such we have never had a women’s lens on national affairs. Men set the agenda and women implement it (and some women) actually make sure nothing changes. Total change is a cumulative of so many pieces of small changes. I am not asking for much, I just want to see a Lady Liberty in this Fatherland of ours and to get there first we need to be conscious.

    • Rodab

      Amal,
      I think Serray wears glasses when reading you, but takes them off when he writes you, hence misspelling your alias:-)

    • Saleh Johar

      Alem, I meam Amel 🙂

      Indeed they are two different words, but you forgot with a deep A, it could also mean Amel as in Work, and Alem could also mean the world, the universe…

      That is not the reason for my comment though, but to admire your sober take on the issue and for not making me feel guilty simply because I am a man! In fact, of all the comments by women (and men) about the topic, you and Tzegereda made me feel we can discuss women’s issues without being accused of male chauvinism.

      You summed it up for me when you laid the priorities in the current struggle so clearly. Many wish they could have a magic wand that could make all our problems disappear, but the world doesn’t work that way. I am a strong advocate of root causes, currently, the root cause of our problem is the PFDJ–not forgetting the defective Eritrean culture that sustained Isaiasism. But again, that culture can only evolve like anything else, and we all have to be catalysts in helping our culture evolve and be enlightened.

      Thank you for the sober comment.

      • Amal

        Marhababo Ustaz Saleh,

        Shukran!

        Alam as the Universe is not at all bad. This is all Semere’s fault anyway 🙂

        To be honest with you I am a bit concerned, Haile TI (semayet wadiko elo min TG gel TI) upvoted my comment, you replied and complimented me. Just let me remind you that it was I that said, men hate women in Eritrea and also I am the one tired of an all male leadership for over sixty years, and my opinion on your article is not much different than The View’s comment (3arabiya? Wa motor? Ya rajel ma3gol? bas tim belko) 🙂

        Yes PFDJ is our problem but that shouldn’t mean we wait until it’s gone for us to wake up. The process of social change should start yesterday, we in the diaspora and as an opposition are in a better position to do just that.

        Shukran tani 🙂

        • haileTG

          Hello Amal,

          Due to lack of the language facility needed, I am not sure what you said about the TG vs TI. I am just hoping that it IS NOT “The Insecure” 🙂 I have a highly educated and position of authority wife to prove it:-)

          There is fundamental difference in the emotional and psychological make up of boys vs girls and women vs men. It has always been there and for a reason too. A relevant distinction that can help explain the strange “liking” of your sober take by the unlikely suspects is the way we process disagreements respectively. In girls and women, disagreements are carried forward to some extent. Meaning that previous disagreements have substantial bearing towards the resistance to future agreements. With men, such is less of an issue. They find it plausible to process disagreements in a discrete rather than cumulative fashion. They can easily go in and out of disagreements as opposed to women who find it rather sticky affairs 🙂

          May the God of man give you the strength to acknowledge this truth and upvote the comment too 🙂

          • Amal

            My Goddess of woman said embi! you upset me just by these few words But it’s the weekend .. So here you go
            http://youtu.be/YIxVY9k7EC4

          • haileTG

            haha Amal Nice,…am I supposed to care though? 😉 back to may empty box;)

          • NMS

            Hey Haile, how do you explain your ‘woe is me’, reactionary and nonsensical rants? And Thomas and Ermias stomping away with their toys and calling us names on their way off the playground? Your comment is too sad to even be taken seriously but since you were gracious enough to offer it, I couldn’t resist just one more opportunity to stop by and remind you that this language and choice of words is inappropriate, chauvinistic, unhelpful and deliberately offensive–in the spirit of Awate’s ‘inform’ motto, of course. I think it’s time we shifted the conversation to why are Eritrean men unable to have respectful debates with each other, women and aliens? And for the bonus round, what’s up with the lazy and boring ‘women are emotional’? Even the ancestors of cavemen rolled their eyes at that one.

          • haileTG

            NMS: I think it is about time I try to get one or two things through what appears to be “thick” mindset. You are a child minded person and terminally so at least in the way you talk to me here. To me you are referring to small band of extreme women and thank God my I see nothing of your sort in my mother, sisters and daughters. You are divisive, irresponsible and dubious (I am going to justify each and single one of those) that thank Goodness I share no cause with you nor wish you get where you want to get us too. I suggest you lock yourself in a room and bang the walls with you head. That might administer a good dose of what cooling off the anger you are trying to inspire and falling flat on your face. Your loose and cheap talk mean NOTHING to me and consider me a sturdy wall against your sneaky sabotage. I am not going anywhere and you will not be getting anywhere.

            You are divisive

            You are using the “us” vs “them” wedge at our critical time in history, standing on top of the fresh corpse of Eritreans we just heard to have perished. They need nothing more than our unity and calling for justice in unison. Your evil wrapped mind is trying to strike divisive note either in service of and in cahoots with the enemy or in child like naivete of me me me selfish arrogance. An Eritrean man is brutalized with his Eritrean sister mother and daughter in deserts and high seas. To me, you are doing something extremely horrible and your rejoice and chest thumping of to of our brothers going away betrays the sinister agenda you have to begin with. I can assure you that they are a fine brothers and they haven’t gone anywhere, it is the respect or consideration they had for you that has gone for good. It is your loss and not theirs. The up standing Eritrean woman don’t need a bunch of mendacious self serving rabble rousers to to get their just and legitimate quest for equality message carried across by the likes of you.

            You are irresponsible

            Awate is not a child’s playground, your mind appears to be one. Ermias and Thomas are members of the justice seeking community whatever that means. If they misunderstood we can explain, if they mean it we ask them to change their mind and I am sure you’ll here from them. But to liken them to children betrays your condescending attitude you armed your self with in coming here empty headed. You have no message and you disgusted people to the point of leaving a place they like and come to contribute. You are irresponsible and have come to pat yourself on the back, well what a useless immaturity your mind is cluttered with!! The justice seeking is not done on behalf of power seeking mendacity and over zealous audacity. It is on behalf of the people in PFDJ dungeons, on behalf the people under the oppression of PFDJ Eritrea, on behalf of those dying at seas and deserts and on behalf of the mothers who just sank off the coast of Libya a night ago. The loss of justice seekers you are celebrating with stupid kumbaya here is the loss of voice to all those victims and future victims, but you are acting like a hyena and its friends salivating on a read fresh meat. Sadly, that meat is that of your sisters, mothers, brothers and fathers…but what would a hyena know, except what a hyena knows.

            You are dubious

            Your delight at the two awate visitor/contributors going says a lot about your plans and sinister agenda here. That goes to the heart of what I am discussing with saay. I know saay in 1998-2001, I know him after, and I know him now. He is a hell of a fighter and I don’t shy away from disagreeing or even openly confronting him if I need answers. We have done that for years on end, I have held my ground in situations where where I was engaging multiple of big minds here simultaneously. The biggest incident that startled awatistas here was when I took all the PFDJista here by the collars and gave them a run for their money. Since then they disappeared and only visit briefly to shed some tears like a little boy and run away again. The awate forum was where they were defeated conclusively. I am since then a legitimate target for them and all they need is a point of I disagree with and roll into work by appearing issue holders in the ongoing argument. You have no point, I have never exchanged a view against the points you raised and you went all too obsessed with me,…hmmmm why? You are dubious and you are barking up a wrong tree because if your handlers run out of here what makes you, with your rather “thick” and “on your face” attitude, think you can handle it? Dreams are free, help yourself.

            The loss of people in the opposition is the primary goal of the enemy, and as far as I am concerned you are no different.

          • NMS

            Nope. This is not nonsensical and emotional AT ALL.

            Hmmm…let’s see…the options here are either to be magnanimous and redirect the discussion to the actual topic or use this opportunity to point out that your comments are actually a perfect case study of the ‘fear of being irrelevant’ theory for men that can’t handle women demanding a real debate about Eritrean women, by Eritrean women. No reason to not do both…

            Haile & Co: Some women aren’t going to glide into the room with a tray of tea and cookies and ask for your permission to speak. The sooner you accept this and join us in the current century the sooner you will relieve yourself of all the heavy entitlement, hatred and close-mindedness. Help us, help you.

            Believe it or not some of us tried to be honest about the environment of the opposition that makes it difficult for women to participate. In actuality, your rants and cyber bulling explained this better than I ever could. In hindsight, it’s actually pretty hysterical that the topic is about women being uncomfortable in the opposition and some of the men in the opposition on this site tried desperately to control the discussion and didn’t consider anything posted by the women because they couldn’t get past the fact that we would like to present our concerns without whispering, batting our eyelashes and curtsying.

            Yes, the tone some of us used may not be as gentle as you are accustomed to—on this very site, but the points made were relevant to the discussion, I wish I can say the same for some other posts. And to be clear, I do not make it a habit to hold anyone’s hand when discussing the oppression and ostracizing of women. If you have an issue with this, I suggest you ‘woman up’.

            Sorry Haile & Co (not sorry), you will not make incendiary and offensive remarks about women unchallenged (breaking news: women have opinions, laptops and wifi also). If you want to control the discussion maybe you should’ve provided an intelligent and respectful argument with hospitable language but it’s obvious what you wrote above is a manifestation of who you really are and how you perceive your position here on this forum, neither of which is my battle. I don’t apologize for my tone, in order for me to do so I would have to respect your views and to be blunt, I don’t. Unlike Mahmud, Serray and Beyan, nothing you’ve posted about this topic is aimed at honestly understanding Eritrean women, they are just to feed your immaturity and self-righteousness.
            It’s also obvious you are just that ONE GUY at the dinner party invited by the host out of obligation that talks too much, too loudly, ignores anyone he deems ‘sassy’ and thinks he’s the smartest person in any room. To put it mildly, you did not react well to being criticized and instead went to the lowest depths of irrationality. If you’re wondering when this is going to die down rest assured I am not going anywhere and I have plenty of axes in the proverbial shed.

          • haileTG

            No No NMS, your Eritrean women rant is busted, it is anything but. We live and breath with Eritrean women and your self serving divisive and delusional points of view is alien to our God fearing and self respecting tradition. I take great pleasure knowing that you will get tired out alone and your ax rusted, twisted and discarded because you are trying to grow this thing with hate. That only kills the bearer. You are wrong headed and spiteful. Your cause needs women who can relate to the society they consider theirs better. No decent and self respecting Eritrean woman would own to your agenda of hate. This cyber forum isn’t that representative. Go and test the waters to see where it would get you to. Your type of hate crazed, nonsensical zealot only deserve themselves. I see you can throw rocks but have no substance that would have traction with the ordinary Eritrean woman. Go tell them to hate men, their fathers, brothers, husbands and sons…you’ll be hanging there to dry with your funny looking ax. I suggest you go and join some anti men clubs that are plenty in the west. The Eritrean women would lough at you all the way to gate. Our society is not at the level of decadence you wish to inspire. I am sure however, you will find few cranky pals to keep you company. I am firmly rooted in my Eritrean reality and I don’t recognize your type of male bashing hatrade in our society. Don’t think life starts and ends in this comment forum. This is small part of what we experience day in day out. Eritrean women are not male haters or against family values which where you are headed to. We don’t need divisions, sell it somewhere else. End of comment on this topic.

          • Tesfabirhan WR

            Dear NMS,

            Let your pen write wisdom! I love you simply. Just to tell few words, All you said was good till I read your last 5 lines.

            Here is a gift for you: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s5iZ7SXuyP4

            Hawki
            tes

          • Tesfabirhan WR

            Dear haile TG,

            Sometimes even an alarm clock is switched simply because sleeping is so beautiful. I remember one who was telling me here in this forum despite my potential I could not control my emotions and collide with any wall that it is around and you???? What????

            Dear haile TG, as great as you are, do not celebrate winning an argument, rather pray not to have another argument.

            A gift for you: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bqppGk-Hyyk

            hwka
            tes

          • haileTG

            Thanks Tes, advice taken;)

          • Tzigereda

            Selam Haile TG,
            Does your assessment fit to what we are experiencing in Eritrea ( PFDJ, opposition ) and world wide, where political decision-making is a male dominated area?

          • haileTG

            Selam Tzigereda,

            The above is not my assessment but scientifically established understanding on some of the basic social, emotional and psychological distictions between men and women/ boys and girls. Those who read or work in the fields of education and other social fields might have read that there is a an established and voluminous amount of research in that area. I have myself gone through an academic experience that looked into the gender issue from a different perspective, nonetheless I had to do some literature review (unavoidably). As far as the way the discussion is framed in here anyway, I don’t believe it would have any value to towards the real Eritrean women’s issue. It appears more of an unprovoked male bashing and castigation. It has been tried a zellion times, it will fall flat in its face. The Eritrean woman and her just cause is not beholden to the current narrow and misguided vindictiveness that would polarize and devide us more. By the way, the attitude being played here is very much against the spirit of unity the Eritrean lady was calling for in the video you linked. I didn’t hear her fuming male hate all over like it is done here. Very UNERITREAN if you ask me.

            PS: disquse has swallowed my reply to NMS, let’s hope it throws it back out so that you see my unflinching stand in this.

          • Tzigereda

            Selam Haile TG,
            I doubt you read my comments very well. Maybe you read it again, you will find no word of bashing or divisivness.

          • haileTG

            Dear Tzigereda

            No No… I doubt you’ve read a single of what I wrote so far with an open mind. For the point at hand:

            – You clearly said “your assessment”

            – I clearly told you “it is not my assessment but established theory…”

            Instead I stated may “assessment” to be that “the whole back and forth here is divisive and male bashing” .

            So, no where did I said you did that. I personally see something dark and negative with “Amal” and “NMS”. It is my right to do so and engage them the way I see fit. I no longer hold them in esteem as far as their sincerity is concerned. This is mine and mine alone perspective and no longer see myself contributing positively in the subject. Hence, I would stop it for now in honor of the true and selfless Eritrean women that gave birth and rared all of that. These two TO ME are exception and megageyti. And they achieved NOTHING so far by their Men Hate Women Uneritrean propaganda. I hope they sell crazy somewhere else…am out.

            https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TZJ9PGN3r4U

          • Tzigereda

            Dear Haile TG,
            I wish you took this song “ክኣልዮ”, instead of “ኣይካኣልክዮን”…
            http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m7Nn0cCcRMI

          • haileTG

            Hi Tzigereda

            hmmm…let me refer that to the Men hate women uneritrean camp!!!

          • Tzigereda

            Selam Haile TG,
            ፍርቂ ፍርቂ እናሰማዕካ ኮለል ኣይተብለና። ደሓንዶ ? ፍረ ነገሩ ጽን ኢልካ ስምዓዮ። ላዛ ዘለዎ ነቀፈታን ኣተኣራርማን ይልመድካ I ክብረት ይሃበለይ።

          • haileTG

            Selam Tzigereda

            ክብረት ይሃበለይ’ዶ ኢልኪ? ጽቡቕ ምጅማር ይግበሮ፡ ጽንሕ ኢልኪ’ውን ካብ ናይ “ድሕሪ ሰለፋ እንታይ ተረፋ፡ ቃል-ዓለም” ናይ ብሓቂ እትልግስሉ ግዜ ይመጽእ ይኸውን መን ይፈልጥ!!

            I am a political oppression victim and you appear to be primarily a gender victim by the lack of concern you have to my views. We can either work together or against each other. Go back and re-read what I said so far to YOU with open mind or we can forget about it.

          • Saleh Johar

            Hi Tzegereda, I thought your taste would be different, maybe it is me. I can listen to any song that has an overwhelming brass noise, particularly Saxophone, that ugly, annoying instrument. .adgi enda’boy frezghi k-hall msma’E yeHayesh kab saxophone 🙂

          • Tzigereda

            Hi Saleh Gadi,
            lol!I know you hate saxophone, but I couldnt find a better song which might help Haile TG to መልሕሱ ከለስልስ…next time I will write ” warning saxo..”

          • Saleh Johar

            Dear Tzigereda,

            You know the level of respect I have for you, but allow me this one:

            I am wondering why Haile is being treated this way? At least you have been respectful… and that is you character I know and you cannot change it. But I cannot stand (just like I can’t stand the Saxophone) when someone comes here and acts as if they represent the entire womenfolk, and thinking that women’s right is all about being antagonistic to men. I also do appreciate that a women. I just feel like sending mirrors to such women to remind them to look at themselves. They are well placed in the society, educated, probably gaining more then the next hundred men where they lives, and protected by all the human and gender rights institutions of the West (if they fail and do not take of advantage of that, they should blame themselves not men), and coming here pretending to be a victims of us, helpless men who cannot free ourselves let alone oppress women. Don’t you think they should specify their oppressors and fight alongside those who are fighting instead of creating enemies of their allies? This Western type of extremist gender discourse turns me off. It is unproductive and this is not its place. To me, the women that need to be liberated are not the few arrogant ones, and yes, the Koboro Junkies, (they are already liberated and showing off their liberty) but the one who needs emancipation is the one who is denied education, denied equal rights in her own country, in a backward society, having to carry a pail of water for miles every morning, toiling the field for four seasons, and Pagume included. That is the woman that comes to my mind when I think of emancipation, not the one who likes to play the gender victim simply because she is feminine. The spoiled, disrespectful woman who thinks all me are her enemies. Did I make it real, or another saxophone 🙂

          • Kim Hanna

            Selam Mr. Saleh Johar,
            .
            Let me barge in before Tzigereda responds to you. I am writing this comment on your comment for two purposes.
            .
            The 1st and more important one is that I agree 100% with you. (please don’t say Oh No!) I wanted to say roughly the same thing you said in plain English but restrained myself because of fear. It is like carrying a dart board in a saloon.
            In the western societies we live in, sometimes things have gone so far out of whack that literarily good is bad and bad is good.
            .
            The 2nd purpose is I wanted to build up my credit, because I have some debits that I am holding out on for another day.
            .
            K.H

          • Saleh Johar

            You are good Kim, our bar serves only tea and coffee… it is safe to carry that dart board 🙂

          • saay7

            Abu Selah:

            I think what you are objecting to is not the instrument, but how the sound is mixed. If you want to know that you really, really, really love the saxophone (it is impossible to hate it), listen to any song that has a sox solo. I would recommend Pink Floyd’s “Us and Them”, Rolling Stones “Waiting on a Friend” or my personal favorite Hall & Oats “Man Eater.” But since Classic Rock is not your thang… I have actually taken the trouble to chop the sax solo of Haile Ghebru’ (Zerai Deres Band) ‘s “Kab Hmamey Qrub TeHasheni.” As Eyob is fond of saying: I demand that you listen to it! (35 seconds only)

            saay

            http://www.tubechop.com/watch/3491037

          • Saleh Johar

            Thank you for trying Saay, can you chop it to 0 seconds?

          • saay7

            Hahaha Abu Selah:

            What’s that? Why of course, I would love to share my 3 all-time favorite sax solos…You are welcome!

            saay

            1. Hall & Oats
            Man Eater

            http://youtu.be/Q1xgmRMVGUc?t=2m15s

            2. Pink Floyd
            Us & Them

            http://youtu.be/nDbeqj-1XOo?t=5m15s

            3. Foreigner
            Urgent

            http://youtu.be/jP3kyG71W2Q?t=4m26s

          • Shum

            (Fist in the air) Funk yeah, Saay! Can’t get enough of that Hall & Oates.

          • saay7

            Hey Shum:

            Actually, I am not a fan of hall and Oates because most of their songs suck:( but Maneater was an inspired song. It’s so good that Stevie Wonder stole the entire beat for his “Part Time Lover” song.

            saay

          • Shum

            No saay, Hall and Oates have memorable songs. Ze problem is, you are. You are ze problem 🙂

          • Saleh Johar

            Saay, you are violating our posting guidelines*: screeching noise are not allowed.

            *If it is not there, please add it and copy Eyob, Kokhob Selam… while at it, ban take about football, and copy Rodab 🙂

          • Eyob Medhane

            Gash Saleh,

            I have to be sure….you are not calling Abraham G/Medhin ‘screeching voice’ are you? You are just talking about that ‘pink Floyd’ mess Sal is putting up…If you are calling Abraham G/Medhin ‘screeching voice’, I have to tell you this, you just initiated war…and I am putting my fatigue and consulting with my generals for a better strategy to conquer awate.com I just wanted a reassurance that you are not messing with Abraham and to prevent this battle…. 🙂

          • Saleh Johar

            And you think I remember their names Eyob? They are all offensive to my ears. Get me a tape of Btsat if you can, no brass instrument, just the voice. I like to listen to a solo singer accompanied by “begena.” I love to listen to wedi Tekhul, again solo, no saxophone. Vittorio Bossi, solo Krrar… anything on that league. Not singers and producers who think they have to use every track on the recording machine…

          • Eyob Medhane

            Gash Saleh,

            You are officially NOT invited to our Saturday music exchange party here at awate. And my military commanders are still strategizing a better way to defend our musical honor… 🙂

          • Saleh Johar

            Ohhhh, thank you Eyob, I was considering coming just for courtesy, you relieved me. 🙂

          • saay7

            Eyobai:

            Despite the fact that I think Harbeyna Weyanai Abraham G/Medhin is a great singer; despite the fact that I think “Megbey” is one of the catchiest songs Tigrinya songs of the last decade, if you declare war on awate.com, of course rally-around-the-awate-flag will take complete hold of me and I will convince myself that Abraham has a screeching voice:) Also that he can’t dance to save his life.

            Also, please don’t bring Cubans, East Germans, Libyans, Yemenis, Russians when you attack:)) Zing!

            saay

          • Eyob Medhane

            Sal,

            Where did you find the idea that Abraham G/Medhin is ‘Harbenya Weyanai’? Abraham was an auditor, before he became a singer. He has never been in the ranks of the fighters, unless you decide to make every Tigrigna speaker ‘Harbenya weyanau’. I will wait until Saturday to show you his two BEST works, other than Megebey…. 🙂

          • saay7

            Eyob:

            That’s a Saturday subject:) Harbena Weyanai is a compliment, btw. Be sure to include his tribute to the late Prime Minister and his attendance of every Lekatit 11 festival:)

            saay

          • Rodab

            Saleh,
            Football is soo not the topic these days.
            This is the topic: http://www.supersport.com/cycling/blogs/cycling-guest/Eritrean_cyclists_pedal_country_onto_world_stage

          • saay7

            Ah! Tzigereda:

            That’s Harbeyna Weyanai Abraham G/Medhin, Tigray’s answer to Abraham Afewerki:) A few days back we discussed his song “Megbey” when we (Sem A and I) were discussing the origin of the double possessive that Papillon and Hayat appear to be fond of (Hawey natey, Haftey natey…) To my knowledge, it goes something like this: Abraham Afwerki (Fiqrey natey) to Abraham G/Medhin (megbey natey) then to Papillon (Haftey natey)

            To the topic at hand. In most forums, the posting etiquette recommends that newcomers go through an initiation period where they read the contributors so that they get a better perspective of the subjects that animate them. Reading Haile TG’s reply to NMS, it is clear to me that Haile sees his role at this forum as the person who has to fumigate it from disinformation campaigns waged by PFDJ. In fact, how Haile became Haile The Great (HTG) is because of his amazing spontaneous takedown of a PFDJ-loyalist by the pen name of “Asmara.” And when he saw names he had never heard from posting, and posting with aggressive messages, his “project the dejen” instincts took over. (My interpretation.)

            This got me to thinking what animates our other regular contributors? And how can the veterans help the newbies get acculturated? And, if we offer that, are we being sexist, condescending…

            Tzigereda, you might want to provide that service to our new contributors because they might be losing the sympathy/understanding of the forum. My canary in the coal mine is Nitricc: he is already moving the new female writers to the toothless column:)

            saay

          • Amal

            Haile TI

            I let your offensive and ignorant comment slide yesterday just because I am done with you and your types. It’s a waste of time. I sent you this stupid link cus it confirms your outrageous claims and it is ridicules. Would you break it down though? How would you like us to express ourselves so that you are comfortable? I think there are moderators on this forum..mish do? Why do you think you have any say whatsoever on what is Eritrean and uneritrean? If you can be condescending, so can we. You can be disrespectful, none of us is having it!!! Seriously, this train has left, you better get on with the program. Because the reality will hit you very hard soon. And please spare us any lectures about unity! All of the lip service you have contributed this past few days only confirms your resentment to women. Respect should be mutual and not just because you are a man that automatically you think any of us will nod and obey. A friendly advice, make your wife proof read your comments on this topic and tell us how she likes it.

        • Amanuel Hidrat

          Selam Amal,

          You are a big asset in our political discourse. Stick with us. But let me ask you, why don’t unlock your disqus to read your comment from disqus page, rather to go all the way to the comment section?

          hawki,
          Amanuel Hidrat

        • Saleh Johar

          Aha! Let is leave it simple, I was not unearthing you old articel, meaning of a few days ago. I was just replying to the last one, I like it and I reacted. Please don’t deny me that satisfaction. Ama nay smayet w’eglo mess’l gomat, e-haleko dibo 🙂
          iyat we ?

    • Shum

      Amen Amal,

      We’re not different from a lot of countries surrounding us. We have to change certain aspects about our culture, particularly how we view individual liberties. I think what Saleh is saying is that this will be an evolutionary change, but that dismantling/weeding out PFDJ is an immediate need. I think we need to work on both simultaneously such that the opposition needs to champion these human rights values. Otherwise we may find ourselves where we are now in the future. We have to get rid of the enabling qualities for dictatorships and lawlessness. So, let’s weed out PFDJ and injustice. By the way, every time I see Amal I think of this Oromo song

      http://youtu.be/nI716tiUGWk

    • Serray

      Selam Amal,

      It is classy of you not to get mad at me for misspelling your nick again.

      Back to the issue, you wrote, “why we as a movement are unable to defeat our enemy for the past twenty-three years and counting? That line of thinking, led me to the conclusion that our problem is the society that gave birth and nurtured the PFDJ”. But pfdj = shaebia and society didn’t create shaebia, the struggle (ghedli) did. If we try to fix our society in order to fix what shaebia brought from medda, I am afraid we will end up tearing apart the very fabric that hold us together. I believe the question is still about democracy, justice and the rule of law.

      We are a young nation and this sickening experience that we are going through in most part is an experiment by a movement that bears little resemblance to either our collective history or tradition. Every time we weave shaebia into our culture and tradition, we make a mistake of overcorrection. Shaebia (or the opposition for that matter) are not a reflection of our society, they are associations created to fight injustice. What’s wrong with them is not what is wrong with our society. The things we need to correct, gender inequality, for example, is not the same as what we need to do to free our youth from slavery. We need a constitution, democracy and the rule of law in order to have a modern nation that believes, among other things, on women’s equality. There can be many things wrong with our society but the defects that are manifesting under shaebia dictatorship are what is killing our nation. We need to make a leap of faith and embrace modern means of governing. As the end of shaebia rule approaches, it is important that we be clear about what kind of government we want. We have to limit our expectation to what is achievable within a context of a governing. We need a system that gives equal voice, to both genders, all religions, all ethnic groups and all regions. This can only be achieved under some form of a democratic rule.

      Finally, the beauty about warrior minded rulers like shaebia is they naturally empower women by making them a majority. If you are interested in making sure that women’s legacy remains intact, women MUST lead the fight to free eritrea. If they are absent for any reason whatsoever or fail to make their mark as they did with shaebia despite shedding their blood in the battlefield, then we might end up with another group of ignorant men who think our nation is precious because it has a zillion wounds. This time, all eyes must be on the ball…freedom in all its forms: gender, religion, ethnic….

      • NMS

        This is sobering and very well said. Thank you Serray.

  • Hayat Adem

    If we want to keep it simple, our major limitations lie somewhere within the fact that:
    1) a good number of us still see shabia/pfdj with a generous and unquestioning eye
    2) a good number of still and sometimes unjustifiably mistrust all surrounding forces of good including the opposition and neighbors
    3) PFDJ’s cunning and Machiavellian abilities to manipulate events and mindsets
    4) The oppositions inability to mobilize potent forces of change and win the people
    These are some of the incapacitating limitations that are holding the needed change from coming at a reasonable pace. For example, the two most important questions to be lauded right now should have been “demobilization” and “normalization”. These two issues could have set the tone and social dynamics of the change sought. Demobilization would appeal well with Eritrean youth and parents, and the latter with international forces. And we know such a call would catch the attention of all stakeholders tied with an agenda of change in Eritrea. pfdj would be fixed whether it accepts the two calls or rejects them. As I have been alarming for a while, the situation in Eritrea is now bordering civil war. We need to consider a crisis prevention solutions including outside help. Democracy, gender equality, inclusiveness etc are not emergency invocations. Such questions assume some minimum normalcy where Eritrea is not conditioned for. Eritrea is slipping into an irreversible collapse by the day. Solutions should point to preventing such a fate and reversing the trend.

  • Kokhob Selam
  • Papillon

    Those of you who have the luxury of talking at length about reforming, handling, containing and appeasing PFDJ, read on and please keep on reading the cruel reality on the ground where the root cause of all is the tyrant and his source of life line PFDJ.

    http://www.sudantribune.com/spip.php?article52134

    http://eastafro.com/Post/2014/08/22/170-migrants-feared-lost-at-sea-off-libya/

    • haileTG

      Dear Papillon

      Thanks for linking info. about those worrisome events. It is indeed dizzying situation that leaves one speechless. On the reported shootings, considering that it was recently reported here and elsewhere that the border crossing especially to Ethiopia was relaxed, it is worrying that it may be a recent change of policy (if true) by the regime. The regime that can’t create other opportunities to wane the steady outflow may foolishly think that it can curb it by scaring the would be refugees through shoot-to-kill. Substantial population flight like in Eritrea’s case can’t be controlled in such a way and it may only end up creating a death mile along the frontiers of the iron grip of Eritrea and the free world outside 🙁

      hawki

      • Papillon

        Dear Haile TG,

        Employment of “worrisome, concerned, alarming” and other words to reflect upon the situation in Eritrea are anachronistic in terms simply because, the nation has practically slipped into a coma. The intellects and the supposed vanguards of the society are veering the kernel of the situation and its recommended solutions into something bizarre completely unfathomable to a sane mind. Some of them say, they will defend the “nation” should the Weyanes march on to Eritrea to remove the tyrant where the Weyanes would opt out for a completely different reason and others are saying that, PFDJ ought to be handled and reformed. What the said elements don’t seem to see is that, they are undeclared PFDJ themselves where they are being played by Isaias’ magic spell. Isaias true to his nature doesn’t have any compaction what so ever. Today he is shooting those who are crossing his turf and tomorrow he will infest the area with land mines till Eritrea is rendered a nation of children, old people and the amputees.

        Haft’kha.

  • haileTG

    Selamat Awatista,

    By far, today’s entry by Tzigereda was the first rational argument that was put on the table on the topic at hand. Before giving my considered view on the substantive matter that Tzigereda raised, I need to share my perspective on a wrong headed notion that I keep hearing by the opposition bashers. That is the feeble argument that “no one has the monopoly of opposition”! How lame, how irresponsible!!! I have the monopoly of the opposition, you have the monopoly of the opposition, the women have the monopoly of the opposition, the men have the monopoly of the opposition, the children in refugee camps have the monopoly of the opposition, all those fighting off injustice with what ever means they have and what ever way they know how have the monopoly of the opposition, the entire masses of the oppressed Eritrean people have the monopoly of the opposition. Of course, the opposition bashers say “no one have the monopoly of the opposition” not to build and strengthen the opposition but to scuttle it into pieces and to dash the hope of the Eritrean people who are desperately hoping against hope something will give (BTW this current take has nothing to do with my previous misunderstandings with saay, my views are corrected following his clarification, this is more general).

    It would have been a winning attitude to have been used as “Everyone has the monopoly of the opposition and we are all responsible for its success”. Instead, the way it is used is akin to someone defacing a public property and when you challenge them they turn back and tell you you don’t own the damn wall, mistreating a child and when you challenge them telling you shouldn’t bother since the child isn’t yours…It is used both by those naive one’s and the shrewd one’s who are acting as mercenary for the bankrupted arguments of HGDEF. The opposition is a temporary shelter and not a permanent residence. Our gender and other social justice problems ought to be seen within the context of greater Eritrea and our aspirations therein. Any initiative that is taken within the context of the opposition needs to be formulated in such away that it strengthens its hand and hasten the realization of its fundamental objective of bringing change to Eritrea. To use different initiatives to talk down the selfless individuals in the opposition camp is helping the hand of the enemy. And every true justice seeker must keep a firm eye on enemy infiltrators and fight them off diligently because YES THE OPPOSITION IS YOURS AND YOURS ONLY MONOPOLY. It is not the monopoly of smart alec power brokers salivating to curve out a piece for themselves. It is not the monopoly of irresponsible self serving brigand. Opposition is about justice in all and for all. It is not about tarnishing one segment and gratifying another, it is not about rubble rousing and definitely not a single issue be all or lose all venture. As a justice seeker and true to yourself and faithful to the fundamental ideals of its calling YOU own the monopoly of the opposition.

