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Archive: awate.com Interview: Meles Zenawi Sizes Up The Region

[This interview was published on April 26, 2011.] The following is a transcribed interview that awate.com conducted with Ethiopian Prime Minister Meles Zenawi on Wednesday, April 13, 2011, in his office in Addis Abeba, Ethiopia. Saleh “Gadi” Johar, founder and publisher of awate.com, conducted the interview. For ease of reading, we have numbered the questions.

1. I didn’t see other parts of Ethiopia, but in Addis Ababa, there is a visibly frantic development activity going on. My question is: some countries went through such rapid real estate development that was followed by a catastrophic collapse of the real estate market and thus of the economy—do you think such a collapse would happen in Ethiopia?

No. Because it is not a significant part of the economy. The real estate sector is obviously growing and not just in Addis; it is growing across the country. But it is a small part of the economy, no more than 10 to 15% of the local loans given by the private banks. Public banks which provide more than 50-60% of the total loan do not provide any loan for real estate. So it will be on the range of 5-7% of the bank loans. Therefore, I do not see a real estate bubble appearing. But we are keenly following the issue. In spite of the big construction activities that are going on in Addis, there is a massive shortage of housing in this city.

2. Does the big number of new hotels on every corner of the city reflect a comparable increase in tourism? Then, I have an observation (you can consider it a personal complaint): why are Ethiopian hotels the only unfair establishments for tourists and visitors? I mean, when I buy gas, shop at a retail store, at restaurants and everything else, I am charged the same prices as an any Ethiopian for the same service or product that I get, but when I go to a hotel, they tell me: if you are an Ethiopian, you pay 200 Birr but if you carry a foreign passport, you pay $40 (which is 640 birr, more than 300%) for the same room and the same bed?

On the first question, hotels space…there is still an acute shortage of hotel space, still. It is mainly related to conference tourism. A lot of conferences are held here in Addis.  And when there are conferences we have problems accommodating customers to the extent that we sort of block certain hotels for official delegation and that creates havoc. So there is an acute shortage of hotel space here in town, particularly at the higher end. But there is significant investment in the hotel industry happening also in the higher end. 3 or 4 additional five-star hotels are coming in. And so that should reduce the pressure.

Now the hotel business…I am not going to justify this; I am going to try to explain it without justifying it. Whenever I go to foreign countries, including Rome, they tell me–for meetings, they tell me the rates during those meetings are much higher than the normal rates…they tell me, this is even true of New York. Because the occupancy rate becomes higher during meetings, they charge higher during meetings than is the case normally. So there is a distinction in every hotel. The rates vary from time to time. Now what these hotels in Ethiopia do is use the local customers as local fillers from whom they do not make much money and use foreigner, and the only way they distinguish foreigners is by passport. And if there is a consolation to your predicament, it is the fact that if you had been an American of Ethiopian origin, you would still have faced the foreign rate, it is just your passport that distinguishes you as a foreigner and nothing else. The justification behind it is that they make the real money not from Ethiopians that they use as a sort of gap fillers, but out of the foreign tourists. And the other justification is that on balance, the rates here are much higher than comparable cities. But I cannot justify it.

3. I have been visiting Addis Ababa frequently since 1991 (excluding the period between 1998 and 2008): there are still a considerable number of beggars and crippled persons, but I have noticed a drastic decrease. Why is that, did their economic situation improve? Or in the case of crippled persons, I think most are polio and such victims, has the healthcare situation improved in Ethiopia that much?

What is happening is that the people who used to come from every corner of the country without any specific job or opportunity of getting a job but to engage in begging on the streets in the hope and expectation that they would be able to survive on the alms given to them,  a good number of them are getting alternative sources of income. We have trained some them and engaged them in cobblestone working in the city; some of them have gone back to their village where the opportunities are significantly higher now. And over time, we are beginning to institutionalize support for those who do not have the means to survive on their own. We didn’t want to take a drastic step against it, because of the history—I don’t know if you know the history, of Addis- but what used to happen, when I was a student, when there was a meeting, this ugly face of Ethiopia will be cleaned off Addis streets for a few days and eventually they come back again. We felt that this would be insulting, to everybody, including the victims themselves. They are not begging because they love begging, but because they do not have other opportunities. So it took a lot of time because we wanted to do it in a sort of a natural way…and that is happening across the country. Step by step, those who are unemployed, but can work, are encouraged to be trained and given an opportunity to work. Those who can go back to their villages are also encouraged to go to their villages. And those that cannot fend for themselves in any way, then we encourage institutionalize support for them.

4.  A sustainable economy needs an efficient use of assets, why is the concept of maintenance so poor in Ethiopia? Don’t you think you are losing so much man hours and money to replace broken assets whose lifespan could have been elongated with proper maintenance—this goes to cars, lifts, street lamps, sewage, etc…

I wouldn’t be surprised if these assets happen to be government assets.

5.  Most probably yes.

I would be surprised if these assets are private ones. In terms of government assets, the culture is to build, use and dispose of. Maintenance has not been a major aspect of it. In recent years we have taken steps for maintenance work to maintain power installations, and telecommunications, infrastructure in general. We have specifically allocated funds for maintenance in these basic infrastructure projects. But housing is managed on the basis of its own income. The government has inherited a lot of houses, and we are not building new ones except low-cost housing and that is transferred to owners immediately so that they take care of it. But we still have government houses that are managed by the public enterprise, and because this institution has no future—it has a past but no future—sooner or later it will disappear because we don’t have plans to own government housing indefinitely. Over time, we will either bulldoze it of transfer it to the private sector. And there has not been a culture of maintaining these housing, so public assets are not properly cared for, especially real estate type of assets of the government. And some of it might come to the private sector; after all, those who run private housing might have been working in the public sector and sort of inherited the culture from where they were working initially.

6. Unemployment. How severe is it and what is being done to alleviate it?

In terms of unemployment, we have been perhaps lucky in the sense that rural-urban migration is extremely low, probably the lowest in Africa. This is partly a reflection of our focus on rural development and land ownership system in Ethiopia. So the influx from the rural areas that, traditionally, created portions of unemployment in the urban area, it is not happening anymore. The young people from the rural areas stay behind in the urban areas after they complete their education. Most of them don’t go back, to the rural areas, but they have some education. So unemployment in the urban areas is much lower than it was, let’s say, five years ago. The second reason why it is lower is because we have network programs here, small and micro-enterprise sector, we train young people, engage them in all sorts of public projects to give skills, employment opportunity and startup capital as a result of the work that they do. That has lessened the pressure but I can only say that the pressure has been reduced, it is not removed, it is never removed, and in countries such as Ethiopia, you don’t have unemployment insurance programs. So it remains to be a significant challenge but not as big as it used to be five or six years ago.

7.  Recently there is a shortage of cooking oil, sugar and other the price of other essential foodstuff is increasing…sometimes beyond the reach of the poor. How are you facing this difficulty?

Edible oil and sugar: We are at a tussle with the private sector who were distributing edible oil and sugar, because it had been monopolized by a small group of about five businessmen and they were charging exorbitant prices (what is called rent-seeking), and so we had to distribute it through cooperatives, and the traditional channels of distribution has interrupted sugar and edible oil. So we had a shortage in the recent weeks but it is an artificial shortage because we are not trying to restructure the distribution and retail sector– it used to be a forest where nobody knew who was who, whose income was what, and so on. So we are requiring everybody to have a tax identification number, like the social security number. And most of our businessmen don’t like it. So it is a difficult task.

Eritrea, Ethiopia & Egypt

8. Ethiopian Egyptian relationship has been deceiving on the surface because, deep inside, both countries were mutually suspicious of each other—two major issues have been the Eritrean revolution and, hydro politics: the Nile water. You have now embarked on an ambitious power generating (not irrigation) project and it is making the Egyptians uneasy. You said that the projects would protect both Egypt and Sudan (in fact you said they should partially fund the projects). If that is the case, how do you explain the Egyptian reaction? Or is it the Egyptian wish to keep the 1929 agreement intact? Why would they object to Ethiopia generating power from the Nile?

You know the advantage of being in my position is you get to access information that is not necessarily publicly available. And the first thing that I learned that these Nile issues, the debate on the distribution of The Nile issue, was really a bogus issue. It was really a bogus issue because if you were to treat the Nile basin–and the most sensitive part of the Nile basin is the so-called eastern Nile, the Nile that goes from Ethiopia to Sudan and Egypt– because 85% of the water that goes to Aswan comes from Ethiopia. This part of the water, Nile, which is supposed to have a shortage of water, doesn’t have a shortage of water; it only has a shortage of money. Ethiopia is structured to be the power generating center of the Nile, geographically. Sudan is, geographically, created to be the main agricultural producer of this region. Only the delta part of Egypt is supposed to produce goods, agricultural goods. And so if you use the Nile water in a rational manner, there will not be any shortage of water. The fact is, for example, that if you built dams in Ethiopia and removed Jebel Awliya from Sudan, it is useless; it generates 17 megawatts of electricity but exposes Nile water to evaporation in unheard of proportion. So you don’t need the regulation of Jebel Awliaya because the water would have been regulated here. And reduce the operating level of Aswan Dam, you would have enough water to irrigate more than a million hectares in Ethiopia, and 4 to 5 billion cubic meters of additional water for Sudan, and Sudan can use the water better than anybody else. The Egyptians themselves have a water conservation project which will end in 2017. And their plan is to save 8 billion cubic meters of additional water. Now, unless they want to take this water and let it evaporate in the desert, they don’t have land that requires 8 billion cubic meters of water. So it is not really about water, it is about politics and power.

The problem, as I see it, is the politics of the Egyptian elite: there is a bit of racism behind it, and there is a bit of colonial inheritance behind it. Colonial clerks tend to be more colonially inclined in their attitudes than their masters and the Egyptians have been, to some extent, clerks of British colonialism in Sudan. And so they inherited this British theory of the Nile serving Liverpool via Egypt. Egypt growing cotton for Liverpool. And finally, the Nile has been this drug that has been used to hook the Egyptian people for external enemies and justify this gargantuan state, Egyptian state which is there to protect the Egyptians vis-a-vis the Abd from the South. So it has been a political instrument more than anything else. And the fact that the Egyptian edifice is beginning to crack now, is allowing alternative opinions amongst Egyptians to creep through the cracks… and these opinions are: why should we quarrel over some natural resource that belongs to us, let’s see if there is a rational win-win alternative…this is unheard of, but it is beginning to creep even into the Egyptian media, so I am very encouraged by it.

9.  Do you intend to develop irrigation projects using the Nile in the future? And how would you balance the natural rights of lower Nile countries and your country’s right to exploit the Nile water resources?

The fact is that the Egyptians could sustain this irrational policy for a number of reasons. First, the geopolitical position was such that they could prevent Ethiopia from accessing grants, loans, and credits for projects on the Nile. They have completely shut off our access to credit whether it is from the World Bank, or Brazil or China or Europe or the USA.  And so they were assured, given the poverty level in Ethiopia, that Ethiopia will not be investing anything on the Nile, of substance. That was the key instrument. The other instrument they had was that Ethiopia itself was unstable and was not going to focus on development and it was surrounded by a hostile government. That is why [Gemal Abdel] Nasser went out of his way to recruit non-Arabs into the Arab League simply because they were in close proximity to Ethiopia—Somalia is a case in point. Now we have reached a stage where some of these assumptions are no longer valid. We are now able to do something significant. We first started with minor projects on the Tekeze [River], Lake Tana. Now we are in a position to be able to finance, on our own, the biggest dam that can be built on the Nile, in Ethiopia. We believe that this is going to dismantle much illusion amongst the Egyptians. We believe that this is going to convince them that they cannot stop us. We believe that this is going to convince them that they do not need to stop us because we are doing their job. The dams we build, we are unable to use 100% of their service, because much of the service is downstream-inevitably, unavoidably. So we will show them in practice, that where we build dams, these are not intended against them. In fact, these are dams that they ought to finance, at least partly, because they will benefit from them. So once we break this taboo, I believe the path will be opened for a rational engagement between ourselves and the Egyptians. By the way, on balance, the Sudanese have taken a rational position on the Nile. On the surface they seem to be twins on their positions on the Nile; that is far from the truth.

10.  Eritrea is considered a Nile basin country, what is the strategic leverage that Eritrea has to influence Nile politics?

Eritrea is a marginal player on the Nile; it is part of the Nile riparian countries primarily because of the Tekeze River. As you know the Tekeze River or the Atbara River in Sudan carries about 9 million cubic meters of water. There are one or two minor rivers from Eritrea that flow to the Tekeze and maybe contribute about 0.1% or so of the Tekeze which is itself part of the Nile basin. Every stream counts. That is why, technically, Eritrea is a riparian country but it is not in the meetings of the ten riparian countries of the Nile. This is not by design but because your president is not infatuated with international organizations of any sort.

11.  Ok. Now, he has never been my president…sorry for the correction Mr. Prime Minister….The head of the Eritrean regime had close relations and coordination with Egypt on Somalis’ and Sudanese politics. He also had good relations with Kaddafi and benefited from him financially. Now, Mubarek is gone and Gaddafi is on the edge of the cliff. How do you think this would affect the Eritrean regime and how would that affect the stalemate between Eritrea and Ethiopia?

The thing is that Isaias needed the support from these parties, to do not just their bidding, but his own internal drive. So this was a marriage of convenience. This was not Egypt and Kaddafi hiring out Isaias. These [are] two groups coming together on the basis of a common agenda. Egypt providing some of the diplomatic clout, some of the training and assistance; Kaddafi providing the finance and Qatar also providing the finance. Now, what the current environment suggests is that this external support is no longer available. But that doesn’t mean Isaias is going to change his color; he will seek alternative sources of financing—and by the looks of it, he is likely to look at possible mining resources within Eritrea to fill in the gaps that will be left by the discontinuation of support from abroad.

12.  According to the Eritrean regime, your government is on the verge of collapse and they mention defections and military operations by your opponents in North Ethiopia. How true is this?

According to the Eritrean regime, we have been on the verge of collapse, for what…ten years now! And these ten years happen to be, in the eyes of a neutral observer, the golden years of Ethiopia. We have been growing at a double-digit rate for seven, eight years now. The country is stable from end to end. Obviously, we have our own challenges; we are still a very poor country. Seven years of growth does not mean much when you start from the bottom of the heap. But there is clearly light at the end of the tunnel and it is visible to every Ethiopian. And you don’t have to come to Addis to see it; you could see it in Washington. Ten years ago, none of the meetings that we would call for would be attended by any significant number of people. The other day, in spite of a massive campaign by the Diaspora opposition and the Eritrean regime, we had thousands upon thousands of Ethiopians attending our meeting and deciding to buy bonds for the construction of the dam on the Nile. So, it is a very stable government and that is what every major country that has interest in the region would tell you. I think this [claim of imminent demise] is how they keep the illusion of succeeding in their agenda of regime change in Ethiopia.