    Tzigereda’s proposition to the opposition organizations is right, positive and helpful to the overall aims and objectives. Sadly, the organized opposition are rarely known to listen and interact in cyber space. I hope they take notice. However, my take would go further than what Tzigereda’s proposal. The opposition as a whole (not just the organized) has strong cyber institutions (websites, FB groups…radio, Tv) the opposition is also, huge respect to Elsa Chyrum, has a powerful human rights advocacy institution. The HR institution (with the Human Rights Concern Eritrea at the forefront) is of course huge and much bigger in stated objectives than just gender issues. It deals with the totality of HR issues and I can see it being a mega NGO institution in free Eritrea and be passed on for generations as a legacy. The face of the Eritrean human rights activism is the dominant image of a female activists. The opposition has also strong diplomatic infrastructures due to the abhorrent nature of the Eritrean regime and the world community disengaging from it. What the opposition doesn’t yet have is a strong women’s institution and there are enough women in the opposition and within its immediate catchment field (all the men have wives, daughters and sisters as well as mothers OK at least one) that they can use grow their ranks. They need their own media, their own groups and other spaces where they can also be supported by the main body of the opposition and they can also support the movement. Such a strong women’s institution wouldn’t only lobby for the necessary policy for the direction of the struggle but also would propel women leaders and be a back bone and strong support in their fight for equality and justice.

    Saying all the above, we need to acknowledge however, the diaspora man, doesn’t have control of the means of oppression against women. The host country laws don’t favor him specifically, he has no say on rights and opportunities of his woman counterpart that much. In Eritrea, he does and the struggle need to be carried with in the context of Eritrea rather than opposition and the opposition can only be considered as a natural ally instead of the “Men Hate Women” camp like to dictate it to us with their alien tendencies.

    Regards

    • Mahmud Saleh

      salam HTG;
      I used the word monopoly today in this context “I don’t know why they would think they are the ones who have the sole monopoly on shaping our debates and judging our views; I don’t know why they feel they are more patriotic than others-” I just want to know if those two paragraphs are provoked by my statements.

      • haileTG

        Merhaba Mahmuday, Absolutely not. I haven’t still read the text you said. In any case, I don’t remember you attacking the opposition in wanton at all. Your views appear to me always to be made directly and they merit a direct response, i.e. if I ever wished to differ or support them. The “No one has a monopoly” subterfuge has been in use in much wider circles including outside of the awate forum. Since the major collapse of PFDJ political platform, there has been an increased activity of infiltrating the opposition for the sole purpose of tarnishing and scuttling it. Every justice seeker worth his/her salt owe it to the desperate victims of our embattled nation to proclaim “I have the monopoly of the opposition and hence I will defend it take initiative to improve it.” Opposition is not equal to only organized groups, it is the combined sentiment of all those who wish to see justice for our people.

        Regards

        • Mahmud Saleh

          Dear HTG and Thomas;
          Thank you HTG for the clarification, honestly, my position has always been that as long as we mark our common enemy, the tolerance of slight differences among ourselves should explain why we are different from PFDJ; it should project our maturity. I used those two sentences to hint to Thomas ( Arkey Thomas, I have to come clean) that it was OK to discuss the subject (women’s issues), I thought what he wrote yesterday about Awate was out of line, but I didn’t want to waste the energy and time of Thomas and the forum on a debate that might have sprung off of that comment. I agree with most of what he says, our difference is on how to end the misery of our people, and frankly, that’s out of our control. I don’t have any influencing role on how the eventuality will materialize; one way or the other it will end, the sooner and less bloodier the better. So, brother (little) Thomas take it as an advice. When you see people with slight difference to your view, don’t get suspicious and jump to judgement. The pain is mutual.

          • haileTG

            ክቡር ሓው ማሕሙድ፡

            ሓቂ ይሓይሽ፡ ምሳኻ ኣዝዩ ዝፈላሊ፡ ጉዳይ ኣሎኒ ኢለ ክዛረብ የጸግመኒ እዩ፡ እቲ ምንታይ ርእይቶኻ ፊት ንፊትን ምስ ምሉእ ሰብኣዊ ክብርን ሓልዮትን ዝልግስ ቅኑዕ ኣካይዳ ስለ ዘስተውዕለልካ’ዩ። ካብኡ ናብኡ ድማ፡ ንእመት ስድሪ ኣላታ፡ ከምዝብልዎ፡ ሽሕ እኳ ዘስተውዓልክዎ ባህርያትካ፡ ካብ ውልቃዊ ረብሓ ዝረሓቐ ይኹን እምበር፡ ኣብቲ ዓቢ ሞሳን ዓስብን ዝግብኦ ገድሊ ናጽነት (ጌለና ብታሪኽ ጥራይ እንፈልጦ) ብኣካልን፡ ምእንቲ ኩልናን፡ ዝኽፈል ዝኸፈልካ ብሉጽ ወዲ ሃገር ብምዃንካ’ውን ሓለፋ ኣሎካ። ነቶም ኣዚሮም ዝዛረቡኒ፡ ጥራይ ኣዚረ ከምዝምልሽ ንምሕባር እዩ። እታ ሓንቲ ንኽልቴና ዝሓንኮለትና ጉዳይ፡ ቅድሚ ቁሩብ እዋን፡ ብጉዳይ ልዝብ መንእሰያትናን፡ ተጋደልትናን፡ ኣልዒልና እብ ዘውካእናዮ እዩ ነይሩ። ኮይኑ ግን ሽሕ እኳ እቲ ጉዳይ ሕልኽላኽን፡ ስምዒት ዘነድርን እንተኾነ፡ ናይ ዝዓቕምና ትኽ ኢልና ዝተዛተናሉ እዩ ነይሩ። ብኻልእ ሸነክ ግን፡ ዳርጋ መሰረታዊ ዝበሃል፡ እንተወሓደ እውን ዝግብኦ ክብሪ ዘይህቦ ርእይቶ ኣይረኣኹልካን እሞ፡ ይቐጽለልና፡ ዓይኒ ኣባይና ይድፍነልና ንምባል እየ። 🙂

          • Mahmud Saleh

            HTG,
            I have no words to express my gratitude, thanks. We are all in the same boat. This ghedli is far more costly (when you consider the damage that has been done to our country) and far more complicate , because the enemy is from within. I know the issues we debate are similarly complicated which may cause occasional disagreement. Nevertheless, I have come to respect you and that’s why I asked for clarification. Thanks.

    • Guest

      Happy Friday Haile!

    • saay7

      Selamat Haile TG:

      When I say “nobody has a monopoly of the opposition”, I mean it its literal sense: that there is nobody who can claim the movement as his, and anybody who has a better idea on how to defeat the Isaias Afwerki regime (sooner, and with less collateral damage) has the opportunity to lead it. They can present their ideas without standing in cue to kiss the ring of the self-proclaimed guardians and gate-keepers. This is very relevant to the discourse at hand where the Eritrean women who have been writing have been asking for bigger roles: my position is that since there is no seniority or tenure system, since what we have is Fiat 600 and VW bugs, show us your SATAEO bus and you may be surprised at how many men are ready to follow you. You have already demonstrated that you can lead on human rights and refugees issues: there is a huge vacancy in the leadership of the opposition: step in!

      Part of our problem is that we mean different things with the word “opposition”, and to clarify it sometimes we say the “organized opposition” (which suggests that the others are not organized), “justice-seekers”, “change-seekers”, “resistance.” There is unanimity in the idea that some sort of coalition or umbrella or united front should be assembled to get us all to refer to us as “we in the opposition.” This has been a “work in progress” since 1999 (15 years since the formation of the then Alliance of Eritrean National Forces (AENF.) If one studies carefully the themes that emerge from the failure to solidify the coalition, two issues emerge in the divorce papers: one is the suspicion that _________ is not nationalistic enough (too dependent on Ethiopia); and the other is the suspicion that _____________ is not sufficiently anti-PFDJ (the value system is that of unitary state, etc).

      Of course, restraining from use of draconian language is not an indicator that somebody or something is a shell for the PFDJ anymore than the use of absolutist language is an indicator of opposition trust-worthiness. The most famous cases of person who was a Trojan Horse for the PFDJ was, as the UN Monitoring Group on Eritrea and Somalia documented, a person who was leading a Tigray-based armed opposition group.

      saay

      • haileTG

        Selamat saay,

        It is true that I had your mention of the term in mind (as well as its persistent use elsewhere). We also notice levels of mutual mistrust and suspicion raise with that. The point is that with the recent turn of events in Eritrea and the tragedies happening, PFDJ completely lost the moral and political ground and large segment of its diaspora holdouts was abandoned and people started to make large town hall meetings in their hundreds lead by influential personalities.

        In response to such deterioration of its fortunes, PFDJ began to spread the counter argument that the opposition is not a viable alternative. Back to back with that argument would then follow if it wasn’t for external enemy the PFDJ wasn’t too bad either, it even did commendable job considering what it had to face off (the super power)!!! Of course that is all a lie and PFDJ and its oppressive and inhuman policies are the beginning and end of the miseries of the Eritrean people. However, what I mentioned so far started to really pay off for PFDJ when the opposition bashing started to be echoed by those in the opposition. It started to dismay the masses of people who are pining their hopes in awaking of the Eritrean people to rise up. When a father dies in a house hold, a new set of expectations are placed (all of a sudden) on the eldest child in the household (in traditional Eritrea). This is what is happening to the opposition. PFDJ has finally given up on restoring normalcy to Eritrea, it is desperately trying to sustain itself longer. Many new eyes are looking at the opposition as a whole( the body of Eritreans who are convinced that there should be change in Eritrea). People come to draw hope and strength to what they identify as “opposition websites”, “opposition bloggers”, “opposition media”, “opposition key commenters”….These arrivals are new ears, new eyes and new minds. Suddenly, the “opposition” is expected to chart the way forward, to furnish a strategy, to inspire solutions, to regulate the tide and to deliver the nation. PFDJ cleverly pitched on the dubious notion of “there is no viable opposition” and the real meaning of this is that the Eritrean people are not viable a people to oppose and demand for rule of law. If they stope thinking PFDJ owns the country, they would start believing opposition owns it. As far as the notion of country is concerned, well, it is alien to them!!!

        IA intimidated a seminar participant in DC back in 1993 by saying “those decorated with gold earrings and living in comfort can’t claim to be more caring of the nation”, who are you, what makes you better than those and those, who gives you the right….are but some of the key subterfuges that played a role in manufacturing minds and souls that dance while their sisters and mothers are perishing in heart wrenching situations. The question should have been “how could you…”, how could you remain silent when your very people are brutalized, how could you remain silent when your young are denied life and held hostage, how could you remain silent when your so called country is hanging precariously and teetering in the verge of collapse, how could you say nothing when the call for justice is undermined and belittled, how could you not be the helping and encouraging and motivating hand to those struggling to organize as a formal opposition, how could you not bring the best and brightest side of the opposition and give hope your people that there is a light at the end of the tunnel? The “how could you…” should be the antithesis of the “Who are you…”. The first inspires hope and impresses responsibility of every single one of us to be the part of the resolution we wish to see, whereas the latter is a subterfuge and invites for criminal (i.e.morally) negligence in the face of ridding the current menace.

        As much as we wish to idealize the “opposition”, it is made up of ordinary people that would benefit from all kinds of care, advice and protection. They are as pron as as any other organization to implode and that would leave all of us in trouble by limiting our means to respond.

        PFDJ has rolled the argument of “no viable opposition” in reaction to the massive out pouring of popular emotions following Lampedusa. Initially their idea stumbled, but since took off with the willful cooperation of those in the opposition to echo the same message. The final losers would of course be the desperate people who don’t even know we are discussing this issue right here.

        The whole issue of the opposition based in Ethiopia and outside of Ethiopia is something I would like to address separately in a thorough format. There are shortcomings on both sides, but there are people on both sides that can bridge the gap if given the chance to be heard out. Sometimes, those with less care tend to take the center stage and start knocking down the walls and demolishing the house, while the residents are still in. So next time.

        cheers

        • saay7

          MerHaba Hailat TG:

          1. PFDJ’s Denigration of the Opposition: Hailat, have you seen the makhete cartoon drawing of a Tegadalai wearing shidda stepping on Meles Zenawi and two other cartoon characters? That was done in 2004. Ten years ago. You know who the two cartoon characters are? Me and SGJ. There was a guy at Dehai Message Board (DMB) who wrote so much about it that if you google “Sal Younis” for an entire decade (as my colleagues, business partners would) all you saw was his crazy writings about me. You know Sophia’s attack on SGJ. It is literally too many to list. So there is nothing new here other than that there are now more outlets to do the defamation. This should not make us be less critical of the opposition and ourselves, so long as it is not personalized and so long as it is based on substance and the intent is to improve us.

          The “no viable opposition” is not just a roll out from the PFDJ. It is what the US State Department says. It is what the International Crisis Group says. It is what almost every organization that does an annual report on Eritrea says. Viable opposition means an organization that has the credibility to step in and govern if the PFDJ was to collapse on its own. Viable opposition means an organization that speaks with one voice, and has a clear organizational chart. I don’t say this to demoralize people; I say this to itemize the tasks we have to work on. We are way beyond happy talk: the PFDJ’s collapse can be traced to its inability to reform and its mastery of squashing dissent by using the excuse of “Weyane.” We shouldn’t not inadvertently copy their behavior which will lead to their extinction.

          2. Isaias in Washington, DC (1993): I am glad you brought up this issue. I actually transcribed and translated the question from the citizen, and the long answer by Isaias Afwerki in the Eritrean Exponent in 1994. It was a case of subtexts, more than texts and how our “social groups” (to borrow from Amanuel) interact with each other. It is also relevant to the discussion on women’s rights that has lit up awate.

          * The citizen, an Eritrean female, chastises Isaias Afwerki for his governance, specially what she considers his government’s lax attitude towards social morals: its tolerance of prostitution and then she asks, “has the Derg done anything worse than this?” (a loud boo from the packed auditorium)

          * Isaias Afwerki takes the occasion to give her a long lecture on role of government and the citizen and then works himself up into a long rant (with active encouragement from the audience: knee-slapping and laughing) that one can only ask such questions after one asks how much have I sweated for the country, how many liters of blood have I bled for the country. But humility is required, he says, of those who are covered head to toe in jewelry…

          The Exponent criticized the questioner, the audience and Isaias Afwerki. In 1994. Back then (before Youtube) videos were being sold at community centers. The PFDJ immediately realized its mistake and the 03 pushed the message that Isaias Afwerki was drunk, had a few too many drinks. But the damage was done. Take a random sample of Muslim Eritreans in the United States and asked them to give evidence that Isaias Afwerki and PFDJ hates them: that video will be somewhere in the Top 5.

          Hailat, in one of his great pieces, Aklilu Zere says words to the effect that he has never met a woman he doesn’t like; all women are good–something like that. Well, I have NEVER met an opposition member I don’t like; I have never met an opposition member who doesn’t have the right motivation: to stop injustice in Eritrea. When my obituary is written, somewhere after my kids say he was a great dad and my wife says he was a great husband (THEY BETTER!), I would like it mentioned that I was a foe of injustice and helped in the struggle to end it in Eritrea. But now, the issue is one and only one: how do we do that and are we, as currently instituted, capable of delivering on the change that our people deserve?

          saay

          • Tesfabirhan WR

            Dear Saay,

            Coming today with solutions

            1. Execute DIA without no delay.
            2. keep all the rest officers under custody and their file to be opened after 2 years.
            3. release all political prisoners FREE without precondition and allow them to file cases against.
            3. All the structures that are running under PFDJ system to be maintained for 3 years.
            4. All the social structures that promote PFDJ ideology be closed for ever and extensive research to be done by experts: These are, Tikal Hidri, NUEYS, NUEW, Workers Association, to mention som.
            5. To allow economic doors stay open and work according to the Macro-policy drafted in 1992? and worked till 1997 till a new economic policy that works on international standards is set, maximum of 3 years.
            8. PFDJ offices and research centers to be closed immediately and only researchers to be allowed to document what ever it exists within.
            9. All Economic institutions of PFDJ to be nationalized and be studied till all the properties within are audited and channeled based on the newly established economic policy.
            10. Educational sector to continue for 3 academic years till a new curriculum is developed and higher Education to maintain the present college status but the governing body to be left as Autonomous unit, similar to that of former University of Asmara, and within 4 years come-up with new working methodology.
            11. Sawa school to be closed and students to be allowed to continue in their mother high school.
            12. Human resource department which is now under minsitry of Education to be separated and be like an institution during the transition period and then after develop it into Ministry level.
            13. Opening of the ports to Eritrean businessmen and allow them to use the existing warehouses on rental bases and work according to the policy that I mentioned above. And encourage privtate businesses to flourish the day after the execution of DIA. Taxation system to inforced as it can be a potential source of national income.
            14. Existing Land Policy to be maintained till a democratically elected governing body is formed.
            15. The 1997 Constitution to be implemented and serve till 5 years but some noticeable PFDJ ideology influenced articles to be excluded.
            16. National Defense as a structure to be maintained and those who serve till then be rehabilitated gradually within 3 years. Till then, salary to be increased and all compensation to be done as soon as possible.
            17. Sawa military training center and Eritrean Police training center to be allowed to recruit new members so that no power vacuum is created and work according to 1995 proclamation (18 months).
            18. Fishery sector and Agriculture be assisted by FAO.
            19. Trade and related programs be assisted by the UN branch that deals with Industrial developments and trade issues.
            20. The humanitarian rights group be allowed to work in developing institutions that deal in similar lines.
            21. All mining activities to be stopped for 6 months and a separate institution be established to re-structure the working principles. The shares that exist be as national shares till the economic policies are changed.

            ** All former ELF members be allowed freely to land to their beloved country and a National heroic Ceremony to be held for them. [Immediate after the execution of DIA and arrest of the ruling juntas]

            The list is of course continuous.

            To do this, UN should fund the economic shortcomings and UNDP to assist in forming new institutions for a new democratic Eritrea.

            caution: NO monetary shortage should occur for at least 4 years and must be free from the existing economic properties of PFDJ.

            Mind you: This are arbitrary and are not in their final form. But, at least they show my opinions (Solutions) during the transition period which I believe to be 1-3 years.

            Power? I didn’t forget and I completely agree with that of brother Amanuel Hidrat’s take, the technocrats similar to that of Tunisia.

            Hawkum
            tes

          • haileTG

            Selamat Saay,

            Interesting and many things you said are correct in their own right. Through the latest perspective that I am arguing for, there are some salient points that I am hoping to draw attention to. The organized opposition and its non-organized advocates do indeed have a long and complex history. You need to be aware that such is mostly a knowledge limited to those who closely followed the movements and have been engaged for a while. To your surprise, many of the wider public has little or no knowledge of such complex dynamics. I spend a lot of time talking to supporters of the regime and discussing many of the current issues. Many do not understand which is which and who wants what. There is a dominant message relayed by PFDJ which simply stresses that opposition is hired hand of Ethiopia and Ethiopia is hired hand of USA. Period. Individuals like meskerem.net go to incredible length to reinforce that message and wreck havoc on the people’s mind.

            Following Lampedusa, we have seen something unique. A petition put out by the opposition to demand the return and burial of bodies was responded to by almost 10,000 signatures in less than 24 hours, hundreds and hundreds of people made meetings about current situation, religious leaders, intellectuals, community centers spoke out openly. Wedi Vacaro travalled to over 20 places around the world pulling large crowds, influential artists crossed the line and spoke openly and the optimism was high.

            In less than few months, many committees were set up by Vacaro’s tour and many others took their own initiatives. Most of these new masses who joined were new to the opposition, they were fresh batch that were jolted by a major national tragedy. Whenever change of stand happens, the first short period is the time where there is the highest chance of relapse. I must also candidly criticize that our Eritrea as a nation (not just opposition) is awash with selfish and shameless behavior of trying to get ahead whenever some see a gathering popular sentiment. (Please don’t start me on this as I have many painful truth that I know of). Sadly, we started to see the fresh additions relapsing into silence because some sinister things started to happen. Semere Tesfay wrote a poisonous article here telling us how PFDJ was indispensable because the old opposition are upto no good and Ethiopia beholden and PFDJ has done well to defend the country (the deaths mean nothing to him then?). Suddenly, there became a sharp polarization between the EY youth groups and also incessant critics of opposition that would completely turn away (into silence) many of those who elected to be vocal. And I felt that such went on so much to the point that it has now become acceptable to openly degrade the attribute associated with opposition.

            A manager to promote (and hence an attitude to foster) is one that moves with the changing times and the new realities. Some of the youth groups are less than 3 years old and did amazing jobs. Many civic organizations too, notwithstanding their challenges, but when single issue zealots and less careful individuals started to wash dirty linen in public, they are blocking of the new, fresh arrival and the alternative to rejecting PFDJ becomes to simply withdraw support from PFDJ and do nothing else. We then clamor around to heap shame on us. We really need to grow up and start noticing that we are all individually responsible not only to pick up garbage but to dispose of it responsibly (recycle or not) so to speak. Our reality is our making. I am the opposition, you are the opposition, the women are the opposition, the new and fresh face who just arrived from HGDEF land is opposition, the guy who never heard of an opposition but is running away from hgdef is opposition and hence we all inhabit this temporary shelter called opposition. It means different thing to different people but it is a public property (shelter) and we’re all responsible to protecting it and shielding it from obvious delinquencies that mounts a frontal attack on it in order to correct one or two issues here and there.

            cheers

        • Mahmud Saleh

          HTG,
          When two dudes with giant brains collide what we learn gets more important than the grass they hurt. Anyway, good discussion; will you present this in an article format, please.

          • saay7

            Mahmuday:

            Nobody has a monopoly on giant brains. (Smile, HTG)

            Seriously, and no-BS-Rodab is my witness, Awate forum has the brainiest commenters than any Eritrean, Ethiopian, Somali, Sudanese discussion forum. And it is still toxic-free.

            I have a proposal: instead of asking (pressuring) commenters to write articles, we can just present a digest in the front page. Kinda like what we tried to do with the Women’s Voices. This will address a frequent complaint: that the discussions have nothing to do with the article. I have just volunteered my colleagues for more work without consulting them:)

            Saay

          • Mahmud Saleh

            Marhaban SAAy7
            There you go, that’s even brainier; of course, no need for that awful word, monopoly. We here declare that Awatistas wonderland is MaHbernetawit.

          • saay7

            Hala Mahmuday

            To make it democratic, how about we pick the ones with the most up votes?

            saay

          • Mahmud Saleh

            Ahlan SAAY7,
            I think that’s fair, but there may be readers who don’t vote, and votes don’t necessarily indicate substantiveness (just my view, please up vote me!!). So, what if I propose to allow you to patch up a representative picture (balanced) and chew you up if you don’t come up with such a summary. I suspect you’ve come up with the votes-rule method to deny nitricc and semere a space and give your Eyobay an advantage! ( just for smile). Truth be told AbusalaH: I think you have earned the respect of your readers (how many years now?), so the trust is there; if not you don’t get away from the great Awatista family. Thank you for the service.

          • saay7

            Baw Mahmuday:

            You introduced a taboo word yesterday–Mahbernetawit–to describe awate. No, no, no, that’s hell to the no. You know my theory of why Eritrea has become a hell-hole is three parts: Isaias Afwerki, military culture, socialist values. All three legs of the stool have to be gone-gone-gone for Eritrea to be at peace and prosperous.

            Eyobai, meet me in Camera 2 (Jebena) for our music exchange program. My first chop video is an excerpt (5 minutes long) from an interview that the great Abrar Osman (a personal hero) gave on the role of art/artists. Why he is a hero also explained:)

            saay

          • Mahmud Saleh

            SAAY,
            I did that to get you annoyed. I know SJG is saying, ” What? Do we have remnants of labor party in our ranks?” So, “equal rights community” or similar description will do it.

          • saay7

            Mahmuday:

            Correction: I am an asmarino anthropologist, more than asmarino:) I am a simple wedi-Asmera. I study them because they are a fascinating species to me and, like all anthropologists, I have fallen in love with my subjects:)

            saay

          • Mahmud Saleh

            Ustaz SAAy7
            Yes, indeed. Your description of Asmarinos is well preserved. That’s what I pull out whenever someone tells me “ane equa wedi Asmara eye.”

          • Kokhob Selam

            ማሕሙዳይ ነብስኻ ኣውጽእ :- ዴስነታዊት is better Lol.

          • Amanuel Hidrat

            Hey Saay,
            Capitalism philosophy is inhumane, it makes you to be greedy and make you to think only to yourself. They don’t have humanity at the core of their belief. Their ideology makes you to think to monopolize the richness of the world. Look how mush the wealth of the world is monopolized by the oligarchies of the world? Come on my friend…think about it?

          • saay7

            Emma, emma, emma:)

            You are doing that thing that you do in our discussions, which is to compare something against the ideal, the perfect (we always have this discussion when I discuss the merits of “democratic coup” and you come up with a perfect plan that has no basis on reality. Comparing Eritrea with Tunisia for example, despite the fact that Tunisia has the most educated and most organized workforce in the entire Middle East and we have low literacy and zero organized labor in Eritrea…but I digress.

            Now, then to capitalism. Do you think we would have had the Badme War if Eritrea and Ethiopia had a capitalist (as opposed to a State Capitalist) system. I don’t think so. Imagine all the business people, the Chambers of Commerce, all driven by the profit motive factoring in what a war would do to their bottom line? It would never have happened…

            When you criticize capitalism, you should put in the context of other economic models like socialism, communism, fascism, state capitalism, etc, etc. Lucky for us, some clever people came up with that: a satire using the old “you have two cows…” econ model.

            Here’s one version (courtesy of Cows and Politics Explained):

            A CHRISTIAN DEMOCRAT: You have two cows. You keep one and give one to your neighbor.

            A SOCIALIST: You have two cows. The government takes one and gives it to your neighbor.

            AN AMERICAN REPUBLICAN: You have two cows. Your neighbor has none. So what?

            AN AMERICAN DEMOCRAT: You have two cows. Your neighbor has none. You feel guilty for being successful. You vote people into office who tax your cows, forcing you to sell one to raise money to pay the tax. The people you voted for then take the tax money and buy a cow and give it to your neighbor. You feel righteous.

            A COMMUNIST: You have two cows. The government seizes both and provides you with milk.

            A FASCIST: You have two cows. The government seizes both and sells you the milk. You join the underground and start a campaign of sabotage.

            DEMOCRACY, AMERICAN STYLE: You have two cows. The government taxes you to the point you have to sell both to support a man in a foreign country who has only one cow, which was a gift from your government.

            CAPITALISM, AMERICAN STYLE: You have two cows. You sell one, buy a bull, and build a herd of cows.

            BUREAUCRACY, AMERICAN STYLE: You have two cows. The government takes them both, shoots one, milks the other, pays you for the milk, then pours the milk down the drain.

            AN AMERICAN CORPORATION: You have two cows. You sell one, and force the other to produce the milk of four cows. You are surprised when the cow drops dead.

            A FRENCH CORPORATION: You have two cows. You go on strike because you want three cows.

            A JAPANESE CORPORATION: You have two cows. You redesign them so they are one-tenth the size of an ordinary cow and produce twenty times the milk. You then create clever cow cartoon images called Cowkimon and market them World-Wide.

            A GERMAN CORPORATION: You have two cows. You reengineer them so they live for 100 years, eat once a month, and milk themselves.

            A BRITISH CORPORATION: You have two cows. They are mad. They die. Pass the shepherd’s pie, please.

            AN ITALIAN CORPORATION: You have two cows, but you don’t know where they are. You break for lunch.

            A RUSSIAN CORPORATION: You have two cows. You count them and learn you have five cows. You count them again and learn you have 42 cows. You count them again and learn you have 12 cows. You stop counting cows and open another bottle of vodka.

            A SWISS CORPORATION: You have 5000 cows, none of which belong to you. You charge others for storing them.

            A BRAZILIAN CORPORATION: You have two cows. You enter into a partnership with an American corporation. Soon you have 1000 cows and the American corporation declares bankruptcy.

            AN INDIAN CORPORATION: You have two cows. You worship both of them.

            A CHINESE CORPORATION: You have two cows. You have 300 people milking them. You claim full employment, high bovine productivity, and arrest the newsman who reported on them.

            AN ISRAELI CORPORATION: There are these two Jewish cows, right? They open a milk factory, an ice cream store, and then sell the movie rights. They send their calves to Harvard to become doctors. So, who needs people?

            AN ARKANSAS CORPORATION: You have two cows. That one on the left is kinda cute

          • Amanuel Hidrat

            Abu Saleh (Saay-TG),

            The “cows and politics” satire has some truth in it – on the respective countries you mentioned. But thank you, you gave me something to laugh for the day. Rare to laugh in our gloomy circumstances.

            Your first “paragraph comment” will be the core issue of our days, because they are solution items to our dire situation. I think you indicate somewhere in your comment, that you will come with an article on that issues. I am glad you are at it (on solution). God wills I will try to elaborate in article form the items I mentioned to you when you asked me.

            I still believe the Tunisian way will not be an ideal one but practical one if we are ready for it. The way we think matters great than the gap of social development we have with Tunisians. I still believe on the Eritrean ingenuity and fast on learning and still can manage it. It all depends on the good will of our elites and our intellectuals. If they are ready for that, Eritrea (our nation) will have good transition. If they are not ready, believe me even you model will not work. Not to disappoint you, but to state the fact that it all depend on our elites.

            Hawka,
            Amanuel Hidrat

          • Papillon

            Dear Sal,

            I would say, one of the notable uniqueness of Awate of course among other great things is that, the owner(s) or editor(s) push and pull elbows with us. That is, it gives you the impression that it is indeed people’s website as opposed to somebody is up there and the rest are down there sort of thing. I often wonder what kind of vision the owner(s) have in store in post Isaias-Eritrea if we are going to see a radio-Awate or a TV-station-Awate or if it is going to be limited to a website.

            Haft’kha.

          • Mahmud Saleh

            ክብርቲ Papi
            ክብርቲ Papillion, what a point! Awate is indeed unique. Both Salehs deserve appreciation; not only that they debate with us on equality basis but that they don’t shy of showing their difference on issues if they occur. It’s the sense of unrestricted belonging and sense of ownership that makes it unique. In addition to the character, professionalism and vision of the owners, the participation of our Ethiopian friends also gives it an added value. Also thanks to the prolific columnists.
            ሓውኺ

          • Papillon

            ዝኸበርካ ማሕሙድ ሓወይ,

            I think one great and unique quality of the editors is that, they are both christians and in the meantime, they are both muslims as well; they are both from the lowlands and in the mean time they are both from the highlands as well. They are Eritrea. The other thing is, I have had a lot of disagreements and often times a “fight” particularly with Saay over the years where he would ignore me for weeks and I “hear” him saying that ኣበይ ዘላ ገንጫር’ያ በጃኻ or እዛ ፓፒዮን ዝብልዋ ሰብ ጥዕና የብላን መስለኒ and I go ኮርፈፈፍ or ኮረፍረፍ for weeks. But again the beauty of it is that, it doesn’t go beyond a fight between a younger sister and an older brother with in a family. That is the magic of Awate.

            Haft’kha.

          • Kokhob Selam

            That is how it should be sister. that is an Eritrea we want to build. differences should be taken as natural and getting the common land should be the job that allows us to live in harmony with human beings and nature- creating heaven on earth-peace . The problem is only when someone says ” I am the only one and should follow me or go away ” like what that nonsense group in Asmara and some opposition say it. AYESE’A’ENENA.Amen.

          • Mahmud Saleh

            Dear Papi
            Yes, it’s all genuine; they represent Eritrea and with a bonus, saay forfeited his Asmarino aura to get muddy with the Cheguar danga, and SGJ seems to be OK exhibiting some Asmarino traits (he’s been seen using that character in his novels and articles); so the guys know what they are talking about- Eritrean society and affairs. ዘይእመልና ናእዳ ደኣ ኣብዚሕና’ምበር፡ ግን ” …ወይ ግበረሉ ወይ ንገረሉ” ዝዓይነቱ ይኹነልና። ብፍላይ ንዓኺ ትኸውን ሓንቲ ሕቶን ማዕዳን ኣላትኒ። ብብዝሒ ቅልቅል ክትብልን እብዝሕ ኣቢልኪ ሰው ክተብልልናን ትኽእሊ ‘ዶ? ዓቕሚ ከምዘለኪ ኣቐዲመ ዘስተውዓልኩሉ እዩ ነይሩ። ናይ ጽሕፈት ምልከትኪ ከኣ ናይ ብሓቂ ዘቅንእ እዩ። ግዜ ኣብ ዘፍቅደሉ ቅልቅል ብምባል ንውሕ ዝበለ ትንተና እንተትህቢ ይሕግዘና እዩ። ብወገነይ ርኢቶ ናይ ሓደ ሰብ ፍሊ እንተበለ ዘጸግም የብሉን። saay ከኣ ካባይ ንላዕሊ ትፈልጥዮ ኢኺ፡ ብዙሕ ዝጓዳእ ኣይኮነን። ከም ማዕዳ ዓቢ ሓው ውሰድዮ።ካብ ዘኽብረኪ ሓውኺ።

          • saay7

            Selamat Papillon/Mahmuday:

            Well, when we were launching awate 7.0, my plan was to assume a role I had in awate 5.0: to be a silent moderator. In fact, I said as much. My rationale was this: when people see “moderator” next to my name, they may think that whatever I am saying is the official position of awate… I had equated it with a football referee taking sides with one team against the other… but then this forum has so many strong-willed and articulate people, it really doesn’t matter whose side I am on (who agrees or disagrees with the moderator)…

            No comment (for now) on the saay-papillon/Lady with Dragon Tatoo persona:)

            saay

          • Kokhob Selam

            That is how it should be sister. that is an Eritrea we want to build. differences should be taken as natural and getting the common land should be the job that allows us to leave in harmony. The problem is only when someone says ” I am the only one and should follow me or go away ” like what that nonsense group in Asmara and some opposition say it. AYESE’A’ENENA.Amen.

          • Mahmud Saleh

            ኮካባይ
            I read you brother. Thank you.

  • Amanuel Hidrat

    Dear Awatistas,

    I have found my voice in the words of “Tesfamicael Kidane” and it is “Eritrea’s salvation will only come with

    the complete dismantlement of Higidef and not through dialogue”. Read for yourself the whole text. in the link below.

    .http://togoruba.org/togoruba1964/mainTogorubamap/mainMap/headingMap/2014A/2208TG4-01AE.pdf

    Amanuel Hidrat

    • Peace!

      Hi Emma,

      I think you need to make your position clear regarding the future of PFDJ. There are only two buses heading to different direction, at least as far as the ongoing debate concerned: YG is saying Ghedli was wrong and PFDJ is a product of Ghedli therefore it needs to be dismantled completely; and the rest are saying Ghedli was a legitimate popular front that liberated our country therfore since PFDJ is a party of liberaters, it shall have a role in future Eritrea. Now, which bus are you in?

      Direct answer strongly prefered 🙂
      Hwuka

      • haileTG

        Hi Peace,

        I think there is a third bus too: Ghedli was a legitimate popular front, the sum total of unforgivable crimes committed on our current and future generations by PFDJ were neither mandated by ghedli nor the people. They were carried out at gun point and brutally. PFDJ must be accountable for every drop of innocent blood that it shed in complete trampling upon rule of law. It must clear its name before aspiring to rule the Eritrean people again.

        Thanks

        • Saleh Johar

          An addition HaileTG, the third bus is kidnapped by the PFDJ, we do not negotiate with captors and kidnappers 🙂 I belong to the crowd pursuing the PFDJ to free the hostages.

          • Mahmud Saleh

            Ahlan Ustaz;
            Count me as a member of the SWAT team.

          • Peace!

            Ahlen Salihom,

            But that’s a matter of justice, not ideology.

            Regards

          • Saleh Johar

            Yeah, Peace. I didn’t say I will fight against justice, but against the enemy. Does fighting an enemy hamper justice? Or should I stop fighting the enemy? Your short sentence doesn’t explain what you want to say, egrn idn alagbela 🙂

            Seriously though, please elaborate because I don’t think I fully understand what you are trying to convey. Also, don’t forget to explain if fighting an enemy is an ideology or a principle. nskha t’aklsi one liner 🙂

          • Peace!

            Hi salihom,

            Sorry I thought you read the question I posted for Emma to clarify his position as I had difficulty in distinguishing between weeding out PFDJ and Dismantling PFDJ.

            regards

        • Peace!

          Hi HTG,

          I categorized the buses interms of ideology, not justice. That means everything you said could happen in both buses. Now, could you clearly describe the third bus interms of ideology?

          Thank you

          • haileTG

            Hi Peace,

            Ghedli was an ideology of liberating the nation (they aspired to liberate the people too, but in fairness that would be too much to ask them to do except commend them for their noble wish). PFDJ is an ideology of enslaving the people and it committed horrendous crimes (even against tegadelti) to implement that ideology of subjugation on the ground. In order to remove that ideology of enslaving the nation and its people, its perpetrators not only have to be removed but also be held to account to their crimes. So the ideology of removing PFDJ is a natural process of paving the way to complete the ideology of ghedli at the next higher level, i.e. liberating the people. Regards

          • Mahmud Saleh

            Dear HTG;
            What a clarity! Where is Semere tsaeda? He is missing a heck of lessons. Ah wey Ane!
            Now, a question for you:do you see a difference between Amanuel H latest clarification of his concept of dismantling the system, particularly, the right of innocent folks to resume political activities after the criminals have been held accountable for their crimes, and the plain has been leveled per election laws (that’s if there are people who want to continue on PFDJ’s platform), and Gafi ‘s (as described on # 6) of heis ” weed them out” concept?

          • haileTG

            Hey Mahmuday, that is a million dollar question because it would depend on who would reach the finish line first to remove the current regime. Personally, I try to think they are really saying similar things, with SGJ taking it to its natural conclusion. When I try to visualize the end game, here is what I see:

            1) A group would take over power (there are possible contenders for this – either internal takeover or the regime collapsing under major external conflict)

            2) The known faces in leadership, security, cadre, external agents would most likely disappear and few might be caught

            3) In the minds of the euphoric and liberated masses the victory is over PFDJ rule. Every single ill of the country would be blamed on PFDJ, even if neither the country nor the PFDJ can compensate any of losses. We will also be pretty much broke, isolated and have an embargo to negotiate out of.

            4) the Neutralization of the organized face of PFDJ from the scene would not only help people to cut their losses and start afresh but also would lower tensions, recriminations and potential fall outs. I believe it would assist the peaceful transfer and to appeal for calm and camaraderie among the citizens to know that the common enemy has left and that we need not fear and mistrust each other. This may pave the way for new sense of optimism and re-discovering our shared dream that made us a nation in the first place. Ex members of the regime who have already defected and make it before the fall of the regime and specially those active in the opposition should be free to set up their political parties and compete at the highest levels. Otherwise, all those who would serve the regime to the last minute at higher positions and political and military leadership would be better to go through the justice system before returning to public duty. The PFDJ as organized entity is however best to be banned for the sake of calming a transition that might explode otherwise.

            In conclusion,

            I don’t think Eritrean have deep problems against each other. And can easily afford to dismiss a system that is so miserable and frowned upon all round 🙂

          • Semere Andom

            Dear Freedom Fighter Mahmud Saleh
            I do not denounce Ghedli whole sale. Jelab mudal Mahmud here is what I am on record as saying and I repeat. I looked in the mirror as you suggested and I like that dodger 🙂
            1. The Eritrean people launched the armed struggle for self determination and for justice
            2.The Ghedli was composed of good and bad people, the bad people won and are still calling the shots. Where I differ is that the hijacking did not take place in 1991, it was made apparent when in 2001 we finally removed the fleece.
            3. Unlike many de-romantics I do not believe that all tegadalti were gun totting robots and dupes, many were highly idealistic and abandoned their good life and promising future in Harvard and joined for a greater cause but the gun totting “adi yeblom awdi yeblom” won and it happened long time ago
            4. Romantics like you and Sal justify the crimes of Ghedli on tegadalti and the innocent as a cost of doing business and blame military and communism. I say baloney because the EPLF treated Ethiopian war prisoners with far more dignity while it treated freedom fighters with the utmost criminality. Ok, am not that out of this planet and I am aware of security concerns but EPLF had the wherewithal to treat freedom fighters in prison the same as the Ethiopian war prisoners. So that excuse is lame, willful attempt to justify the crimes of Ghedli
            I also believe that the EPLF tegadalti showed bravery in the battle field, truly ready to die on behalf of their friends and comrades, but they dreaded the Halewa Sewra and instead many committed suicide instead of facing the Halewa Sewra, and I consider in hindsight that the bravery they showed in the battle field was also a form of suicide, that is how bad it was. And you know it.
            I think almost like Haile in this regard, but PFDJ was not created in Asmara, it was probably created by the time you joined. And finally, too little and too late for them and for us the G-15 committed suicide by writing that letter.
            Conclusion: Eritrean Ghedli, which was ultimately lead by EPLF was a colossal failure, it accomplished nothing.
            From reading you and from debating and joking with you I learned a lot, but most importantly I learned that you are one of the able, innocent true freedom fighter, deserving of praise and accolades and you did not fight for what we have and there are so many of your compatriots in the same predicament, your conciliatory tone and tenor are enduring testament of your inner human core. But your believe that EPLF was a success and you kind of justify the crimes of the process.
            Sem

          • Mahmud Saleh

            Teg/Semere ( aka Hfoon)
            OK, now let’s leave Eritrean stuff as a family discussion, but you said ghedli treated POWS more favorably than tegadelti? Did I read that? Can you pass that to my friends Amde, Horizon, and the rest. I’m leaving out our neighbors because they are familiar with our living room. T.K. arkey, you hear me? I’m not calling for a fight here.

          • Abinet

            Very interesting ! You must have had a good heart to treat the POW better than your own people as freedom fighters.however,the moment you controlled asmara you showed the world your true colors by inhumanly kicking out the Ethiopians even before the referendum . What changed in the short period? Is it part of the gedli package?

          • Amde

            Hi Abinet,

            I see it as is just a manifestation of the cult of Shaebiya.

            This forum has made huge strides in moving from Weyane as the source of Erirea’s ills to Issayas as the source of evil, to PFDJ being the problem child, to the irredeemability of PFDJ.

            But Shaebiya still remains a sacred cow, not ready to be slaughtered.

            Give it time – it is inevitable.

            Amde

          • Abinet

            Selam Amde
            I can’t wait to see the next excuses. So far we have seen a lot including luck. I found the “luck” very funny.

          • Semere Andom

            Hi bro Mahmud:
            Yes, the prisoners even had their own musical band.
            But why are you making “strategicawi mzlak”:-)
            Sem

          • Mahmud Saleh

            Teg/ semere
            When my laptop isn’t around I’m helpless. I’m not good at texting and Nitricc is not around. So save me from writing long texts. Anyway, mzlaq and mTQaE go hand in hand. SAAy7 is in now deal with him. Yes, they had the best band around and was loved by tegadelti. I don’t know if imprisoned tegadelti had one in Halawa sawra, you are the expert.

          • Mahmud Saleh

            Teg/semere
            Hey sem A. Where is the report? I think SAAY needs to be held on being so easy on you. Waiting. I’m also looking for appropriate words if I could reciprocate your nice words of yesterday. If I could, otherwise, I can close it with the reply you value most: shukran jazeelan ya akhi Semere.

          • Semere Andom

            Hi Mahmuday:
            Thanks from all the languages that you are so proficient it words hagelka egliye 🙂
            About the report actually Sal offered advice by suggesting making it scientific and I took that seriously and it is hard so I will se how do it there are options iTishfeg what was the sayng shafig…? I am making that up, I know no such saying.
            Those words of yesterday, I believe them and EPLF were also made of such people and that is why I delineate clearly when I talk about Ghedli

          • Mahmud Saleh

            Ahlan Semere,
            That’s wonderful, take your time. The saying goes, ” shafg Ewoor weld.”

          • saay7

            Sem:

            I am itching to help you. But Nitricc would no longer think I have any teeth at all and you know he keeps saying I am his mentor and I wouldn’t want that on my conscience:)

            saay

          • Tesfabirhan WR

            Dear Semere A,

            [Yah, sometimes, even a vacation needs a vacation].

            Your lines are becoming very neat and clean. Just one more, do not loss hope on the youths. Remember their mindset, the mindset nurtured by PFDJ ideology and work to clean the fog that prohibits them to read the reality. Give them time and re-install the souls inherited naturally, re-generation, not like Nitricc (who got a transplanted cell-brain and forgets often) but a natural way of rehabilitation. For this, HOPE is the the means besides time and LOVE endowed t them. Sometimes, today’s youths are outcasted thinking that they are impotent. No, I assure you
            today’s Eritrean youths are very complex to read them/us. A friendly approach, humanistic and true to its objective approach is very important.

            Some are hijacked by the politics of “Divide ad Rule” and sentimentalists of “Regionalism” though they do not buy it. I have faced this experience once I tried to organize the people who are living
            around. Once I started to engage in organizing Justice seekers, the others who were watching put me in their basket and gave me a virtual identity. Once they got who I am, they started to change their course and claim as if I am “Hijacked” from their own trap.

            I used this as practical experiment though I was ready for it and identified the weakest point that exists within the community that I am engaged and we are in the right track to change the game, Dismantling the mindset that exist around. Hence, do not loss hope, work on it and I am quite sure we will win.

            As a strategy, sometimes formating can not be enough and hence anti-virus is needed. But I tell you, YG is another worst virus by himself. No good exists in YG’s pen and it is one that has to
            be weeded-out too.

            huka
            tes

          • Semere Andom

            Dear Freedom Fighter Mahmud Saleh
            I do not denounce Ghedli whole sale. Jelab mudal Mahmud here is what I am on record as saying and I repeat. I looked in the mirror as you suggested and I like that dodger 🙂
            1. The Eritrean people launched the armed struggle for self determination and for justice
            2.The Ghedli was composed of good and bad people, the bad people won and are still calling the shots. Where I differ is that the hijacking did not take place in 1991, it was made apparent when in 2001 we finally removed the fleece.
            3. Unlike many de-romantics I do not believe that all tegadalti were gun totting robots and dupes, many were highly idealistic and abandoned their good life and promising future in Harvard and joined for a greater cause but the gun totting “adi yeblom awdi yeblom” won and it happened long time ago
            4. Romantics like you and Sal justify the crimes of Ghedli on tegadalti and the innocent as a cost of doing business and blame military and communism. I say baloney because the EPLF treated Ethiopian war prisoners with far more dignity while it treated freedom fighters with the utmost criminality. Ok, am not that out of this planet and I am aware of security concerns but EPLF had the wherewithal to treat freedom fighters in prison the same as the Ethiopian war prisoners. So that excuse is lame, willful attempt to justify the crimes of Ghedli
            I also believe that the EPLF tegadalti showed bravery in the battle field, truly ready to die on behalf of their friends and comrades, but they dreaded the Halewa Sewra and instead many committed suicide instead of facing the Halewa Sewra, and I consider in hindsight that the bravery they showed in the battle field was also a form of suicide, that is how bad it was. And you know it.
            I think almost like Haile in this regard, but PFDJ was not created in Asmara, it was probably created by the time you joined. And finally, too little and too late for them and for us the G-15 committed suicide by writing that letter.
            Conclusion: Eritrean Ghedli, which was ultimately lead by EPLF was a colossal failure, it accomplished nothing.
            From reading you and from debating and joking with you I learned a lot, but most importantly I learned that you are one of the able, innocent true freedom fighter, deserving of praise and accolades and you did not fight for what we have and there are so many of your compatriots in the same predicament, your conciliatory tone and tenor are enduring testament of your inner human core. But your believe that EPLF was a success and you kind of justify the crimes of the process.
            Sem

          • saay7

            MerHaba Sem Hfoon:

            Sani Masyam Wad abuye Andom…. Fast forwarding to item 4 above…

            About this Sal dude who is trying to “justify the crimes of Ghedli on tegadelti and the innocent as a cost of doing business” by blaming “military and communism”… having had long conversations with him on the subject at hand, I can tell you that you are leaving out crucial pieces of information: the argument was an antithesis to a thesis.

            The thesis was this:
            The Ghedli generation (made up of Muslim lowlanders and Christian highlanders) were running away from the refined Habesha culture that dignified life: they created a hybrid of an alien culture: the Muslims adopted an Arab identity and the Christians created a Ghedli identity. The Ghedli identity venerates death and sacrifice and irrational hatred of Ethiopia anytime people want to reject it and embrace their original identity, the Habesha identity of love and life, those who have embraced the alien Arab and Ghedli identity create hurdles. The solution is to reject Arab and Ghedli identity and embrace Habesha identity. Also, stop burning Tigre books.

            The anti-thesis:
            Describing the Ghedli culture of “death and sacrifice” is an incomplete definition as the culture also included virtuous qualities of courage, determination, dedication, and the willpower to win. The reason that the culture was sustained for so long is not because it became a way of life for people (in much the same way as gangsterism is a way of life for some) but because it had strong enemies who were One Ethiopia fundamentalists who were determined to annihilate it and would entertain zero alternative solutions other than win-lose/ lose-win. A combination of three things–a charismatic leader with popular support, a military hierarchy, and an ideology of communism–all conspired to kill many innocent Tegadelti who were sounding the alarm of the looming authoritarianism early on.

            saay

      • Amanuel Hidrat

        Merhaba Peace,

        Do I have to argue by YG’s or anyone political framing for that matter? I don’t think so. Peace, I couldn’t be more clear than I have done twice when I was asked. Even though PFDJ is a continuation of EPLF ( not a ghedli of the entire era), I believe that history has found its conclusion once for all. Now there is a governing party in Eritrea, a party with its institution that dictate the entire life of Eritrean people. Our struggle now is for freedom and justice. Hence forth, we can’t dismantle the party, we can only dismantle the system they installed. If the struggle is to bar them from our political process, what makes us better than them?

        What Eritrea needs is a new constitution where the entire population took it as their own document and a New system that has new governmental structure (a) where the “state” and the “government” is clearly delineated (b) where the three pillars of the government functions properly. The new constitution should allow the devolvement of certain power from the center to the periphery as part of peoples power. Once that is set and the election law is ready, PFDJ should have all the rights to exercise in our political process. That is what I call justice in my book. Other’s could have different perspectives, but if they are fighting to bar PFDJ from our political process, they couldn’t be different from the current PFDJ and of course we can not call them justice seekers for that matter. However justice for the victims should be observed and the criminals should be brought to the court of justice. How about now Peace?

        • Saleh Johar

          Amanuel,

          Yesterday you wrote: “You don’t weed out a system you dismantle it.”

          Today you wrote: “we can’t dismantle the party, we can only dismantle the system they installed.”

          I have a few questions if you don’t mind.

          1. Please define ‘figure of speech.’

          2. I say the PFDJ has to be weeded out. Do you doubt that I don’t take them for plants but I equate them to nasty weed that needs to be weeded out?

          3. Do you have a doubt if you bare down“weed PFDJ out” to formal speech–no example, metaphors or figure of speech–that weeding it out means dismantling it?

          4. How do you dismantle a system (that is the PFDJ) without dismantling the PFDJ.

          5. Have anyone here stated that every member of the PFDJ would be pursued just for being a PFDJ member, in fact I am on the record stating that we cannot pursue every Adei Tekh’a who got the PFDJ ID to recieve grocery coupons.

          6. Let me clear what weed them out means, to me or to any serious reader: You weed out the PFDJ, dismantle it to the last nut and bolt. Then every citizen gets his rights, anything else is left for the courts (or negotiations) depending on how the nightmare ends. If some people want to revive the PFDJ (some will certainly be banned by the courts not to engage in any political activity by the courts), they have to fulfill the requirements of the Party Law as per the constitutional mandate. Otherwise, this struggle means nothing. Here is a bit for you: Once the PFDJ boasted that it lent money to the Eritrean Government. I will not laugh at that, I will just pass it. The PFDJ accumulated wealth it looted from Eritreans, land that belonged to the refugees, and expropriated so much property we will be surprises when finally we know the scale of extortion and abuse. So, would you give such a party, a tyrannical party that we are fighting, a free pass to return to power from the backdoor?

          7. What would you think if the EPRDF weeded out the Derg as it did, but didn’t dismantle it enough and the DERG was ruling Ethiopia? (though I don’t know how that is possible)
          ______________________

          Everyone reading: You are all invited to a wegaH tbel leyti, and dinner, in Eritrea once the PFDJ is WEEDED OUT.

          • T. Kifle

            Dear SGJ,

            The precondition, I think, is mainly dependent on the behaviour of the PFDJ itself. So far there are no signs of goodwill from them to bring about choices to the Eritrean people. In their book, there is no platform for alternative political discourse. SO the change the opposition hope would come in would be by forceful removal of this nagging entity called PFDJ. Why then allow them organize again when everybody knows that they, in all intents and purposes, are against this cardinal attribute of democracy? It seems Amanuel H. has got it wrong as far as this point is concerned. Post PFDJ Eritrea should be for those who unequivocally submit themselves to constitutional principles and values.
            While at it, initially, the EPRDF’s proposal for the transition period included WPE(Esepa) be part of the process on the condition that Dergue accepted the peaceful transition(it was in 1989). Then true to its nature, Derge rejected that proposal to its peril. Then, the final proposal excluded WPE from participation taking the defeat in the protracted war as a final verdict, sealing its fate once and for all. Of course it didn’t take them long to reincarnate themselves in myriads of names and forms: opposition, journalists, human right activists, and what have you.

          • Mahmud Saleh

            Arkey T.Kifle;
            I frankly don’t believe there will be people who will organize around that name, but here we are talking about principles. Amanuel H talked about the transition period, but did not elaborate on how Eritreans could get there. There are individuals and organizations who believe on forceful removal of the regime; the idea has been active for 14 years. I don’t know if it will get support from Eritreans ( I heard what your prime minister said). There are also parties and individuals who pursue peaceful means, and yet others who think of a combination to reach to that transitional period. To come back to your point, I could think a scenario in which PFDJ minus its criminal package is allowed to function only when a peaceful transition is given a chance (eg.Yemen case), or it’s militarily toppled from inside. If the regime is defeated as a result of rebel groups from without, then PFDJ fate will be similar to ESAPA. Of course the victor will decide its fate. And by the way, PFDJ to Eritreans is like ESEPA to Ethiopians.

          • T. Kifle

            Dear Mahmud,

            We are talking the same thing. Or are we not? You said AH is saying what he has been saying only for a transition period. That means the transition period, unlikely as it is, would be realised with full cooperation of PFDJ willing to listen to the grievances of the wider opposition and take them on board. It goes without saying that that sort of transition would be dictated by PFDJ proper and the opposition will have little dent on the course of Eritrean’s political future. If this is so, the terms of the transition are dictated however AH or anyone else believe otherwise. If change is effected from within, you will have another version of PFDJ and the future the opposition will have in stock would be left to mere chance . If change comes without, those who bring about change would have the last say on issues of importance.

            The diversity of the opposition doesn’t affect much of the bottom lines . But having a dominant force is mandatory. Otherwise, there will be little chance the political turbulences would precipitate to predictable outcomes.

          • Amanuel Hidrat

            Selamat SGJ, Tes & others who have the same view,

            Let me answer one by one in a simplistic way all your questions.

            1) I will not define “figure speech” as I fully understood it, that it will divert the core of our argument. If you want to do it, you may.

            2) Because “weed out” would mean also other than what you mean, like to “weed out nasty weeds” – to kill them and throw them, I precisely use the exact word that wouldn’t mean anything other than one thing. Hence “dismantle” which refers only to “structure” is the best suited and appropriate political terminology. By the way say words of single meaning will help you to avoid confusion as well as it conserve your energy that expend to elaborate what you mean.

            3) Refer to answer for Q-1. Look my friend sometime metaphors will not fit to political terminology.

            4) Again you could only dismantle the “political system and political structure” of PFDJ. Otherwise, it will take us into the literary meaning of “weed out”.If I am not wrong from your expalnation which you told us you don’t mean to bar them from having the party “PFDJ” if they want it, as far as they abide and governed by the rule of law of future Eritrea.

            5) I didn’t accuse anyone of that sort. My argument was let us use the proper word that fits to our argument.

            6) I hope not to create a court that infringe the rights of individual and groups for that matter to exercise their rights by the rule of law. The word “ban” is not inclusive. You just make them to abide by the law of the country. Again “weed out” can mean anything including up to eradicate them out.

            In conclusion, If you understand “weed out” to be “dismantle” I take it as you understood it, but it is a heck of task to elaborate yourself, which you could avoid it by using proper word or terminology. But In my political vacabulary “weed out” is not the same as “dismantle”. So as far as your “weed out” mean to you as “dismantle,” I have no problem. Amanuel will take it what you mean. So as far as I am engaging in politics, “weed out” is not my word of choice.

            regards,
            Amanuel Hidrat

          • Saleh Johar

            Dear Amanuel,

            Since you eject “figure of speech” as a tool of communication, the rest of what you stated is irrelevant to my questions because my questions, and your reaction, was all anchored (anchored this is a figure of speech). Over the ages, humanity has developed language, and then similes, idioms, metaphors and a lot more, including hyperbole. Maybe you can live without figure of speech, but I doubt if anyone living on this earth today can utter five sentences without using them, including you (I will come to that below). Today for example, a friend called and as usual, asked about the weather. He told me “we are boiling here, it is very hot.” I am sure they are not boiling in a pot, but I understood what he means–that is everyday communication.

            Writers find figure of speech, idioms and metaphors very expressive–it is the face of literature, drama, and a lot more.

            Without going too far, let me show you what I found just by checking three of your last posts for ten minutes. You have used figure of speech lavishly quotes from your post are in bold fonts:

            “the three pillars of the government functions properly”
            Pillars are building structures, you have to say the three branches (n that is a figure of speech). Maybe you have to say units, parts, departments?

            1. “That is what I call justice in my book.”
            Are you talking about your book or about your opinion? I understand “my book” to mean my view or my opinion.

            2. “awitistas has to take as their homework “
            Do we have a homework? I understand that to mean work, think, debate, find a solution, etc, to resolve their problem. Something of that nature.

            3. “the big picture of our struggle”
            I understand that to mean, an overall assessment, an all-inclusive view. Not like a picture in a frame hanging on a wall.

            4. “On the other hand”
            That definitely means, a contrasting, competing, other, different, viewpoint. Not a hand with five figures.

            5. “you need change of your messaging and probably your rule of engagement,”
            I do not understand that to mean that the person has a set of rules that he follows when he debates. You are advising him to consider his manners of debating. You are telling him his debating method sucks.

            6. “Know your message and hammer it to cross the mind of others.”
            This doesn’t alert me to wear a helmet to protect my head, I understand it to mean, debate diligently to convince others.

            See Amanuel, even if figure of speech escapes from us, we cannot escape from them. Here is a relevant quote that I found in one of your posts: “…instead of elevating the capacity of the resistance force … we spent all our time on criticism.”

            That is the spirit. That would help us avoid hyperbole and nitpicking.

          • Amanuel Hidrat

            Abu Saleh (SGJ),

            I don’t reject you. I avoid that particular question not to be diverted from the issue at hand. Again I had answer to it, but chose not to go to it. I think I gave you hint that metaphors sometimes doesn’t fit to certain political terminologies. Second I make it clear, If you mean “weed out” is the same like as “dismantle,” I accepted it. I also told you my choice of vocabulary is dismantle that won’t lead to any confusion. I don’t understand why this become a big issue. What is wrong to tell each other to select words that haven’t multiple meaning to avoid confusion? I will be glad the public to understand you, like what I understood you from your long explanation, which I believe could have been avoided. That is all what can I say.

            Regards,
            Amanuel Hidrat

          • Saleh Johar

            Selam Amanuel,
            We both know we have no difference on our wish of what should happen to the PFDJ, we want it dismantled and weeded out, and with that, we beyond the debate over semantics. Good.

            Both of us also agree (I think!) that a dismantled/weeded out PFDJ is naturally non-existent and any organization is not legitimate unless governed by the rule of law (constitution–party law, etc)

            For your information Amanuel, I chose not to take you on this until I read the following which I couldn’t pass without challenging it. 1) Because “weed out” would mean also other than what you mean, like to “weed out nasty weeds” – to kill them and throw them,” and 2) …but if they are fighting to bar PFDJ from our political process, they couldn’t be different from the current PFDJ and of course we can not call them justice seekers for that matter.

            On the average, I probably wrote about weeding out the PFDJ more than anyone else. And that accusation definately included me. It is an unfair and disenginious accusation. To correcet that argument you made, we had to come to this. If you remember, when you kept referring to the AT as “they” I corrected you to use “it” isntead when talking about an entity. I want to kill the PFDJ entity (or dismantle it, weed it out) but your comment implies killing PFDJ members, because you are using “them” when I never used it tomean anything but the entity.

            Therefore, taking your advice, “You guys we expect you to develop this qualities in the process of our debate. and “We failed to administer our differences. In fact I am worried whether we could administer our differences even after the removal of the despot. So all our engagement should be to improve in this particular area. Knowing our difference is one thing and administering our difference is another thing” and encouraged by it, I decided to iron out our difference if there are some.

            To me, this is not a debate over nothing, I see it essential because I consider you a close friend and an ally. WE have to remain on the clear.

            Back to our topic, in reality, the victor decides the fate of the vanquished, so the victor would decide whether a few bricks from the PFDJ foundation remain, or the soil on which it stood is turned upside down to erase any of its traces and stains.

            Simple, I am saying the PFDJ should be weeded out. Its top officers (those who remain until the last minute) will certainly be apprehended and hopefully brought to justice and the courts will have to decide their fate.

            The rest operatives, depending on verifiable accusation (or precautionary steps), should be charged and sentenced, or absolved and freed by a competent court.

            The Hamed Hafash who carry the PFDJ ID to get groceries, those who were coerced and made members, those who joined for opportunistic reasons, are not important, their lives should be protected just like any other citizen. And these are the people you seem to be worried about, I am also worried about their rights and safety, not their political future.

            Here we have arrived at a level ground where every citizen has equal rights and obligation, regardless of their past affiliations.

            What they do in the future, as far as getting organized, is their problem; ours is to make sure that everyone abides by the laws that are properly enacted.

            We agree that the will no more be privilaged citizens like they are now, but equal to the rest of the citizens and they have to do what is expected of the others: if they want to regroup, they have to abide by party laws.

            So, why is it that you worry about what happens to the PFDJ members after their party is dismantled/weeded out? I say that because I don’t see you worry about the political future of the rest of the citizens or the type of parties that other forces will have, or who is entitled to form one or not. Why is it important to debate what the the ex-members of a weeded out party will do in the future? Is their choice of national dimension if they can be treated just like any other citizen?

            Dear Ammanuel, let’s agree on a simply premise: the law will determines what happens, therefore, we should not be concerned specifically about the post change fate of the ex-PFDJ foot-soldiers or passive members. Frankly, I do not care what they do once their mothership is weeded out.

            But if there are “PFDJites in the ranks and files as well as in the leadership who want to continue the legacy of Issayas” as you wrote, I will have a big problem and will fight that PFDJ2 just like I am fighting PFDJ1. That will not be about a citizen’s right, but the nation’s right, a nation that will not allow a monster it eradicated to reappear through the backdoor.

            I hope I explained my position in a clear way.

            Take care

          • Amanuel Hidrat

            Ahlen Saleh (SGJ),

            I think your explanation was enough to me, when you mean “weed out” is to dismantle. I don’t know how I could tell you. I said it clearly. But if you still believe we have differences, we can’t resolve it by back and forth at this time until the signs of change start to be seen on the horizon. We are talking only to shape our views.

            Second a big national issue like this, believe me, can not be solved in the cyber debate. It could only be solved by the stakeholder sitting on round a table on formal dialogue.

            Third, let me assure you that the conflict of ideas brings the birth of new idea. I also see it that the law of unity and the struggle of opposites is taking place in our debate to bring social development. How about that abu Saleh?Allowing the process of dialectical unity in our thought process is paramount to bring the needed change in ourselves as well as in our society? I checked you by telepathy nodding to show your approval. Just kidding.

            Regards,
            Amanuel Hidrat

          • Tesfabirhan WR

            Dear Amanuel H.,

            Wondering! I want to ask some questions.