13.  After the last election and after forming a new government, observers believe that the old guards [of the Ethiopian ruling party] were unceremoniously distanced from the center and new blood occupied their positions. This is said to have caused a rift between you and some of your colleagues. How true is this?

It started out with my declaration that the last term would be my last term. In some ways, that was my public declaration of that intention and it was contradictory to normal party procedures. Because it has not been sanctioned by party debate; I didn’t do that by accident but it was, nevertheless, not within the rules of the party. So it pressed a debate on succession and carried out studies and we saw experiences of other countries and, in the end, leadership came to a conclusion that there should be an organized, gradual withdrawal of the leaders of the armed struggle. And the best way to withdraw is while the going is good, while that leadership is still alive and able to influence policies from behind. So, at that stage, this was the consensus position. Now, who goes first and who goes later—there was some debate but it was mostly focused on when I leave when I depart. And then it was agreed that I will depart at the end of this term. And that would be my departure and the team that departs with me would be the last one. That is why everybody has to depart between the beginning of this term and the end of this term. So it was a consensus position and there has not been any of those that have been retired. They are not unemployed—some of them are ambassadors, some of them are training our leadership, some of them are working in public enterprise and so on and so forth. So there are no complaints.

14.  Last year, you signed an agreement with the Ogaden groups and they even participated in the elections and are part of the local government.  Are they in the federal government? If you could describe for me where that agreement that reached… what was achieved and what was not, maybe sticking points if there are any?

Yes we signed agreements with two groups—one was an Islamist group, an offshoot of Al-Itihad Al-Islami group. Their agenda, their decision was to get out of politics and integrate into society, do business and so on and so forth. That has been completed. And then we had an agreement with one group, one faction of the ONLF, again the agreement was a process of integration domestically and for them to try to win over the rest of the ONLF particularly in the Diaspora. So I believe the program and the agreements are being implemented quite well.

15.  Are they in the federal government?

Yes

16.  Now you have South Sudan as an additional country that borders Ethiopia. As if how Sudan would have close relations with Ethiopia and Eritrea is not confusing enough, South Sudan has close relations with both Eritrea and Ethiopia. Can you tell me how that is possible when there are so many interconnected crises in the region?

The assumption is wrong. South Sudan is not in good terms with Eritrea. Before South Sudan is born, Eritrea is beginning to destabilize South Sudan. Those in the know in the region, they know among other things the Eritrean regime is beginning to arm a militia group led by a certain gentleman known as George Attol.  I am told by reliable sources that the Southern Sudanese went to Asmara to plead with the president not to destabilize southern Sudan, and I am told that the response they got is a surprised stare—which is typical of the Eritrean regime: they never admit what they are doing. So, the relationship between South Sudan and Eritrea is typical of Eritrea’s relations with everybody in the neighborhood.

17.  I heard from some sources that a leader of Southern Sudan is apprehensive that Ethiopia has relations with the Eritrean national opposition because he considers them Muslims and Arab influence. First, is this true? If yes, what was your response? Why would a new country adopt such a bigoted position?

The assumption is wrong again. Silva [kir, the leader of South Sudan] never, ever, asked me to, in any way, affect my policy on Eritrea. Not just with the opposition, but also with the regime. He never raised any of this issue, at all. Naturally, he didn’t, at all, raise the issue of who we are supporting or nor supporting section of the Eritrean opposition…I don’t think he draws all that conclusion of  Eritrea.

I have heard and seen articles in the Eritrean opposition website about what Eritrea could teach southern Sudan and that and the other. I think this is largely ill-informed. First of all, southern Sudan currently has no business with Eritrea, they have no borders, and they have no economic interaction. Ten years ago, they needed Eritrea because they needed arms; now, if they need arms, they buy them; they can’t get them from Eritrea. So the only interest for Isaias in southern Sudan is that there is a significant Eritrean Diaspora in southern Sudan and they are doing well, business wise. And the regime is trying to suck money out of them like it does everywhere else.

18.  You have Libyan investment in Ethiopia. One of them is Libyaoil: Is it true that Libyaoil is owned by one of Kadaddfi’s sons? If that is true, wouldn’t [it] be a gesture for Ethiopia to hand over the assets to the transitional Libyan administration? How about the Libyan embassy in Ethiopia—what is its position, still with Gaddafi? And how much of your oil comes from Libya and how has the supply been affected?

I understand the embassy, at least formally, is siding with Kaddafi. The Libyan government has bought off Shell Ethiopia and it is now OilLibya. That is the only investment I know of the Libyan government or Kaddafi—it is very difficult to distinguish between the Libyan government and Kaddafi. I don’t know where Gaddafi private starts or where the Libyan government property ends. Now, the way we operate here in Ethiopia is to follow first international law—Security Council has said this property is a sanction on Libya that applies to Ethiopia.  Secondly, there is AU—sometimes we agree within them sometimes we do not agree with them. But even when we do not agree with them, we do not believe in publicly second-guessing them. This, we think, is part of the due that we have to pay for the fact that we host the AU. So at this stage, we have not recognized the national council in Benghazi, we wait for the AU to do so. Even in the case of, for example, Somaliland where we engage with the authorities like a sovereign authority, in everything except name. We refrained from recognizing them, and we have told the Somaliland authorities, they have got to get the African Union supporting them before we can recognize them. Again, in the case of [Alassana] Ouattara, in Ivory Coast. He is the internationally recognized president and he wanted to change his embassy here and we recognize him like the AU he is the internationally recognized leader, but we asked the AU if they would give us clearance because he will also be the ambassador not only to Ethiopia but also to the AU. The AU told us to hold up for a moment, hopefully, now they will give us a clearance. The way we operate here is such that we don’t take initiatives in recognizing states, especially in Africa.

19.  Over the last few weeks, you made statements regarding Eritrea and there were also statements from the Ethiopian ministry of foreign affairs. Is anything extraordinary happening at the border area, troop movements, preparation for an attack…or anything of that nature?

It is not so much about a tense border situation; it is about the fact that we have reached a stage where our previous policy of passive defense does not work, it cannot work anymore. In the past, our policy was to try and follow the terrorists that Isaias was sending across the border and try neutralizing them rather than responding at the source. That was fine for two reasons: first, their target ground opposition and terrorism was government and government institutions, specifically, military and security establishment and other government entities.  These are what they call “hard targets”, you can harden them and protect them. You can never be 100% full proof. If some terrorist slips through a crack you can take it from there and move on because these are government targets. In recent months, the target has been shifted. The recent crop of terrorists that Isaias sent across the border were targeting things such as Fil-Waha [hot springs in Addis, which is a tourist destination], Mercato [shopping district], taxis, buses—these are what they call “soft targets”. The instructions that they were given when they were being trained around Asseb in Dankalia region, was to change Addis into Baghdad.  Now, when you have such a soft target, the only way you can protect the soft targets is at the source. So, we now have to tell the Eritrean regime, if you carry outrageous acts in Ethiopia, not only the terrorists that you send but you yourself, you are going to pay. And our response is going to be proportional. As I was saying in parliament the other day, if they shoot a bullet at us, we shoot a bullet back at them. If this forces them to stop the destabilization activity, all the better for everybody. If they maintain the current state of undeclared war and do not escalate it, we will maintain a response that is appropriate to it, we will not escalate it. If they escalate it to a war and a full-scale invasion of Ethiopia,  we will do what we always said we will do in the past because this will be a second certified invasion of Ethiopia where the proportionate response to it would be to make sure that there would not be a third one. So there is a shift in direction, it doesn’t automatically mean that there is going to be war –it all depends on how Isaias responds.  [If it is] by escalation and invasion of Ethiopia, then we will have war. If he responds by de-escalating, then there won’t be one.

Djibouti, Eritrea & Ethiopia

20.  Last week I was in Djibouti and I visited the port facilities, the container storage, car storage, oil tank farms and dry cargo facilities. I also visited Bilbela, a town that seems to thrive on business from the Ethiopian drivers and the general Ethiopia-Djibouti business and the transport trucks that pass through it. I also saw thousands of Ethiopian trucks in that area. My question is: how much business is Djibouti getting from Eritrea? And if what happened ten years ago didn’t happen, how much of that business do you estimate would have been the share of Eritrean ports? And, if the political situation in Eritrea changed and there was a liberal, business-friendly government there, how much of this do you think Eritrea would regain…I mean, including Massawa, which is more convenient to the northern part of Ethiopia.

Quite a lot. The current prospects in Ethiopia now are such that even if we had Eritrean ports as key ports, we will still be needing Djibouti. So, while we have not given up on the hope of normalization between these two countries, Eritrea and Ethiopia, nevertheless, we are convinced that even with normalization, Asseb and Massawa, and a few other ports like Tio, will just not be enough. So we are investing heavily in Djibouti. We are going to build a new railway from Addis to Djibouti. We are going to build a new railway system from the north to Tajura—a new port will be built in Tajura [old Djibouti port]. In the short run, all of that business, 80% of that business would have gone to Asseb and a small percentage would have gone to Massawa, but now it is completely diverted to Djibouti.

21.  Can you give me some figures, the value of this business?

I do not have exact figures at hand, but I will be surprised if the net income of Djibouti were to be less than half a billion dollar or so.

22.  Do you think that this business is lost forever by the Eritrean ports or Eritrea would be able to regain these lost opportunities under normal situation?

It is going to regain it precisely because the demand of the Ethiopian economy is going to go beyond the capacity of Tajura and Djibouti to take care of the requirements of Ethiopia. For example, we are beginning to develop the potassium resources in the Afar region of Ethiopia—that is millions of tons per year that need to be transported. Technically, the closest port to this is not even Asseb, it is Tio. You could develop it into a big port. So under normal situation, Eritrea could regain most of these businesses and develop new businesses as well.

Thank you.

articles at awate.com

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If You Shall Do Wicked Things, Don’t Brag About It

[this archive material was fist published on Dec 12, 2002 @13:47] Arabic saying: إذا ابتليتم …

  • Paulos

    Selam My Good People,

    ክቡር መራሒና is telling us to capitalize more on our collective work ethic by working 48 hours a day including at a stretch. The obvious question is, is it possible to have a day that has 48 hours in it? One can certainly make the argument that, it is a matter of convention where people of the world agreed to have a day that has 24 hours in it instead. Equally, if people of the world agree, we can change it to 48 hours but of course, 48 hours is cumbersome where 24 hours is convenient for reasons that are rather interesting.

    Really really brainy people, circa 3 millennia ago, in an area called Sumer came up with the idea of dividing anything and everything including time and an angle into 60 parts. They figured that 60 has more factorials where it can be divided say, by 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 10, 12, 15, 20, 30 and 60. It has more factors than other numbers under. It is more convenient to have 12 hours from sunrise to sunset and another 12 hours from sundown to sunrise where an hour would have 60 minutes and a minute with 60 seconds.

    The same argument can be made for time zones in a globe as well. Those of us who live in North America are conscious about time zones as in Eastern, Central, Mountain and Pacific. How is that say, Pacific time zone as in California is three hours behind than New York? Well, again we go back to 60 and multiples of 60.

    A globe or a sphere has 360 degrees. And if we divide 360 degrees by 24 [For a day has 24 hours in it] we get 15. This means, 1 hour is equivalent to 15 degrees. If we translate the ration onto a world map or a globe particularly of North America, we see that, if California is three hours behind New York, it means, it is 45 degrees of and separated from New York, for again, 1 hour=15 degrees. As we can see, ክቡር መራሒና needs to be more realistic and practical.

    • Ismail AA

      Dear Dr. Paulos,

      You are sharing your scientific knowledge with normal and sensible human creatures; not individuals like the person you are talking about whose normality and sensibility have been deleted by personality depreciation syndrome-driven întoxication of power. Despots get conditioned that possession of tools of control over people they dominate raise them to levels of omnipotence and monopoly of truth that nullify sciences, logic and knowledge that humanity had gained through ages. For this man changing rules is his sole prerogative, and once his instinct drives him to speak, the ruled and governed should obey and execute an humanly impossible to possible; and the reason is simple: it is order that rules out all rules, mundane or Godly, regardless.

      • Paulos

        Selam Kbur Haw Ismail AA,

        It is again so sad and I would dare add መርገም to have Isaias Afwerki for a leader. His contempt for the Eritrean people is boundless. In the interview he made it clear that as much as he said the Constitution is dead and buried so is the issue of demarcation. In fact, he alluded that anyone who asks or suggests about the political prisoners or the indefinite national service, he or she is a Weyane cadre or as he put it, ወይጦ ሃሱስ ጃሱስ! Again, it is sad!

  • haileTG

    Selamat George,

    I don’t think IA’s lobbying efforts has anything to do with it. This is not out of opposing IA, it is true. Yes, the mekete group tried this or that but his sheer spoiler role meant that it would have been next to impossible to get them lifted. At the high of his spoilermanship he demanded compensation from the UN! The sanctions were imposed and lifted by Ethiopia’s diplomatic role. If IA can lobby to sway UN, how come there is no hope on the HR front? So the sanctions were indeed a card to play with because regime deliberatly went out to undermine everyone’s effort. Even Ethiopia’s effort was scaring it that it came up with strange argument of compensation to just offend the process. But PMAA has shown IA who is the boss here by swiftly getting the required US agreement. I feel sorry for those who take the scambag IA seriously.

    • Berhe Y

      Dear HTG,

      This PMAA is a real trickster. He tricked IA to say ok to what ever he asked him, by praising him and giving him Gabi, feres and camel and kaba and a ring, arrow and shield.

      He got him to join the UN HRC and now he got the sanctioned lifted. He is making him to answer to someone and turning him to a regular leader.

      Like you said, he has left no body to blame except himself now. With power comes responsibility.

      I will not be surprised at this rate, he will make him release political prisoners, end national service and eventually making him irrelevant …,

      Berhe

      • haileTG

        Hey Berhe,

        I agree with your views of PMAA’s role.I wouldn’t call him trickster (you probably didn’t mean it to offend). He seems a very astute, smart and responsible person. Considering how young he is too, it is even more impressive. IA can’t play with guys like him. He has already established a tone for IA, one that has subdued the latter considerably as you can judge from the interview. IA is now trading ሓሰር ንፋይ he has no buyers whatever he does. PMAA will not encourage him to continue with his old rif raf. Eventually, IA will get so stressed and likely run away to Turkmenistan for asylum.

        • Selam HTG,

          The effect of PMAA’s charm seems to have no limit. Not only ethiopians at home and those in diaspora have shown him love and approval as never before for any african leader, but world leaders like Merkel and Macron as well, who see him as a young african leader they can trust and help to carry out his reforms. His visits to france and germany and the usa were phenomenal. They turned out into ethiopians celebrating proudly their ethiopianness. They believe his words, and they believe that he respects his words.