            1. If you dismantle a system and its structure, how could you expect to strive and evolve again?

            2. We are dismantling/weeding-out PFDJ because it is against justice. Then, is there any Justice for a system that is against Justice?

            3. Are you talking on the transitional dismantlement or permanent dismantlement of the system?

            hawka
            tes

          • Amanuel Hidrat

            Haw Tes,

            Answers to your questions,

            1) If we dismantle the system, it is dismantled for good. But the party can evolve however the members wanted it to be evolved ( look there is room for evolution of a party). If they resist to evolve we know the fate of the party will be.

            2) Justice is to follow the rule of law for purposes of simplicity. If rule of law reign justice will be observed. If the PFDJ refuse to follow rule of law, the law will act upon them accordingly. There is justice to end the injustice and not to end the PFDJ that brings peace and tranquility,.And that is to make them aligned with the rule of law – justice for all.

            3) Permanent dismantelment for sure.

            hawka,
            Amanuel Hidrat

        • Semere Andom

          Hi Emma:
          I am confused about dismantling the system but allowing the PFDJ party to continue because the ultimate victors are not like them, we allow multi-party system. PFJD for the last 23 years has become synonymous with Nazi,, cleansing the very Eritrean identity, selling the organs of our youth, raping our sisters, collaborating with the Rashaidas to sell the bodies of Eritreans . The system that you want to dismantle is the tapestry of the tentacles both physical and non-physical that the party(PFDJ) has established so the party functions to deliver its mission that has been wrecking havoc on the nation and its once bright future. We dismantle every nail, wire and glue that keeps the party to function so the party ceases to do what it is doing to us now. The systems is the legs, hands, eyes and the party is the brain behind, the command center that directs the organs to work, we cannot allow the brain to regenerate. Otherwise this sounds like a fancy version of Sal’s idea of PFDJ without DIA. PFDJ must be dismantled/weeded out, every atom of it. PFDJims must be banned for eternity just like the Nazi and everyone who exhibits PFDJims must be checked. They can gather and reminisce about the old good days when it was easy to rape girls and disappear people at whim and they can pray at the altar of DIA and Manjus, but they should not be allowed to run as a party. Dismantle the system allow the party is an oxymoron.
          Sem

          • Amanuel Hidrat

            Ahlen Sem,

            As a principle “Fithawian” will give justice to every individual and group to exercise their rights as far as they abide by the rule of law. If they resist to the rule of law then the story will be different. Second if the criminals are brought to the court of justice, other card holders will be given the second chance. This position will reflect to our struggle as justice seekers. It is also an exit strategy from the political culture of killing each other which was part of our history. It allows peace to reign, coexistence and stability to take root in the landscape of Eritrean politics. I want to see peace, justice, and stability in Eritrea before my last departure from this temporary world.

        • Peace!

          Hi Emma,

          Thank you for your eloquent clarification, and for your T’gedasnet: Much respect. I was just a bit confused with your wording “weed out,” “Dismantle,” “System,” and “Party.” If PFDJ is a system and needs to be dismantled, I do not think it makes any difference replacing “weed out” with “dismantle.” And given the fact that a dismantled system has zero chance of regrowing, which PFDJ are you referring to when you say it should be welcomed as a party?

          Once again thank you for your time.
          Hawuka

    • saay7

      Hi Emma:

      I don’t understand Tesfamicael Kidane’s conclusion as it had nothing to do with the points that Daniel G. Mikael was saying. Nowhere in Daniel’s statement is there a call for dialogue with Hgdef, nor does he saying anything about dismantling or maintaining Hgdef. What Daniel DOES say is that both Weyane and Isaias Afwerki are working for the dismemberment of Eritrea and the justice-seekers must be rely on themselves to create “Eritrean solutions for Eritrean problems” which is the theme of the Bologna Festival he is advertising.

      Beyond that, in Tesfamicael Kidane’s article, the sentence that appears just before the one you saw fit to quote is: “Not withstanding the current infighting, the Libyans showed us what a united hand could achieve.” Do you think this is an accurate characterization of what happened in Libya?

      saay

      • Amanuel Hidrat

        Abu Saleh (Saay),

        I am sure we have different position as to how we expedite to bring change in Eritrea, and even on the nature of change we look forward. If I am not wrong you are calling for Reformism and I am calling for fundamental change. You look PFDJ to take the seat to lead in the transitional process. I look for “independent technocrat” to lead the transitional process. Therefore our difference will reflect on how we see Daniel’s argument and Tesfamicael’s argument.

        Tesfamicael and Daniel differs how they see Ethiopia in the current of our politics. Tesfamicael doesn’t see any wrong to make alliance with any foreign force to expedite the change needed while Daniel is a kind of “bistefrena as if our struggle has never made an alliance. As you noted yourself Daniel is not talking in principle it is all from the in-fight of EYSC and his defiance from giving up the chairmanship of the organization. I thought he was one of the hopeful youth we have when I saw him in their founding conference at DC. I was wrong. One who fight not to give up the power he assumed, is a creed of the system we have in our country.

        Amanuel Hidrat

        • saay7

          MerHababkum Emma:

          Umm… let’s skip what I am calling for until I write an article about it, Inshallah:)

          I think you mischaracterized what Daniel is calling for and, worse, what I said about what Daniel is saying.

          Daniel is not saying we shouldn’t have allies or alliance. He is saying that he doesn’t think the current government of Eritrea is such an ally.

          And, no, I didn’t note that “Daniel is not talking in principle.” For a guy who hates when he is misquoted you were, with respect, a bit careless. What I said is that it appeared to me that he is using a wedge issue. One can be principled AND use a wedge issue when in campaign mode. I have no comment on whether he lost, gained, maintained the chairmanship because EYSC politics is even more complicated than EDA politics:)

          saay

          • Amanuel Hidrat

            Dear Saay,

            I will stand corrected instead of quoting you, I went for interpretation. On that I raise my hands up. As Daniel is concerned, I have enough about him and I stand with my statement.

            The alliance is not in reference with the regime. The alliance I am talking and Tesfamicael is talking is about the opposition forces to have alliance with foreign force. In that respect his position is clear and it is “bitsefrna” no alliance with foreign entity. I think your view is congruent with him in regard that. Correct me if I am wrong.

            Saay, brother, I don’t emulate Libyans as to how the handle their differences. I would like to emulate the Tunisian one. You know it and I raised in our debate few months ago. But I will encourage you to go ahead to write on the issue that thew us in to opposite end.

            Thanks for pulling me back to my principles and that is “debate by quoting your adversary.”

            Regards,
            Amanuel Hidrat

  • Amal

    Dear Sarray

    Good to see you again, I was getting worried 🙂

    Until I can properly reply to you, just in short..

    I don’t want men to change by pressing a button. I want them to know that WE have changed, I want them to stop looking for their “good woman” she is long gone!

    I Will came back!

  • NMS

    I was waiting for the word ‘sexism’ to show up! The View–thank you for joining the Awate’s gentlemen’s club. Be prepared: you will be asked to tone it down, prove yourself and to wait until PFDJ is gone before daring to ask for equality. It’s ok though, the men on this forum are just shocked, SHOCKED I TELL YOU, that women actually have an opinion on you know, women’s issues. Let’s give them some time to un-clutch their pearls.

    In the meantime, I am jumping up and down at this:

    ‘I think you are focusing on what is on the media as far as showing ‘adetat’ attending these parties and there is a massive expectation that “they should know better since they are mothers’ but in reality I believe there are more men who support this regime than women.’

    So why are there unbalanced expectations? In this example–it’s because men are expected to support the regime due to their stubbornness and emotional detachment. Women are naturally compassionate and are supposed to care more about the suffering of our people which eventually means aligning with the ‘right’ movement. Based on the consensus here, that is the only right choice for them. I would like us to consider that maybe these women are making conscious decisions for themselves and the well-being of their families in the context of being women and raising children in a patriarchal and judgmental Eritrean community. Whether they support the regime or not is irrelevant. Why they make the choices they make is based on the ingrained stereotypes that we can’t seem to shake off. We, as a community consumed by tragedy, loss and distrust need to first recognize that if we tell our women to ‘care’ more it is also interpreted as ‘take care of us’ which takes us back to square one. Both men and women should cry and wail equally as loudly when our children perish in the ocean. Both should channel that grief into effective ways to end our suffering, but oftentimes it’s the women that show up at vigils and the men that show up at meetings to make ‘decisions’. Women that are present certainly need to hold other women accountable for their absence. But Eritrean women cannot solely be blamed for their political in-activeness when they are still primarily expected to be perfect daughters, wives and mothers. Some of that means being agreeable, passive and restricting your opinions to humanitarian matters. Mostly it’s that when a woman spends time not caring for her husband and family it’s considered selfish and individualistic.

    As a friend recently reminded me, men cannot emancipate women—only women can do that. But there is a duty for our men to be cognizant of the messages they send, expectations they hold and judgments they make on women who do not fit their ‘good woman’ ideal.

  • Bayan Nagash

    “It is certain, in any case, that ignorance, allied with power, is the most ferocious enemy justice can have.”
    (James Baldwin)

    A metaphor commonly used by educators when wanting to express for the need of multicultural perspective to
    be inculcated in what children learn in schools is ‘mirrors and windows.’ The former helps children to see them
    being represented in the books they read. The latter helps others in, say, how the dominant culture begins to learn
    something valuable of the real world as it exists not as the world comprised only of their ilk.

    One salient point that has emerged from discussing gender related issues to Eritrea’s political landscape,
    specifically within the opposition is, which Amal has said it best: we lack
    language for it – part of the reason why we went from Butler to Argentina,
    point well taken. Now, how does one go about in localizing it and finding
    within that localized ambiance to find a language that we all can begin to have
    common understanding of gender roles, vis-à-vis patriarchy, masculinity,
    exploitations, and the like. There is a strand in the lacking language, which
    one can safely translate to mean pleading ignorance, one way to ameliorate it
    would be to educate ourselves.

    Myriad questions that have emerged from various individuals during the discussions
    made me realize how little I know about feminism, and what I know is tainted by
    Western notions of feminism, concepts of which I can see will come handy,
    but I am thoroughly convinced now that I would have to begin reading African feminists
    to really grasp and relate it Eritrea’s context. One way that this can be realized is, say, if possible,
    Awate can give those of us who are interested on the subject at hand a corner
    in which we can learn together, such as, reading articles & books; watching
    films & various forms of arts, thereby educating ourselves so as we may discuss
    issues as that will inform the common perspectives that we will gain, in a
    sense giving a sense of agency in taking matters into our own hands as we
    learn. What was clear in the discussion is that not only were we not on the
    same pages and chapters, but we were on different books. Once the viability of
    this idea is realized, for example, we can start reading a book “Nervous
    Condition,” the highlights of which Helen Nabasuta Mugambi*** offers pristine
    analysis, the first paragraph of which reads as follows:

    “Tsitsi Dangarembga’s “Nervous Conditions” is one of the most complex and
    insightful coming-of-age narratives in the postcolonial African literary tradition.
    It intricately weaves the lives of diverse characters in a Shona community to
    highlight the challenges of growing up female in a patriarchal and colonized world.
    Trapped in the poverty of the homestead, a result of the historical displacement of
    indigenous people from their fertile land by colonial forces, Tambudzai, the daughter
    of Jeremiah and Mainini, struggles to obtain a Western education in a patriarchal environment
    that does not value girls’ education. It is only after her brother Nhamo
    unexpectedly dies that Tambudzai is allowed to go to school, taking her beother’s
    place in the mission school run by her father’s brother, the revered but
    controlling, ultramasculine Babamukuru,
    who is also father of Nyasha and her brother Chido. During Tambuzai’s stay with
    Babmukuru and hois wife, Maiguru, her awareness of colonial evil and gender
    oppression is intensified through her sharp observation, augmented by insights
    from the rebellious Nyasha, her alter ego” (pp. 199-200).

    The above plot-line is meant to show Awatawyan that we can, indeed, learn and genuine lessons from some such
    books. The author of this article goes on to search deeper and beyond
    colonialism to show the richness of the book how masculinity in relation to
    girls and women perpetuates it.

    *Helen Nabasuta Mugambi, “Reading Masculinities in a Feminist Text: Tsitsi Dangarembga’s Nervous Conditions.

    The essay above can be found in Twelve Best Books By African Women (2009). Eds. Chikwenye Okonjo Ogunyemi &
    Tuzyline Jita Allan

    Sincerely,
    Beyan

    P.S. Earlier this summer a good friend, a scholar in his own right, suggested that I read
    “Nervous Conditions.” I have yet to read it, but I read the essay in question before I read
    Nervous Conditions.

    P.S.S. My little brother sent me the eight minute link below when he saw some of the conversation
    about gender equality. For those who do not understand Amharic, my sincere apologies.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=62LrNMW8asA&feature=youtu.be

    • Amal

      Dear Beyan,
      Reading you now makes all this discussions (insults) worthwhile. It all starts with one person. I am sure you have been fallowing the posts and what we have been called? From reformists, lesbians, PFDJ to insensitive nonsensical etc. It’s not because our men are evil but there are so many guards and the wall that the Eritrean male have built to safeguard his statues is made of cement. Both genders are responsible for the state of affairs we find ourselves in. The blame is on the men here cause it’s patriarchal norms that govern us, in other words they have to be receptive and that wall needs to fall for there to be any hope for a positive future as a society.This is not a we vs them battle (even if it seems that way) this is case of us going through this together as a “we” for there to be a healthy foundation for a better tomorrow.

  • Tzigereda

    Dear Awatistas,

    Just some quick points (to my opinion) which might help clarifying things. What are the impressions, experiences and expectations of the Eritrean women in the opposition camp (explicitly?)in Diaspora.
    In my previous years of “political activism” I had the feeling that I (we women) was ( were) an equal partner of my ( our) men colleagues in every aspect. Unfortunately many things have changed, indietro!
    .
    1. There is almost no voice of women in the leadership of the political organizations and movements. Almost all the women participating have the role of “ኣሳሰይቲ” (“assistants”, ተቀበልቲ ኣጋይሽ, introducer’s, demonstrators, radio speakers, cookers, singers, dancers). Those who sit at the podiums and give political speeches and political discussions are dominated by MEN. Even the leadership of the “newest” organisation “Forum for national dialogue” is composed only of MEN. Women are not yet taken serious as political partners. Why? I feel somehow ashamed when at conferences of the opposition, those who come to give “solidarity messages” (from “foreign parties”) are most women and the role of the Eritrean women is limited to hand over flowers.

    2. It is not easy for an Eritrean woman that her political opinion be heard. Eritrean women are welcomed as long as they cry and whinny, as long as they take care of refugee, as long as they march at demonstrations. The average man is confident that he knows much better about politics than any woman who might have much more experience and knowledge in the field (or at least similar). A women has to be “excellent” in order to be accepted as “good” (even in awate Forum!). A woman who is involved in politics has to “deny” her “gender” or “sexuality”. No question about the “advantage” of men being more “informed” and “actors “of the political scene. The status of those women who are members of the political organizations has remained the same since the last 20 (or 50) years. Why? And this has not even changed visible in the youth organizations. The tone and attitude towards women is sometimes much worse. Do you have an idea why?

    3. The defamation by PFDJ against women in the opposition camp is always “misogynistic ( for example “the smear campaign against Meron Estifanos, in Alenalki.com, years ago). On the other side (by some opposition members) there was an ugly smear campaign against some women who participated the Bologna event (EYSC) last year. The insults were personal ( ነውራም፣ክትደግሞ ዘሕፍር, under the belt) in comparison to their man compatriots.I leave aside the “insults” at FB, demonstrations directed to women from which side ever. All this shows that the culture we are partially “proud” of is getting lost (ክብረት ትሕትና).

    What is the academical, social, and political status of your wives, girl friends and sisters? I asked “similar” question days ago. Only Ermias responded “ክላ ግደፍና ፖለቲካ ይብላ”. Why? Maybe because they sense that the male dominated opposition is still driving the rusty or new seicento, (and they are wating for a speedy car, a caravan, where everybody can sit in, take one) maybe because they do not feel addressed? And the elders ( women) are saying “ባዕሉ ድኣ የውግሖ እምበር”. The dream, slogan has not changed since years -ስምረት፣ ሓድነት፣ እንተዝገብሩ እምበር-. Beyond that they are missing a “women respecting and encouraging atmosphere” (not meaning ሓለፋታት፣ ኣይንፈልጦ እኳ!).
    The male-dominated opposition camp has yet to do much more, women were not decisive “partner” of the whole history (good & bad), and nothing will change as long as their concern and fear is not taken serious. Yes they will stay aside and try to “minimise” the damages (helping refugee problems), which is far from a solution as long as we are not able to work on how to prevent it.
    The good news is that women have begun to organize themselves; they are coming out of the shadow. I hope this will have an impact on encouraging more women & men to get involved. To make visible changes we all need the “liberated man” more than any other time. We, women want to be seen as equal respected partners, partners who should be encouraged and criticised for whet they do and stand.

    • Amal

      Dear T
      this was from the heart!!!!! It brought tears to my eyes 🙁 Needless to say I agree with every point mentioned. although I still don’t think this forum should be given the answers this easy, after all the active men and women on this forum are not imported from Kazakhstan. They know what we have been trying to say for days. But they have no courage to vocalize it.Thank you.

    • NMS

      For the win!

      Thank you Tzigereda. I hope this will encourage us to stay on topic.

    • Amanuel Hidrat

      Sis Tzegereda and Amal,

      One information that I would like to share with you from my experience which I believe will help us is in our debate, is,. In any political and civic activity I participated, we asked our compatriot sisters to join us Knowing their indispensable role and contribution they could make. But they always decline with reluctance. No body knows the reason except we could guess. Of course we can not debate based on guesses. But the active women in the awitistas has to take as their homework to make some research on why our sisters stay passive (I am talking in general and particularly on our erudite women).

      I have been one of those who were advocating (in the ghedli era) to increase the role of our women in the revolution in particular and the cultural emancipation of our women in general. I still do believe the struggle of their emancipation is continuing within the big picture of our struggle. Since it is cultural issue, we will see always resistance, the same as in every demand of change and transformation. Our task is now to raise the consciousness of our women to stand up to fight for their rights with those conscious men who understood their role in the nation building. There is no nation building without the participation of our women in every capacity they could render. On the side of men, we should guard ourselves from aggravating their grievances. We are always together to address all kind of grievances.

      regards,

    • Mahmud Saleh

      Dear Tzigereda;
      Now, the show is on; plotted and directed by women; that’s what is needed. Thank you. I was going to say something about those who consider this topic as a sideshow or a diversion- I don’t know why they would think they are the ones who have the sole monopoly on shaping our debates and judging our views; I don’t know why they feel they are more patriotic than others- but that’s another topic. All I can say is this is an integral part of our struggle. We discussed it yesterday, we are discussing it today and we will continue to discuss it tomorrow, long after PFDJ is gone, because we can’t be full without meaningful participation of our daughters, sisters, and mothers. To come to your points:
      a/ on 1 and 2: I think men have for ever enjoyed power and they don’t want to lose it. It’s that simple. Power has always been snatched and not given back on good will considerations. Dr.sara O, in one of her comments brought an interesting point: and that was that we need to think of this as negotiation, give and take, as complimenting each other,etc. Women have always been sidelined and men enjoyed leading the show. They’ve taken it for granted. Here in the USA, politics is pretty much the domain of middle age and older white folks; when colored and women candidates penetrate that circle, you read speculations of how affirmative actions helped them reach that position. The society does not take those few candidates for who they are; they don’t narrate their stories on their merits, ” There should be something that helped them propel to that role,” they assume. In our diaspora communities most of the organizing and activism have been run by men. Women are considered as augmenting numbers and making gatherings more enticing and colorful. The same attitude that PFDJ holds towards women. Unfortunately, our educated folks (women and men) have retired to their suburban lives and the show is run by ill-equipped ghedli generation aging folks who have little sensitivity and training regarding gender issues. This must change, and I am afraid, women will need to come forward, particularly the young and educated, to take responsibility in advancing women’s issues. Along the way, they have the support of many men. Amanuel H mentioned an important point, and that’s women, particularly those privileged, need to take the initiative; they have to brave male’s current attitude, not in confrontational way but in a morally high-ground fashion, raising issues, educating, enlightening and challenging our notions. There are many men who want to see their sisters and daughters succeed, it’s just that the society remains patriarchal, and all the attitudes and mannerisms remain to reflect our male-dominated culture; whatever they do for women emanates from their understanding that as men they should treat women fairly, and not from deep a understanding that women don’t need to be treated differently, but equally. Just allow them to have the same opportunities, no more no less. Bottom line, sisters come out and run the show, it’s your right, you owe it to the thousands of heroines who died believing women’s place would be different in the year 2014. We are there with you, it’s also our issue. We can’t win without ensuring that women assume their role.
      b, On 3: Unfortunately brilliant women were bullied even on this forum. I can assure you, I have been made more aware since you (women) have joined in and made the debate more robust, because it’s different when it’s narrated by the female. It’s genuine,and therefore, helps us improve our understanding. Societal and social resistance will continue, but the more women come forward the more our understanding will get better and the more we will move faster on other agendas. Recently, I attended one of our community resistance meetings, there is a board which includes three women. It’s chaired by a man and vice-chaired by a woman. The meeting displayed typical Eritrean-male heated debates with a lot of loud noises. None of the women spoke until at the end of the meeting they were invited by the men to ” say something.” The three women were all professionals and more educated than the men who were shouting all day. And ironically, one of the point that took much of the time was on how to make the movement more appealing to women; men were debating it. On that day, I did take it normal and went back home, but now, I don’t take it normal.

      • NMS

        Mahmud, thank you for your courage and for directing the conversation towards progressiveness!

  • Mahmud Saleh

    Dear Awatistas;
    ” ንበይ-ኤርያ ኤርትራውያን ንዲሞክራስያዊ ለውጢ፡ ለይቲ ምስ መዓልቲ ብምስራሕ ከም ሞቶር ኮይነን ዘንቀሳቕስኦ ምዑታት ደቂ-ኣንስትዮ ኣለውኦ። እዚ ኸኣ፡ እቲ ቃልስና ደቂ-ኣንስትዮ እንተድኣ ተሓዊሰንኦን፡ ብግብሪ እንተድኣ ተንቀሳቒሰናሉን፡ ክሳብ ክንደይ ንቕድሚት ክስጉም ከምዝኽእል ዘረጋገጸልና ተግባር እዩ። ምስቶም ሰሪሖም ዘይደኽሙ መንእሰያት ስራሕ ክቀባበላ ክትርእየን እንከሎኻ፡ ካብቲ ብዙሕ እቲ ውሑድን ዓይነታዉን ብልጫ ገይሩን ዝያዳ ኣድሚዑን ከምዝውል የረድእ። ነቲ ዝፈረየ ውጽኢትን ዝተሓፍሰ ዓወትን ምስ እትርእይ ኸኣ፡ ካብ ኣመና ዕግበት ዝተላዕለ፡ ንስኻትኩም ጸባ ስተዩ፡ ተዓዊትኩም ኣዐዊትኩምና፡ ንስኻትክን ከኣ ሽሕ ኩና ትብል።”
    posted on http://assenna.com under the title ፈስቲቫል ዓዋሉ ፈሺሉ 1ይ ክፋል on 08’21/14 (ብወልደየሱስ ዓንደማርያም)

    That’s how unity works; unity of citizens comes before unity of political organizations; united and empowered citizen compels political organizations to think twice. At the center of unifying citizens’ efforts is women’s role for neglecting that would mean like trying to clap with one hand. When women engage, they mean business, they get things done. Everyone wins. It’s that simple.

  • Eyob Medhane

    Gash Saleh,

    Did you say Seicento? Are you conspiring with Teddy Afro to advertise his song? hummmmmm…..

    In his new hit everyone is going ga ga over is guess what Seicento and care’dash ( It means, I don’t care in the slang of really really old Arads some 50 to 65 years ago, right after Italian invasion) are prominently mentioned 🙂 Enjoy…

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uzZHA7Fb93A

    • Abinet

      Eyobe
      You need another bad English ? I will put it in a sentence .
      “Still eskeAhun almetachim”

    • saay7

      Eyob:

      Teddy still seems to have a problem with HarbegNa Weyanai whom he once referred to as “basra seat merge..qumTa” and “addis negus inji lewT mechs meTa” in his Janhoy-loving Yastesrayal. Here are the lyrics to his new song (courtesy of FB.) What is he saying Eyob? You know my Amharic is rusty 🙂

      Saay

      • Eyob Medhane

        Sal,

        And that assumption and insinuation is absolutely outrageous!! I mean it. The guy is just paying a tribute to an almost gone generation and a cultural legacy and impact they have left in Addis Ababa. Nothing more. Those, who over think this lyrics should get their head examined. The ‘keridash’ generation are in their late seventies, into their eighties and nineties. They are almost gone. But, the stories, their ‘arada lingo’ and their fast disappearing area, which they used to ‘Rock it’, in favor of new buildings and development should be something to sing write and be talked about. Please, Sal you and your facebook friends don’t spoil it for the rest of us. Let us enjoy it…… 🙂

        • saay7

          Eyob:

          See what happens when you don’t stick to our schedule and you do the music exchange on a weekday? I have to engage and ruin it for u:

          1. “Fast disappearing” is always politics. Even when the disappearance is for the better, you will still have people who resent change;
          2. What do you mean “spoil it for us”? You mean u are not capable of enjoying songs even if you don’t agree with their message? Fara neh ebakeh. I think “Yasteseryal” is Teddy’s second* best song but I don’t agree with its message at all.

          saay

          *his best being “Musica Hiwote”, of course.

          • Eyob Medhane

            Oh Sal,

            Come on! There is nothing politics has to do with some things that are really disappearing fast….Think about it, Sal the people, who we are talking about are THE FIRST URBANITES of Addis Ababa. They created a legendary enclave in the middle of the city called “wube berha” that produced famous people, famous stories and for your liking people were even open the door for many about criticizing emperor Haileselassie’s government out loud. According to Mengistu Lema’s old book “Yimtu Bezina Addis Ababa”, it was ‘wube bereha’ that the first set of plain clothed security agents (Nech Lebash) start to work, because at the bars and “secretos” of ‘webe bereha’ many young patrons were saying ‘unflattering” things about the emperor and his family and they wanted to “investigate” that. That’s history, man. To preserve a piece of that would have been pretty good. If you go to the old “wube bereha”, there are very few things that would remind you of its old glory is the majestic Hager Fikir Theater. Same with the old neighborhood of ‘Serategna Sefer’, ‘Doro Maneqia’, ‘Afincho ber’, ‘Eri Bekentu…very little is being preserved from the piece of their past……

            Read this, you will know what I am talking about…..and of course, you will be overcome by some nostalgic moments of YOUR old hangout… (Come on Sal, let’s not kid ourselves. Everyone knows you are eighty something and have a story or two tell from your ‘youngen’ days at wube bereha in the 30s and 40s…. 🙂

            http://www.thereporterethiopia.com/index.php/living-and-the-arts/society/item/1024-the-memories-of-wube-bereha

          • Saleh Johar

            Eyob, Doro or Dro?

            Is it Doro, as in chicken, where they strangulate the chicken (my God), or Dro, as in old, or literally “the old gallows”? I think it was the latter ….according to what I was told a long time ago. Do you have a correction for me, or I gotcha on your own turf? 🙂

          • Eyob Medhane

            Gash Saleh,

            No, you didn’t get me :-)… It is DORO as in chicken. The story goes that women keep losing their chicken that their husbands used to buy for them to cook for holidays. The disappearance of these chickens was much of a concern and that the “Yarada Zebegna” (That’s what police used to be called in those days) was notified and their investigation revealed that some thieves who used to live in that area were abducting the chickens and kill them silently, rather than traditionally slaughtering them. The reason for that was according to the story, if they slaughter them, their blood would have made them suspects as chicken thieves, because of they number of slaughtering they would have done of the chickens they have stolen. So they chose to kill the chickens in a different manner. Hence, the place the thieves used to live called ‘Doro Maneqia’….That is the story Gash Saleh….

            Source:- Mengistu Lemma :- Yimtu Bezina Addis Ababa Page 123-124

          • Abinet

            Eyobe
            I’m sure you have read LETUM AYNEGALIGN by Sibhat G.Egziabher .

          • Eyob Medhane

            Abiye,

            You are so mischievous. I know why you are asking this ‘yetenkol tiyaqe’ 🙂

            But yes…I have read it. I actually read the hand written version, because he couldn’t find publishers to take on the Amharic version, because of the you know what 🙂 so he distributed a hand written and typed copy……and I read that one….but I am sure you have read it, too…. 🙂

          • Abinet

            Eyobe
            No tenkol here.The reason I asked was because I have the book and willing to give to whoever interested .including oromay
            Btw,I had tea with Gashe Sibhat several times at Edir shay bet at AAU .one more thing,did you know the main character in Baalu’s “derasiw”is gashe Sibhat himself? They were friends.

          • Eyob Medhane

            Abi,

            Yes. I read ‘Derasiw’, when I was 8th grade. (You may not believe me, but it is true) You are very lucky that you got to be at edir shay bet with Gash Sibihat. I met him only once at the old Ministry of information in Abune Petros, where I was an intern and had a very short stunt at (ENA) (E Ze Aa (in Amharic) before I left the country at Now being demolished Abune Petros office… ( Sal, did you catch that?)….

            The books that I am looking for is Dagnachew Worku’s Adefres….couldn’t seem to find it anywhere…that would make my day….

            Speaking of Gash Sibehat, I heard his interview about a certain encounter, which he had with one TPLFite,

            The guy angrily asked him, ‘you make all this money, and you claim to be from Adwa, but what have you ever done for Adwa?’

            Gash Sibhat said he replied ‘ What have Adwa ever done for me?’……

            He was an interesting man….:-)

          • saay7

            Very funny, Eyob:

            But seriously, the article that you linked (thank you! I get the references in Teddy’s song now, including the Korean War) makes my point, doesn’t it: it is politics, in it truest definition. That is: the State is taking action that it believes is in the best interest of the people, and the people most directly affected by the decision are unhappy. Whether it gets done or scuttled is really on the balance of power between the State and the citizen.

            In the Los Angeles are, there is a freeway (710) that connects Long Beach to Pasadena. Since 1960, the people who live in South Pasadena have said no to the completion (much to the annoyance of commuters like me.) So now the freeway dumps you on a street…you fight traffic for half and hour… There is a “extend the damn freeway!” and “over my dead body” debate going on right now. That’s politics, no?

            saay

            http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/.a/6a00d8341c630a53ef01676946fbd8970b-640wi

          • Eyob Medhane

            Sal,

            I get your point, but the ‘wube berha’ issue is a little difference….

            By many scale Addis is not that much an old city. Only 130 years. That is the age of two 65 year olds. Which means in its history only couple of generations in the past that have played the most significant roles in its journey. The era from 1941 (Fascist defeat and departure) -1960 (Coup attempt of Mengistu Neway) was the making of the urbanite Addis Ababan. Those twenty years were the times of many cultural taboos were broken. Ethiopian music was changed from a masinqo azmari to the brass band. Tilahun Gessese, Bizunesh Bekele, Mohammud Ahmed, Frew Hailu, srung up. Writers, thinkers started to speak up, and wube berha was the center of all that. At least, other thank Hager Fiker theater, there should be some piece of that history would have been great to be preserved in that very place to commemorate its contribution. Sebhat Gebregziaber was married with a women from the Royal family at the time he wrote ‘Letum Aynegalign’. But do you know what he did? He moved to Wube Berha, leaving his sheltered and comfortable life to do research for his story. To live the life of the story he was writing. The result? One of the finest works, and probably the only translated Amharic novel in to an European language, French (Les Nuits d’Addis-Abeba, Paris, Actes Sud coll. Aventures, 2004- ISBN 2-7427-4907-1)

            So, if Gash Sibhat, one of the most renowned writers our country had did this, why not doing the right thing and preserve some history of ‘wube berha’, Sal. whaddya think 😉

          • Amde

            Dear Eyob,

            I am an Addis Abeban born and bred, but I never thought of Wube Bereha in this way. Perhaps I was too young and it had passed its heyday. But you taught me quite a bit – very interesting – thank you.

            When Wube Bereha was brought to my attention, it was relayed to me as a place where anything goes (or at least used to go). I think the book “Mehalye Mehaliy” was about the sexual libertine cuture of the kazanchis area. In that aspect perhaps kazanchis might have taken up after Wube Bereha, but I do not think it has ever had the same cache of cultural transformation as Wube Bereha did.

            And Sal, there is so much demolishment going on in the city, I am afraid the city is going to be a large waste land of concrete blocks. Don’t get me started on this – I have a whole family of pet peeves on Addis’ transformation.

            amde

          • Saleh Johar

            Amde and Eyob, please do not misspell the Italian word. Not Kazanchis, it is Casa INCES, an Italian name for an Italian founded place 🙂

          • Eyob Medhane

            Gash Saleh,

            You really jumped on that one didn’t you? We only know Kazanchis that’s our story and we’re sticking to it… 🙂

            Now, were you disappointed that you didn’t get me on the ‘doro maneqia’ gotcha?

            Speaking of that, you said “…according to what I was told a long time ago…”…Who told you? A “friend” in “doro maneqia”? If so, did you have a friend in doro maneqia? Why were you asking about doro maneqia? Did you hangout in doro maneqia? hummmmmmmmmm 🙂

            See, you brought a lot of questions, which you don’t want to answer upon yourself, Gash Saleh. Now answer the questions. You are under oath…. 🙂

          • Saleh Johar

            No Eyob, in Eritrea we never had a place where people shouted for help in vain. The fact that people would scream HELP and no one would respond intrigued me…until I saw Erri Bekentu 🙂

            the Casa INCES tidbit is actually from the books I read, and something triggers that from the dormant disk.

            Doro Maneqia sounded silly: why would anyone hang a chicken? Once I was in Addis with my late father in-law, an Arada of his time, and a few of his friends. I heard it there–you want to know where? The Piazza cake bet that you do not like 🙂 Honestly though, I though no one came close to making a good cake but one in the nineties SAAY Cake Bet in Bole Road. Now you know who owned that business*.

            Ciao
            * I am kidding before you start another battle 🙂

          • Amde

            Saleh,

            “Doro maneq” in this case means “strangulate a chicken”. As you know, us Orthodox are prohibited from eating animals that have not been slaughtered (i.e. killed in a way where blood is split, and most prefereably accompannied by an invocation of the blessing of the father, son and holy ghost). So in that sense, the culprits are not just petty criminals but almost heathen.

            Now, “doro maneq” can also be translated as “chocking the chicken” but you did not hear it from me. winkitty wink 😉

            Believe it or not, I was going to add that the stories of Wube Bereha probably have a lot of Eritreans as supporting characters. Perhaps you can tease out some stories out of your father-in-law, hmmmm?

            As to kazanchis, that is how we grew up spelling it. We will change when Asmarans change their spelling of komboshatato and kershelli to their appropriate Italian spelling. The reputation of the place now leaves me wondering just what kind of a libertine old Signor Inces was lol.

            amde

          • Eyob Medhane

            Amde,

            Thank you so much…I guess both you and I were born long after wube bereha’s hey day was over. Most of my information comes from ILS catalogue library at Addis Ababa university. The best book to read about that era is a novel by Haddis Alemayehu called ‘Yelm Exzat’. Great book! You’d fall in love it….

            P.S And I also have few pet peeves about some demolishing that is going on in Addis for development…

          • saay7

            Eyob:

            First since you mentioned the period of 1941-1960 and since this might be one of the few chances I get to say a sentence I have been dying to say, thanks for the opportunity, and here’s the sentence:

            “I wasn’t even born then!”

            Now, I was going to keep this a secret, but since you insist, I am in the last chapter of translating Kehadis Alemayehu’s “Feqer eske meqaber” to English. The publisher is not sure whether it should be Harlequin Romance or historical novel.* So Sebhat will have company in the translated-books section:)

            saay

            * or comedy, due to mis-translation:)

          • Eyob Medhane

            Sal,

            Your publisher should reject your work outright, because you don’t even know the name of the author of the original book. His name is ‘Haddis Alemayehu’. Not ‘Kehadis Alemayehu’. If you have read ‘Kehadis Alemayehu’ on the cover of the book, it is to mean ‘Ke Haddis Alemayehu’ or ‘from Haddis Alemayehu’….Tsk Tsk Tsk….

          • saay7

            Eyob:

            Oh, God, most I have laughed all week– guilt-free laughter because it is at my expense. Busted!

            Actually, I really like this website, good-amharic-books.com. I read Amharic books for free…they should have a donate button so I don’t feel guilty:)

            Amde, did you notice how Eyob wouldn’t give in one inch that the tearing down of Addis buildings has political ramifications and the minute you said it he kinda started singing a different tune. I noticed that he is very protective of Harbena Weyanai:)

            KeSal

          • Eyob Medhane

            Sal,

            First, really thank you. That link was a gold mine….there was a book that I was looking for, and there it is…..you exonerate yourself. Now you can translate ‘Fiqer Eske Meqabir”…wait! no! You can’t. Somebody else already did….http://www.amazon.com/Love-Unto-Crypt-Sisay-Ayenew/dp/1418491837

            Really bad translation, but it’s out there… 🙂

            I didn’t change my tune about demolishing, Sal. what are you talking about? I am for preservation of historical areas…that’s what I said and agreed with Amde, no?

          • saay7

            Eyob:

            Thanks for the heads-up on the quality of the translation. Here I was, wallet in hand…check the image for its price.

            Again? Ok: when people agree or disagree with the decision of the State, and they express themselves, it’s a political position. That may take the form of “don’t get me started…” Or, a song that raises awareness… Hi tutu hint hint

            saay

          • Eyob Medhane

            Sal,

            Don’t, don’t you dare to buy that book….I am sorry to that but the translation is the most awful translation that I have ever seen…REALLY AWFUL. The guy needed to understand the book to translate it, but I doubt he even knows what the book is about……Haddis Alemayehu must have turned over in his grave about this “translation”. I am still very upset that I bought that so called (my first time using ‘so called’ book…

          • saay7

            Hey Eyob:

            For today’s music exchange program, meet me at Camera 2 (Jebena page)

            saay

  • Amanuel Hidrat

    Ermi and Thomas,

    Never give up until your body gives up. If you are absolutely sure in your mind that you are right for things you advocate, you just continue to convey your message in different way, using different vehicle, until it gets traction. The struggle of politics is always tough, because it demands sophisticated communication to stick in the mind of others. In politics being right is not enough, it has to cross to the mind of others. You are the future leaders of Eritrea. But you need to develop the following qualities (a) patience (b) communication skills (c) The ability to administer political difference that existed with ion your society. You guys we expect you to develop this qualities in the process of our debate. The task is not easy but you should strive to meet the challenge from your inner instinct. Don’t give up, be persistent in what you do and what you believe in, while you are allowing rooms for negation for the birth of new ideas.

    Hawkum,
    Amanuel Hidrat

    • Thomas

      Hi Haw Emma,

      I am not a politician and I don’t consider what we have is just politics. We are trying to save lives and a nation, for which we paid high price. Some people are tying to wish death to our brothers and sisters inside and across the borders of our neighbor countries. We furiously are our lauding, “Hilinakum Abey Alo, where are our brothers and sisters?”. We will never allow any negotiation with the mass murderers, enough means enough!! It is amazing for us to see some willing to talk about gender equality. We have a country and our people living in chaos. I don’t think there was talk of gender when you were fighting hand in hand with the enemy. The enemy we have inside the country is destryoing everything we own and people want us to play toys with them. Enough is enough, first thing first!!

      • NMS

        Thomas, let me remind you that gender issues are at the forefront of most revolutions, check your history please. Women must feel empowered to join any struggle and in the process, work towards equality and liberation to create a better life for themselves and their daughters—ultimately this affects all women. Basic issues like decision making, leadership, respect, sexual violence and education need to be addressed and are crucial to any successful movement. We are fortunate to have someone like Elsa Chyrum who fearlessly fights the regime on her own terms even while under attack from PFDJ and the opposition. But she is the exception, some of our women feel intimidated and marginalized. Some may even feel above sentiments such as yours, instead choosing quiet strength over public drama, feeling empowered but would rather stay on the sidelines instead of being associated with an opposition that doesn’t respect them. No one is claiming that the emancipation of Eritrean women is more important than deposing PFDJ. But for the latter to become a reality we need the former to not be completely dismissed—as an example, the women of Liberia come immediately to mind. I would urge you to not make grand declarations but to try and dig a little deeper, the movement can only benefit by including more women and will only suffer by denying their needs.

        • Interesting!
          If prople like Elas Churum are recruting the youth to flee from eritrea; and the youth is drawining in the high sea; how is it you are fortunate for you to have pople like Elsa?
          People make up your mind and lets the truth be told.

      • Amanuel Hidrat

        Dear Thomas,
        While I am sharing your concern, avoiding engagement is not the the option. The reason why the opposition camp in status quo is, we don’t know how to engage each other. We all know the limits of the political organizations. But instead of elevating the capacity of the resistance force or becoming an alternative to the weak opposition, we spent all our time on criticism. Criticism is important only when you are contributing towards emboldening them and actively working to change the current discourse.

        Second the crises of Eritrea is “socio-political”. No matter how small it is our engagement in this forum or any other format, it is always political. In other words we are talking about “political administration.” We failed to administer our differences. In fact I am worried whether we could administer our differences even after the removal of the despot. So all our engagement should be to improve in this particular area. Knowing our difference is one thing and administering our difference is another thing. Thomas, we are here to do both of them. These is the reason we are engaging each other. Knowing that you change your messaging and probably your rule of engagement. Know your message and hammer it to cross the mind of others.

        • Thomas

          Dear Amma – It sounds like a scientific research which is to take a very long time (like DIA’s answered to the interviewer/journalist – election could take 3 or 4 decades). It is sad when you see people dying each hour of the day, yet some deciding to talk about the non urgent stuff. Are we not humans? Don’t we see that we are at a very critical period? I mean how urgent can things be for the people to get it?

          • Amanuel Hidrat

            Tommy,

            unfortunately until our people understand the urgency of the problem we are facing, they will have fun on debating side issues and unrelated issues. One or two years ago I was like you out crying to the team as well as to the awatistas. I was told it is open to anything and everything to debate in this forum. I give up on my appeal, but I won’t give up in engaging with my country men and women. The only thing we can do is to fight to bring the issue upfront as often as we can.

            The depopulation of our nation and the risks our young taking is mind boggling, that they are still drowning in the high sea and dying in the sands of Sahara deserts. All these befalling catastrophe can not change our heart and our priority. As sad as it is, we should not stop from engaging. Stay and fight to influence for what we believe is priority. That is all.

            Amanuel Hidrat

  • Saleh Johar

    Amen Marqosai….

  • Saleh Johar

    Ahlan Beyan,

    Over the years, since the days of Dehai, I have noticed that feminism is your favorite subject. You do it so good nobody would notice if you used a female nick 🙂

    You castigated me for using a metaphoric “meat” as a substitute for words I chose not to spell out. I don’t think you would mind had I said “selling their bodies” instead of “selling meat”; but a body is made of meat (flesh), bones, and blood! Beyan, should the words we use be dictated to us by the cultural tyrants at the expense of what we know? That borders on political correctness policing.

    I called their male equivalent Wedini, Skunis, pimps, pickpockets, etc, but you didn’t object to the way I described the men! The female equivalents are well known and I know that in Tigrinya, Arabic, Blin and Tigrayet, Italian, English and a few others if I google enough. You didn’t notice that I chose not to utter those words by including a disclaimer (in the article) that you missed: “I am suppressing the urge to spell the words that describes them, I am resisting it” … and, “Pressured by traditional norms, I never uttered the feminine equivalent of Wedini and Skunis.” And you wouldn’t allow me to use a metaphor!

    Since I have a feeling you will come back with this, let me cut it short with the following:
    If you were to describe the “women [who] stood in front of doors..”, would you call them business women since that is common in the USA? Would you call them “the oppressed women standing in front of doors”? Honestly, what would you call them? A noun please, not an adjective. Certainly not a social or economic analysis. But you did well in picking one word from a 2266 word article 🙂

    By the way, your article would entice people who like fishing; it resembles a fishnet, but I am not in the mood for that today 🙂

  • Amal

    Salam Amanuel, Tes, Semere, Bayan, NMS, miss Flawless (Tsigeered) and all

    This debate about women, emancipation of women so far has been disingenuous. Maybe not intentionally but more because we don’t have the language, mechanisms and culture of talking about this particular subject. It would help the discussion if instead of focusing on why the majority of women appear to be supporting PFDJ to what are the cultural attitudes that prevent women from opposing the PFDJ? That would have been a more fruitful debate.

    We went from Butler’s feminist theories to women in Argentina and even passed by “lesbianism or hairy legism”
    Because we refuse to look in the mirror, we refuse to see ourselves for who we are.

    I have more questions than answer’s to all those that have ironically posed the question ” what have women done to Eritrea?”. I find to answer these line of questioning to be utterly patronizing to the person that asks, cause they know the answer. Nonetheless, instead the question should be: have women EVER had their own vision and agenda in Eritrean politics?

    Let’s admit that we are a traumatized people, men and women alike. For years we didn’t need to look inside, because our enemies were always from without, the threat was always from strangers. But this time the enemy is from within. To win this fight we need to remember who we are! We need to redefine what being Eritrean means first and for most. The feudal culture of “Nehnan Elamanan” ( yes PFDJ is EPLF) that the regime want to shove down our throat needs to be challenged and defeated. Because it’s in that culture we have lost our Eritreaness! When I say that men hate women in Eritrea, I am not talking about the womb! But more to RESPECT the intellect of women, to recognize that women are intelligent beings, that think, that add value.

    Today we have an opposition that acts as a copycat of the regime, it welcomes only women that are willing to act as tools. It’s considered positive if women are dancing in opposition gig and not with the regime? It’s as if, what is upsetting the men on here is not that these women support PFDJ, no it’s more, why are they not with the opposition? But that it. It does not go further than that. This debate is disingenuous because the men on here ( not all) don’t understand that the time of patronizing women with words like “Shikorina” and “Sandalet” is OVER.

    We are all witnessing where men alone for 60+ years being in charge with women as their cheerleaders got us! If the opposition is ever gonna defeat PFDJ, first it has to stop acting like it. And to realize that YOU are going nowhere and achieving nothing without us women. The sooner we have a genuine debate about gender and the position of women in our society the better for our cause.

    *Semere, abayka min Alam 🙂

    • NMS

      ‘Because we refuse to look in the mirror, we refuse to see ourselves for who we are.’

      THIS. Thank you Amal. And thank you to Shum, Mahmud, Marqosai, Amanuel, SAAY, Maytafor and Tes.

      To address what I deem the most obvious reason why this discussion has inspired such offensive and patronizing tones:

      Fear. It’s easy to pretend you care, briefly speculate, nod your head in agreement and quickly move on from a difficult topic. It takes courage to truly examine why archaic patriarchal attitudes like the ones we’ve witnessed still exist. We fail to practice self-reflection and continue to operate with a defensive and inflexible approach, suspicious of anyone not foaming at the mouth because of PFDJ and dismissive of those deemed inferior—in this case women. This stems from fear of change, fear of being questioned and most importantly, fear of being irrelevant. A long standing cultural norm deems it acceptable for men to fiercely debate and the women to either listen or do ‘womanly’ things. There are reasons why some choose to communicate the way they do, this is no accident. And while this could have been a fruitful discussion on how to assess the role of women in the opposition and why some women are still supporting the regime we are instead inundated with language that serves absolutely no purpose except to remind us who are the residents here are and who are the house-guests, a few examples from the past few days are:

      The lovely: ‘The face of the HGDEF koboro junkie is the dominant image of the Eritrean diaspora woman’ (Haile)

      The compassionate: ’So, I kind of feel that the women (just like many of the men too) have not reached the level of conscience to believe that Eritrea can be made a lively place for them and their children as well as all those dying needlessly by going after HGDEF rather than refugee status.’ (Haile)

      The perfect grand generalization: ‘It didn’t move the Eritrean diaspora woman in huge deal. Independence days and Festivals came and went telling pretty much the same story as ever’. (Haile)

      The funny: ’Some people do not understand the urgency of the situation we are in; and are acting like Marie Antoinette, Queen of French, “Let them eat cake, if they can’t afford bread”. Some women just care more about social aspects; and they can be opportunists at times,’ (Thomas)

      And illuminating words like: gossipy, pretentious, feminism lesbianism or hairy legism, meat sellers and the list goes on.

      This is not what I expect from this particular website but sadly, none of it surprises me. Why some women are absent from these discussions is a consequence of the opposition’s perception problem. To jump ahead and fulfill the alleged reformist quota: the current opposition is only attractive to a select few and it has failed to gain supporters (women AND men) because of the way it conducts itself publicly. I can assure you many of the men I disagree with about Eritrean politics are amazing brothers, fathers and husbands–privately. But collectively, this mob mentality of puffing your chest out, marking your territory and rejecting anyone and everyone with a different view, however moderate, however it’s presented and especially if you dislike the messenger–regardless of its merits is the reason why YPFDJ and PFDJ are still immensely popular—they agree and focus on the enemy. Meanwhile the opposition is recruiting more acronyms than activists.

      • haileTG

        NMS – I hope you give yourself a big hug for striking it lucky to get away with so much loaded self serving halewlew. Go on continue your self indulging because you are only dancing to your own tune. I don’t need your rude nonsense as it serves no purpose.

    • Kokhob Selam

      new way, new style, and new face !! Shikorina, I drink cup of milk mixed with one spoon of honey and take rest. Ah, but remember some time it is worth to say it and I say it also “how on earth a women from legal parents dance today with illegal group called PFDJ?”

      “We are all witnessing where men alone for 60+ years being in charge,” tokhsakhitey, Mama !!!

      …nowhere and achieving nothing without us women” I have said it also but that doesn’t mean women all are innocent and stand for truth. Thank you.

    • Semere Andom

      Dear Amal:

      እንታይ ኮይና እታ ሽኮሪና ካብ ጥልያን ተለቒሓ ለቂበላ
      ክትኮነልኪ ሮማንቲካ
      ስአን ሕራይ ትህረም ስበይቲ
      ሽኮሪና ካብ ጸላእኪዪ
      እሞ ዘይብለኪ አትዮ
      ንኽልቴኡ እንተ ዘይርዓምክዮ
      ዓርኮኮባይ፣ ስየ፡ ምዓረይ ክ ክመይ ርኺብክዮ

      አንታ ስብአይ አይትብክ እነድዩ ዘዛርበኒ ዝሎ
      እቲ ሽመይ ክ ዝሃቡኒ አቡዮ ዎ እምየ?
      ንዐኡ አጠዓዒምካ አቓሚምካ እየ ዝብልካ
      እሪትራዊ ስብ አይ ዘይስቆሮካ

      አቃሚምክ ትብልኒ ንኽሽነ ክትመልስኒ?
      አነስ ሽኮሪና እየ ዝብለኪ ክምታ ናይ አዝማሪኖ

      እሞ ሽኮሪና ካብ ጸላእይክዪ
      አዚኽሉ ካብ ጥልያን ተለቂሓ
      ካልኦት አልዋ ዝምነየእ
      ነቲ ሽኮሪና ነቲ በላ
      ከይድልኪ

      ኢታአቕብል ምኑ

      • Amal

        Dear Semere,
        Am waiting for the translation ehm ehem

        • Semere Andom

          Hi Amal:
          To what?

          • Amal

            Semere, If possible Mandarin but for better luck try English …eske 🙂

        • Semere Andom

          Dear Amal:

          What is wrong with shikori-na I borrowed the suffix from Italian
          To make it romantic
          If you do not like shikori-na
          How about I call you “Atiyo”
          If you dispise both
          How about I call your Arkokobay, Siye or “mAray”

          Man that is what I am talking about
          How about calling me by the name my parents bestowed on me
          Sweetening, spicing and seasoning it
          Typical Eritrean man you do not get it

          Did you just say spice it up so you can use me in the kitchen?
          I will call you shikori-na just like an Asmarino
          If you do not like to be called shikori-na
          After all the beging to borrow a suffix fromt from Italian
          There are others who badly want to be called shikori-na and bela
          I Have to go

          Please do not come back

          • Amal

            Semere 🙂 that’s sweet!

            And it’s never Shokarina in this context I am talking about.
            But in our political activism today, these are words used to belittle and undermine women.

            But hey who doesn’t like some spice in their private life. The subject tonight though is not romance. I am sure you get me.

            Wadahanka

  • Thomas

    Awate forum – please consider removing the logo “fearless opposition website” because it is no more making sense. I feel like I am the so called website “Tesfanews.com”. WOW, I did not see this coming. Shabait.com has bought awate.com. Surprisingly, the payment in Nakfa was made probable a few days ago or Shabait.com might have paid in kind. We cannot say much now since the case under investigation.

    • Ermias

      Tommy, yep I hear you my man. This shady characters NMS, Amal etc. were created too to cause more confusion. This website has become ‘operation dismantle the opposition.’

      I am out. Long live HTG.

      Meet me at asmarino!!!!

      • Thomas

        Ermi – good thing we have the asmarino.com intact.

      • Abinet

        Ermi
        What if they are clones of the same person?

        • Amal

          Really?? Soon you will say; surely they must be men! It’s all good, shows where we are as a society. We have a long way to go- is an understatement.

    • Saleh Johar

      Dear Thomas

      Please leave exaggeration aside and make your point without hyperbole. Who knows it could be a useful feedback. The way you are doing it is easy to dismiss as nonsense.

      • Rodab

        H.E. Saleh
        Stopping by to give few words of encouragement.
        You [the staff] really have ‘thick’ skins to continuously be on the receiving end of human emotions and yet never fail to graciously and professionally handle it.
        I admire the patience you guys have. My homage to you!!!!

        • Saleh Johar

          Thanks Rodab,

        • Mahmud Saleh

          Rodab;
          I wonder where you’ve been hiding.

  • aklilu zere

    Dear Marqosai:

    First my greetings. Thanks for your reply.

    I never did and I shall never demean the person of a woman [any] or a man [any] but especially Erirean woman and man. For me they are the good Eritrean woman and the good Eritrean man.

    My cold [as opposed to emotional], short and condensed reply was concerning the PFDJ “woman” who was partying and dancing while the eyes of the whole world was watching in horror at the tragedy in Lampadusa [one small eaxmple]. No one will accept such negligent and abhorent behavior/action from a woman [any woman] in any circumstance. Why? Because a woman is the mother of conscience. As for the PFDJ “man”, because I said he is emasculated”, I will not expect anything good from him.

    In summary, as far as I am concerned,the PFDJ “woman” is anti-woman. One don’t have to be emotional to criticize such a “woman’

    Regards,

    • Tzigereda

      Dear Ato Aklilu Zere,
      How and where do you see the role of the ” good woman” in the opposition camp?
      Thanks.

  • haileTG

    Dear Beyan,

    In all sincerity, I am of the view that such a volatile issue (highly compressed and pressurized canister of generational injustices) would be helped by your type of in depth yet balanced leadership. The complexity in which the issue is intertwined with virtually every aspect of contemporary issues, our inherent deficiencies to fully comprehend it and its multi-layered manifestations at all strata of the socio-cultural psych is too daunting to the average Eritrean man at this juncture. As you correctly identify, that the issue being one of dehumanization that is played out through various ways of devaluation, the devalued being the woman in this case, the victim is not only (rightly so) bitter towards the oppressor but sometimes becomes an unwitting accessory in its perpetuation. SRV (social role valorization) of women requires the breaking of that cycle through promoting of alliances with other oppressed groups. Such an undertaking isn’t easy and you see where it got us to before the get go. The question is how does the victim of gender oppression coalesce with the victim of political oppression for the benefit of both (notwithstanding the obvious overlap of subjects in both groups)? And what form of accommodation would there be for the natural alliance among gender victims on both sides of the political isles and the confusion this creates in attempts to forge alliances with the political oppression victim who has an obvious problem with otherside of the political isle albeit a gender oppression victim? Very difficult scenario indeed especially considering our over all level of social consciousness. I would readily admit that I am very much a learner on this issue and would welcome your elaborations (basically the role of the PFDJ woman , her being the natural ally of the oppressed woman but part of the oppressor for the politically oppressed man:) Regards

    • NMS

      Haile–interesting questions but I have some questions for you: Why did it not occur to you to pose similar questions to any of the women that have been active on this forum–at least 3 if I’m not mistaken? Or include them in your response to Mr. Negash for first hand insight? Especially since you are specifically asking about the role of women in their own victimization.

      • Bayan Nagash

        NMS, common now. Is it possible that it didn’t dawn on Haile TG until he read the piece I penned – is that not a likely scenario? Dialogues and discourses evolve, and the man is coming with excellent questions that are worth contemplating. If you would read Haile TG’s piece in question again, you will notice he has brought forth in clear terms the complexities gendered issues bring forth when they are embedded in the realms of political oppression, such as in how to align the “political oppression” and within that gambit rest also myriad oppressions, one of which, of course, is what he mentioned: gender oppression as it happens was and is the central question being addressed. So, NMS, how about giving Haile GT’s questions a shot – I will try my best to address it on my next comment. Gotta get going now.
        Beyan/Bayan

        • Ermias

          Good one beyan. To some it is a gotcha game. But it is hard to get Haile to get tripped on his own words. He is one careful and deliberate lad.

        • NMS

          Thank you Bayan, I will most certainly give this the thought it deserves and respond. My question was posed to Haile because it’s my understanding this discussion was a genuine attempt to engage both genders. I can understand why it may have seemed confrontational but that was not the intention. I asked the question because I can’t speculate on the intentions of others. I look forward to reading your response.

          • Mahmud Saleh

            NMS;
            Thank you for understanding the situation. I think we need to encourage each other to move towards better understanding and towards better territory. I commend HTG recent comment. He seems to understand the complexity of the issue but he is seeking for help. I’m confident Beyan is going to come up with an educational reply for all of us. And remember, we are all junks (sorry for the word) when it comes to gender issues; at least, so I think of myself.So let us (men and women) chip in in enhancing our understand and certainly HTG’s understanding of the issue. A clash of ideas is fine as long as the total sum is better than the original ones.

          • NMS

            how refreshing, thank you Mahmud.

      • haileTG

        NMS – deeper questions require deeper trust of one another. To be frank with you I have not reached the level of trust with those sisters (even you included) to ask next level questions. I trust in being truthful and truth would protect me, so let me spell it out to you.

        My few interactions with you has left me as much suspicious of you as you are of me, as much judgmental of you as you’re of me and as much questioning of your intents as you do of mine.

        My political solidarity with Tzigereda is in place, in this topic she has impressed on me that she thinks I am out to get women. No point going further until she comes to terms with the fact that I am as much confused and oppressed brother of hers as she is sister of mine. No point pushing issues ahead of the right time.

        My few readings of Amal leaves me with the impression of a sister who be (justifiably) very angry and contemptuous of the men in our society (and clearly in the opposition). I am always ready to adjust my views if corrected but that is the impression I am left with. It wouldn’t hurt to let time reveal a better picture of us to the other as we continue to read one another. But it is to early and unfortunately we have not established the trust needed to talk in deeper and substantive levels.

        Beyan has been around for some time. I had the opportunity to read and interact with him. Over time I began to trust him and feel no threat whatsoever with his difference of opinion with me because I had reached a level of trust that would allow me to positively listen to what he says and learn from that, I am emboldened to ask him questions. If he tells me OK Haile move on that is a crazy question, the trust is there to laugh it off and do as he says.

        Dr Sara is some one I need to read more about. I didn’t really know her much before the last few weeks. And we haven’t ever directly interacted really so no point directing a random question to her.

        So, my point here is that what we say and how we say it to one another would determine the level of trust we would have towards each other which would in turn determine the depth of discussion. Hence, trust determines depth in short.

        Regards

        • NMS

          Thanks for keeping it real Haile, I really appreciate your response. Just to clarify, I see no need to have to trust you or anyone else on a public site designed to encourage debate with strangers. Unless we are here to talk to ourselves or only to people who agree with us, I would expect everyone to share their ‘truth’–as you stated above ‘the truth will protect me’. I hope we can all abide by this.

          • haileTG

            NMS trust meaning whether you are here to debate or grind an ax. For the latter is only intended to wear-down the other. I am not proposing you trust me for anything else. Your vibs against me so far has only put me in alert.

          • NMS

            And your language has not exactly inspired civility yet some of us managed to remain engaged. Besides, by your own admission you are only distrustful of the women–no surprise here. Your response was arrogant and condescending but I still respect the honesty, that was my point.

  • Mahmud Saleh

    Dear Bayan;
    Thank you for picking out a part that, perhaps, our biased male-brain failed to identify. I agree with you on the root cause of prostitution. You penned an excellent article on gender; it’s educational for most of us. Thanks again.

  • Amanuel Hidrat

    Haw Beyan,

    Well said. very interesting perspective. Keep on.

  • Maytafor

    An excellent article, dear SGH.

    As an individual who is involved in the opposition movement, I can tell you that those who desire and are capable of taking a shot at importing a SATAEO are becoming overwhelmed by the tactless and emotional (a “Nkhid TraH” version of the opposition) and underwhelmed by either the silence or lack of adequate supporters of a sensible and strategic approach. The challenge for the sensible activists is how to courageously stand against those who confuse emotional exorcism for a legitimate opposition and convincingly convey the absolute and uncompromising necessity that the Delayi FitHi has to transition into a Teqalasi FitHi by becoming, among other things, Alami Mela. In brief, we need to invest our energy into becoming a portal through which a glimpse of the future Eritrea is communicate in such a way that it inspires people to march alongside us. Saay7’s “Diffusion of Innovation” is a brilliant tool that can be used in crafting the message by understanding our intended audience first. And yes, if we are wooHwooHing in their faces, even if they abandon the regime, they will definitely not be joining our movement. Why? Because we got personal and they, just like us, are humans with feelings. Having said that, however, my primary concern at this point is more with the “Majority Turned Off” than with the “Silent Majority”….

    Disclaimer: the “righteous indignation” of the “Delayi FitHi” is understandable and justifiable, but we must learn to ask ourselves some serious questions and at the top of the list is: are we channeling our indignation to unburden ourselves or to reach and touch the conscience of those on the other side?

    • NMS

      ‘In brief, we need to invest our energy into becoming a portal through which a glimpse of the future Eritrea is communicated in such a way that it inspires people to march alongside us.’

      Excellent!

      At the very least this requires us to self-evaluate, be honest about our intentions, check the baggage at the door and work cohesively with those that share our vision.

      • Maytafor

        Absolutely, NMS. It must start with a series of serious self-introspection.

    • Ermias

      Dear Maytafor,

      Some of what you said sounds quite good specially that we need to be ‘a portal through which a glimpse of future Eritrea is communicated…’

      In my opinion, however, the “Majority Turned Off” are the same as the “Silent Majority.” I say this because the majority of the Eritrean people were extremely supportive of IA and EPLF/PFDJ up to very recently. But eventually the majority got completely turned off (that is act one) and now they are silent (act two), they were not silent but cheerful and supportive of the regime and I can only imagine for the majority to finally unite and throw this regime down the cliff (act three).

      • Maytafor

        Selam Ermias,

        My apologies for not clearly conveying what I meant by “Majority Turned Off”. I was actually referring to the activists who stood against the regime or those who had every intention of doing so but couldn’t find or were discouraged by the modus operandi of some of the opposition movements and, consequently, opted to disengage. The subjectivity inherent in the question of “What is a sensible means of struggle?” can be minimized by asking some piercing questions that strip down the layers down to what is the most effective, progressive, sustainable and principled way of fighting back.

  • Hayat Adem

    Dear friends,
    I’m now realizing how far I’ve been left behind when I found myself unaware as to when and how the debate between Sal and HaileTG evolved to reach such a sharpened apex about a range of important issues.
    Sal, good luck with that and I’ll stay put following you how you will come out from that.
    I want to comment on only one aspect of your defense package: “I proposed [PFDJ without DIA] because I came to believe that the list of Eritrea’s victims includes the PFDJ; I proposed it because it is one of the few institutions we have;…”
    Well, but that “one of our few institutions” is the very problem we have right now. Also your point about including PFDJ among the victimized is amazingly nonsensical. You can’t defend a culprit while it is on an active mode of victimizing others. Behind the essence of victims and victimizers is just power- the power of victimizing others; and the powerlessness to defend one self.
    The following story might fit well Sal absurd position: a young man was charged with a crime of murdering his parents. The court found him guilty. He was asked if he has anything to say to the court for consideration to ease up the sentence on him. The criminal said, “yes, your honor: I am orphaned”.
    Hayat

    • Amanuel Hidrat

      Hayatom,

      I will take this note for today: “You can’t defend a culprit while it is on an active mode of victimizing others”. How difficult it is for bright minds and well articulate like our “Saay ” could miss the living reality in the nation of ours? I can’t comprehend and am still puzzled, Saay to argue on “PFDJ-without-Issayas”, while the PFDJ is the sole organization that threw his family members to the dungeon.