          There are as those who worry that he has no organized political base whom he can trust and that is ready to defend the reform, and not only support it. He works in a situation where opposition politicians cannot be trusted. Nobody knows if they have really come back to carryout peaceful struggle and build the country, or they are opportunist power mongers.

          The kleptocrats and those who ruled the country for three decades with brute force have gone back to their hideout so that the law will not be able to reach them. They expect that the people of tigray will die defending the money they have looted and the land they have taken from others to fulfill their madness called “greater tigray”, thus creating an unstable situation in the country.

          There are those who urge the pm to use the known medicine (poison), i.e. use force to quell the instability. Fortunately, he does not seem to be a person who sees the use of force as his first and foremost choice, but the last thing he will resort to. He created a cabinet, president, and chief of justice where women shine. This i think comes from his wisdom that no more will testosterone bring peace and stability to ethiopia, but those who have always been on the receiving end of injustice in ethiopia and worldwide.

          We know where so-called decisive leaders who hid behind the army and security brought the country to. It should not be repeated again. As we saw, nobody can persuade people or convince them to do something by brute force all the time. It has failed in the past and it will fail again. We are all witnesses. I hope that ethiopians will continue to show their wisdom, and they will stand against power mongers and kleptomaniacs big or small, who are ready to sacrifice the people and the country.

          Finally, eritreans should not forget that PMAA is the pm of ethiopia, and in no way can he replace the president of eritrea or his government. What eritrea got up to now is through the pm Abiy’s positive influence within ethiopia and in the world political arena. It is not possible to ask somebody to do a favor (let me say), and later on say, you should not have done it. His work i think should be appreciated. In my opinion, it is up to eritreans to work for the rest. The ethiopian pm has built a bridge, and it is up to the stakeholders to reinforce and widen it.

        • Berhe Y

          Dear HaileTG,

          Yes that’s what I meant. This is what I think, if the PM gets elected in 2020, I would say IA will have a maximum of 2 years after that.

          Berhe

  • Paulos

    Selam My Good People,

    Same ‘ol same ‘ol. Double speak and blurred generalizations. Isaias offered no promises or national reconciliation so much for hoping he would say something different. Sad really sad!

    • Haile S.

      Selamat Paul et all,
      Yes, I agree.
      ኢሳያስ ኣዕሊሉ፡ ምስ ባዕሉ

      ቀደም ብድሆ
      ብድሆ ካይተፈጥረ ብድሆ
      ብጣልያን ጊዜ ብድሆ
      ብእንግሊዝ ብድሆ
      ብሃይለ ስላሴ ብድሆ
      ብደርጊ ብድሆ
      ነጻነት ብድሆ
      ዘመነ ወያነ ብድሆ
      ሰላም ብድሆ
      ሎሚ ብድሆ
      ጽባሕ ብድሆ
      ብድሆ በዲህና
      ምዝናይ ዝበሃል ዘይ’ናህና
      ሽርሒታት ብብዝሒ በዲህና
      48 ኣብ 24 ክንሰርሕ ኣለና
      ኣገልግሎት ነገልግል መሊስና
      ንብድሆ መሊኡ ዝብድሃና
      ካብ ደገ ከይተጸበና ብጽፍርና
      እንዳጠመና ‘እንዳተሓገዝና’
      ደርማስ ደርማሳዊ ደራሚስና
      በዲህና ስለዘይመትና ስዒርና
      ክንደይ ዝለፍለፉ ዝጽሕፉ ርኢና
      Think-tank ዝበሃሉ ጽሑፋቶም ንዒቕና
      ክንድዚ ተጻብኦ ብድሆ ሸርሒ ወቒዕና
      ……….. እስኪ ድረፉልና
      ዕድመ ማቱሳሌም ይግበሮ ዕድሜና

      ሕልሚ ደርሆ ናይ ብሓቂ ሓሊመ፡ ጳውሎስ!

      • Paulos

        Selam Hailat,

        You’re gifted! Thank you for the great poem. Dreams certainly come true given one makes an effort. As they say, the only dream-killer is an alarm clock ⏰. I wonder if a chicken actually dreams.

        • Haile S.

          Thank you Paul,
          Good question. Not sure. I know my dog dreams. She frequently emits noises that sound like barking while deeply sleeping.

          • Paulos

            Hailat,

            Three main things that gave us advantage over other species are: Big Brain, Language and Dexterity of hands. None of the other species have the above three and if some have as in elephants for instance, it is small in comparison to their size. Hard to believe it they dream for dream is related to languages and the unconscious mind as well.

          • Haile S.

            Paul,
            You can’t believe how many words can a dog understant if you teach it. Our does a lot. Even if she doesn’t speak, she communicates with her regards, head tilts, paws and barks. One thing that she use to do, but rarely now is, when her drinking water is law, she tests uf there is any remsining by touching carefully with the tip of one of her paws. I cannot explain her niuses while sleeping other than dreaming. Haven’t you fallen from a cliff and glided and landed safely when you were a child. I thought reading this is a universal dream for children. Similarly dogs and other animals may have something like that kind of dream. Cheers

          • Paulos

            Hailat,

            I never owned a dog myself except that we had two at home back in Asmara named “Lucky” and “Bobby.” But even as a child, I was never fond of any animal including a cat which is my nightmare.

            For instance, I remember my mother on two occasions asked me to slaughter or kill a chicken or hen as we used to call them back then. To my shock, the hen started walking around after its neck was partly snapped or cut. Thing is, according the common belief, if that happens, it is said that it is an indication of a long life for the person. Sad for the chicken but a sort of heart warming for me. Never said ok to my mother afterwards when she asked me to do the same thing come ኣውደኣመት።

          • Haile S.

            Paul,
            Then you will live as long as Matusalem ~900 years, as long as your Aya IA 🙂 🙂 :-), if Wedi TKul wish sticks as he sung those words to IA and Abiy, I think. እንቋዕ ዝመተ ጸሊም ደርሆ ኣይተሳገርካ ጥራይ, this misfortune again exists in many cultures. Best

          • David Samson

            Selam Haile,
            Growing up, we often struggled to get money for Cinema Dante and watching soccer in SanSiros. Looking back, why did we skip the free cash that was mixed with ጸሊም ደርሆ?

          • Paulos

            Selam David,

            As you know, Cinema Dante was 75 cents per ticket and that d*mn 75 cents was hard to come by. One of my desperate moment to get 75 cents was when two feature movies were shown at Dante. One was a super great Karate movie called “Four Riders” and the other one was an Indian movie titled “Jignu” where Darmendra in it playing a burglar who steals a precious stone as in a diamond. It was one of my happiest moments when I managed to get three d*mn quarters.

          • David Samson

            Hi Paul,
            You remind me the good old days of shouting ‘Kadro’ when “Four Riders” film was blurred due to repeated exposure to light.
            I do not know if you could remember: most of us had our own heroes, and mine was Darmendra. Do you know an Eritrean comedian and an artist nick named “Jignu”(Real name Girmay Mokennen)?. Blimey! Some people just do not get old. The guy has been acting since Tsegay Haddis’ days and still looks young.

          • Paulos

            Selam David,

            Same here. Darmendra and Amitabachan including Himamalin were the stars we grew up under. I am sure you remember “Sholay” the movie where three of them in it. Man, I watched that movie more than three times or so for the guy who worked behind the projector at Cinema Roma was my old man’s best buddy and he would get me sneak in for free. As it happened, Hemamalin was on the news not long ago for she had car accident. She has gotten old which s*cks really.

            A bit of a tabloid stuff to get you up to speed 😂—She was married to Darmendra and both have two grown up children.

            Yea I know of “Jignu” and not sure if it is a rule of thumb if you will but artists in general seem to freeze in the flow of time.

          • Haile S.

            Selamat David,
            BTW, I am working on our discussion of the week. If you see me distracted, it is Paul’s fault. ዕላሉ ሓዳርካ እዩ ዘረስዕ። If I understand you correctly, do you think the Dante guards would run away not to cross a black hen, for you and I to snick in freely? ፈሲ እንዳ ዳንተ ከማን ኣየህደሞምን! 🙂 :-).

      • haileTG

        Merhaba moxie,

        Great as usual! It actually got me thinking as I read this poem. Imagine the real thief dressed in a police uniform and helping with the search for a wanted thief (which is himself)? If we have done all the above ብደሆ then why not one against the one calling for ብደሆ, IA himself? Because it wouldn’t be true to say Eritreans can resist when he can get away with broad daylight murder. About time to turn the focus closer to home:)

    • Abrehet Yosief

      Selam Paulos,
      Here is a joke from the old days and the video released in 2015.
      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mtAfOUSHXNs&feature=player_embedded

      • Paulos

        ብሩኽ ሰምበት ንዓኺ ፍትውቲ ሓፍተይ,

        I am still laughing. Thanks for the joke. Not sure which High School you attended in Asmara. There was a joke about this guy who taught one of the sciences in High School and as it happened his parents owned convenience store in part of Asmara and he tended to it in his student days. And the joke was, when a buyer walks in to the store and if he or she asks if they have a candle, he would say, ሽምዓ የብልናን ክርቢት ግን ኣለናና።

  • Blink

    Dear all
    I tried to watch Issias but I couldn’t due to his babbling here and there , whatever he said he does not make any sense at all . He keep repeating Cold War and then 30 ዓስርተ . I think the man is sick , I mean sick that he is forgetting what he said just before 2 minutes.

  • Abrehet Yosief

    Dear Awate Readers
    Eri Tv made my day. I watched a play that had already started so I don’t know the title. It is a shop whose walls are full of slogans, such as the virtue of patience and one gem “pride leads to destruction.” It shows a father and son who arrive at the shop to pick his birthday cake. They are met with a slew of characters who require them to answer useless questions and fill forms. Each employee gives long explanation on why patience is important and more convoluted steps that must be taken before the cake can be picked. Every time the desperate father, who is now pressed by his son who needs to use the restroom, complains a big guy holding a stick walks around growling. The father ends up agreeing to every stupid demand until he can no longer take it. He scoops up the cake with his bare hands and threatens everyone if they would dare get near him. It was very well written and hilarious. The dialogue of the employees could be a direct copy of our dear leader’s twisted logic. That they showed this play half an hour before the interview starts is the best comedic timing.

    • Paulos

      ሰላም ፍትውቲ ሓፍተይ,

      Protesting through ማስያ? A PFDJ zombi may read the play differently. Subjective as it is, it wouldn’t have gotten the green light from Charlie, if the play was subversive.

      • Abrehet Yosief

        Selam Paulos,
        I don’t think it was a protest or subversive at all. They live in an echo chamber listening to their own voices. They fail to see the irony.

  • Haile S.

    Dear Awatawian,

    As the tigrigna saying goes ሕልሚ ደርሆ (hen’s dream, unrealizable or something unimagineable), you might consider I am wishing the hen’s dream to be realized, but the best words that IA could say today is to announce the end of EPLF’s (PFDJ) and his mandate. I can imagine the Hen’s dream is to pick grains on the ground and lay eggs. Eritrean’s too! To pick the grains from their ground, build family and end the protracted Ghedli that allowed them to be able to do the picking on their ground and live happy.

    • Paulos

      Happy Saturday Hailat,

      Isn’t it sad in this day and age the entire life of 5 million people depend on a single man who is an absolute cruel and lunatic. And speculating if he is going to talk about X or Y. Simply because there is no Constitution or political institutions to hold him accounted for. ናይ ባሓቂ ሓጥያት’ዶ ኣይኮነን ንሓደ ጽሉል ሰብኣይ እንታይ’ኮን ይብል ይኸውን ኢልና ክንጽበ!

      • Haile S.

        Selam Paul,
        Sad indeed, but that became our reality. His front reinforced him, put its trust on him. The people put their trust on the front. No other front could break this vicious cycle (ዕንክሊል). The hope is the round movement of this cycle will end up beaking and opening the vicious dictatorship.

        • Amanuel Hidrat

          Selam Hailat (Haile-S),

          “His front (his organization) reinforced him, and put its trust on him. The (Eritrean) people put their trust on the front (organization)” is in fact the exact political reality in our nation that negate the one man institution argument.

      • Amanuel Hidrat

        Selam Dr Paulos,

        ሽግር ኤርትራ አብ ሓደ ሰብ ክሳዕ ዝወገናዮ መፍትሒ ክትረኽበሉ አጸጋሚ’ዩ:: ሓደ መራሒ ትካላት ሃኒጹ: ሰባት ኣብቲ ትካላት ተሰኹዖም ከአ ነቶም ውጥናት ዝሃንደሶምን ዘውጸኦም አቅዋማት ዘተርጉሙ ክሳዕ ዝሃለው እቲ ስርዓት ናይ ሓደ ሰብ ስርዓት’ዩ ምባል አጸጋሚ ጥራይ ዘይኮነስ “ኢፖለቲካዊ” አዛራርባ እዩ:: ብዘይ ሐደ ጽኑዕ ውድብ (ዕላምኦም ብዘይገድስ) መንግስቲ ኾይኑ ምስ መንግስታት (ትሕዝቶ አመራርሖም ብዘይገድስ) ካልኦት ሃገራት ዝዋሳእን ናይ ሐደሰብ ስርዓት ተባሂሉ ክጽዋዕ ግጉይ እዩ:: ንስርዓት ኤርትራ ግቡእ መግለጺኡ ክንህቦ ክሳዕ ዘይከአልና ንሽግርና መፍትሒ ክርከቦ ማለት ዘበት::

        if the so called “one man” is protected by the “institutions” he built, and the institutions he built are run by his colleagues , even if the instructions are directed from the top, it is not a single man institutions. A single man, however powerful he might be, he can not survive this long without a formidable organization and committed followers.

      • David Samson

        Selam Paul,

        I have not seen IA’s interview since 2001 and highly unlikely to watch him live again. I am not in the habit of consuming lies. In fact, calling or naming it as interview is abusing the word and the profession it represents. I have got better things to do this afternoon: my beloved Gunners are playing Liverpool. I know we are going to lose the match and will feel gutted but better than listening to MinyaKolele.

        Having said that, I suspect you will watch a fresh-faced IA, buoyed by the peace process, and rightly feels that he is in a strong position since the end of the war.

        • Paulos

          Selam Dave,

          I agree. The guy is not only a complete turn-off and freaking boring but as you put it, he lies through his teeth as well. My kids will keep me busy today and very unlikely that I will watch the “interview” live today. Again, my apologies for not responding to your earlier comment of the other day. Good luck with your team.

        • Amanuel

          Hi DS
          Yes I couldn’t agree more and the last message ( I won’t call it an interview because it is one sided) of IA I watched was in April 1993.
          Instead of watching his AjeWjow ( bla-bla) I watched Arsenal & Liverpool game and I am not disappointed. Please don’t write off the Gunners.

          • David Samson

            Selam Emma,
            I was dreading we are going to thumped down five nil, but rather pleased with the draw. Liverpool must have left their 3rd and 4th gears’ at home. No chance of the Gunners lifting the trophy at the end of the season. The league is almost fixed— it is between City, Liverpool, and outside chance for Chelsea. I do not know if it is true: Alamuda tried to buy Arsenal. No Habesha player in the premier league. Even the Ethio-Arsenal player bloke vanished without any trace. Is it our gene or the magic Injera is doing the trick?
            I heard IA and many African dictators support Arsenal. It is shame the Gunners are painted and linked with nasty names.

  • Blink

    Dear Ayneta
    Agreed but if you state the truth you will be accused as “ islamophobia “ which is really not helpful for Islam to readjust its old an practical way of doing it . Most ME moderate scholars of Islam are being pushed by the people you see in Pakistan, Iran , Afghanistan, KSA , Qatar, Egypt and many others. What good is there for any open minded person to brag about old Islam at this age . Some people are simply irresponsible or they are acting on behalf of the Chequers. The sad part in this issue is a bearded man in Iran can sentence your life to death , how crazy do you think these who obey are ? I have always think the religion need to adopt to new reality . How could sentence one woman for 8 years for drinking with the things you used ? I mean it’s madness .

    • Reclaim Abyssinia

      Hi Blink,
      Don’t you think your statement is a bit provocative? Do you think the Eritrean Muslim people that read this post will agree with your statement of “Islam to readjust its old an practical way of doing it”

      I think you are way too advanced for Eritrea, &ethiopia, maybe this discussion of Pakistan should take place in another forum, maybe in the UK? Where it gets very much appreciated.
      RA

      • Berhe Y

        Hi RA,

        Blink favorite sport is to pick on religion and divert the attention away from the dictator when he is cornered.

        Have you noticed he was disappeared for three days when the discussion is about Abba Teklemariam speech.

        Berhe

        • Blink

          Dear Berhe
          Come on What is wrong with You , who is this ABA You are referring? What does he do that you did not hear before ? Pls let him eat the meal given by poor widows in the name of their dead husbands ተስካር :: Priest are my unlucky human being who by profession is simply making lies about things that never will come to reality.

          • Berhe Y

            Dear Blink,

            You have not heard the speech? I find it hard to believe, I was actually surprised you said nothing to discredit him.

            1) You should listen and comment on the content, if you have something to say.
            2) He said it from inside the country (the point you were making to discredit Minister Berhane that others made the speech or wrote the book because he was sick or something, to discredit him).
            3) You did not sleep to discredit Haji Miss when the Acria incident happened.

            May be I made a mistake now 🙂 I ruin your lifting sanction celebration weekend.

            Berhe

          • Blink

            Dear Berhe
            I am just trying to understand how you put me to the groupings of your that I support PFDJ , berhe you are an intelligent man and I believe you are good too but I couldn’t comprehend how you can’t see Eritrea and PFDJ from different angle . I believe the sanction did nothing to PFDJ infact they used it to their advantage but Eritreans I mean Ordinary Eritreans do lose big time due to sanction, they lost big investment. The sanction is not being used to punish the leadership but Eritrea all Eritreans . I think you should refresh your program about this .

          • Berhe Y

            Dear Blink,

            It’s not that you support PFDJ openly but you oppose openly everyone who opposes PFDJ.

            The sanctions did a lot, yes there may some ERITREAN businesses that may have impacted but I think, because it prevented IA from initiating another reckless war then it has served for the greater good.

            He put his hands where ever he can, Somalia, S. Sudan, Congo, Darfur, Djibouti, Ethiopia, Yemen, the Palestinian, The Tamil Tigers, North Korea, Iran, Liybia..

            Berhe

          • Blink

            Dear Berhe
            Do you think Issias is short of arms ? I mean how could you miss this sir . PFDJ has never worried about weapons shortages. PFDJ are sitting in a chair that used again and again about getting weapons and war machines. A sanctioned country has a unique problem for getting investment or any kind of such . Remember who is the victim in this . By the way that hearsay about Somalia , South Sudan , …. is just a hearsay . Trust your own logic , if we all hade opposed Qerenlos and his pals from the get go , we could have now a very vibrant opposition but people like You encouraged these people to get drunk with ethnic politics and religious views and now everything about opposition is a mess . I oppose horrible opposition , I was a constant member of EPDP for a good time hoping they will adjust and crush or pull people like Qerenlos yet to my disappointment they failed and you guys produced Tesfatsion which to my dismay .

            Who do you have I can support?
            The competitors must be about ideas not about ethnicity, grouping or religious lines yet everything about them has been all away from ideas .

          • Berhe Y

            Hi Blink,

            Here you go again the “pure opposition”. Sanctions is about arms as well other interests of the regime.

            May be it was my ignorance but recently I met this Canadian families who sponsored kunama ERITREAN and were I was helping with translation and stuff like that.

            I had no idea the Kunama population is 60,000. At this rate they will extnics and it’s realky shameful. Querlinos and others are right in fighting this regime with what ever means they have.

            Speaking of EPDP, it them who weaken the opposition with their EPLF baggage.

            Berhe

          • Blink

            Dear Berhe
            It is not the fighting bad it is the way he bulldozed others that matters , 60,000 , I don’t think they are even 30,000 or 20,000 . The fact that Qerenlos thinks he will administer Barentu and Tekimbya shows everything with his views. The way he bulldozed our founding fathers as well as prostited with weyane was the only reason that I mentioned. The way he tried to humiliate Eritrean elders in Ethiopia is the reason I mentioned.

      • Blink

        Dear RA
        It is not my intention to provoke anyone but the facts on the ground are simply too big to hide or forget. I have an uncle in Saudi who become an advocate for wehabisim and by his standards of Islam almost all Eritrean Muslims are not Muslims , in his book all Eritrean Muslims need a Salvation Army to teach them his way , I rarely meet this blood related man and when ever we meet ( he zoom to Europe or America once a while ) he will freak out by my presence. Infact some times anyone in the house can see his urge of hate towards me because we both can not go together at any family discussion, the reason I am telling you this is because almost all Eritrean Muslims in Eritrea are decent people who born from within and I believe all will be angry and sick to hear the Pakistan woman problem . When I say angry and sick I mean it because I know them well . RA it is the facts that you and has to tell as it stands .

  • Blink

    Dear readers
    According to AFP John Bolton played a role in removing USA insisting position on Eritrea’s sanction and the draft is moving to remove the sanction, what is he going to ask from Issias ? Remember it was John Bolton who rejected the ugly Rice from destroying the Algeris Agreement between weyane and Eritrea. I would love to call rice and Frazer the ugly head about this . As well all know sanctions are counter productive and are less to hurt any countries leadership. Sanctions do play a great role in removing economic investment especially if the investment area is commodity.

    The sanction was a false one orchestrated by weyane and their American ugly two women who wanted to give weyane a free pass. What happened to to people views like I mean saay and many who has been taking people to court and then judge themselves even before any truth come forward. Here again Eritrea didn’t start war with Sudan , Yemen , Ethiopia, Djibouti and Somalia , it was all played by weyane and their goons .

    Finally the sanction being removed , the war with Ethiopia declared over . What reason could it be to have hundreds of thousands young men under one belt for their ages ? What reason could it be for Eritreans to settle for Issias and his goons ? What reason does he wanted to say now ?

    By the way lower your expectations for Issias interview because he will say nothing important, he will repeat what we knew for 3 decades ግዚኡ ምስ ኣኸለ ክብል ክምሲ እዩ :: መዓስይ እዩ ግዚኡ ዝኣክል ?????

    • Berhe Y

      Hi Blink,

      I do not want to spoil your celebration mood because the sanctions will be removed.

      How did Bolton rejected Rice from destroying the Algeries agreement. He served under George Bush, Rice come after him under Obama? How can he stop her when he had already left?

      The sanctions did work and IA and PFDJ were caged from further instigating another war with Djibouti, Sudan and create hovac in the horn by arming and training Al shebab and other terrirists.

      By no means I support the TPLF government policy of war on terror and in the process destroyed Somalia democratic progress and set it back a decade and destroyed so many lives.

      Berhe

  • Selam All,

    Maybe you have read about Asia Bibi, a Pakistani christian, who was on death row for eight years for blasphemy, and who was finally acquitted. This caused a countrywide demonstration and religious fanatics are demanding for her head on a platter.

    What i fail to understand is this paragraph on the Guardian, that says “Bibi, a Christian farm labourer, was acquitted of blasphemy on Wednesday. She had spent eight years on death row after she drank from the same cup as a Muslim, prompting false allegations that she insulted the prophet Muhammad.”.

    Why is “drinking from the same cup as a muslim” a blasphemy, or does it have a different connotation? Anybody, any idea. Thanks.

    • haileTG

      Hi Horizon
      Not sure if there is more to the story because the sharing issue seems to only prevent haraam from being cross contaminant. Here is what I found: “It is permissible to use the containers and utensils of non-Muslims if they are washed. It is possible that non-Muslims may eat Haraam or drink Haraam. Therefore, it is not permissible to eat or drink from the same utensils as non-Muslim due to contamination with Haraam. The spit and saliva itself of a non-Muslim is not impure. If a non-Muslim drinks water from a utensil, and it is known that he did not drink any intoxicant just before that then it is permissible for a Muslim to drink from the utensil used by a non-Muslim.”

      • Selam HTG,

        Thanks a lot for the explanation.
        Sometime ago i watched a video, in which an ethiopian priest tried to explain the two words “dogma” and canon”. He said that a dogma is a permanent and an everlasting belief (concept), while canon or the law, is the method of practicing religion, which is not monolithic, but can be somehow modified after the complete agreement of the church elders, in order to facilitate the practice of religion. It was more or less like this, as i put it, if i remember well.

        For example, ethiopians used to eat pork in the old days. From what i know it was prohibited (became እርም) during HSI’s rule by the ኣቡን of the time. Do ethiopians seem to care if they eat pork or similar products? I do not think that anybody cares, or any priests would ask their congregations about what one eats and doesn’t eat, which means that silently that decree is not followed by anybody, and not even the priests themselves, i hope.

        Now, in this 21st century when using a utensil could lead a person to his/her death, there must be something wrong really. Why are Muslim Clerics afraid of taking measures against such rudimentary practices, or at least try to ignore the case and thus show to believers that such secondary religious issues should not be the reason for a call to death of the alleged culprit? Eight years on death row was already a big injustice done to this woman.

        • David Samson

          Selam Horizon,
          I believe you are missing the point about the state of Pakistan. Right after partition from India, Pakistan had a minority Christian population. It was estimated to be between 3-5% of the Pakistani’s population. Rightly or wrongly, the religious fanatics used the blasphemy’s law to wipe out the minorities. I used the word ‘Wipe’ in its true sense. If you are a Muslim but have a grievance or some other issues with Christians, all you have to do is quote the verse. If the Christian is lucky, he might be imprisoned– that is exactly what happen to this poor girl–, but most likely you will be stoned to death by crowds. It is a well-known fact that the edict is used to settle jealousy or grievance. Many of the minority are business owners. If a rival wants to eliminate you, he just needs to create an excuse to invoke the verse and you are done.

          The political elites and establishments could hardly do anything about it, as the fanatics have a grip on the country. Any politician who dares to challenge these fanatics will not see another day light. There are many Pakistani who are ready to be suicide bombers. A Christian minister was gunned down for challenging the edict, and Benazir Butto faced the same fate.

          Now, the girl’s lawyer has fled Pakistan for fear of his life, and the girl is banned from leaving the country. In short, the Christians and other minorities have no any feature on the country.

        • haileTG

          Selam Horizon,

          You see, belief is a belief, they’re all the same size, shape, make, weight, hight, texture you name it. The belief that there is God is exactly the same as the belief there isn’t. The problem is that there is another belief that believes that my belief is more true than yours. And there is another belief that what I take as true is really true….it goes on like that. These beliefs allow for the believer to engage in activities that would normally be considered brutal and inhuman. To me it was not a woman who was on a death row, but God himself. How could one serve God by treating those created by God with such contempt? Is this woman not alive and impelled to be that human she is by the very power, light and and divinity of God himself. If she is killed who actually is impacted? Isn’t that the life force in her that is the work of God himself? So all religions are simply delusional in the sense that they fail to see all beliefs are identical and theirs is not and can not be special.

          • Haile S.

            Selamat ሞኽሲ,

            Completely agree with you. Let me quote Zer’a Yacob, the Ethiopian philosopher (borne in 1599) from his chapter “thought on faith and prayer” (my own translation from Claude Sumner’s book Sagesse Ethiopienne* (Ethiopian wisdom) written in french). …I was thinking to myself, is everything written in the holy scriptures true? I was thinkg a lot on this. Then I said let me go and ask the thinkers and knowlegeable. But later I said to myself, are people going to tell other than the thought of their heart? Indeed everyone says my faith is the true one. Other faiths are liers and God’s enemies. The ፈረንጅ (white referring to the portugese) say their faith is the true faith, ours is not. We tell them, not true. Yours is false, ours is the true one. If we had asked Mohammed- followers and jews- they will claim the same conviction. No human being can be a judge, because all humans are plaintiffs and defendants between themselves. …… While thinking all over these, I said to mysrlf: “O my creator, wise among the wise, right among the righteous, who created me with intelligence, help me understand, because humans lack wisdom and truthfulness, as David said, every man a liar.”
            *Edition Recherche sur les Civilisation, Paris, 1983.

    • Blink

      Dear Horizon
      In the old times the Christians were exercising horrible things and now it seems the Muslims turn , they have quite a similarity between them. Aljazeera the Muslim brotherhood channel will not seek reason for the woman but they are stack at the Saudi thing of a journalist who was a friend with Osama bin laden. I think the Pakistani woman news is the higher quality of Islamic theory administrating this globe . The PM of Pakistan at least tried , know the truth about Islamists and know that such attitude is shared by 70% of Muslims in the ME . Remember the game .

    • Amanuel

      Hi Horizon
      Drinking from the same cup is not the case here. According the two women accused her of blasphemy it was the reason why they had argument with her and during the argument they said she insulted prophet Muhammad, which the Supreme Court found no evidence.
      You can read the details on Aljeezra and BBC.

  • haileTG

    Selamat awatista,

    With the proposed lifting of the UN sanctions on the regime of IA expected to take effect in the middle of this month, the regime has no cards left to evade rule of law and accountablity. Although the sanctions were nothing more than toothless paper pushing, the regime even used it to argue at the HR debate last month. This is a great news because the emperor is now naked.

    • Abrehet Yosief

      Selam Haile TG,
      That is what I suspect tomorrow’s interview will be about. State things that convince the governments (or at least give them a way out) who insist on keeping the sanctions. He did a random interview in October as well.

      • haileTG

        Hey Abrehet
        Good point, but the sanctions will be lifted. The US has dropped its objections and the UK is tabling the res. It is expected it will pass without objection.

  • Abraham H.