      Dear Saay,

      PFDJ-without-issayas is not a change and will never be a change. PFDJ is a political system with its political culture that includes their value system (their ideology and their administrating philosophy). One good question to you my friend is, in order to check your alternative, who are the PFDJ-without-issayas, for there will be also PFDJites in the ranks and files as well as in the leadership who want to continue the legacy of Issayas? What is the ideology of the “PFDJ-without-Issayas”? What is your assurance to the public that the PFDJites will change their political behavior to any other political outlooks? Don’t tell me as a reason, that Issayas is also throwing PFDJ members into a prison. Those PFDJ-members (who are sent to jail) are not in anyway show the metamorphosis of PFDJ culture to a new political culture. They are sent on changes of their own views.

      Dear friend, your strategy looks a costly camouflaged strategy of PFDJ to say the least. Because “you can’t defend the culprit” organization that victimize your family in particular and the Eritrean people in general. God wills I will right short article on this subject, after my response to YG’s recent article, that will come in few days.

      Regards,
      Amanuel Hidrat

      • Peace!

        Hi Emma,

        What about the ordinary PFDJ who are fighting along side the opposition against DIA to reclaim the country and the freedom they fought for over thirty years, are you going to weed them out too?

        Regards

        • Amanuel Hidrat

          Dear Peace,

          I think you haven’t followed my argument with Saay when we argue on how the transitional period should be. If you remember when he asked me to give him a summary point on how the transition will be, I made it clear to the extent I will not be against the existence of PFDJ as a party, if members want it to keep and continue with it in the “Hadas Eritrea”. Those former PFDJ who are with us in the fight are fighting with delieti fithi, I believe they abhor the PFDJ system and want to change the system they had. Therefore they deserve their rights be respected.

          I don’t like the word “weed out” for it has bad connotations. You don’t weed out a system you dismantle it. I use always a political term “dismantle the system”. To dismantle the system doesn’t in anyway means to weed out the members of PFDJ. They have the right to exercise their view on plain level field, with other possible political organizations on agreed constitutional document that every Eritrean could defend it (not the 1997 constitution) and ruled by rule of law. I made it clear so many times my position. Eritreans to be reconciled they need new system and new constitution. Anything less of that Eritrea will continue in turmoil. Just have it in your record now as to what my position is.

          Amanuel Hidrat

          • Hayat Adem

            Good take, Emma.

      • Aman once the great SAAY asked you the way to bring change with out with out includung pfdj and for the record you have not answered it. Sure you mumbled something about orange revolution in Georgia but that want as a joke. Now you are still at it. Again can you please tell us how change is achieved with out including pfdj? Even if you followed Haile’s plane; a change by mid officers;guess what those officers are pfdj. So sir; can you stop being stubern and tell us how change is Posible with out participation of pfdj. Sir!

    • Kim Hanna

      Selam Adem,
      .
      You have been missed. I have been waiting for you or Pappilion to show up and with the usual flair to calm things down a bit. I am really shocked that you are taking sides and fanning it more.
      As you might guess this is not my normal time of showing up to comment on this forum. Most of the time I am not sure if I have understood the topic of discussion sufficiently.
      .
      Now, I am not here to defend saay, God knows the man can talk a cat out of a dairy. I think I have to ask you, Hayat Adem, the main question and that is: Do you really believe ALL (insert the number) the members of PFDJ are victimizers. (my suspicion is membership includes people who are in it for themselves, fearful if they are not, waiting for better days and preying, waiting for credible leaders, those who don’t know what is going on…etc)
      .
      If you agree with my suspicion, then what saay appears to be saying is let us get rid off Mengistu first and then we will deal with the few lieutenants of Mengistu in Kerchele later on. Not only it is a fair way but we will need most of member bureaucrats in the aftermath. It also avoids the unknown, unknown. What is wrong with that kind of thinking?.
      .
      Respectfully submitted.
      K.H

      • Hayat Adem

        “Do you really believe ALL (insert the number) the members of PFDJ are victimizers?” K.H
        A reverse question to K.H: do you really believe DIA is the only problem in PFDJ? I don’t suspect you of possibly answering that in the positive but to show you the fact that not Sal nor me were referring to individual members. The talk was about PFDJ as an institution. PFDJ is a political institution that has assumed an exclusive government power, (an absolute power control) and using it destructively against national aspirations and the ppl. Political institutions are organizations which create, enforce, and apply laws and policies in reference to a recognized structure of rules and principles and practices within which or without which things are allowed or disallowed to happen. Nobody is saying every PFDJ member is criminal. Nobody is even saying every institution in the PFDJ government has to be demolished. But the core work values and structures of PFDJ, the very basic system that defines it to be one, have to be replaced as a system with a progressive and inclusive one.
        Like you, I like and respect Sal. But the best way I want to be understood is in terms of whether I am talking sense or not. It must not be based on whether I am taking sides which is unavoidable if it is about an either-or type contrasting ideas. But I never thought of myself as always being against Sal. On this one issue, I agree with him that DIA is a problem. But he stops there and I continue on listing some more. I also think monkey is a problem, charley is a problem. wedi kassa too, kisha too, the guys who are trafficking our youth, the guys who are dehumanizing our youth in sawa and in every enslavement projects, guys who designed and manned and run EraEro. But it is more about the system which always more than one man at the top and more than the total number of individual members in the system. Speaking of members, I am not as bitter or as mindful about the kebero junkies and individuals like Nitricc, not even the guys are policing the imprisoned. But pfdj must mean more than one individual or few individuals. It is a whole value system that hosts enablers that hold it functioning.
        Also respectfully,
        Hayat

        • Kim Hanna

          Selam Hayat,
          .
          Thank you for your reply. I do understand you better.
          I used the name Mengistu to highlight that his party, his government and his security apparatus appeared invincible at one time. Leaders with wisdom and intelligence came and saved the country.
          .
          The time will come, I hope and prey for all of us the good guys with wisdom will be their to lighten the burden of the people.
          Thank you again.
          .
          K.H

          • Hayat Adem

            Thank you, too. Mengistu and his party he built and led (WPE) were removed. The system were replaced with a new and better one.

            Hayat

  • Tzigereda

    Dear Awatistas,
    Out of Eritrea..enjoy it!

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=hg3umXU_qWc

    • Amal

      Dear T,
      Don’t waste your time! This discussion is not about women, gender or women in the opposition.. As usual it’s about our men and their inflated ego’s nothing more nothing less.

      • Tesfabirhan WR

        Dear Amal,

        Do not let these men[Junkie] that you are talking about to talk on behalf. We have many things in our junk shop. This is what we do as you said assuming that we are doing something useful though meaningless. If you do so, again you will leave the floor for us while we are not invited guests (In reality it is happening) and as always bark. Expose our ignorance and hallucination. Tell us that what we do is wrong, just a fulfillment of our ego, a kind of lust generated while a solder(man) is in a trench. A 2-3 minutes men climax is of course not enough for women’s orgasm. As such, do not let your pain to simply vanish, use all means, a fare play.

        Solution: Talk then, expose and belittle our only and only one box. Spend your time and give us the juice that you can and in deed you can.

        Awatistas: I am sorry to break my vacation. Just I am sending a scratch message in hurry to say for our women, “Fight” Even, women have to pass through the test of Litmus Paper. Again going back to my meditation cave.

        • Semere Andom

          Tes:
          I told you do not take your computer 🙂

      • Amanuel Hidrat

        Dear Amal,

        You are giving new breath to our debate. Please stay engaged. I have been watching you in the last few days and your perspectives adds new dimension in to our political discourse.I can tell you many of us are enjoying your take. Together, whether women’s issue or other national we will make changes in the mind of Eritreans. Please stick with us.

        Hawki,
        Amanuel Hidrat

      • Semere Andom

        Dear Amal:
        Like Serray I almost called you Alam, but it was not a typo in my case:-)
        Actually the forum lurched into this debate when Serray in passing said to Sal that the Eritrean women are PFDJ supporters and your truly complemented him on tacking this taboo. And like any other debate it veered, carined and degenerated to some extent. But it was not about that rude, belligerent and insensitive Eritrean man.
        The EPLF women’s organization is alomsot 40 years old and to this date there is not significat contributions that elevated women, the tegadalai has not diluted his rudeness and belligerence of that average Eritrean man, women need to awaken that giant lurking in them instead of blaming it all on the Eritrean man, the seedlings that has germinated recently are promising but do not rest on your laurels.

        You have all the tools and means to liberate the Eritrean man, what has the woman done so far? What bothers me the most is when the idea of women’s emancipation by the women tegadaliti is reduced in matching the belligerent man’s in sexual promiscuousity and subjecting women to the servitude of the so called national service, to masculinate them

        The Erittrean woman is resilient and the Eritrean man is impotent without her, their contribution is indelible in the armed struggle and this is not from the EPLF condescending literature. I believe your fight is against those who give you the bad name such as that proverbial “koboro” woman and the Sophias, who exude characteristics unbecoming of an Eritrean woman, or any human in their vulgarity and cruelty, that is the toughest fight and sorry to say that many women in the grace them by standing ovations to these woman, opposing these vulgarity needs no “nqhat” or winning over, it is in every human heart to tell evil from good and the opposition or the man cannot be blamed for not enlightening the women who clap and legitimized these events.
        Yes the debate is about the emancipation of the Eritrean woman, who not only has the inalienable right but paid heavily for that elusive dignity and freedom from the dual yokes that burdened her for generations.

    • Mahmud Saleh

      Dear Tzigereda;
      I’m not patient in watching long videos, but this one was worth it. Thank you for linking it up here. I encourage Awatistas to view it.

      • Tzigereda

        Dear Mahmud,
        Thank you, I wish I could post a shorter one, she speaks for all MEN & WOMEN in this world.

  • Mahmud Saleh

    Salam Saleh Johar;
    Good reading, good title (although I am not Asmarino), you need to say something next time about your drawing skills/background too. I have seen some of your drawings and they look great. So, a political columnist, a novelist, a poet, an artist, a businessman, a ሓርበኛ/ተጋዳላይ/ኣቶ/…ሳልሕ! carrying more titles than mengustu! Thank you, it’s really a good read, a typical Negarit!! (Just between us), I found out it was negarit late in the evening. I saw the title and just assumed it was one of Aklilu’s ( since he’s been after the Italians), I do really enjoy Aklilu writings too. So, I thought it would be for bed reading. Well, it’s summer, the heat is to be blamed.

  • Mahmud Saleh

    Dear Awatistas;
    Just an opinion: I suggest that when we do political pronouncements, each of us do them in away they represent his or her political view. Most of us are posing ourselves as representatives or spokespeople of the opposition; most of us are showing signs of intolerance to small differences; most of us are becoming jumpy at going personal. Nobody should tell how the other should frame his/her statement. It’s up to the other debater to produce a counter argument, ask for a clarification or just ignore it. We need to show readers (all of them, including PFDJ) that we are different from PFDJ; we need to display those good qualities we say are missing in the PFDJ camp. We may disagree without disrespecting each other. There is no screening to tell us who is genuine opposition and who is fake; except those veteran justice fighters/writers we know, the rest of us have no real names or addresses and yet we act as if we have the sole screening authority calling others names and labeling them the way the heated moment imposes upon us. For disclosure: I use my real name. I also know about 4-5 veterans of this site who are known by their real names The rest frankly are unknown, voices behind veils. How could someone who lives behind nicknames/masks attack others they cowards or not patriotic enough? Staying behind masks or assuming nicknames is anybody’s right but please don’t address us as if you are representing the whole opposition. We are equal here. I will commit myself in representing myself only and not to imply as if I am speaking on behalf of a certain group. Those who represent certain political group, tell us which group you represent. What’s been happening here is that folks are popping up, including myself, and labeling others as unpatriotic, hgdf,..wayane,etc. I think it’s important we use the pronoun ” I” instead of its plural form “we” in endorsing or defending an idea. It’s also important we recognize that any amount of time we waste in attacking each other, it’s an opportunity for PFDJ to attack us all; any moment we are locked in fighting each other is a loss on our side while it’s a gain and a moment of celebration on the other side. I know, I’m not so innocent to say that; but I can tell you, I have learned my lesson; I miss brother Amanuel Hidrat. That’s what heated debates do when they veer out of control, ( they separate good people).. Regarding SAAY and HTG, Forum participants have already read your positions and Gadi has adequately addressed it and above all women participants have discussed it. Let’s move on friends. Thank you Ermias for voicing similar advice.

    • haileTG

      Dear Haw Mahmud,

      I will take the advice of quickly moving on from disagreements. The other general remarks you made are fair although I would also like add that there many complex things happening out there in the ground. Let’s give every form of opposition a room. I would one thing that would help the prospect of calm dialog here, to err on the honorable thing to do and take them for their words because that is all we use to exchange our views. However way it is done, I don’t think any more than enlightening each other is achieved in forums such as this. And I am sure that has its contribution in the big schemes of things however significant or not. Thanks again.

      • Mahmud Saleh

        HTG;
        I appreciate that. I understand the need to leave room for participants to air their opinions while keeping their anonymity. It just gets unpleasant and disadvantageous when it gets personal, because you become basically a sitting duck. I hope we all display magnanimity in treating each other. Thanks.

  • NMS

    The Awate team needs to find a way to move this comment up-thread. Thank you Marqosai!

  • Ermias

    Dear HTG and SAAY,

    There is no question in my mind that you both have the best of interest for the Eritrean people in general. We can all see that you two have extremely sharp differences in some issues. Knowing full well your cool demeanor in each of you, I just want to reiterate for you guys to continue to keep it civil and debate the issues you have differences about. Please refrain from going years back and referencing who said what and believed what. Please stay focused on the women issue and how fruitless the opposition has been (SAAY) and how effective it has been (HTG). The implications of each accusation are profound and I hope to see a quick resolution and clarification from each. I am hoping what HTG is saying is in accurate but I am afraid there is a bit of truth to it. My hope is that we are somehow misunderstanding SAAY.

    It’s good to engage but again please continue to keep it to the issues and not on any personal matters.

    • haileTG

      Selamat Ermi

      If I were you I would head to the closest bunker because WWIII is upon us 🙂 (haha..OK chill no danger of what you fear). Actually, quoting or recollecting old stuff is something I only use in extreme rarity when the point I am making could never have been said otherwise (without the reference). Other than that I try to avoid that for the simple fact that what ever was said or claimed in the past is part of the other prevailing situations at that time and isn’t a good fit to current discussions. Another point I was meant to clarify to you before I forget is regarding your good advice for me to provide supporting links to some of “profound” claims I make. I actually use to write along with such links but later fell to the habit of making a statement and leaving it to the reader to request for a link or other forms of verification. Partly this happens because i need to dig out the supporting source and I guess that is the advantage of being a commenter, getting away without footnote references.

      I think saay can verify this to you but we have had many disagreements in the past too. This one is taking place at a very precarious time in our history and our people getting increasingly desperate. I do understand things may likely flare up from time to time, but rest assured, we will get through this too.

      Regards

    • Ermias cut bull crap and get to it. what was you are keeping to your chest about something YG said about awate or SAAY. First you better learn to come clean your self before you can preach to others what to and how to interact. Again you are the one you took side and blame SAAY now why are you flip-flapping? To be honest with you no one need your advice; let alone Haile and SAAY; because you have no stand. You are a moving target; wishy whasy. Now, what is that your are keeping up on your chest about something your master YG said? Come cleannnnnnnnn.

      • Ermias

        Nitricc, I am still waiting for you to receive your second brain cell before I can engage you. What happened to your other characters recently – hope, tafla, araya, house of stark, SM….you killed them all?

        • Ermias if you think i am that dumb aren’t you insulting the people you have listed? Lol please don’t elevete me to those epeopl’s stutes. Please apologize to those people.

  • Eyob Medhane

    Ermi,

    I know you are a football fan,

    Please watch and support Ethiopian national team with Brazilian premier league. LIVE now…

    http://www.ethiotube.net/EthiopiaVsBrasiliense

    • Ermias

      Eyoba, I missed it as I was tired after work. I will check the highlights. Thank you! I hope you enjoyed it.

  • Thomas

    Hi Ermi – lol. I think the two words characterize Nitricc. I mean he sounds fara hagererseb & fara. Imagine, he never heard of an Eritrean by the name “Thomas”. There are some who just crossed cities and got to know names Thomas, Daniel, Simon, Nathaniel, Samuel, Robel, Aaron/Aron, Yeseph to mean Joseph etc. I always wonder if I can meet with Nitricc and find anything in common to communicate with. I have to tell you, but I can relate with anyone hagereseb/country man or otherwise. I can tell Semere Andom is hagereseb, but I am sure we could have found things to talk about:)

    • Semere Andom

      Hi Tomas:What is up?

      Me and Nitricc in one paragraph? Also do not start me in Eritrean names you will lose hands down, if you think am bluffing ask SAAy:-)

      Here is for your
      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qCOBrel4uJ8

      • Thomas

        Thanks Semere Andom. I guess now I stand corrected:)

    • Maytafor

      Selam Thomas. You are joking, right? 🙂

  • saay7

    Abu Selah:

    You were talking about how we are unable to use the Ghedli model… I will ask this of you, Emma, Kokhob Selam, and Mohammed Saleh: did they insult those who haven’t responded to their message? Or did they reference to them (at least publicly) as people who are wrongly-aligned with the enemy but that, in due time, will awaken and align with the people?

    You were referencing marketing and branding. In marketing, as you well know, there is the concept of “diffusion of innovations”, a bell curve that tells us how quickly people accept a new idea. Put on your marketing hat: if we take the product, in this case, to be: “The Isaias regime is a menace to Eritrea!”, how quickly do people accept this new idea? In standard marketing, the segmentation is as follows:

    innovators: 2.5%
    early adopters: 13.5%
    early majority: 34%
    late majority: 34%
    laggards: 16%

    A company that pitches its products only to the innovators and early adopters will go out of business. A company that insults the early majority and late majority for being too slow, will go out of business. It is quite ok for the innovators to make fun of the early/late majority for being too slow to accept an idea, but those who have taken the responsibility of propagating the idea (Isaias and his regime are menace to Eritrea and they must be disempowered) cannot indulge themselves in such guilty pleasures.

    Why do those who support the regime still do? Does a Diaspora Woman (clad in the flag and beating her koboro) say, “let them die! they deserve it!” when she hears of Eritrean youth who have perished in the Mediterranean? Or does she accept the argument put forth by PFDJ propaganda that it is the work of the US, Ethiopia and the opposition? If it is the latter, do we have an obligation to effectively address the PFDJ propaganda or do we just write her off?

    It so happens that an Eritrean lady conducted a small survey of Eritrean women who are at various stages of separation from the Eritrean regime but haven’t taken the final step (I hope she gets to publish it.) Here’s what was shared with me:

    1. Fear of repercussions (isolation)

    2. Fear of denial of entry to Eritrea
    3. Fear of the opposition agenda

    All of it is driven by fear. When we insult them, attack them, we are just adding one more fear factor.

    What I find most stunning is that some of the fire-breathing forum-writers are pen-name warriors and they are very sympathetic to (1) and (2) above but are able to completely compartmentalize it just before they get on the soap box.

    saay

    • SAAY people are afraid of the opposition. At least I belong to the fear of opposition category. PFDJ can be straighten out and reformed by just calling an election; implementing the constitution and realizing the prisoners; the end of story! How do you fix the so-called opposition? Let’s assume PIA and his government is out of power by the extreme prayer of the hard core anti PFDJ individuals; that is all they could do; pray, then what? Which opposition is to assume power? What is the national program of the so-called opposition who is assuming power? The questions and the scenarios are freighting. How exactly is anyone to blame the majority for not following the so-called opposition? First get an opposition that has a program; national vision and NOT associated with TPLF. Then and only then you can argue or criticize the majority who is flipping the finger to the opposition.
      Again what is the opposition has to offer? What? Insulting PIA does not qualify for an answer. Think about it?

      • saay7

        Nitricc Haw Selas:

        Since:

        (a) Isaias Afwerki is a rigid man who is incapable of change and hasn’t had a single original idea in decades (by your own admission);
        (b) it is wrong and unforgivable to detain, and hold without charges, citizens for decades (by your own admission);

        What is the minimum requirement that an opposition organization must meet before you decide to take a chance on it and turn your back against a man and a system that is idea-dry and imprisons your fellow citizens?

        saay

    • Semere Andom

      Brother Sal:

      I know you are only calling on the former tegadalti, but I intrude and teg Mahmud will disagree
      First I am not sure about the ELF, but the EPLF did insult those who did not respond to their massage: For example after “Nadew Ez” was destroyed, they had a campaigned, “lomi zyketet bdewu km zimote”, after Massawa was occupied by EPLF in 1990 they intimated, shamed those who did not join, whether you were member of “hafash wudubat” or not, they threatened that you will not set a foot in Eritrea tomorrow and the list goes on and on. Actually EPLF mass organizations insulted those who were not heeding their massage. And those who joined in 1990 they insulted them as “wogahata”, cowards who joined after the dawn. So what kind of questions is that, maybe they were not insulting folks in the west back then but insult is their (EPLF) implement
      As the analogy of marketing to our case, I am not sure it makes sense because this works only in a new product, some are just love thing and they love innovation, some wait shrewdly to see what it can do for them, but the PFDJ is not a new product and almost all Eritreans know what it does to them, but the majority are not opposing it openly at least. But opposing openly

      Yes, some of the women clad in gold and flag say those cruel words and it seems that you are quoting them verbatim and yes some buy into the lies of PFDJ

      • Mahmud Saleh

        My friend Sem A;
        We’ve witnessed even the great SAAY and HTG went off their planned route, making the debate personal, that’s for another day. But since I feel I have known you very well, I will take some moments to get you to say, ” Sorry for the shataHtaH business,” to all Awatistas TG. And yet, this is another shataHtaH! Here is a friendly correction:
        1. “ሎሚ ዘይከተተ ብደዉ ከም ዝሞተ” was not intended or used to insult people; rather, it was intended to invoke nationalist sentiments thereby mobilizing much needed resources. Eritrean society folklore are full of such battle-cries; go to kebesa or metaHt, you will find plenty of songs and stories of villages, regions, tribes,etc. that tell how our people mobilized themselves to protect their territories; it’s not even unique to us; it’s been done throughout history by all types of societies. I don’t hold it against you, since you didn’t get the opportunity to grow up in your native habitat. If you check the history of the US (closer to you) you will find similar calls during conflicts (Civil War, Spanish, Mexican wars, WW I, WWII…). You admit that you dodged that call; that’s OK Semere, but others (thousands of them) heeded the call. They would not join us if they felt insulted.

        2. “…. whether you were member of “hafash wudubat” or not, they threatened that you will not set a foot in Eritrea tomorrow and the list goes on and on.”

        Let me just say, this is one of your shetaHtaH, or “white lie” (Gadi), ሕማቕ መዓልቲ ውዒልካ። ኩባያ ቡን ወስ ኣብል ኢኻ። And let SAAY get this since he was here at that time and is more learned about the “Hafash wudubat” thing. I don’t know why he chose to die “standing!” SAAY ዓርከይ! ኣልጊበ ክገብረልካ! (ከምዚ ገበረሎም ‘ባ ጎሚዳ..ንሰመረ ተመሪጻ ኣላ።)

        3 “.And those who joined in 1990 they insulted them as “wogahata”, cowards who joined after the dawn.”

        Sem Arkey, you’re mixing street, or shall I say, mieda jokes with official policies. Let me give you an example: in the mid 70s, when I joined the revolution, there was this saying “Hurya gheribah,” you know what it means, but for those who don’t speak Arabic, it’s similar to wegaHta. Since the war was closing in to the capital Asmara, anyone who joined the revolution around 1975 was nicked Hurya gheriba. (They were jokingly telling the new recruits that they were lucky because they joined the revolution close to its finality). Of course, it was a joke; it took us 16-17 more years to liberate Eritrea. Again, it wasn’t meant as an insult, it was tegadeltis jokes. The official line remained to be the same: both organizations knew it was up to them to educate (ምንቃሕ) those who needed more education. In many cases, even villages and areas that had aligned with enemy were treated with care. This doesn’t mean there weren’t erroneous policies or officials who screwed up some good policies which resulted in isolating some segments of our people. But measures of corrections were taken. The bottom line is: ሰመረ ዓርከይ፡ don’t accuse the victims, look yourself in the mirror and see if there is some work to be done, some cleaning here, and some embellishments there. Check your strategies and policies, if you have one, and see if you could make them more appealing, more tailored at winning those who’ve been fooled and abused by PFDJ. It needs seriousness. Blame campaign hasn’t worked; it won’t work.
        Have fun with the marketing portion of your argument with saay.

      • saay7

        Selamat Sem:

        I introduced the marketing concept because SJG, Ermias and Haile TG were talking about branding, remember? They were discussing some kind of mascot to symbolize the oppo. So, kab saEsaEkas teqotSatSe and apply all the principles of marketing, no?

        Sem, “lomi zeyketete bdewu kem zimote”, “gobez do ywaze Addi keyHaze”, “Asmerana bdergi do tHlo? lom zeben Hadiu alo!” were more inspirational than threatening. But let’s really unwrap what you said:

        “the majority are not opposing it open at least.”

        This is your conclusion. The logical follow-up question is, (a) what is it that we in the opposition are doing that is moving the needle? (b) what is having no impact? (c) what is making things even worse?

        One of the best speeches that SGJ gave was in his tribute to Ahmed Mohammed Nasser in his eulogy. (I can say nice things about him now because he has stepped away.) SGJ asks the audience, paraphrased, “did all of you wake up at the exact same time today? Chances are you didn’t. Similarly, different people have different political awakening…”

        I think somewhere in the PolSci 101 is that you never blame the people for your failures; you assess yourself and ask what can I do different. You may conclude that you have done nothing wrong and you are just ahead of your time, but not before you ask yourself. And when, despite all the abuse that the people are subjected to, we haven’t gotten to the tipping point, it is frustration substituting for righteous indignation when we make even asking questions a taboo.

        Finally, I don’t know what you mean by “you are quoting them verbatim”? What am I quoting?

        saay

    • Saleh Johar

      Tegadalay Saay,

      In corporations, there are departments or units that specialize, or are tasked with specific aspects of the operation/marketing. A salesperson is tasked with making the hard sell and increase volume, the financial person is tasked with optimizing expenses and saving, the personnel administration is tasked with making sure talents are kept and moral stays high, production makes sure the product line runs at the maximum speed.

      Similarly during the struggle era, the cadres preached, “ahwatna enduyom, they will realize their mistake, etc,.” The combatants made sure they destroyed the enemy,the nurses worried about the health of the people, the veterinarians treated the cattle, etc. It was a perfect division of labor. What I am saying is, we shouldn’t burden those who do the actual fighting with the task of strategists, or the messages crafters.

      I agree with you our crowd of opinion writers should be more careful. But that should not come at the expense of the ability of the fighters to demolish PFDJ enterprises, we shouldn’t put hurdles on their way. We also have to notice that the PFDJ festival halls has an exist and entry doors; whenever a batch graduates and joins the justice force, a new wave comes in (those were mostly “silent majority” in their previous life). We can’t downplay the activism of the years as if it didn’t produce anything. It did help many be “Born Again Justice Force Members.” And the revolving door is open. At the end, there are a portion one wins, and another one will never win–those one cannot win should only be defeated. And we all know the opposition camp is not a den of monsters, so many diehard members of the PFDJ has switched and now are influential members of the opposition–in fact the way we receive them seems a bit exaggerated, we are so generous with them, isn’t that our attempt to make them feel welcome and to express our joy in having them! Once they cross the line towards justice, they’re part of it, in fact they are elevated to levels they never imagined. See how the opposition received Wedi Vaccaro, Wedi Tekabo and many more Wedi-somethings! They are part of us and once they leave the enemy line (PFDJ) the opposition should have nothing against them. That is of course if they are not planning to inherit the regime and lord over us.

      You asked what the regime supporters do, I think they do worse than “let them die they deserve it.” They openly wish opposition members never see Eritrea again. They wish their bodies is not buried in Eritrea. They defame and attack everyone who criticizes the regime. They invented defamation and personal attack. They perfected destroying families by ostracizing those who oppose the regime. They disrupt marriages if one of the spouses is an opposition. They do more than that. What they say is more accentuated by what they do, remember what they did in Atlanta during the Lampedusa disaster? Remember the regime considering them, “alien refugees.” Why am I telling you this, you know it more than I do. I am just saying it because you asked me publicly.

      I understand your sober approach, your wish to see those rascals treated decently, and with respect. You feel that alienating them is a bad strategy and we should be able to win them. But this is a matter of conviction, some might still have the stamina to treat them with soft gloves; others might have finished their patience. Both strategies can go in parallel and whichever strategy wins is good for all of us. But we cannot say only my approach is right.

      As far as I am concerned, I am not going to worry much about winning them, but defeating them. When? Well, sometimes pursuing principles is not that sexy, but I do not see the struggle as a strictly business transaction and year-end audit, maybe reflection, appraisal, but not in monetizing our efforts for the convenience of the audits. Let it take as much time as it requires, maybe as some say we are not ready to be free from the shackles of tyranny ( كما تكونوا يولى عليكم ), “you get what you deserve!” But if someone can make it shorter, not promises, but actual solution that I can see and feel, it is fine, I will not going to complain as long as I can go back home and enjoy a cup of tea under the shades of a Neem tree. I need nothing more that that. And you know where that tree is 🙂

      • saay7

        Abu Selah:

        I was going to respond to this but then I read Shum’s message addressing you as “Aboy Saleh” and I can’t stop laughing so you better address his question first:)

        saay

        PS: The neem tree in Keren? Oh, please: we all know you Kerenites are all migrating to Asmara: you guys are like the senators who get elected from the Midwest and who never leave Washington, DC even after they get defeated.

        • Saleh Johar

          Okay, we don’t want to be elected or defeated, just let everyone pass through your airport to their villages and town, we don’t mind paying 2%. Just let us pass by 🙂

        • Shum

          I’m glad someone has a sense of humor. I didn’t think anyone would catch that. Sorry Ato Saleh. I just wanted to feel young again and I needed a contrast. Ma’lesh.

    • Amanuel Hidrat

      Dear Saay,

      You came with my weakest spot, and that is explaining your argument using business model. I will not delve in to that argument. But I want to make clear my stand on few things.

      1) I don’t want to see the ghedli model nor do I want to see Eritrea at this time to be lead by the ghedli generations.

      2) ghedli survived by coercion more than by persuasion. Ghedli by its nature has never been an accommodating organization, it’s political culture was unbearable that its survival instinct was by eliminating anything and everything along its way if you happens to be inconsistent to its ideals (be it bad or good). YG was correct when he put it, that ghedli’s political culture was ” unity by subtraction.” Those whose principles were unity by subtraction are ruling the current Eritrea nation by the same principles. This culture has to end now and replace it by new political culture of tolerance and accommodation. That culture will find its closure by totally dismantling the system and transferring the torch to our young generation.

      3) Our debate becomes sometimes personal and side issues. And side issues always divert us from the main issue. Let me give you an example: Haile is not less or more than anyone of us in this forum on the issue “emancipation of our women” but a single statement from his whole comment became an issue, which shouldn’t be. We all know Haile defends the right of women. That statement was only reflect to one segment of our women and shouldn’t be a big deal.

      4) So often we take debate for winning, we don’t see it for learning and knowing each others view so along the way to find the middle ground to run our politics. We failed to do that. Can we change this attitude.

      5) But question to both Salehs (the moderators). Is it possible to make us to stick to the issue on hand (whatever subject written on the front page of awate. If the team felt certain comment is worth in the front page of awate for debate purpose, you could do so as you do sometimes. Some subjects written on the front page sometimes we don’t heed them while they are very important. We are always swayed by unrelated issue, not even worth debating them. While I admire so far in behaving us, you still find a way in making us to debate on the issue at hand, whatever issue is at the front page.

      regards,
      Amanuel Hidrat

      • saay7

        Selamat Emma:

        Staying on topic? Ok, this particular topic is about Eritrean 600 and Ethiopian VW: SGJ’s critique of the tiny opposition groups. It is also about women who still support the PFDJ which he classified into 5 groups: (1) Those who have toiled so much and invested so much on the PFDJ starting from the struggle era and they are not willing to throw away their financial and emotional investments; (2) those with “genuine conviction that the PFDJ is the best that Eritrea had and could have—true believers.”; (3) Those “who are harmless but, similar to the men, they are possessed by demons that demand dancing events where one can display glittering gold ornaments.”; (4) those who are in the “silent majority” and (5)
        those who are “noisy and combative among them are the equivalent of the Wedini and Skunis in the men’s department.”