    Selam Awatista, here is a quote from a news from voa Tigrinya, “ኣብ ኢትዮጵያ ነቲ ምስ ኤርትራ ዝህልዋ ንግዳዊ ርክብ ዝትግበረሉ ሕጊ ይዳሎ ከም ዘሎ ተገሊጹ”. Well and good, but I’m wondering whether there is any more a nation called Eritrea; what about the policies and rules from Eritrea regarding this common developing relationship? Why does almost everything that has to do with the new relation has to come from the Ethiopian side only as if the Eritrean people are not equal stakeholders? The situation in Eritrea is now becoming more about whether the Eritrean people have a sovereign nation or not rather than merely about rule of law and justice.

  • Abrehet Yosief

    Selam Awate Readers,
    Here we are on the eve of moqshish briefing from our dear leader. How lucky we are?! We will get to hear the vision of our new owners. I had hoped that SAAY has been freed from his obligation to summarize the torturous interviews, but alas that is not the case. SAAY are you there? We are counting on you.

    • Haile S.

      Selam Abrehet,
      I heard rumors that Sal is in Asmara to conduct the interview, unless he comes out right now and deny it. 🙂

      • Abrehet Yosief

        Selam Ayay,
        Tedemiru beleni? 😉

      • Berhe Y

        Dear Abrehet, Haile and all,

        Please do not disturb Saay. He is translating the speech of Abba to English.

        Ok I made it up. But I would urge him to translate the speech rather than spend time listing to the dreadful voice of death. We have tortured him enough in the past already.

        Berhe

        • Ismail AA

          Dear Berhe,
          I thought he could be immersed in reading and reviewing former minister Abrehe’s books.

        • Paulos

          Selam Berhe,

          We shouldn’t expect much of a different in tone or substance from the interview. It is going to be same ‘ol same ‘ol. He will take all the credit for himself including the collapse of the Weyanes and the rise of Abiy as well. No mention of the Constitution or the release of prisoners and will end the interview with ሳላ ጽንዓትና መኪትና and ብዙሕ ተማሂርና’ኢና።

          • Nitricc

            Hi P; we should expect something different. when PIA declared the game is over, this includes to PIA too. I have never been to Eritrea and i don’t know the exact mind set of the people but reading history, they are the most dedicated people who loves their country. Once the country survival is at hand, PIA better watch out. of course we should give him time but he must show the road map, anything else is trouble for him. He should start by freeing all political prisoners. no one will put up with his ” we are in war footing” i.e. no change mantra. Enough is enough.

          • Paulos

            Nitrikay,

            If he is going to say anything new, he will tell us to listen to a guy named Abraham Isaias Afwerki from now on and we will oblige as we are terribly good at.

          • Abrehet Yosief

            Selam Nitricc
            Didnt he do a no reason interview in October last year? This is the same. An opprtunity to say what is needef to get the sanctions lifted. That is all.

          • Berhe Y

            Hi Paulos,

            I don’t think much is expected but it would be interesting to know if he would ever say anything to the demands of Abba.

            I don’t know if it’s in reaction to Minster Berhane challenge and Abba recent demands. I call them demands because he was not asking or begging.

            Berhe

          • Paulos

            Selam Berhe,

            At the height of Dergue’s military offense, this is what Isaias had told Dan Connell, “…the more I get challenged, the more I become stubborn.” That is Isaias through and through. I can’t emphasis enough the fact that we are still naive and expect Isaias to change course mid-stream. ከም ጡብ ኣዴና ክንቀብጽ ኣለና!

          • Desbele

            Hi Paul ,
            Six comments on fb question ” what do we expect from DIA’s interview? ”
            1. Hasot
            2. Shenkolel and enkilil
            3. Nobody likes me or buys my evil tricks anymore. I resign. And the dumb zombies, follow me
            4. wela hanti. Teketilu tiray yesma’ana
            5.Ajewjew
            6. Angela Merkel is now national enemy

          • Paulos

            Selam Desbele,

            I feel sorry for ወዲ ዓቤ and ወዲ ነጣባይ as they quiver to even ask a staged question. I am sure it will be studded with self aggrandizement and a bravado of defiance laced with ሕጂ ካብ ከቢድ ግዳማዊ ተጻብኦ ስለዝወጻእና ነቲ ዘቤታዊ ተጻብኦታት ግን ስለ ዘይወጻእናዮ ሕጂ ከም ቀደምና ክንምክት ኣለና፣ ነዚ ዘቤታዊ ተጻብኦታት ምስ ሰገርናዮ ድሕሪኡ ናብ ሃገር ምህናጽ ክንኣቱ ኢና፣ ከምቲ ደቂ ኤሜሪካ ዝብልዎ we are not out of the woods yet ማለት ጋና ካብቲ ጫካ ኣይወጻእናን ዘለና።

    • Ismail AA

      Selam Abrehet,

      Many of us Eritreans have lost sense of hearing for what the despot says. This time around lots from the ranks of his own narrowing support base, who have been jolted by his treachery and betrayal (the issue of border demarcation is just one of them), will dismiss his haranguing with disguised and open distress saying: ክላ እዚ ከኣ . By the way, saay7 is very much missed. Hope his absence is for good reason. Actually, these days serveral of the gem commentators and discssants in this forum are being missed.

      • Abrehet Yosief

        Selam Ismail,
        SAAY is waiting for Bolokh 😉 He forgot he is our Bolokh..

        • Paulos

          ሰላም ፍትውትን ክብርትን ሓፍተይ,

          Bolokh ማለት እንታይ ማለት እዩ?

          • Abrehet Yosief

            Selam Hawey natey,
            (Now we can use double possessive grammer, as SAAY is no longer here.) Google “Eritrea digest”. You will see it there.

          • Berhe Y

            Dear Abrehet,

            I read it but it was long article and I didn’t get to the Bolokh definition part.

            I think what saay was waiting Abba Teklemariam Bolokh Ilom ember.

            Berhe

          • Abrehet Yosief

            Selam Berhe
            It is in reference to a play called “Waiting for Godoth”. The characters in the story wait for a character called Godoth for a long time. Then either they get fed up or realize they are supposed to write their own story and accept Godoth may never show up. That is in a nutshell or as it is relevant to our discussion here.
            There are more educated discussants here, and they could explain it better. But since we seem to have taken up the sport called bash-the-intellectual, I dont blame them if they stay quiet. You have to settle for a semi-literate ጥራዝ ነጠቅ like me. 🙂

          • Paulos

            ሰላም ክብርቲ ሓፍተይ,

            Knowledge delusion, they say. Our mind loves to play tricks on us where we think we know a thing or two. We don’t. Probably fragments of information where the totality is beyond reach. But again, know thyself is the Golden rule.

            It is not to demean those who strive to learn but to make a point that there is no an Ivory Tower where the rest are way down below.

            “Waiting for Godot” is deep and philosophical as they come where the gist is, if we are the sole owners of our fate and destiny sans the reins of Divine power. Imagine a writer is half-way in writing a novel but decides to stop writing in the middle. What should the characters do? Should they wait for the writer till he comes back and decide their fate or should they take matters into their own hands and continue the story on their own. As Shakespeare had it, the world is like a stage in a theatre and we all are actors in it. Who writes our stories and our respective role in it? God-ot?

          • Abrehet Yosief

            Selam Kibur wedi Kuburat,
            Didn’t I say the intellectuals will be better at explaining it? Thank you. Now here is a thought, what if the characters in Shakespeare’s play, instead of finishing their own story, jumped to a Christopher Marlowe’s play?

          • Paulos

            ትሕሽዮ ትሕሽዮ ፍትውቲ ሓፍተይ!

            How about if I say, it is your turn to enlighten us about if the characters opt to jump wagon onto Marlowe’s instead. I am sitting under the ዓባይ ዳዕሮ and waiting not for Godot but you ሓፍተይ to learn.

          • Abrehet Yosief

            Selam Paulos,
            I imagine Juliet would run away from her fate and appear as Hero. A priestess who lives in chastity but is devoted to the god of love. Similar to Eritreans devoted to freedom but live calmly under opression be it directly or indirectly.

          • Paulos

            ሰላም ክብርቲ ሓፍተይ,

            Thank you. I see the paradox and the reversal of fortune in life. Thank you again.

          • Ismail AA

            Selam Dr. Paulos and Abrehet,
            ክልተ በላሕቲ ምስዝ ክራኸቡ ኣብ ከባቢኦም ዘለዉ ጎደብቲ የብልሑ። Indeed bewildering is the paradox that awaits the brightest minds to break it.

    • Nitricc

      Hi Abrehet: No, this interveiw is if not an interview of his
      life but his entier presedency or lagecy. There is Weyane this Weyane that or
      no peace no war. This is the beginning to the bright future, the end of story!!! I also like and agree with speech a guy from Segenyti? He said everything needed to be said. The people put up with everything is because they love their country. When 100 million solders breathing in your nick, you got to protect the country but now that fear gone, time to hold the government and the government must start to answer questions. and the answering starts tomorrow. So, I agree with guy from Segenyti. If anything , he over prized PMMA. True, PMAA has done many things but too much prepping.

      • Blink

        Dear Nitricc
        I think for PFDJ to claim anything they have to show a demarcated border with the deceitful neighbors weyane and transfer Eritrea in to a democratic society unless up until now there is nothing to show or even talk about his legacy. Weyane are resettling new displaced Tigrians in to Eritrean land and they are even saying there will never be demarcation. I think PFDJ has to demand Abiy to respect his word and remove weyane generals away from Eritrean sovereign land.

        • Nitricc

          Hi Blink; No, don’t you worry about that. The border will be demarcated. The reason for the delay is PIA trying to give PMAA time to strength his power. I think if you think about it, if anything good to happen the current Ethiopian leaders must stay in power. Right now, Ethiopia is a mess. i.e. demanding the border to be demarcated, things may go wrong. There is nothing new what the weyane thugs do. they did the same thing in Wekayt and they did the same thing in Raya so, if they do some resettling in Badime, what is now? Besides, say the border is demarcated, if Tigryans want to settle in Badime, who is to stop them? But at the end of the Day the border will be must be demarcated.

          • haileTG

            Hey Nitricc,

            I wish PFDJ and IA were as cautious as that in 1998. I think the risk was much higher then than now to the people. Do you agree 🙂

          • Nitricc

            Hi Haile-TG; i couldn’t agree more. Even the war in itself was not necessary but back then there was too much testosterone and I believe TPLF had to plans to accomplish. one, is to teach Eritrea a lesson and to show who the regional boss is and the other to cement their superiority among the rest of the Ethiopians, if you don’t behave look what we did to Eritrea. However i agree some cautious could have helped to avoid all that nonsense. this time around both sides have learned their lessons.

  • Amanuel Hidrat

    Good morning Dr Paulos,

    I just listened Radio Assenna this morning. In its broadcast, they read articles written by Memhir Amanuel Sahle and Redi Kifle (Bashay). I found Amanuel Sahle’s article titled “እንታይ’ዩ ጥልመት” or what is a betrayal do substantiate my argument about the “individualistic behavior” of our people. Pls listen to it and let me know your take on his piece. This guy is a good Eritrean asset in the field of philosophy.

    • Paulos

      Selam Professor A. Hidrat,

      My apologies for the belated reply. Listened to it yesterday on my way from work. Certainly, Memhir Amanuel is a national treasure where everyone of us should give heed to what he says and writes.

      The reason I seem to think that “Individualism” is misplaced with in the Eritrean historiographic context is that, we as a society do not see, say, a family as an institution connected through a calculated risk taking or an economic model but as an organic entity where the whole is greater than the summation of its parts. We look out for each other. We care for the weak and the disable. We do not ibstitutionalize the elderly but we take them in to our adobe till they cross over to the other world.

      I certainly do not want to bog you down into either philosophical or historical threads to substantiate the genesis of Individualism where some thinkers trace it to the teachings of Calvinism, Rene Descartes’ Analytical Geometry and of course when the transition occurred from Agrarian to the Industrial Revolution. If there is a feel of Individualism lurking into the Eritrean social fabric, it is being stoked by the regime in Eritrea not as an asset but to instill suspicion and mistrust with in the fabric for a grander political gain.

      P.S. David, my apologies for not replying for I have been busy of late.

      • Haile S.

        Selam Paul,
        Upvoting you for “the incompatibility of individualism with Eritrean society”. ኣነሲ እንተጠፋእካ፡ EAL ተሳፊርካ፡ ብሓዲሽ ኣበባ ጌርካ፡ ክፉት ዶብ ሰጊርካ፡ ሙሉቕ ካይበልካ፡ ኣስመራ ጥቓ መደበር ወሪድካ፡ እንዳ በጠበጥ መሺሉኒ እንበቲቶ ክትበልዕ ዝኸድካ። ጸብጻብ ጉዕዞ ከመይ ነይሩ ክብል ክዳሎ ቀንየ ክሓተካ። ዝኾነ ኮይኑ፡ እንቛዕ ብደሓን ኣብ ዓወተ ተቐልቀልካ።

        • Paulos

          ሰላም ሃይላት,

          እንታይ ይግበር ኢልካዮ እንጀራ ሕሱም ኢሎም ኣቦታትና፣ ቆልዑ ከነዕቢ bill ክንከፍል ስራሕ ብኽሳድና ሓኒቑና፣ ግን ‘መስገኖ ፈጣሪ ንሱ ኣይሳኣን።

  • Mitiku Melesse

    Hei All.
    There is a cliche joke which goes like this. In US we can protest against the president… So what we can do the same against US president in Ethiopia too…

    Some Eritreans in Frankfurt repeated this joke when the PM of Ethiopia met more than 15 thousands gallant and joyful Ethiopians from all over Europe. The Eritrean protesters sounded that they have no idea what sacrifice Ethiopians have paid in the last 27 years so that Ethiopians welcome their leader with joy and pride instead of bombarding their oppressive leader every time they show up in a democratic country.

  • Acria

    Selam Girmay,

    You are welcome to delve into the politics of anybody as long as you have good intentions. We have ‘thin skin’ because we are unreasonably fearful of others and that majority of our population if not well educated. ” Our current culture” does not favor dictatorship rather dictators use our division and lack of education to pursue their own agenda through dictatorship. Eritrea would have been a very strong nation lest that we were fed with the division sentiment of ELF vs. EPLF, Muslim Vs. Christian, Highlander vs. Lowlander, and etcetera.

  • FishMilk

    Hi All. U.S.A. and Europe know that every country in Africa (to include Ethiopia and Liberia) has been colonized and they fully comprehend that every African country will remain in economic indentured servitude insolong as African countries continue to incur -family planning free- unabated spiraling population growth. There is a reason why most here have chosen to live outside of Africa. The Africa continent must have a major period of awakening! Otherwise, is there any real hope? The U.N.’s Strategic Development Goals (STGs) do not even mention family planning or population growth. How convenient!

    • David Samson

      Hi FM,
      Feeling blue, I have been airing similar views. Some of these numbers are really frightening. Not long time ago, Nigeria population was around 100K, but now shot up to 168k, while countries like Eritrea the population has remained either static or might even gone down.

      • Berhe Y

        Hi David and FM,

        Africa is bigger than China, India, US and most Europe put together. These countries have a population of 3.5 billion, while Africa is a third of these.

        I am not saying planned parenthood is not required but I don’t think it’s all legitimate concern, specially coming from the western countries.

        Berhe

    • haileTG

      Selam FM
      Berhe has touched one aspect. The main problem is that it is assumed that there will not be supporting infrastructure to cope with the projected growth of the African population. Africa is the youngest continent with median age only 19. This means half the population is not even in adulthood yet. By the end of the century Africa will top 4billion in population with over 90% of human population growth coming from Africa alone. Clearly, Africa will be the future of humanity but development needs to catch up to that. In as far as curbing that explosive growth however, it is next to impossible.
      This growth will also have profound impact in the global economy with half of the world being African. Another argument for peace and democracy for our continent.

      • Selam HTG,

        Although there is a limit to the number of people our planet can sustain, the main problem for the time being does not seem to be population growth, but if this growth is accompanied with increased food production, increasing the education level and job creation for the 1bn young africans by 2050, or not. Nelson Mandela’s widow and Bill Gates are ringing the alarm bell that underfed, less educated and jobless 1bn young africans by 2050 could be a danger not only to africa, but to the whole world as well, due to uncontrollable immigration that will follow. Africa can sustain 1bn young africans provided the above factors are fulfilled. It is possible to achieve these if african leaders start to work right from now. Otherwise, the negative impact on society and even the world will be tremendous, and peace and security will be in a big mess.

        Last time PMAA was saying that ethiopia could sustain double the number of its population if she succeeds to develop economically, agriculturally, politically and socially. That i believe is not far from the truth.

        Moreover, it is said that the exact opposite is happening in europe, because the european society is becoming the society of old people. By about the same time there will not be enough number of young people in europe to shoulder the expenses of their retirement and the welfare system. One of the reasons why chancellor Merkel opened the gates of germany to immigrants seems to be this.

        The president of the european union said sometime ago that africans should succeed to create there common market so that it could be complementary to the eu. This could be a twin to the eu and the two could create a huge market never seen in the world, i.e. industrialized europe and agriculturally developed africa to which consumer good production could be outsourced (something like that when interpreted).

        Therefore, the future is a common problem of all humanity. They either will swim together or drown together. Those who ring the bell should force the west to work for saving the climate and the environment, those who have robbed human beings and cannot make use of the money they are hiding in black holes all over the world, etc, should bring back the money and invest it on the future for the sake of humanity. This way they will save not only africans, but themselves as well.

        • FishMilk

          Hi Horizon: You mention ‘if this growth is accompanied with increased food production, increasing the education level and job creation for the 1bn young africans by 2050, or not’. Not to be pessimistic, but that just ain’t gonna happen. Is there a single good example in Africa at present to go by? You are right in mentioning that the opposite is happening in Europe (though not all countries), but that is not the case in the U.S., which has seen its population grow from 255 million back in 1991 to an estimated population today of 327.5 million. It is also not the case in France of the U.K. One must also keep in mind that computerization and robotics will have a future negative impact on the numbers of jobs. Amazon’s warehouse operations are almost entirely handled these days by robotics and they are looking at drones for courier delivery service whereas I see that Walmart and Sam’s Club are moving away from cashier services. Immigration will no doubt continue to become a very contentious political issue in the future for not only Europe and the U.S. but also for economically -better to do- countries on the African continent, which are now already getting hit with immigrant problems.

          • Selam FM,

            Why “that just ain’t gonna happen”, when africa has fertile land and abundant water (the nile, the congo, niger and many other rivers). Education and job creation need more investment. Instead of the only about 4% of gdp for education and nobody knows how much of gdp goes for arms purchase, and money lost through corruption, etc, what if this money is diverted and invested on education and economic development? It may not be impossible, as you said.

            Western governments may be forced in the future to block illegal capital flow from africa to the west and may be the east as well. Otherwise, africans would be forced to simply follow as immigrants the flow of their money, and the west and east that are today functioning as the destination of illegal african money will have to manage the result of uncontrollable human migration. Look at what is happening in latin america and central america where mass migration is taking place to the usa as never seen before, while the flow to europe has not yet stopped.

            Increase in the populations of the usa and some european countries you mentioned above, is due to the fact that these countries are already multicultural and they host a large number of migrants who increase the birth rate. Ask white americans and european, and you will hear a different story. One of the main reason for the surge of the far right and white supremacists in the usa and europe is because they are afraid that they will become minorities in the not far away future.

            Technology in general and AIs and robots in particular, are well known that they will affect job availability in a negative way in the future. That is true for the developed world, but, does it hold true for third world countries like africa? If you compare the cost of sophisticated and very expensive technology, with the cost of low wage african laborer, may be the later is much cheaper for poor third world countries and even for investors coming from rich countries. In addition who owns such technologies, the public or the private sector, will be an important issue in the future, because it affects everybody’s livelihood.

            If technology is introduced to african farming, farm product dependent export-oriented industries flourish, and their is world wide cooperation out of necessity, the future is not as bad as it looks, and africa may feed a large percentage of the world population.

          • FishMilk

            Hi Horizon and thanks for your thoughts. I really wish I had some of your optimism. For more than 3 decades, we have been lured to the attraction of a call for a ‘Humanitarian Relief – Development Continuum’ for Africa, much along the lines of what you have mentioned (i.e. investment in education & job creation). However and for a myriad of reasons all too well known (i.e. leveraged corruption through loan processes) it just hasn’t materialized. The U.N., not one to easily give up on what it clearly has failed to achieve, has over the past year, re-branded its earlier ‘Humanitarian Relief – Development Continuum’ as the ‘Humanitarian Development Nexus’ in support of the IASC Grand Bargain. I remember reading one study on 39 African countries from 1970 to 2010 which found that for every dollar borrowed, up to 63 cents left the continent within five years. Is this likely to change with China’s big entry into the scene? I don’t believe so.

          • David Samson

            Hi FM,
            I share your pessimism; I just can’t see any hope that its ills can be resolved by Africans. There is not enough arable land left to feed the growing population unless you are going to move over the whole population by rivers’ sides. This might not even sustainable.
            However, I am optimistic and confident technology and science will come to our rescue. Many experiments have been carried out on turning the Sahara Desert in to green land, and early signs are promising. It is also inevitable that future food will be grown on labs.

          • FishMilk

            Hi David Samson. I hope you are right in science and technology being our safety net. I see that India for example is touting duckweed as a possible solution to its future food needs. Maybe we might need to drastically change our dietary habits! Duckweed instead of fish or chicken? ….uh….got to drink far too many brews before I go there :).

          • haileTG

            Hi Dave,

            I think the traditional approach to agriculture is definitely not the answer. I agree with you there. But as the idea that was shared by PMAA (in my earlier post), a modern business model is needed. Suppose you grow oranges. The orchard that you run for growing oranges can be managed by you personally or by employing others. You could just be the owner who trades in other goods elsewhere too. So the orchard could just be part of your enterprise. Right there you will need to hire for tending the field. I can produce packaging for your oranges, someone else can make orange juice, someone else can make jams and other products, someone can be retailer and so forth. You can see how an ecology of business interaction can be formed, with your orchard as the primary producer. This was the idea shared by the PM of Ethiopia recently. This involves careful planning and boosting domestic investment and micro and macro planning to support that. Peace and security are also central. The economic potential of the agro sector can’t be underestimated.

          • haileTG

            Merhaba Horizon, FM and Berhe,

            Thank you guys, this is an interesting discussion. I find FM’s concern valid, Horizon’s practical approach valid too and so is Berhe’s view that Africa’s interest is not narrated by those to whom Africa’s interest is at their heart.
            But we need to accept that the African population will explode potentially above the current predictions (if the policies of family planning fail as in the past) and this will be a fact. Recently, I watched an interview with PMAA when he was opening an agro-industry involved in yoghurt production. I liked what he said there when he explained how the agriculture sector can be transformed into the biggest employer and the basis for a large chain of supply and demand in many sectors. I think the key economic model for sustainable growth needs to focus in agriculture. I very much support what has been started in Ethiopia (with many challenges) in this regard. Again, leadership is important, you can have a dead meat like IA shamelessly giving appointment for interviews (as if anyone cares what he has to say) or young smart and dynamic as PMAA with whom we can’t have enough of their fountain of new ideas 🙂 The latter is a must.

          • FishMilk

            Hi haile TG. We have to have hope! Interesting to note that many believe that empowering women lies at the center of controlling spiraling population growth in Africa. In this regard, the recent actions of PMAA are indeed encouraging!

          • Berhe Y

            Dear Hailat,

            I think the whole issue in Africa is, how the western interests really focus on industries that serve their interests, so the goods to be exported to them.

            For example, I did a quick search. Ethiopia exported 221 million coffee and earned just about 1 billion US dollars.

            Then you have Starbucks who served 4 billion cap of coffee per year and someone did the math and it’s about 40 million kilos of coffee beans.

            Starbucks made 20 billion in revenue…

            Same goes in all other African resources, like flowers, meat, and a of row materials.

            WHY…because they control the funny money called Foregin exchange and they force African countries to serve their interests and feed their greed.

            I know Starbucks have expenses and it employees a lot of people (238 thousands ) but I am sure they make a hefty profit, but compared to Ethiopian farmers who harvest these coffee (20 million of them) and you see where my problem is.

            Berhe

          • haileTG

            Merhaba Berhe,

            I fully share the sense of unfairness there. However, I have a dilemma: since we are vulnerable to exploitation and there isn’t much that can be done about that in the short term, who would rather exploit us, the west or the Chinese. The Chinese are losing their credibility very fast with their debt trap of poor countries and then forcing them to hand over things like land and ports. Read this:

            Mr. Rajapaksa was voted out of office in 2015, but Sri Lanka’s new government struggled to make payments on the debt he had taken on. Under heavy pressure and after months of negotiations with the Chinese, the government handed over the port and 15,000 acres of land around it for 99 years in December.

            The west does tend to adhere to basic code of conduct while raking in high profit, but the Chinese neither adhere to decent code of conduct but still rake high profits. Again, Kenyan government is dealing with increasing levels of overt racism of the Chinese towards Africans. This included barring Kenyans from using the same washrooms as Chinese and making verbal and physical threats and attacks against African workers in Africa.

            So, our long term economic relationship should try to figure out better rapport with the West in general and EU in particular. This approach also has political support base in the west, where as in China there is no awareness about fair trade, its all China first ideology. So this is a great dilemma I am faced with, looking forward to your thoughtful input.

          • Berhe Y

            Dear Hailat,

            It’s a sad situation isn’t it? I agree with David that we can’t keep blaming the west or the Chinese when our leaders are not responsible for they suppose to do. In Uganda for example, I saw similar abuse by the Chinese against a minister (a minister with his body guards, being abused by a Chinese guy for losing a bid) and the body guards just try to break and holding back. How pathetic can it get.

            Eritrea does not out of the Chinese control either. All three mining companies (Nevsun, Sunridge and another Australian company) were all bought out (Nevsun in the process I think), and I am sure when the new potash company will probably be bought when it reaches production.

            I think the best way is for African countries to invest in finishing products and export finished products instead of row materials. They will get more money, they create lots of jobs and they get more on long term (when they learn the know how). Brand player a big role, there for it may be good to buy western companies who use African products. For example, by the shoe company in Portugal if it uses African leather and figure out how most of the jobs can be outsourced to Africa and shipped to Portugal and sell the finished product in Portugal as “made in Portugal” as an example. Same thing with most other products.

            Another important factor I think is, African governments should start investing in the western markets, when there is a downturn and take advantage of the stock market gains (those reputable companies such as Berkshire) over the long term hedge of their resources. And another aspect is, to get African people to invest their capital in world markets and gain the upmarket.

            In case of Eritrea, I think we have a blessing in disguise. If what we are told is true:

            1) Eritrea does not have a lot of debt
            2) Eritrea is independent and free from influence by western / Chinese companies and governments
            3) Eritrea population has been in check (involuntary) by government policy
            4) A sizable number of Eritreans live in the west where they can be an asset and investors
            5) The potential for tourism, fisheries, mining as well port services…

            Looking at our case, I think our best days are ahead.

            Having said that, I think, it’s enough about this topic as it has very little relevance to our current state or urgency.

            I would say, if people like you, saay, Beyan and others in this forum and focus on the great Ismail and Abrehet topic of Abba Teklemichael and how we should respond to his call that would be great.

            Berhe

          • Blink

            Dear Berhe
            You are right , every commodity is like that for example Eritrea’s potash will be like that too for 10 years due to the agreement PFDJ as well as their partner did with a corporate based in Europe and that is called milking with big gallon while the kids go hungry . The commodity market is not even dictated by the consumer but by a western corporate business interests and I think AU has to ask the EU , USA , IMF and WB to at least consider start help Africans .

            The population of Africa has to increase much higher as the consumer market for can be used to dictate what exactly Africans wanted , you know EU and USA as well as all financial institutions do mess with China and India , the consumer market is one form of power that can be wield to your advantage but for this to happen the AU has to creat a frame work for such power to be used .

      • FishMilk

        Hi haile TG. Countries which have incurred growth rates of above 1.5% have simply proven incapable of meeting increased needs for food, water, infrastructure, and services. These are expenses that most high population growth countries have little ability to provide today, let alone if their population rises dramatically (for which it will!). Even current cereal surplus producing countries such as Tanzania and South Africa, given current population growth protections, will within 5 years require substantial amounts of food aid. The U.N. World Food Programme, against its original target, should have achieved global food security by now and put itself out of work, but instead, has grown into a monstrous organisation with some 15,000 staff (and it continues to rapidly grow!). Ethiopia with its very high economic growth during recent years, has simply been unable to provide employment of a large percentage of its citizens (many of them educated) and is incapable of feeding and providing clean water for substantial numbers of its population. I am now reading a USAID/DCHA fact sheet which states that Ethiopia currently requires emergency food assistance for 7.9 million people. What can one expect for a country which back in 1991 had a population of 49.8 million and as of today is estimated to have 108.4 million. You mention that it is impossible to curb explosive population growth, but major actors such as the U.N., are simply not even trying. Population growth and family planning is omitted from the U.N.’s new set of Strategic Development Goals.

      • Berhe Y

        Dear HTG,

        When Obama took power in 2008, I think the US national debt was around 11 Trillion. When he left it was around 16 and now I think it’s around 18 trillion. Basically in 10 years they added 7 trillion dollars out of thin air. If you look at most other European countries, the UK, parts of Europe (Italy, Spain, Portugal, Greece) are all in the same boat, I don’t know the exact numbers. Japan has been on the same cycle since the 90s.