        Now, to me, this is SGJ saying that the women who support the PFDJ have the same motivations as the men who support the PFDJ.

        What I am asking is this: is there a relationship between why the opposition is a bunch of 600 and VW organizations and its tendency to make villains of victims or villains of those who are late-bloomers (laggards)? Notice that this discussion we are having is NOT about how to win over categories 1-4 of the women but to beat up on category 5.

        saay

        • Ermias

          Hmmmm SAAY, you must not only have read SGJ’s article but maybe also his mind. Here is what he said shortly before you posted the above:

          “On the Skunis and Wedini, I do not think the gullible and common members of the PFDJ are a threat, they are easily manipulated and are deadly when they are loyal, but I do not see them as a threat. Those who pride themselves as being “deqi shuq” (not to mean urban, but a swindle) those who take pride in hoodwinking the people, and looting the resources, they are the risk. I believe, if you get rid of them and their tool and machine, the PFDJ, everything will be fine.”

    • haileTG

      Selamat SJG, Aman, saay, Ermias and awatista

      Firstly, thank you to SGJ for putting many of what I was thinking in his reply to saay. I am increasing finding saay’s pronouncements carefully chosen to damage the current mass of opposition and sell his rejected brand of PFDJ-IA. This symptomatic pattern of making comments that are laced with indirect salvo at the opposition using PFDJ language. I simply couldn’t believe my eyes now that he is accusing us of “guilt tripping” by calling for dignity of our fallen victims in Lampedusa. It is OK that he has now crossed the line and has delinted the battle lines. His “woman” agenda that he has put in the context of “the opposition’s failure” rather than root causes betrays its real intent behind the smoke screen.

      saay,

      One of the central and structural fallacy of your arguments is that you take your own assumptions of “the reality of the opposition camp” to be facts. No they are not facts, those are your assumptions. The key to “opposition” is weakening the PFDJ hold in the diaspora and the combined effects of all that happen towards such an end (including the commenting here you try to belittle) has resulted in the substantial degrading of that hold by PFDJ. Kudos to all justice seekers who are making that possible. Your incessant belittling, undermining and accusations can have no other purpose than futile attempt to make PFDJ-IA appear to be the only savor in the current crisis. That approach is consistent with the claims of the bridge builders whose principal strategy is power brokering for themselves at the expense of the innocent justice seekers who toiled to expose and undermine the regime.

      You seem to be going fast and loose with abrasive conclusions regarding the opposition movement that has fought valiantly in the face of huge challenges. Many of us came from deep in the woods of shaebia support, into realization of facts, getting disillusioned with the acts of the regime, to where we are today where we will support nothing short of the complete dismantlement of the PFDJ empire. At each stage, we spoke and acted in ways that reflected our stand of the day. By and large the opposition is much more focused and more reasoned now than at any time in the past. Your continuous denigrating remarks to suggest the opposition never exist, it never progressed, it still is small and irrelevant, it is sold out to outside interests, its men are rude to women, everything they say or do is wrong, they use Lampedusa for emotional blackmail and so forth and so forth is nothing but a shameful way of making a u-turn and turning the heat against the opposition in favor of a dying regime. And that can only come for a reason because I don’t think you are engaged in this unwittingly. Paranoid hmm may be, but you’ve crossed the RED LINE when you are bracing to go to conflict over our right to speak for our dead. A dangerous gambit (gambit in chess is an opening in which a player makes a sacrifice, typically of a pawn, for the sake of some compensating advantage) if you ask me.

      Back to memory lane:

      [Back in the days when I thought the opposition was being too loose with their words and honestly believed that they should press for the border resolution so that the youth at home can rise up, you not only rejected my views but spoke in your characteristic dismissal against my criticism of the Asmarino head line that portrayed YPFDJ as fascist youth of hgdef. In fact I went overboard to insult the those who held such views as “unemployed something that I can’t remember”. SGJ criticized me for using such term regardless of my getting worked up on the issue. And I publicly apologized after reflecting that I was indeed unjustified to have said so. We then had a heated discussion with Semere A and saay was intervening to justify the designation of YPFDJ “the fascist youth of hgdef”. In fact, in a direct rebuttal to my views that it wasn’t right to have called them that, saay reasoned to me that the regime uses them in its propaganda to the people at home when it engages in its fascist acts (he used bestial as a word) and hence they were fair game to have been called that. Today, it is all different, we can’t so much acknowledge the reality that HGDEF promots koboro junkieism to the brim and adetat are used to put a face to such activity.]

      You see saay, are you now comprehending that we are trying to put a brand to the opposition? Are you going to belittle, engage below the belt punches and what have you if I tell you that you mis comprehend? The “face” is something that evolves not something you design and try to artificially fit. Adetat became a face because it was there from the ghedli era (that of tegadalit, the hafash wudubat, the mothers of tegadelti…). This resonated powerfully with our history and hard struggle. And that tradition is continued and abused by PFDJ to make it the face of its koboro junkies. The opposition has a face, a face that you are trying to reinforce (weak, hopeless, never makes progress, manned by outsiders as you made it out recently…). You are at the forefront of reinforcing that central theme used by hgdef to castigate the concept of opposition. Your attempt to mount a hallow attack on me yesterday has been a big miscalculation in your ill fated attempts to pull the plug on the opposition and go over full on to HGDEF (-IA) failed politics.

      You did have no interest what so ever on engaging women genuinely but to agitate a conflict. Your article was auto-pilot (summing up what we said), you had no stomach to discuss or engage any of the issues that I referenced as to weakening the hand of women, instead went over board with a statement I injected having fully considered what it meant. You took it for a slip of tongue and gave away your plan. Please inform us which organization in the opposition discourages women and why. Please inform us how or what good things PFDJ is doing for the “women” to choose it (that I don’t believe they did but you try to imply that – I could be wrong?).

      PFDJ operatives brutalize womens decency beyond measure, many of its women in its ranks have openly wished death to justice seekers, the likes of Meron were regarded as drug addicted, molested kids who grew up in a bar environment (I shudder to repeat it). No justice seeker is capable of their level of evil, yet you are now dealing the wrong hand and mounting a very unnerving attacks left and right.

      No parent would tell his delinquent kid that the kid is useless, his peers are better than him, he has never achieved anything worthwhile that most likely he would end up a failure. He would instead accentuate his positives, suggest changes of attitudes and leads by example. Your incessant attacks on justice seekers and shining the rotten aspects of PFDJ and now outright dare devil to call us guilt tripping for airing our anguish over the devastating sadness we feel about the tragedies and irresponsible reactions of PFDJ supporters (to the point of doing DNA checks and telling us they are Ethiopians…), well it is extremely disturbing to me to see you abandon the stand that I believed you firmly had all along.

      I hope you humbly review your increasingly aggressive attacks on justice seekers, because I can only see it leading to unfortunate dead end all around.

      Regards

      • haileTG

        here goes, also remember that Sophia has also openly wished Elsa chyrum to die from hunger in the latter’s attempt to draw attention to the suffering of Eritreans!!

      • saay7

        Selamat Haile The Great:

        One of the worst things about having strong disagreements with people you respect over issues is that, when it is bundled in emotional language, readers may not even follow what the disagreement is even about.

        The kernel of your argument with me is:

        (a) you believe that I denigrate the opposition: “never exist, it never progressed, it still is small and irrelevant, it is sold out to outside interests, its men are rude to women, everything they say or do is wrong, they use Lampedusa for emotional blackmail and so forth and so forth…”;
        (b) you believe that this denigration is purposefully done to empower an alternative to total uprooting of PFDJ, the alternative being a PFDJ without DIA;
        ( c) you believe that the recent introduction of women’s voices is part of my women’s agenda to attack the opposition (“justice-seekers”) even more;
        (d) you believe that there was no slip of tongue in the words you used in characterizing Diaspora women and you said it after having “fully considered what I meant.”
        (e) you believe that I have crossed the red line by “bracing to go to conflict over our right to speak for our dead.”

        I think that sums it up. Before I address each one them, have I left anything out?

        saay

        • haileTG

          hello saay,

          All fair summary except (d) which uses your erroneous interpretation of what I said. I stated the “hgdef koboro junkies” you are insisting that I stated “the diaspora women”. I hope you engage me on what I said or cut and paste where I said “the diaspora woman in general are xyz”. The rest is fair representation of my views as it stands right now.

          • saay7

            Selamat Haile TG:

            Before I address your points, I want to reassure our readers that they need not put on their helmet or sound the alarm: Haile and are going to have a civil debate on substantive issues. In the end, even if we don’t come to an agreement, my intent is to crystalize the choices, not to win a debate. A lot of times, the experience people have had with cyber wars is so negative that people shy away from them with the assumption that nothing good will come out of them. Well, here at awate, we have tried (if not always succeeded) to have discussions that do not degenerate into name-calling and fragmentation and that is the standard I intend to keep.

            (a) Hailat, you believe that I denigrate the opposition. You expounded on that by saying that the sum of my message is that the opposition “never exist[ed], it never progressed, it still is small and irrelevant, it is sold out to outside interests, its men are rude to women, everything they say or do is wrong, they use Lampedusa for emotional blackmail…”

            First, I think it is fair to say that I make a conscious effort to refer to the opposition as WE. (Ermias, the reference to “Deleyti Fithi” (justice-seekers) as THEM is because (a) I don’t think that is such a great name and (b) it’s mostly a network of member-based organizations that I don’t belong.) That is, this is not me pointing a chubby finger at others, but taking part in the blame. I can’t possibly say it never existed (I am, therefore I exist:). I have made the very unoriginal point that WE are small (refer to the title of this very article we are discussing which equates them to orgs that can fit in a Fiat 600) and the equally unoriginal argument that WE are of disappointing relevance and that we are not ALL independent. Not only that, many of our colleagues are VERY dependent on others with their agenda, with their funding. I stand by those assertions and I have given many examples of that and can give many more. When the Isaiasist call the ENTIRE opposition dependent on CIA, Weyane, etc, they are trying to delegitimized and destroy US. When I (and many, many others) have criticized those who are entirely dependent on Ethiopia and NGOS for their agenda/funding, it is to encourage them to embark on a new course. I have been in the struggle for 14 years now and it is a disheartening occurrence: an organization will go all excited to Addis and come back all fragmented and disheartened. Once is an incident; twice maybe a coincidence, but year, after year, after year for 14 years? This is not addressed to you but to those who will roll their eyes: no, I do not fault Ethiopia for advancing its interest; no, this is not comparable to the EPLF-TPLF alliance because the TPLF, except for a brief period in its infancy, was NEVER dependent on EPLF for its existence; and the EPLF was NEVER dependent on TPLF for its existence.

            (b) No I don’t “denigrate” to empower an alternative vision of “PFDJ without DIA.” I do it to help us change course: and by “us” even those who, like me, share the “PFDJ without DIA as a first step” vision because they are just as dependent on foreigners as those with “uproot” agenda. I blame myself for the confusion created in the “PFDJ without DIA” alternative because I never laid it out in an article, I never addressed the reservations of others, and I never explained that I mean it as a transition period. I have just been dropping posts here and there and I promise (Ok, I hope) to write an article outlining it in greater detail. Suffice to say for now, I didn’t propose it because “fqrey ms Hgdef aywedaekun”; I proposed it because I came to believe that the list of Eritrea’s victims includes the PFDJ; I proposed it because it is one of the few institutions we have; I proposed it because I have seen the “broken country” all over the Middle East and its even more horrific that the coming attractions promised. I proposed it because I wanted them to be resoundingly defeated in a post-Isaias Eritrea; and not in a gun-fight that may take decades. But I am pre-empting my article.

            (c) The so-called “women’s agenda” was a spontaneous posting. An activist Eritrean woman (the kind that Serray will include in his short list of activists that bring results when she finally decides to step out) was discussing with me a posting in Facebook by Eritreans equating the Eritrean woman with the North Korean women who cry and faint at the sight of their Maximum Leader. Some of the language used by the self-described “Deleyti FitHi” was horrific (trust me, the PFDJ does not have monopoly on the skunis culture) and my correspondent expressed her horror, which I shared with Awatistas. I had accepted the premise that Eritrean women do not participate in Eritrean politics in proportione to their numbers because they don’t want to. I began to ask if there are things the opposition are doing (something in the culture of the opposition) that is making them feel unwelcome. Five women: Tzigereda and Dr Sara (who rarely write), Um Awate, Amal, NMS (who have never written before) said unequivocally that, yes, that is the case. Our two resident female contributors (Hayat and Papillon) were surprisingly silent. What I can tell you is that if awate.com was a US corporation, much of what was written by the men (particularly you, Hailat, more on that later) would have received an immediate referral to sensitivity training. So my outrage was not manufactured: I just saw a few men circling the wagons and I reacted accordingly because I have a sense of ownership of this website and its reputation is extremely important to me.

            The “women agenda” goes this far and only this far: given that women are not proportionally represented in the opposition (organizations, civil society groups, discussion groups) is it because they are not interested or is because we are not doing enough to attract them. I can see how an article posted by awate staff (note: if it is mine, it will always, always, always have my byline) and the fact that I have never made “women rights” as a priority before made have made you say, “hmmmm, interesting…” but the events were as I described them.

            (d) Yes, I DO believe that you behaved extremely badly on this issue. At first, I thought it was a lark (you and I have a bad habit that sometimes people don’t know whether we are serious or joking.) I have already copy/pasted a fraction of what you said. No, it wasn’t just the “koboro junkie” statement; it was sentences and paragraphs. If you believe that this is all a conspiracy, all choreographed, all designed to defame the “justice seekers”, of course you would react the way you did.

            (e) I honestly don’t know what “crossing the red line by bracing to go to conflict over our right to speak for our dead” means. You have stated that the death in Lampedusa has not moved Diaspora mothers to the extent it should have and, from that, you have reached conclusions different from mine. I have argued that if it didn’t, it is not because they are heartless women but because they buy into the Isaias regime’s talking points: that it is orchestrated by the CIA, that the regime is blameless, that it is misguided children seeking fortunes, etc. I tend to take the Isaias regime’s propaganda seriously (because it finds its way to reputable organizations like the International Crisis Group) and try to counter it.

            Finally, a lot of times when I discuss the absence of strategy, it is not because I am a strategist. It is because the mistakes I see committed by our opposition defy common sense even at my neophyte level.

            saay

          • haileTG

            Selamat Saay,

            Let me start by addressing the core problem here and hope you don’t mind being the subject of the example that I will use for illustrating it.

            -” I came to believe in the charges I laid against you, i.e that you are intentionally undermining the opposition and my theory to explain your motive was that you are attempting to clear the decks to make way to the concept of PFDJ-IA is the only real alternative. I also reasoned that since the ideal presented as a whole is unattractive, you are using a piece meal approach of legitimizing its component parts first so that it becomes seem less to chew the whole idea.”

            You may say hey hey hold it now, how on earth you think that. Well that takes me to my observations and how I interpreted it:

            – In an article that I presume you endorsed that covered the outcome of the UN Human rights deliberations here in AT, may comment included on average the article contained more paragraphs that gave air time to PFDJ reaction than the intl. condemnation that it received. Again while we are at it, in an article that was written to highlight the exclusion of the dictator from the US Africa submit, the podium was taken to surprisingly attack the opposition as something manned and run by outsiders, to my perception, it waxed a full on air time that pretty much justify the position of the regime. (we have discussed this and it is not necessary to run it again). More than three times now I noticed you mentioning the tragedies befalling our people as being “used” by the opposition (in various contexts). I would confide with you in passing that nothing has traumatized me personally more what I am witnessing happening to our people day in day out. I was baffled as to why you even decided to go there. That has followed by the continuous of-the-cuff remarks of the opposition hitting the wall, being spread out in small parts and so forth with in the context of accentuating its lacking and being almost tied lipped of its success stories, proliferation, managing to fully degrade PFDJ’s free hand capabilities here in the diaspora and so on. And finally, here comes the gender issue which appears to be orchestrated to me because despite being a volatile issue that cuts many aspects of our social issues, it is presented in a narrow vindictive and provocative fashion. Conclusions are drawn early and those who seem to be interested in the issue don’t appear to care at what expense. People (male or female) are free to belittle, attack, castigate… their brothers, sons, husbands and fathers. The concept of patriarchal society and references to feminism were not introduced in these discussions by me. The latter term has a strand of misandry that is argued about the inadequacy of men and used in the lesbian philosophy. Incidentally, the latest HR council report on Eritrea had also issues linked to LGBT rights. But it goes to show you the depth and complexity of the issue being dealt here.

            I personally had issues I wanted to address in bettering the conditions of low skill women and new migrant mothers in my local Eritrean community. Although my project was fully readied to go operational and it was certain to improve the prospects of some women that were struggling with difficult situation, mainly the chief hgdef operatives, but including many women played a very naive role in forcing my hand to fold to project. Our knowledge and experience doesn’t start here in the comments sections. What we say here is partly a reflection of what experience and what we went through and we don’t all have the same roles, positions and experiences. I am unwilling to engage the issue at “parochial” matters or “feminist” perspectives because they are above me and frankly there is no way I can win any argument against a women in gender issues because the oppression is obvious. But I am prepared to discuss it from perspective of our collective experiences and what we can do to grow and learn from each other. Instead I was patronized, the opposition denigrated and a tense, confrontational and mutually suspicious environment was created. And I reasoned that this was an uncalled for aggravation using issues that are way beyond us to effectively address given the severe crisis we face as a nation and people. In the end, all there seems to have been achieved is mutual recriminations.

            Your defence:

            In reaction to my interpretations of your motives and actions you explained that it wasn’t the motive you had and gave a clarification that you provided in part [c] above.

            Where do I go from here

            Well I can follow your footsteps in the way you refuse to accept my explanation of what you interpreted to be an attack on all women. I can even go very creative with it and try to piece together what you said here and there to justify my rejection of your integrity and and cast doubts on your sincerity.

            Or

            Act in a decent and honorable way and respect your right to make your point however way you wish and accept your explanations in good faith.

            I usually do the second one and find it the right way to go. Once a person clarified their position, to go beyond it over their head it rude and uncalled for. It dishonors the person’s integrity and casts doubts on their character. It calls for mutual contempt and aggrieved parties all around. Once you have now explained as you did, I have no business to refuse your explanations and insist on my earlier assessments that were made by me alone. I now have your input and the way you are still going about it in my case is symptomatic of what makes us mutually contemptuous of each other. If my word means nothing to you and are willing to hold on to your erroneous way of judging the issue regardless of my directly clarifying it the way I feel should be understood, then it becomes suspicious.

            When I said you are now attacking our rights to speak for our dead, that a reference to your repeated description of using guilt to control people. I hope you stay away from this issue for the sake of all of us. It does not add value to the point you are trying to say. I fully capable of taking that from the despicable hgdefites, I know the evil they are capable of off (little do the know blood will beget blood in due time). But, I find it EXTREMELY offensive to hear any muting intervention about all the bodies of Eritrean women and children strewn all over the place. The issue, as I said earlier, is highly traumatizing to many people and I hope we let things take their course and people internalize the situation the best way they can manage.

            I have a point or two about the necessity of framing things in ways that would promote opposition than in the way it undermines it. The key being the tone and language usually utilized in this regard. However, I want to focus our debate to what has lead to the current disagreement and the fact that your insistence on fitting everything into your view point, even at the risk of completely rejecting the rights and independence of the person involved. Such an approach is damaging and undermines our purpose.

            As illustrated above, I took a certain view of your actions and motives, here you have explained and your latest explanation replaces all my previous understandings. We had similar disagreement with Ghezae Hagos in the past about issues of Visa for Ex EPLF. He then explained his side (after we both spent long and unnecessary exchanges) the minute he clearly explained his side, that brought our disagreement to an end.

            One of our main problem is the robbing of the dignity of our people. And one of the final straw for me with PFDJ was when I finally realized our people at home have broken self esteem and don’t even feel they belong to the country any more. The violence against the dignity of the Eritrean person can only be stopped when everyone is willing to go for a fight to defend it. My words and my opinions and views are integral part of my personality, disrespecting those not at concept level but simply denying their existence is how we perpetuate the indignity met out on us by playing it upon others. And frankly, that is what I experienced here in the last few days.

            Regards

          • saay7

            Selamat Haile TG:

            Thanks for the detailed explanation. I think more important than coming to a shot-gun agreement (a coerced smur-gnbar), is our ability to articulate our different visions for bringing change in Eritrea. This minimizes future entanglements and a sense that a fragile cease-fire was broken.

            The best way I can do this is to give a few “I believe…” statements. This is so you know I don’t say what I say or do what I do to provoke people or to cross your red line or others.

            1. I believe that the Eritrean opposition (collectively) has been disappointing. For over a decade, I had taken the position of “at least they are making an effort” and bit my tongue. I consider that a lost decade: people were held to a very low standard and they delivered. I will (respectfully) hold them and us to a higher standard: of delivering results. I will try to use objective metrics: numbers enlisted to our cause. I cannot guarantee that feelings won’t be hurt or “red lines” crossed because people’s redlines are entirely arbitrary; and the only one that matters here is the posting guideline. I will set myself to the same standard and my measure will not just be right and wrong but also winning and losing.

            2. I believe that the disappointing results were partly due to the Opposition’s comfort with dependence. Dependence on Ethiopia, dependence on the West–its governmental and non-governmental institutions. This has created in it a deeply-ingrained culture that it cannot do anything on its own: we are too few, too poor, too unorganized, too fractured. This then has become more mill for the gist–a vicious cycle of self-fulfilled prophecies.

            3. I believe that many in the opposition are, to quote our newest awatista Maytafor (welcome btw) who has put it far, far better than I have been struggling with, “channeling our indignation to unburden ourselves” but not doing it in a way to “touch the conscience of those on the other side.” I will feel no qualms in pointing this out and here’s why: nobody has monopolistic power over the opposition: its my movement, too, and I will be damned if I am going to tolerate (as I did for 10 years) mediocrity and self-sabotage of our collective movement. I will do it with respect and tastefully but I will be relentless in trying to nudge people in the direction of trying to persuade people as opposed to writing them off wholesale.

            4. I believe that the softest landing for Eritrea–one that eliminates its existential threat without creating a new existential threat–is to direct our energies on removing Isaias Afwerki from his position as head of State and government. I consider all other options as high risk/low reward. I am very much willing to debate this, to acknowledge its limitation, but I intend to do within the context of the risks/rewards of the other options.

            I am not responsible for people feeling that their dignity was violated anymore than I feel responsible when awatistas come here complaining how Eritrea’s dignity is violated because we let Ethiopians express themselves freely. I believe all those are means to curtail people’s freedom of expression and to have a discourse about Eritrea’s future.

            saay

            PS: Beyan Negash, thanks and welcome back! See what happens when you disappear? We have to bring the one topic that will get you back in–women’s rights 🙂

          • haileTG

            Hello saay,

            That is good and clear and I hope that we will get to address them one by one soon. I was expecting a direct response to the following and I hope you would address it candidly (I don’t really mind how you answer it).

            – I had a certain interpretation of your motives and intentions. You gave a direct clarification as to your actual intent as opposed to what I had thought.

            – I am on record to have said that I accept your explanation in good faith to replace my previously held view because only you are entitled to verify your own views.

            – You made as statement of interpretation on what I said. I clarified in good faith. Can you directly state you either accept may explanation as true statement of my views or you still hold to your previously held views of my intent and meaning of what I said.

            The above is at the center of our current dead lock that would determine whether we restore good faith trust of each other’s integrity or not. It is really our individual prerogative whether to accept or reject someone’s integrity. I am not cajoling for anything here. Just to know in black and white whether you have accepted my clarification or still doubt my intent.

            Thanks

          • saay7

            Hailat:

            Sorry I didn’t know there was a question there. My answer is: yes, of course, I take you at your word. Ashunkay HTG, nkhndey Gae GelTem tewahibu. So yes: Is there a question about chitlins?*

            saay

            Sem A, that was my Tinglish of “nHmito do alewo Hto”.

          • haileTG

            hey saay,

            And that closes the chapter for me because the rest is a matter our individual point of views as regards various issues. We can only use it to enhance our current understanding at best and or use it as a point of debate in normal circumstances.

            I have a wide range of views on the various pertinent issues to the struggle that you covered and I would definitely address them in due time. For now though, since trust seems to have been restored and the dark clouds have passed us by 🙂 let me take a well deserved break, assuming that the western front is all quite for the time being 🙂

            Regards

          • Rodab

            Haha Hailat. Yes, break is in order, so it seems.
            I sense you two haven’t had good sleeps lately. Not to make you jealous or anything but I have had some of the best sleeps the past few days…oh before your mind wanders, my well sleeps have nothing to do with Awate forum:-)

      • Thomas

        Hi Haile TG,

        I did not include my name above. I actually thought I was hit with bomb or something. After SGJ posted his article and explained what you meant I was so relieved. If I am allowed to say something about your tireless posting after each tragedy in Lampadusa and Senai, it broke my heart reading your postings and the view you described those very sad times. You are really humanitarian and a very caring person for women and children. You would be the first person to get my nomination for such awards. Please keep the great job up!! No one misses that you have a very loving heart. Our nation and people are lucky to have compassionate citizens like you. Please keep doing what your doing! I am proud of you!!

      • Kokhob Selam

        Hailat, I was a bit far for some time. I can’t jump to other comments before saying Thank you Hailat. Thank you. I admire you ability in clearing things. I admire how fast you have captured the concept of fighting for truth. really, you have gone to much ahead and please don’t ever stop progressing. you see, I have been there in ELF and I have given chance to EPLF to listen as most has done. in my journey I have seen different type of people. Few are those who wake up and get the track and developing fast without turning back.love you.

        Hailat Note that Saay is strong challenger and he will continue challenging even sometime to open the debate to other stage, so we can learn (this is what I notice- twgah emo!! Lol)

  • Tzigereda

    Dear Awatistas,
    Why are we actually talking about the women in the PFDJ? I thought the issue was ( is) about the role of the eritrean women in the opposition? The issue was ( is) about the ” emancipation of the eritrean women”.

    • Amanuel Hidrat

      Sis Tzegereda,

      The problem with this forum is, that we don’t focus on the “core message” of the communicator/messenger on his/her comment or article or essay. Instead we focus on the way how the individual communicate or the way the individual explains to pass his/her message. if we find one statement that irritates us or disagree with, within the whole piece, we argue on that particular rather on the core massage. So you see all the diversions in our debate that cringes me all the time. In this case we can have different reading on the reality of our women, but that different reading of reality shouldn’t divert us from the the subject of our debate, and that is “the role of our women and their emancipation. It is not only in this subject matter but all cases we have debated. Just check it and keep your eyes and you will find it precisely that.

      Hawki,
      Amanuel Hidrat

    • NMS

      Agreed Tzigereda—this caught my attention and I appreciate SJG framing it this way so that we may deconstruct:

      I posed the question to a few people whose judgment I trust. My question was specific: can you give me the profile of an Isaias supporter among women?
      The following categories are what I found:
      ‘Those who have toiled so much and invested so much on the PFDJ starting from the struggle era and they are not willing to throw away their financial and emotional investments.’

      Sentimental attachment to Shabia and not betraying the martyrs is a common reason among many Eritreans for not opposing the current regime, not just women. If we are going to ask why women specifically are holding on to this we have to ask exactly what they sacrificed for their beloved Eritrea: fathers, brothers, sisters and children. Not to mention leaving a communal and traditionally comfortable society to arrive in the West and work demeaning jobs to support the struggle and their families or languish in refugee camps fully dependent on others. Plus constantly having to meet cultural expectations at home and in community gatherings. All the while not being fully accepted as intelligent human beings with valid opinions and concerns by the very communities they are sacrificing so much for. Giving up on Eritrea=PFDJ now may seem like invalidating their entire life. Reducing these women to ‘koboro junkies’ is irresponsible at best and chauvinistic at worst . We can disagree on whether they have a functioning conscience but if we really want to understand their apathy, the burden is on us. Besides, some may also not openly oppose PFDJ in actual DEFIANCE to the current regime because they consider themselves stakeholders in Eritrea’s future while the ineffective opposition gets it’s act together. Dancing at parties is far from a comprehensive way of assessing their political cognizance or interest in current affairs. It just creates a new symbol and buzzword to throw around when real analysis is lacking.

      Providing we are TRULY examining the role of women in the opposition we should not cast blame and create scapegoats out of frustration and arrogant superiority. It is up to us (women and men) to create a movement that reduces their fears (because their fears are similar to what the rest of the silent majority is also apprehensive of), accepts anyone with a divergent opinion, can withstand constructive critique and is open to positive transformations, welcomes all ideologies and beliefs, engages in civility and fairness–even when issues are heated and personal, receptive to challenges and encourages progressive ideas….and most importantly can identify the actual problem (the PFDJ regime) and focuses it’s energy and resources on discussing and building collaborative approaches to remove it.

      • NMS
        I am thinking it stands for National Military Service. If it does then music to my ears. NMS will ontrubute emmensily to developing the future Eritrean women daynesty. Men had unfair adavantage when it comes to schooling. When a guy can study and relax after school but the girl is obligated to help doing work hous work and helping their mothers till the end of the day. this unfair advantage was solved by NMS. In sawa the men and the women have the same shoot and as the result of it; young Eritrean women are burning the scoring and setting the bar high in sceince. I was doing some digging and i was blowin away by the achivment of young eritrean women in Medical school. So, it is not all doom and gloom. I am hopefull more than ever.

      • Maytafor

        “We can disagree on whether they have a functioning conscience but if we really want to understand their apathy, the burden is on us”

        This is exactly it. Very well said.

  • haileTG

    Selamat SJG,

    A refreshingly bold and honest assessment of the reality on the ground. When you said “…general consciousness among Eritreans is not as high as that of Argentinians at the time..” it is true and does resonate well with the way things stand at the moment. However, the Eritrean women have also done something akin to what you described the Argentinian women to have done. That happened when about 1000 strong of them marched in Tel aviv with their young children, when they also spend hours wailing excruciatingly outside the Ministry of Interior offices in Israel. Of course, it was not a call for the international community to end dictatorship, not a call intervention to force PFDJ to engage rule of law, not even to call for the rights of the embattled Eritrean woman in her natural God given land of her ancestors, it was simply to proclaim “We Are Refugees!” So, I kind of feel that the women (just like many of the men too) have not reached the level of conscience that Eritrea can be made a lively place for them and their children as well as all those dying needlessly by going after HGDEF rather than refugee status.

    Regards

    • Tzigereda

      Dear Haile TG,
      As you stated correctly the video clip of the eritrean women in Israel was not posted ( I posted it yesterday) to show any political activity of women in ” dembe Fithi”, but to ” highlight” in what condition many eritrean women live, which might make understable why they are not yet in any position to be ” political activists”. And nobody can claim why they are ” silent”.

  • Thomas

    Aklilu – “I guess the PFDJ “woman” is filling the vacuum left by the emasculated
    PFDJ “man” and the “invisible” and confused opposition “man”” Great idea. They might be going for the “feeling protected” or can safely say some are opportunists.

  • Saleh Johar

    Ustaz Aklilu,
    Nice to hear from you again. Thanks for the post, it’s time you graced us with your usual gems.
    Take care

  • Thomas

    Great Article Saleh – It is great because it excludes the lame excuses for not being at the front to fight the obvious oppressors. No one needs no one to tell what is happening to innocent hardworking people and to our beloved nation. The entire world population are disgusted seeing us drowning in the seas while running away from the bunch of mafias, the entire world is disgusted by the imprisonment of 10,000 out of total 4 million population, the indefinite military services of the young who should have been doctors/engineers/educators/scientists and living a normal life instead of carrying guns and learning how to shot people and the most distressing way of living in the country. If the Lampadusa ship Catastrophe (357 beloved citizens including innocent children and pregnant women), the 155 more recently drowned citizens, the other uncounted I would say in thousands more killed while running way/crossing to Sudan/Ethiopia by the soldiers supposedly work to protect the people or by the bedouins in the deserts of Sinai. They hear about this clear and loud. How come someone blame the oppositions for all who chose to remain silent despite of these heartbreaking news. It just human to ask the why/what/how questions and care for your own people and fight the devils who are the causes human disaster. How can the oppositions/concerned citizens protect the tragedy that the monsters are creating from inside the country? I don’t have to side with anyone to fight the devils/criminals. The purpose fighting is the same for all, it is to weed out the very criminals who are the main causes of the problem and that this by itself should have created a united opposition and for the HiGDEF dancers to stop being entertained/Koboro junkies.