        What I am saying is, Africa is in the economic problems it is not because it can’t create jobs, produce enough food, or support its population growth. The main problem is, it’s resources are being exported and depleted to feed the hunger and greed of the western societies who are still control the financial means to create and support its own development without depending on IMF or the World Bank.

        Africa needs to have its own currency where it’s able to finiance its own development, same as China, India and Brazil have done in recent past and are able to get themselves out of poverty in such a short period.

        It’s easier said than done, because all the western trained African experts, do not think and address the real issue but rather play the same movie that’s directed by the west (divide Africa in small countries) and continue to serve the greed of the western countries.

        The western countries are now worried the population growth and they are worried sick. I am very sceptical what the future holds for Africa, but I can’t imagine that they will let the population get to 4 billion. They will do something to stop it.

        Berhe

  • FishMilk

    Hi All. Hard to believe but an American concentration camp existed for freed slaves in 1865 and it was ran by unionists. Some 20,000 liberated slaves died in the Devil’s Punch Bowl. Have we really come that far since then?

  • welde

    Hi Horizon,

    I am flabbergasted by your comment regarding Tigrayan student, how do you want them to react? They have been killed in Amhara universities just because they are Tigrayan. Don’t you think you should be hones enough to criticize the people who are governing the Amhara people, who are responsible for all this killing in their killili.
    No Amhara were killed or deported from Tigray but the reverse is true and yet you attack and blame Tigray, TPLF, typical! You continue this line of thought , blaming every ethnic group in Ethiopia but the Amhara,and you will soon find out there will be No Ethiopia on Africa MAP.

    regards.

    • Selam Welde,

      I don’t think that i said that tigrayan students shouldn’t have demonstrated. I was simply pointing out at where ethnic politics and the policy of divide and rule has brought the country to, that students do not feel safe anymore to study in other regional states. This was a country where studying in other provinces was the norm than the exception.

      I don’t know if it matters whether it is an amhara that has been killed or not, nevertheless, we remember of oromo students of meqele university killed and found thrown in a ditch in the early days of tplf rule.

      Ethnic politics is the pandora’s box, and unfortunately, those who opened it are still insisting it should continue despite the fact that it is destroying the country. Ethiopians have reached the stage when they are seriously thinking that ethnic federalism should be replaced by other forms of federalism (regional), as in the usa, germany and many other countries all over the world, and it is better if tplf stops insisting on the first. Whoever is interested with the future existence of ethiopia will not insist on the toxic ethnic federalism.

    • Teodros Alem

      Selam welde
      Not that i care tigraians killed in amara university but 1st, there is no such thing called amara university, 2nd, it is a lie, no one died in ethiopia universities in amara kilil.3rd, i know 1 guy from Gojam died in adi grat university( that is in tigrai).
      Inconclusive, stop lying and starting from now on, don’t go over there, what u said above is going to be true.

  • Reclaim Abyssinia

    Dear Gebremedhin Yohannes,
    Sorry I somehow missed your post.
    Looks like we both watched the same TV channel in Ethiopia, actually, there was only one channel during my time growing up in Ethiopia. I don’t think there is anything new you can tell me about them (Haile Sellasie). We went through all the same propaganda, Ethiopia the virgin & greenest land in the world, selling for Arabs, I was surprised when I first saw tegadelete ( they were actually human)etc etc.
    We all learned now, it was feudalism at the time of Haile Selassie governance.
    We really also don’t know what the emperor had in mind, but I trust the emperor knew that change was needed than passing the crown to his son. I know he stuffed up about breaking the federation with Eritrea… Bad move with that, & that’s what brought him down.

    I have watched some of his interviews such as Uni students forum in the USA & It’s impressive, Xmas speech for the black NewZealand people, and a lot more speech in Amharic. The only fault that I found about the Emperor is the move on Eritrea. Apart from that, he is an iconic figure to the world, inspiring for the black race, and a messiah for millions, except for Ethiopia.

    I think the Emperor gave so much to his people but his people let him down. He educated them in the USA, he gave them the power & responsibility, but they couldn’t even take care of Wollo. They got stuck on Tere sega & Tejj. I guess they are paying for that.
    cast a spell on them?
    I understand this will be very hard to swallow for the northern ppl for a number of reasons.

    መግዛእት is መግዛእት,
    Reclaim

  • David Samson

    Selam Girmay,
    I did not see your comment as I was busy with the loose camel( the only nomad).

    I was really shocked to learn that Mengistu was grooming his brother. I never heard or known the butcher had a brother. As with Mugabe’s wife, he was fast tracked to earn a PHD and was given some senior positions in the army. I used to get upset whenever I hear an African leader is grooming his son, but now it makes me laugh.

  • Haile S.

    Selamat Ismail,

    If you had led the debate, I wouldn’t have lost my way 🙂 :-), truly. Here we have a practical example of the risk of starting a long haul in history when we are not the professional traveller. We get tired and decide to climb on the Camel to arrive at destination. I was lost in the intricate routes to Abyssinia. Ismail you perfectly filled in the big gap I left with allusion only, jumping to our current rulers. Yet, yesterday when scribbling these notes, I had Allula’s biography by Erlich Haggai in front of me. I completely agree with everything you said. You precisely answering Berhe’s questions.

    • Ismail AA

      Good morning Haile S.,

      Dear Haile, it’s is only your humility and goodness. You being a student of science, I would argue with in any authority on the field if what you had graced us in this discussion would not be graded at an A level. This enabled me to read in you an examplar citizen who invests time in knowing the past of the space and environment he was born, grow and work as an aware national in a modern nation-state.

      I am glad that Berhe had provoked you to share a tip of the a mountain of common knowledge you are blessed with: language (poetry, which is the most elegant form of it) science and social disciplines as your contributions in this forum has proven. Thank you, I have benefited, and hope Berhe also did.

      • Haile S.

        Good morning Ismail,
        Well what can I say. Thank you! I learn from my elders like you. I can dare say, my generation, those of us still under 60 were fortunate enough to have inspiring elder brothers and sisters when were very keen to education and knowledge and to follow your example. I don’t think we ourselves were similar examples to our juniors, given the circumstances we were facing. When I was starting school, I remember my elder sister reading reading history of Ethiopia in tigrigna. She is of the generation that started to learn in tigrigna. I recall her reading us from that book paragraphs related to the events we talked about. Here goes a poem I don’t forget:
        እንተዘይቀተልካ እንተዘይቀተልካ ኣብ ጉራዕ
        ንኖኻ ትኾነን ሰኽታት ቁራዕ
        እንተዘይቀተልካ እንተዘይቀተልካ ኣብ ጉንዳ ጉንዲ
        ንኖኻ ትኾነን ሰኽታት መጉዲ።
        That was the way king Yohannes was encouraging his soldiers to fight.
        Best regards

        • Berhe Y

          Dear Haile and Ismail,

          I just want to take a moment to say thank you for taking the time and share your vast knowledge and history that I do not know and I don’t think most younger generation (although I am way pass the time to consider myself young).

          I will write more next week and the reason why I brought it up, and Ismail has captured accurately why I wanted to know.

          Berhe

      • Amanuel Hidrat

        Selam Ismailo, Hailat & Berhe,

        You have very educational exchanges. It is the gentlemen’s exchange of views. You are an exemplary of our decent part of our society. Keep up and do not be destructed by the untamed trollers.

  • Ismail AA

    Selam dear moderator,

    Earlier in the day, I posted an input related to Haile S. and Berhe discussion under this thread. Disqus kept it in pending for hours. Now, it has disappeared. Do know some way of retrieving it, please.

  • Reclaim Abyssinia

    Dear all,

    Late last year I took a trip to Addis with my children during their school holiday. Due to the unrest in southern Ethiopia, we couldn’t go outside of Addis. I was a bit afraid to take them to Sodorey, Langano etc. But running around the neighbourhood and socialising with the locals did improve their level of confidence and interaction with other kids. I was so impressed with them in terms of how quickly they were able to pick up the language. The first word they learnt was “Meberat Tefa” (መብራት ጠፋ), follow by Weha Tefa (ውሃ ጠፋ), Network Tefa & MEBERAT META!! (መብራት መጣ)::

    One of the best parts of the action about all this trip was the “Meberat Tefa” scenario, whoever discovered first that the light-out has to say it loud & clear for everyone to hear it. All the other people in the house repeated after them, as if there was a reward for the first person to say it out loud, followed by the next person saying it much louder “መብራት ጠፋ” & when the light is back everyone had to say it loudly MEBERAT META “መብራት መጣ”

    The second best part of our trip was flying to Axum to visit the Queen of Sheba’s Castle. Telling the children the juicy story from the Bible about King Solomon and Queen Sheba made them excited to go to Axum and see the castle. Unfortunately, I forgot about their assumptions about a castle (The Medieval version of a castle), that they watched over a number of movies such as ‘Frozen’, ‘Beauty And The Beast’. But seeing the tombs of King Kaleb took their excitement to a different level. They started to imagine the game called ‘Tomb Raiders’.

    They were very disappointed with the castle. I tried to explain to them that this was like way back 3000 years ago, at first they didn’t buy it… but they felt a bit better when they saw other tourists taking pictures and giggling and laughing on Queen Sheba’s stages.

    After lunch, there were no more things left to see, so we decided not to spend the night in Axum. I wanted to see Negashi mosque, so we started to ask around for a rental car, but there was none. I made some calls to Addis and stretched my network of connection and got some assistance for someone to hire a minibus for us.

    We started travelling late afternoon to Adigrat. It was a very scary road, but with an experienced, cool, and down to earth driver, our trip became one of the most pleasing highlights of the entire trip. We drove slowly through Adewa (the battleground), Enka Chew, and some Churches. Throughout the trip, they were showing us the NO War No peace zone by just pointing out to us within a distance of kilometre or less. The driver knew that this was the closest I could get to Eritrea. I also thought this was as close as I could get to show my children their roots with this one-off expensive trip.

    The sightseeing, the chains of mountains and the valley gave my children another dimension of imagination that relates to the computer game. They said it was obvious for the Italian to lose the war to the locals. With such valley of land and chain of the mountains close to each other, it would be very easy for the locals to simply ambush the Italians, with camouflaging with mountains, etc etc. So as the van manoeuvred through the mountains, the kids started to pick a suitable spot on the mountain to ambush the Italians to point out to me. They kept saying.. Dad, look over there… you can shoot from there pampampampam tatatta.. followed by my kids were trying to speak in Italian Accent.. saying, hey Would you like Pasta, Pizza, Italiano YAM YAM… Woulddd youu like CHEESE with THAT

    So I told my kids that’s why the Italians now sells Pizza & Pasta because they could not win a war.

    Cheers,
    Reclaim

  • David Samson

    Hi Girmay,

    Colonisation and Ethiopia do not mix up well. I have expected a bloodbath on Awate but so far, it has not landed you in hot water yet.

    The population of Sub-Sahar is expected to double over the next decades. Europeans are very concern by this time bomb. Recently, I saw a documentary on migrants from Sub-Sahar. I can’t remember the name of town in Sicily, but its population has gone down to 35%, and the mayor has decided to re-populate the town with immigrants. Most of these immigrants are from Nigeria who crossed through Libya with children. They are now learning Italian and did not hide their wishes: they want their family to join them. Imagine, if many Eritreans are given the opportunity to immigrate to Italy. I would not imagine anyone will be left in Eritrea. Does not make sense if Italians are asked to come to Eritrea instead? No, they would not, why should they?

    I am pretty sure you have some experience with hypocrites ‘Habeshas’. They pretend that life is so good back home, and they blame Eritrea immigrants for being spoiled brat. They pay extortionate prices to smuggle their families; they do all sorts of shame marriages and other illegal means, but they behave as if they are not affected by it. They spend their free-time cursing their adopted country policies, capitalism, Trump and other conspiracy theories.
    I know many people are shocked when I said, ‘Bring the Italians Back’. Some people have tried to be on their high horse.

    • Berhe Y

      Hi Ghirmay and David,

      I think the problem it seems to me, the more western education that we acquire (Africans in general) the more we wanted to become westerners and in the process erase who we really are.

      What you are writing like ‘Bring the Italians Back’ or ‘which European colonizers can we choose ?’ beside being complete impossible but it serves no practical purpose. what does this type of discussion serve?

      In Eritrea we have become so numb, and we totally forgot that we really use to have some dignity. Saleh GJ said is best in his last video “ጌሶ፡ ሓርጭ፡ ሽሮ፡ በርበረ እዩ ነይሩ እዚ ኩሉ ቃልሲ”.

      In the weekend I come across a biography of Haregot Abbai, compiled by someone. Haregot was a mayor of Asmara from 1963 – 1974, later he was executed with the rest of Haile Selassie cabinets and ministry. Some of his achievements when he was a mayor of Asmara,
      —————-
      1. Low cost residential improvement plans around districts of
      Asmara covering Abbashaul, Geza Berhanu, Senita and
      Mai Temenai.
      2. Expansion Mai Serwa of existing and building of a new Mai
      Nefhi water reservoir dams to improve the city water
      supply system which was critical to city during the long
      drought periods.
      3. Covering of the notorious Mai Bela open sewer system
      traversing through key location in the city.
      4. Improving sport and entertainment activities by
      constructing a new stadium with appropriate lighting for
      night activities.
      5. Improving economic and social activity expositions by
      building the Asmara Expo Center.
      6. Helping the homeless by building a city homeless center to
      shelter abandoned children and adults.
      7. Upgrading city roads and building of ring road for the use
      of commercial traffic to avoid congestion in the city roads.

      During his tenure, Asmara also hosted many heads of states,
      including Queen Elizabeth II of England, Queen Juliana of the
      Netherlands, King Olav of Norway, The Shah of Iran, The
      President of Germany, The President of Bulgaria and Premier
      Chou En Lai of China.
      As Mayor of Asmara, he received various recognition which
      included:
      1. Traveled to the USA as guest of the US government.
      Visited several US cities and states to tour industrial and
      agricultural locations. Received Keys to the cities of San
      Francisco, New York and etc.
      2. Knighted by Queen Elizabeth II receiving the Knight
      Commander of Victoria Order (KCVO).
      3. Order of Norway decoration by King Olav of Norway
      4. State medal of recognition by President Heinrich Lubke of
      Germany

      —————————————-
      ኢሰያስን፡ ህግደፍን ከአ ሰሪሖም ይበሃለለይ.

      Berhe

      • David Samson

        Selam Berhe,

        Has anyone mentioned Harogot over the last 27-years? In fact, you might now be labelled as a ‘Unionist’ since Harogot was a unionist. My beef has not been with Eritreans, but with the new boys in town.