    • “It just human to ask the why/what/how questions and care for your own people and fight the devils who are the causes human disaster.”

      Okay sunshine; I am asking you-what are you doing on your part? Do you have any shame? You sit your fat behind and getting fatter, yet you calling out people to fight for you? How about you exchange your bottle to battle your enemy; The Eritrean government? I wonder what your IQ is.
      How about your get your fat behind and do what you are calling others to do.

  • sara

    ato aklilo
    your comments today forfeits the image or respect many had of you,honestly i don’t know what to say knowing you are also an elder eritrean. i wonder what to make of with the beautiful articles or poems you wrote about eritrean women in the past. was that just sort of make believe artistery or a joke.

    • Amanuel Hidrat

      Dear Sara,

      The Truth must be told. Aklilu the language economist had made a convincing argument. The description he suggested, that the PFDJ women are “un-natutral, destructive, and corrosive” as oppose to the natural Eritrean women is not derissive and not out of reality. Aren’t they “pompous, bogus, noisy, and superficial”? The man is so good in describing reality. So Sis Sara our task is to change that reality.

      Regards,

    • aklilu zere

      Dear Sara: First my heart felt greetings and thanks for your honest reply. I apologize if I hurt [jolt is the right word] your feelings. But I suspect the root cause is your “misundertanding” of the message in my condensed and layered reply.

      My articles are genuine and not make believe or jokes. I grew up in a family of strong good women and I spent half my life seriously studying all good Eritrean women and I have no doubt of their genuine Goodness.

      Goodness is merit. Merit is substantiated by performance. For generations the good Eritrea woman have outperfomed all expectations without failing. So she deservedly earned the designation “GOOD”.

      By her performance the PFDJ “woman” [a very small percentage of Eritrean women] have repeatedly failed in her performances and expectations. Thus I called her derelict thus anti-woman.

      Dear Sara:
      You are a good woman and I want you to uphold, defend, exihibit and preach your tenet i.e., goodness [inherited goodness].

      Regards,

      • sara

        ato aklilu ,
        thank you for the compliment, but reading the many comments above by others
        your generous consolation will not help all the girls/ women here.
        with due respect

  • Tzigereda

    Dear Saleh,
    Let me add this..
    The ” equivalent of wedini& skunis” you mentioned are overall.

    • Amanuel Hidrat

      Dear Tzigereda,
      Can you please make the above statement of yours, palpable. I am curious what you mean by that.

      Amanuel Hidrat

      • Tzigereda

        Selam Emma,
        I mean that ” wedini& skunis” are also outside the PFDJ.

        • Amanuel Hidrat

          I got it. The “wedini & skunis” are every where Identified by their peculiar mannerism (the way they act and speak). They exist in PFDJ, as well as in the opposition camp.

          • Saleh Johar

            Indeed, Amanuel. They exist everywhere just money exists everywhere in different amounts–some have more of it than the others. The PFDJ has a quasi-monopoly of the Wedini and Skunis.

    • Semere Andom

      Hi Tzigereda:
      You are correct, wedinis and skunis are dime a dozen and PFDJ head hunts them aggressively, it also grows them in house to create a perfect and custom tailored wedinis and skunis from both genders and from all 9 tribes and I can see a few of them here in this very forum;-)
      sem

      • I don’t know what “Wedini and Skuni” mean but from what you guys talking about does not look a positive words. And Semere, you said you know people on this forum who are “ wedini and Skuni” who? Why do you always go around the bush? Now tell me who?

        • Saleh Johar

          Nitricc, Wedini and Skunis are two common Eritreans terms. The first derived from Arabic, the second from Italian. In short, it means hoodlums and urchins (street boys).

          • SJ
            thank you very much. I knew it was something but i did not know it meant hoodlums and urchins. thanks to you i do now. so; “Ewala” will do the job in Tigrigna?
            Thanks.

          • Amanuel Hidrat

            Nitricc,

            You have it. Yes it means “ewala” in our language. The “wedni & skunis” are the borrowed urban languages.

          • abrham

            Dear Saleh

            Why are you overlooking his vulgar behavior? To use your term he is generalizing and insulting the people of tigrai and specifically from Adigrat. Is this what you call Chauvinism? If it is then this will not be Habeshas but PDFJ. I know Mahmud S is happy the way he behaves but not from you and Aman. Ageb beluley!!

          • Saleh Johar

            Abraham, it is not fun baby sitting adults–moderates are out, and I am not doing it. But I do agree with you, Nitricc doesn’t know that his comments about Tigrai are bigoted.

          • SJ
            Come now what is wrong mentioning the name of Tigray? Lol. They are so insecure, even mentioning the name of their village is considered bigotry. OMG!
            Anyway SJ why are you miss spelling abrham =====) to Abraham. Lol
            They are funny people. He is trying to use Eritrean name and ended up misspelling it. it is okay use your own name. what is your name? I am sure starts with Gebre-something! Right?

          • Rahwa T

            Fanti Ghadi must be a cold-blooded-man to take your words of appreciation. WurgaT !

          • abrham

            Dear Rahwa,

            I am really puzzled why those Selam deleyti (Mahmud & FG) are either silent or accept his words as normal.

          • Rahwa T

            Dear Abraham,

            I, too, am asking the same question (to myself). They (including the moderators) seem to have accepted as normal whatever this spoiled old-baby call us. Looking his arrogance and stupidity for considering the bible names as Eritrean name. According to this little man, whenever we have names from the bible, we are copying from Eritreans. I couldn’t control my temper after reading what he has been discharging from his bad mouth to my people. He doesn’t seem to get proper upbringing and I guess he is trying to compensate it by insulting others. WurgaT is an Amharic word that characterizes an ill-mannered person who throws insult after insult with no feeling of shame.

          • Amde

            Selam Rahwa

            I think the greybeards in this forum (Mahmud, Amanuel, Saleh etc…) think Nitricc is a prototype of the ignorant Ypfdj that could be reasoned with.

            They share a dream – that one day they will all suddenly break into a song… “Awet at last! Awet at last! Elillill belu!! Ellill belu!! Nitricc ye arbegnoch gora teqelaqlual!!!”

            Hope is a powerful thing.

            Amde

          • Amde do you want a peice of me?
            Why dont get the hell out of my way. Lemang. Why are you here? Stupid.
            Do you guys wanna gung up on me. Bring in on. I am going no where.

          • Rahwa T

            Dear Amde,

            Yes, they have this hope that will never be materialized. Otherwise, I would have joined them in the day of ululation, although I don’t see the point for bringing a nonsense man into the opposition camp while there are thousands of nice men and women out in the open world. After all, he job here has been biting many important Eritrean ladies and gentlemen. The only day he
            will learn will be the moment DIA confronts Gadafi’s fate.

          • Mahmud Saleh

            Dear Amde;
            First salam; I believe you didn’t read my reply to abrham, please check that out. And then, what do you expect me to do dear Amde? Can you get more than Gadi to chastise nitricc? Now, let truth be told my friend: your comment above is too low for my expectation I’ve held about you. We know nitricc is on the look for a fight, usually he does it with individuals he knows well, and I think they somehow settle it without too much bloody noses and scuffles. They may come out of the fights with some bruises, but not to the degree that outside help would be needed. I expect you to be fair: just look what Aster said to him when he was doing his usual chores. Aster started the fight; she accused him of “false nationalism,” well, he went for his favorite punchline, then Rahwa and abrham came. Gadi told nitricc he was “bigoted” without telling Aster to stop provoking a fight. abrham could simply ignore the name issue; you see, I don’t know how these moderators are going to manage it. We all just need to be at our best. I wish if our Ethiopian friends would be open enough to share your experience on issues concerning gender. That would be excellent; after all we are wundmamoch.

          • Saleh Johar

            Mahmoud Pasha,
            The Ethiopian women issue is more complicated than you think, I would take the Eritrean state of affairs a million times. Now Eyob is sharpening his tools 🙂

          • Mahmud Saleh

            Abusalah;
            Eyob? That’s your fight brother.

          • Eyob Medhane

            Gash Saleh,

            I actually really stayed away from this’Eritrean women in diaspora and opposition’ discussion issue. It’s not my forte, and I don’t know much about it. So, I just observe. However, in my personal observation, on Ethiopian women in opposition politics, they seem to surprisingly doing much better than ‘Ethiopian men in opposition politics’. Birtukan Mideksa, when she was a federal judge, she followed her conviction and set free one of the most wanted man, former defense minister Seye Abraha, because she believed he was wrongly accused. She was forced to resign her post, because of her decision, her family split, because a father of her daughter (Shimeles Kemal) disagreed with her decision and sided with government, (later on he became government’s spokes person, and in a cruel coincedence (may be not 🙂 ) he was the prosecutor, when she was charged along with other members of Kinijit) but she stuck to her guns, and decided to change the system to a form she thought was right, joined opposition party (the now severly weakened Kinijit) she got arrested for it. When she was released from prison, she decided to strengthen her life, career and political thinking and joined Harvard Law, instead of becoming the crazy and ineffective diaspora politics. She now is a research fellow at ‘freedom house’ and contribute to impact a kind change she believes the country needs. (for the record, I hate freedom house and I believe what it does, doesn’t stand for it says it stands for). The same thing with Reeyot Alemu. Of course she was duped to work for a certifiably insane individual by the name of Elias Kifle thinking that he belongs to a legitimate opposition. She got arrested for it. She protested her arrest, declined to plead guilty and lessen her prison term, when her other men colleagues did, she decided to fight in court and counter sued the government from prison and ultimately she got the hearing, and her 14 years sentence was cut short to five, because her appeal was successful and the ‘Teqlay Fird bet’ threw out three counts of what she was charged and sentenced for. I disagree with her entire political ideology, but I admire her courage. These are just two examples. Ethiopian opposition have some ‘token’ women representation in their ranks, but the ones, who were given a chance seem to exceed the men in performance…..

          • Saleh Johar

            Aha, all Ethiopian women are judges and they all live in Addis. I understand all the star studded stories Eyob, I meant the common Taitu who fetches water from five miles away and toils the land for four seasons including Pagume 🙂

            I just wanted to tease you, it’s my way of saying hello! Please, that would do for now, we have enough on our hands. I promise, next year we can talk about Kenyan Women, then Gambian women, and then Ethiopia 🙂

          • Amde

            Dear Mahmud,

            I did not mean to offend you. If I offended you then I apologize. This goes to Saleh and Amanuel as well. I hope you do not find the use of the word “greybeard” offensive – it is generally used as a word connotating an older person of some respectability for their knowledge and experience.

            But truth be told, while how I responded has some jest, it really seems to me that most of the older generation tegadelti seem to go out of the way to try and engage his “rational” side. I personally find his comments to reveal just how completely clueless he is, and his “nationalism” so synthetic, that to assume he has any rational angle that can be engaged seems futile. It is so futile, I think it is a comedy.

            There is this expression – don’t get into a mudfight with a pig – the pig enjoys it whereas you will only get muddy.

            As to the issue of women – I really have not followed the nuances of the discussion so I can’t discuss too much. But my observation in general is that “most” women are fierce mothers, wives and sisters, and they will sustain their menfolk in their endeavours (whether wise or foolish) fiercely. They don’t care too much about abstractions – I have heard more than once “wendoch poletika mawrat yiwedalu”.

            But they will go through thick and thin to support their menfolk in their struggle – even after death. My personal suspicion is that behind every “koboro beating PFDJ woman” is an emotionally unresolved martyr’s death. She is not allowed to properly grieve over the death of a loved one and so she holds on to their memory by holding on to the cause which they died over. I am not sure berating her for staying emotionally true is the right way.

            I realize this is a somewhat paternalistic point of view, at odds with the theme of women’s emancipation as equal partners and social agents as men. But the picture Saay put up on the “Women’s Harvest” article says so much about the bottom line reality. There is not a man in sight as the woman toils into wilderness – not for an epic adventure – but to bring water (life) to the family.

            Amde

          • Mahmud Saleh

            Dear Amde;
            You’re fine, thanks for the reply.

          • Ato Amde. What is to you if i am synthetic or organic?
            I am in an Eritrean web site and there is no shame to be what ever i am. So your attack says more about you than me. However; now i understand why hundfull tplf gangs are riding you like a donky. The truth is they will inslave you for years to come. You are gutless to have the dugnity to be free. Happy slavry. Tplf will bend you for life.
            You people are good at talking.
            Just be happy and make sure you obey your masters;the weyane. And you are advised to leave me alone. One morea anprovoked attack from you then you are warned. Dimpit.

          • Amde

            Yes Einstein, you threaten an anonymous poster on a public forum…. you remind me of this guy… http://img1.wikia.nocookie.net/__cb20140521025732/disney/images/8/83/The-Incredibles-the-incredibles-620940_1024_768.jpg

          • Shum

            buhahahaha! ayy, Amde. Now you ruined it for me. Every time I see a posting from Nitricc, I’m going to think of this guy. Can you mock it up with some dental equipment in his hand?

          • Saleh Johar

            Type your reply…

          • RahwaT

            Selam Saleh,
            I didn’t get you, sir.

          • Saleh Johar

            Rahwa, forget it… it was an error, I thought I was typing on an e-mail page…and didn’t realize it was posted..it is deleted.

          • Fanti Ghana

            Hello Abrham and Rahwa T,

            I heard you my friends! At least you, Rahwa, vent out some steam sometimes, but I was really saddened to see Abrham feeling hurt by this.

            There is no doubt that Nitricc is legendary when it comes to his lack of diplomacy (he even came up with his own phrase for it: toothless-ness), but for what it is worth, let me briefly address the most recent incident that triggered this conversation.

            SGJ says something about Wedini & skunis
            Nitricc asks what it means.

            Coming out of nowhere, Aster calls him a “false nationalist.” Did he deserve to be labeled “false nationalist” for asking what something meant? Of course not. Did anyone come to his defense?
            Absolutely none!

            I understand you, Abrham, thought Aster did not generalize but Nitricc did, and I also hope Aster didn’t mean it one of the ways it could be translated, but when you combine the phrase “false nationalism” with the occasional blame some of us place on Eritreans for waging a struggle for independence, and add to that the YG school of thought which blames Gedli for most of Eritrean ills, then you begin to understand why Nitricc responded the way he did.

            Now, imagine the benefit all of us could have had had Aster or somebody else sympathized with him for not growing up in the areas where these two words are commonly used and offer him a simple explanation the way SDJ did instead.

            Please understand that I am not trying to condone his word choices or generalizations of two days ago or other times. What I am trying to say is that we all failed two days ago by not uttering a word of condemnation or criticism when Aster labeled him a “false nationalist.” By doing so we
            forfeited our moral high ground to blame Nitricc for whatever the consequence was. Do you see how easy it is to not see?

            There are many, on other websites, who seem to have nothing constructive to say except creating derogatory terms for Ethiopians, but Nitricc is not one of them. Yes, some of the words he uses are similar to what those messengers of hate use, but his mind set is not even remotely close to theirs. I wish we all start to see that.

            Selam.

          • Fanti the soul!
            Thanks for stating the truth. And to add to your point; ABRAM,rahwa and the rest the Oromo like Amde they are not offended by what i say. Thire agenda is to make noise as loud as posible so something will stick and to get AT to react and ultimatly to get me banned. That is their plan. If not i challeng any one to point me where i provocked anything.
            Any way Fanti i have a story to share with you. Last week i was at a major. University for work related and while i was doing my thing something happened to make me remnembring you when you were in prison at the young age and the lesson you learned from the milltary man in that prison.
            Respect!

          • abrham

            I got my name from the GEEZ bible not from the Italian or English version & its normal to miss spell it. Do not worry man we are waiting for your English language lecture and of course introduce commercial farming capabilities. Thanks Rahwa I got his real name “Wurgat!” how do you spell it in English?

          • Mahmud Saleh

            Dear abrham;
            Why do you think I’m happy about nitricc’s choice of words? Have you seen me in that behavior? SJ replied to him and that should be enough. ዓቢ ሰብ እንታይ ደኣ ኮይንካ? I can be held accountable to my behavior,sir, but not to other adults. Don’t worry, there is no Habesha or Ethiopia without Tigray. All you need is educating nitricc why Tigray is the center of Habesha civilization. Ask him if he can explain his ancient history out of that box. Then he will know why you should not feel “insecure.” To me political parties/groups are fair game. So, when I go after TPLF, EPRDF, EPLF, PFDJ…I am not going after the people or the state they may appear to represent. But I know also people pick on him, and you have to be fair here. Just look how the thread degenerated, start from Aster and follow it down.

          • abrham

            Aya,

            unlike her(Aster) his reply is against the mass.

            thanks

          • Rahwa T

            I got warning for using one of these word few weeks back. “Interesting” to read it again.

        • ASTER

          Oh Nitricc
          You have a lot to catch up about Eritrea , its people, language and food.
          What are you basing your “false nationalism” on when you have no clue about the country & its people ?

          • Well Aster, I did not claim to be Arab or Italian nationalist, did I. you just heard the man said that the words are from Arab and Italian. So, why are you attacking me for asking? You seem itching to take a shoot at me, you must be from deep Adi-grat to used the word “false nationalism” I hate to disappoint you but there is no such thing called “ false nationalism” if there is, then it must be only when the Tigryans claim to be Ethiopians. you know what i am saying right? right!

  • Tzigereda

    Dear Saleh,
    Hilarious!
    Yes, the word „silent majority“ is somehow “misleading” ( never liked it) and I prefer to say people who are not active members of the resistance movement, since ” silence” would implicit a total negligence of a situation ( just my understanding). Most of the eritreans in Diaspora have abandoned the regime, and still many are not yet part of any organisations, which doesn’t mean they are “silent”. We have many activists (thousands of eritreans follow, comment and post in FB, hundreds spend their time in pal talks and skype, in websites, meetings, demonstrations, pray…). And we have many “silent” activist who are engaged (be it encouraging activists, helping refugee, active members of communities.). When we come to the political organizations and movements we can not say that the membership is as high as it should be. To my opinion we have scattered (partially experimental) activism, consuming too much resource and time. So, the opposition is still lacking “a representative ownership” (a united front) with a workable strategy.
    What you have being doing (since Ghedli) and now do as a moderator of Awate.com is beyond informing and reconciliation, “emboldening” and that means you care for more participation ( including the ” silent majority”) in defeating the tyrant.
    I prefer to agree with “The face of the PFDJ junkee is an image of a small group of the Eritrean Diaspora MEN & Women”. The “koboro junkee” does not represent the majority of US women in Diaspora (that was the reason why I objected and they dont belong to the ” silent majority”!), just as the male supporters of the regime dont represent the Eritrean MEN in Diaspora.
    Why Eritrean women`s participation in the resistance movement is still low (specifically in political organisations, movements and political decision making positions) doesn’t have to do “exclusively” with the societal attitudes of the Eritrean men. I think it has also to do with lack of self-confidence (and this has in turn to do with our culture), disappointment, hopelessness “special” burden of life in Diaspora, absence of recognition, they don’t feel perceived and posttraumatic disorders (which includes the male gender too!) and many other things. The male-dominated partially aggressive or belittling behaviour is neither helping. The ” women -issue’ which is still a world wide challenge and ours too can not be dismissed as ” untimely” or distracting from the ” main issue”( am not saying you said it) it is one of the important topics ever. So it is not about MEN vs WOMEN, it is about WE as a society, it is about how we can respect and listen to each other. It is about exchanging ideas to understand what is wrong. It is all about how we all can make our contribution better, wiser, bigger, making possible that every segment of our society is involved, to get rid of the tyrant and build a democratic governance where every citizen`s right is respected.

    • haileTG

      Dear Tzigereda

      Thanks for your reply on the other post, I will respond to it later. On the above however, you say “The face of the PFDJ junkee is an image of a small group of the Eritrean Diaspora MEN & Women”. Who wouldn’t Tzigereda? The question is if you have the decision making power with the PFDJ committee that is tasked with deciding what the face of the HGDEF koboro junkies has to be. Walmart decides what the face of its brand is, Mac Donalds decide theirs too, so do GM, Sony, Apple… So does PFDJ who is the sole owner of the koboro junkie culture. It decided it to be “the dominant image of the Eritrean diaspora Woman” i.e. “Adetat”. What power have you to go through PFDJ’s entire media, news, comittee, communities, Mekhete….networks and re-assign the designation of “the dominant image of the Eritrean diaspora woman (Adetat)” into a brand new concept of “the Eritrean Men and women”? You may be able to make “the dominant image of the Eritrean diaspora woman” the face of the struggle for justice, the face of freedom and rule of law and what have you. But to assume powers we don’t have (because the koboro junkies don’t consult with us) and propose change of reality seems hard to justify.

      Regards

      PS: For some the face of the Eritrean refugee may be the dominant image of a young sawa recruit, the face of the PFDJ youth may be the dominant image of a diaspora born young Eritrean, the face of the opposition movement, may be the dominant image of ___________________ 🙂

      • Saleh Johar

        HTG, this falls right into my topic of interest. What you described is corporate image, and corporate positioning. Alas, we cannot use the Gedli image because those who are supposed to use it as an image are busy dismantling it 🙂 But we badly need a face, a brand face, a symbol that we coalesce around. As it is, we have a million faces thanks to the Seicentos, each one has its individual flag, its individual seal, boasting nay wddbna arma, etc. It would be demoralizing if I said, “we have a long way to go.” But I am not saying that 🙂

        • Shum

          Aboy Saleh,

          I would appreciate it if you dive into this topic some more. I do think we need to brand ourselves with a set of values and views. I mentioned in another post how sacrifice, martyrdom and steadfastness were hallmarks of the struggle. The era of martyrdom needs to end. Furthermore, we need to, as Saay said, take PFDJ’s and PIA “strengths” and turn them into liabilities or weaknesses. I would say this would be a part of the the “Weed them out” strategy”. Here are some talking points

          1. Sovereignty – PFDJ has weakened our sovereignty by allowing Ethiopia to occupy large swaths of our land. They have no plan to retake it militarily nor diplomatically.

          2. Self-Reliance – Our people are destitute and rely on handouts from their families abroad. It has gotten so bad, they are fleeing in droves to find a place where they can do for themselves. Self-Reliance means individuals cant take care of themselves, not that they can take handouts from family members. Also, we need to highlight the foreign debt because I don’t think people are aware that a lot of the programs they initiate are funded from IMF/World Bank.

          3. Plan – This is cited as one of the major reasons people don’t join the opposition. They say we don’t have a plan. But the truth is PFDJ has no plan. If you challenge any of the PFDJ supporters to tell us the plan, they cannot. We need to provide a better plan on how we move forward from our crisis-oriented government.

          4. Existentialist Threat – PFDJ has weakened our country in world opinion. They claim to be holding the country together from fragmentation, but they are the biggest factor in our fragmentation. They are creating the conditions for our people to lean on sub-nationalist (I hate this word) sentiments because the leadership on a national level fail to deliver.

          We also need to look at our brand in the opposition. We have the moral high ground, but we don’t communicate effectively enough on the forums that I have seen. We blow up on each other at the drop of a hat. We need to push a common set of values that can inspire people such as liberty instead of oppression, coexistence instead of isolation, dialogue instead of instigation, accommodation instead of rigidness, positive confrontation instead of meekness, etc.

          Aboy Saleh, I want you to have at it as this is your topic of interest.

          • Saleh Johar

            Sure Shum wedey,
            I will try to address your brilliant points tonight. Now I am off.

          • Saleh Johar

            Hi Shum,

            Now I have to curse you and spend time replying to your tough and intelligent remarks 
            In marketing, one has to take the environment, traditions and all, into consideration.

            Strategies and formulas that are fit for a developed capitalist country cannot be so for a country with different cultural values. I have seen strategies designed for the USA fall on their faces in other countries, bell curves deliver their premature babies and become flat.

            Let me begin with a story: I worked for a company that wanted to implement a campaign for a soft drink and wanted to piggyback on the popularity of a known chocolate brand. The advertising company, another famous USA ad house, presented a storyboard for an expensive commercial that had to be shot in Spain (though the the Gulf sun is ideal for shooting, I don’t know why, but they like expenditure and if you object you still have to learn a lot). Then the commercial that cost close to half a million dollars was booked on all the television stations of the Gulf countries. The setting was on board an expensive yacht where wealthy looking sophisticated middle age men were munching chocolate and drinking the new soft drink. It was a complete failure—in that part of the world, only children eat chocolate, it was degrading for a grown up many to hold a chocolate bar and be excited. Totally alien to the culture. As you can imagine, it was a flop.

            So, anything we devise should not be focused on the émigré population, because we ourselves are spread over tens of different countries with different values, economies and social structure. Those who live in Socialist Sweden do not like the lifestyle of the USA. Those who live in the Middle East do not appreciate the lifestyle of Sweden, and so on. And that has been one of our failures, we think of our adopted countries as if they are counties in Eritrea. They are not. Refocus on Eritrea, the values, the traditions and what tickles them. At the end, we are not struggling to free London of Washington DC, but Eritrea. Recalibration is in order. If you agree with the above, I think you are well suited to expand your thoughts on the points you raised and develop them as working paper.

            1. Sovereignty: we should show that we care about our territories, but we must avoid the PFDJ belligerent language in handling it. At the end of the day, we wish to resolve that peacefully. Before we adopt that as a communication strategy, we have to carefully craft our message. WE should plan to make our position clear and convince the Ethiopians that we want to start by turning the page on the PFDJ belligerence.

            2. Self-reliance: this has been attacked enough for the way the PFDJ handles it. Self-reliance is not bad, it is only bad when it is not honest. As members of this planet, it is not shameful to ask for help—technology transfer, financing, investments, etc. What is bad is that self-reliance become a prescription for isolation and arrogance the PFDJ way. Also, the same time, we should shun twenty-something kids from the West dictate on us how we should run our affairs—I have seen a few of those and I cringe remembering how bossy and arrogant they are. It is happening with a few entities who have become beholden to their funders. That should be shunned and not encouraged. And if it is done, it should be transparent and accountable.

            3. Plan: Don’t worry about this, the same was said about our struggle, that it didn’t have any plans when it launched the ELF. Sometimes, no-plan is a plan. I am not saying it is good, but that is how it is. I do not think there is an entity that doesn’t have a plan: some are carrying guns and want ethnic federalism. Some are actually carrying guns and fighting, how effective has nothing to do with the existence of a plan. But for activists, the best plan I can think about is to encourage every individual to do his part, leave others alone if he cannot join them and make a bigger team. If this can be done, it well and good, but if not, let’s depend on the power of the individual that would inspire and attract likeminded people. WE cannot plan for every type of entity since we do not have an umbrella (you know how good we are at breaking our only umbrellas). Short of having an umbrella organization, let every small entity, and individual do their part until they discover no much can be done unless it is as a formidable organization. If we can’t do that, we will not realize victory as soon as we wish.

            4. Existentialist Threat: Hammer what you wrote in this part, perfect it and spread it.
            The rest of your points are excellent, the solution is not easy. Brace yourself.

            Your topic is not easy, it can’t be elaborated in a hasty manner, it needs brainstorming sessions, consultations, feedback and more. If you are willing, take it to the next level and you have the support of myself and my colleagues at awate.com. But remember, this is a long-term process, it is like plating a mango tree as opposed to a beanstalk.

          • Shum

            Don’t curse me :-). I figured if you called Eyob, Lij Eyob, I could call you Aboy since Eyob is around my age. Don’t let Haw’Aboy saay get you worked up. Keba’sena delyu. He’s the typical Asmarino standing on the sidelines instigating a fight between a Wedi Keren and a hagereseb. Gn Ab’za wididir (Asmara vs Keren), feres yebileyin.

            Zikohne koynu,

            I like your reply overall, but I have an issue with #3. Our struggle didn’t necessarily have a plan when it started, but it sure found it’s groove quickly and plans were drawn up. Some worked, some failed (You know what the Quran says about plans.) But plans are essential. My biggest point about plans was that PFDJ has no plans. People reluctant to join the opposition or PFDJ supporters always make this point about the opposition. But, we never throw it in their face. We gotta go topsy turvy on these guys and show them that PFDJ is just winging it. They have no plans. Better yet, I wish we had ways to show them their performance through infographics like this http://thumbnails.visually.netdna-cdn.com/the-state-of-the-world_50290a664382a.jpg

            But more importantly than a plan, we have to cultivate some values that can take us from we are now and last us as the new Eritrea takes shape. During the struggle we stressed unity, sacrifice and steafastness. These are good and had their moments where they were key. But after independence, it hurt us. We sacrifice and tolerate too much. It’s in our culture to be deferential to authoritarians. We have to cultivate values like liberty in addition to unity to ensure that every Eritrean feels the pain when an individual or a small group (ethnic, religious, social, etc) is targeted.

            I’ll take your advice and think this over more. But you lost me on planting a mango tree; that’s a little too Keren for me 🙂

      • Ermias

        …a tired, lonely, detached, nearing retirement, highly educated man

        • Amanuel Hidrat

          Ermi,

          Hailat is not detached, but he swims with the heart beat of his people, he is not lonely, but he convinced many followers by his realistic argument, he is not on the verge of retirement, but he is at the peak of his energy in the struggle of his objectives, You are only right that he is “highly educate man.” I would like Hailat to confirm my statement.

          • Ermias

            Emma, oh man. I wasn’t describing HTG in particular neither was he speaking of himself when he said:

            “…the face of the opposition movement, may be the dominant image of __________”

            I was filling in the blank space he left.

          • Saleh Johar

            Oh Ermis, now I see this, I am glad I read it correctly.

          • Ermias

            Thank you SGJ. I have no idea how Aman H. totally misread it.

            If I may ask you two questions:

            1. How would you fill in HTG’s blank space? Maybe I should reread this great article you wrote and deduce from there.

            2. Wedini and Skunis seem to me to describe street smart people, which I always thought you used describing IA and Co. instead of the average PFDJ. I hope I don’t get overly judgements but the average PFDJ operative is uneducated, hagererseb or I should say fara and more often than not naive and gullible. What do you think?

          • Saleh Johar

            Ermias,
            Let the filling the space wait for an opportune time, when we internalize the need for a symbol that represent us–which we have but do not recognize it.

            On the Skunis and Wedini, I do not think the gullible and common members of the PFDJ are a threat, they are easily manipulated and are deadly when they are loyal, but I do not see them as a threat. Those who pride themselves as being “deqi shuq” (not to mean urban, but a swindle) those who take pride in hoodwinking the people, and looting the resources, they are the risk. I believe, if you get rid of them and their tool and machine, the PFDJ, everything will be fine.

          • Ermias

            SGJ, I agree. Per your description of Skunis and Wedini, those are public enemy number one. One way to defeat them is for all of us to educate the people around us by shining the light on these shefatu.

          • haileTG

            SGJ: the face of the opposition could have been made the dominant image of Ghdeli. Although, I fundamentally disagree with undermining the image of ghedli in lieu of dealing with the current problems and their immediate causes (lack of justice and rule of law), it may be problematic to actually use it as the face of the opposition movement. Remember that the face of PFDJ’s political legitimacy is the part of ghedli that it influenced. This may make it confusing to the people.

            PFDJ has worked overtime to give a face to the opposition movement and that face is that of “a collaborator with external enemies of the state”. And that face can only be maintained in place by maintaining the environment of fear that the PFDJ has created. By accentuating what is positive about the opposition, it is not only possible to demolish such shrewdly instigated perception but also inadvertently end up making whatever positive that you are accentuating to be the face of the opposition to be the dominant image associated with such positive attribute. The reverse would work in the opposite manner. I.e. not only maintain the PFDJ instigated face but also reinforce it by sedimenting even more of the same.

          • Amanuel Hidrat

            Ermi,

            You make me lost by not indicating us that you are filling the fill-in. I get it now. I jumped to defend the active debater “Hailat.”

          • Saleh Johar

            Ammanuel and Ermias,

            I think Erias was describing visualizing the representative image of the opposition and he described as ghe did. I didn’t understand it to mean a description of HTG. Ermis, please correct me if I am wrong.