        Years ago, I went to ‘Black Month’— which commemorates the contributions of blacks’ for the emancipation of Black people. Zerai Deres was one of them. Zerai is honoured by people who hardly known him, yet he his home country does not want to know him since he died holding Ethiopian’s flag. You see how history has been twisted and buried because it does not suite the new narrative. To add an insult to an injury, the new boys have a statue of some unknown entity in down town Asmara while world known local heroes are erased from its books. I was lied and felt ashamed of my own history because Zerai was perceived as Ethiopian, no anymore, Zerai was a hero and will be a hero for ever. The more I learn about the lies I have been fed, the more I will question history written by Ghedli.

        • Berhe Y

          Dear David,

          I live in a country where I spend almost double the amount of time I spend in Eritrea. I know what a “Unionist” called “Federalist” any”Separatists” or called “Sovereignst” mean.

          As a Canadian I will defiantly fall in the Federalist / Unionist camp, I don’t want to see Canada break up. As an Eritrea, I defiantly fall in the Separtists / Soverignist camp, I do want to see Eritrea to be an independent and sovereign country. In my opinion, there is no right or wrong stand but what ever stand one believes.

          The difference, I think is, people have the right to express their opinions freely and they have the right to decide what ever that they wanted without stamping on others to do the same.

          Advocating a Union with Ethiopia is not wrong in itself in my opinion but the breaking of the Eritrean federation and annexing it without having the mandate to do so (without having referendum) is the real problem.

          Dear David,

          I don’t Ghedli or those who fought for Eritrea independence have any problem with Eritrean history is being told. The killing, the bombing, the torturing and exiling of Eritreans from the lowlands happened during the period where Haragot and others where serving the HSI government. Ghedli main objective was to releave Eritreans from the misery they were going through and not lionize those Eritreans who were to some degree an accomplice (albiet un willing partner) to the regime who was bombing and exiling them.

          As far as Haregot goes? I really don’t know much other than what people say here and there…without truly knowing to what his role. In general thought, older people do remember him for his achievements as a mayor of Asmara and the work he has done.

          Berhe

          • David Samson

            Selam Berhe,

            But history should be written as it is, not as you see fit to ones’ narrative. We must our own history—be it good and bad.

            Ethiopians have fallen on this trap for over a century. Every new government has re-written history to fit it in the prevailing politics. Tedros and Yohannes were hardly mentioned during the king’s reign, while Tedros was lionised during the Mengistu. TPLF have tried to lionise Yohannes, while Menelik has been a forgotten figure. If the Oromos ascend to power, they will probably erase Menelik from its own history and so on. Every generation who has brought up with each new government has its own history.

            You know how the Jewish lobby has successfully linked criticising the state of Israel with anti-Zionist. One can be perfectly fine with the state of Israel, but not happy with the treatments of the Palestine. As soon as you step in to criticise Israel’s policies, you are labelled as ant-Zionist and Semitics. Many prominent figures who believe in the state of Israel, but criticise its policies have been silenced.

            In Eritrea, anyone who does not clap and repeat the narratives of Ghedli is labelled as YG and Unionist. And recently, Agazian has been added to the list, but luckily, I do not live in Eritrea and thanks to the Internet, I will not be silenced just as the Zionist’s lobbies do.

          • Berhe Y

            Hi David,

            I agree, history should be written as is. In terms of Ghedli, correct if I am wrong but I don’t think there is anything wrong if they don’t spend time and efforts to write history of unionist who they fought with. As long as they do not stop others from writing and telling the story, I don’t see it’s up to them to write this or that of history. In Eritrea, I don’t think even we have that luxury to begin with, that the whole country was hijacked by Isayas and his group.

            In my opinion, I think YG has the right to say what ever that he wanted. Personally the problem that I have with his writing is for his omission, which I think is purposely and because it’s lack of over sight.

            I don’t think HS or the Eritrean parliamentarian had the authority:

            1) I don’t think Asfaha Woldemichael should run and be elected chief executive, where he was serving the King at the same time made to be head of the Eritrean parliament.
            2) I don’t think the Eritrean parliament abolish Eritrean constitution, replace the arrangement and annex Eritrea

            YG omit this very foundation that led to Ghedli in the first place and tries to put all the blame on the Ghedli culture.

            If none of that happened, I don’t think there was a need for Ghedli or it’s culture that he criticize. I don’t think the Ghedli culture is any different than any other revolutionaries that happened at the time. So his argument is really mute in my opinion and that’s why it doesn’t really bother me personally.

            I think the Agazian guy is just pathetic…honestly I think
            we should complain to google so much and we should shut down his videos. They are not only offensive but really hate speech against certain group of our society who wants to see the country immerse itself in civil war. I personally think he is doing so, to create controversy so he gains viewership and find a way to monetize and generate money for his own selfish gain as he did with his Africa AIDS organization.

            Berhe

          • David Samson

            Selam Berhe,
            We are now drifting. Who would write Eritrean history from unionist side inside Eritrea? Having a laugh? I know I mentioned it before, Mehari Mesghina was gunned down in Asmara for simply writing his own version of history. YG would have faced the same fate as Mehari’s. Why did EPLF killed Mehari? It is simple: the front wants to write history to fit its own narrative. As far as I know, Mehari had complied a written history, mainly of Eritreans who fought against foreign invaders. He hardly mentioned Eritreans who fought against the rebels. As the result of Gehdli’s adventure, we have lost part of our history (My own). We do not know how many brave Eritreans had fallen to defend their fatherland; they are simply forgotten, and in the process they are erased from our history. As you alluded, we now learn the history of Harogot. We should take his negative side as well as his positive contributions. Although, I do not know him, I am the lucky ones who benefited from school built by him. I used to walk through his house as it was a stone throw from my elementary school.

            Since the front’s history has become a de facto, anyone who challenges this narrative has been labelled as anti-Ghedli, Ghedli Demaniser and so on.

          • Berhe Y

            Hi David,

            I don’t think we are drifting. I don’t think any thing can be said

          • Blink

            Dear David
            If you are imagining different outcome for YG and like him people like you get your own in line and your fate will be more worse than Mehari . As you can see many in the opposition camp tried to demonize Hamid Idris Awate in favor of Meles and ask where their fate is now . Don’t mess with Eritreans sheer determination of glorifying their victory over the unionists. All unionists were benefiting from Hailesilassie while most Eritreans were gunned down by their operatives at night . YG is a dishonesties anker and he is gone dying. What a time to see them die inside while their eyes and ears are open . Remember hailesilassie also built many things yet for what purposes .

          • David Samson

            Blink [The Camel Herder]

            Since my plea to you not to engage with me has ignored, you have left me with no other option, but to go low.
            You want me seen murdered for expressing my God’s-given rights. I am not surprised by your callous attitude since you are a Bedouin and an organ dealer. I know now why you are defending the regime in Asmara since you are an accomplice to the ring criminals in Asmara. You are actively engaged in people’s smuggling and it is only a matter time before we found your real identity as you are not only a coward but a murder too. Once the regime in Asmara is removed, you will first serve for the crimes you committed against innocent Eritreans, and then will be deported to the Sahara desert.

          • Desbele

            Selam David,

            I hope you read Tekeste Negash’s ;Ethiopia and Eritrea, The Federal Experience. It is an eye opener. Unionists Party is one of the first anti colonial movement in Africa that we should be proud of.

          • Desbele

            Selam David,

            I hope you read Tekeste Negash’s ;Ethiopia and Eritrea, The Federal Experience. It is an eye opener. Unionists Party is one of the first anti colonial movement in Africa that we should be proud of.

          • David Samson

            Selam Desbele,

            Thanks! It has been on my list but did not get around to read it. This coward nomad pretends to care about Habesha people and punching above his weights. He has become restless since the peace process as his smuggling business come to an end. He trashes Habesha all day while he has nothing to show for his savage tribes. He lies 24/7/365, to defend his criminal operatives in Eritrea.

          • Blink

            Dear David
            I am proud camel herder and you are a proud donkey herder , nothing wrong about that . The fact that you think that as insult shows your idiotic beliefs have been there for a long time . For the other points I just don’t think you seem to comprehend your anger due to failure after failure.

          • David Samson

            Blink[The Bedouin smuggler]

            If you accept you are a nomad and a camel herder, what are you doing in Habesha’s land? You are a trespasser; you should be in desert looking after your camels, not in down town Asmara. How did you end up in my home town? Have you taken an orientation class on how to mingle with Habeshas since you seem to lack any civility? You are unable to shake-off your up brings, and you are always will be a nomad wherever you live. How many villas are around Cinema Odeon—just one?

          • Blink

            Dear David
            There is no habesha land , What i know is Eritrean land and that doesn’t include unionists like you. Again don’t think nomadic life is bad thing , in fact it is a life where thieves like you can’t survive . It is an open space where honesty rule the day . You are used to lies and deceitful lies at your food table and there is no way you can survive without making lies and deceit.

          • David Samson

            Blink[The loose camel]

            My comments are beginning to hit the nerves. You are becoming restless and sleepless. You’d better the enjoy the stolen money now since the net is tightening. You know nothing about food—Gaet is the stable food for nomads. I bet you have never been to a town, let alone a city before the criminals in Asmara assigned you the smuggling business. How often do you get in touch with one-eye-man smuggler?

          • Blink

            Dear David
            You would be surprised to know I am not like what you think but to make your day better, I will know what exactly is going on. Asmara, well again you will be surprised too.

            Who is better , lose camel or hungry donkey? Trust your own gut , donkey is not smart , not strong as camel but I hear you guys are using donkey in your restaurant dishes. So you know why we can not be in one table with you guys . Unionists are simply irresponsible and horrible. They benefited from Eritreans deaths .

          • Mitiku Melesse

            Hei David.
            If i were you i delete this comment. What Blink wants is you engage in his meaningless insulting biased comment exchange. From Blink comment you get nothing productive at all. So you better stick to your principle than going low to his level.

          • David Samson

            Selam Mitiku,

            Ignore him? Many people on this site has ignored him, but he does not understand no, means no. On the contrary, this behaviour has energised him. He assumes that just some people do not drag themselves to his level, he mistook their gestures as a sign of weakness and has started to increase his personal attacks. I have on many occasions asked him not to reply to my post as well as not to use or refer my name on other’s comment. He has now gone on record to see me dead for simply expressing my views. Things will not get lower, and this sick person must be stopped. I know his suffers from sleep deprivation, and use this form to release his anger and frustration. I know ‘severely ignore’ is the favourite phrase on Awate. I prefer ‘Skip’, so I am asking him again just to ‘SKIP’ my comments and should never use my name. If he does that, we are all good to go, as Americans say.
            I am also hoping the moderators will reign on him and listen to my plea.

          • Blink

            Dear David
            Still you are using the ጭጉራፍ ሲ ባዕላ ሃሪማ ተእዊ . ናትካ ነገር ምልክባጥ ናይ DNA ጉዳይ ኮይንካ ኣበይ ክትገድፎ .The moderator plea and i stop , here You are takling and insulting me again . From the beginning it was you who come between me and Girmay and insulted me , remember how we reach here . You started it and bragged you do not take bullying lightly and now . Just as weyane game .

  • Lamek

    Selam Ghebremedhin. This guy blink is blinded by hate of the Tigray people. He is a very disturbed person. Most likely, his family were deported during the border war and he has been unable to move on from that unfortunate dark history of TPLF. But I think it affected him to the point of extreme phobia and almost obssessive hate of Tigrayans. But it appears to me like he is crying for help and if he doesn’t get one soon, he may inflict harm on himself.

  • Reclaim Abyssinia

    Hi Gebremedhin,
    If there is something in common among Eritreans and Ethiopians is the hate and deformations characteristic towards Emprorer Haile Selassie. The bizzarre part of HIM is almost all Ethiopian, do not like to acknowledge, the good part of his achievement.

    “Haile Selassie is one of the most bizarre and misunderstood figures in 20th-century history, alternately worshipped and mocked, idolised and marginalised.”

    Thanks,
    Reclaim

  • haileTG

    Selam awatista,

    Thanks Horizon for filling in:) It is interesting that the OLF is facing the same problems as the early 90s. Then as now the issue was entering camp and disarming. I wonder why they didn’t think of that this time. Weren’t they have been supposed to hammer agreements before hand?

    On our weekend detour, it is noted that the amount of water on earth is exactly the same as it was at all times in its existance. The same with air, I guess. This shows water is not only shared but circulated among all beings and things. Much like air is shared too. If our body, brain and the earth have roughly the same proportion of water (about 60-70% give or take), and this stuff circulates among us, how are we different from each other? Take the G15 and other prisoners in Eritrea for example, how much water that was once part of Petros or Drue is part of you now? Isn’t this the perfect illustration of “love your neighbor as yourself”, because, really, there is no material difference. When we ignore the suffering of others, we can’t help it but suffer ourselves in a different way.

    I think we have to feel the pain of others as if it is us, and this way we can hasten the change Eritrea is ripe for sooner than later.

  • David Samson

    Selam All,
    One of the biggest football games in Europe–El Clasico– has lived up to the hype and name. The Catalan trashed the wimp Madrid’s boys–5-1. Real seemed out of all sorts and missed badly their ex-star–Ronaldo. It was a real treat for Footie.

  • Selam All,

    As we wait for HTG to bring another great subject for discussion, let me say the following. It is about dawud ibsa, the olf leader, who refuses to disarm and his supporters’ demonstration in lekemt/wollega in support of the demand that olf, with about 4k armed fighters, should not be disarmed. PMAA has reiterated that all liberation front fighters put together do not have more than 10K active fighters.

    I do not understand how this old guy sees armed struggle as opposed to peaceful struggle, and if there is a difference at all for him between the two. How can such a person be a leader, really?
    The question that follows is that if he is a mercenary of egypt and other enemies of ethiopia, a power and war-monger, who does not care for the life of young oromos and other ethiopians for the sake of his hegemony in his oromia he envisions in his mind? This cannot be for the interest of the oromo people. He must be naive to think that he can have his independent enclave on a platter, simply because he wishes it, and against the wish of the majority of oromos, who want to see a different ethiopia and not a balkanized ethiopia, fighting and killing each other. Dawud Ibsa must have a short memory indeed, when he forgets that olf (about 25K armed fighters) were disarmed within a day by the joint action of of tplf/eplf in the early 1990s. Now, if a free breakfast and lunch in tigray for his fighters are enough to make him change side and stand against the government that called him to participate in building ethiopia, it shows how much unprincipled and untrustworthy he really is.

    It is unfortunate that when ethiopians chase away one “yeqen jib”, another one replaces it immediately. Two are PMAA’s nemesis on top of those who lost power and are carrying out a clandestine war. They are those who sneaked in exploiting the peace call, and are manifesting their true anti-ethiopian and anti-peace agendas, dawud ibsa, who thinks that olf has been called back to take the throne in orommia, and jawar, who has already crowned himself as king of the queerros.

    This is the true nature of some ethiopian politicians, one step forward, two steps back, not principled and not trustworthy.

    • Mez

      Dear Horizon,

      The contradiction you mentioned is internal, an Ethiopian one.

      Between what the guy wants to do and where he is now is a big gap to still bridge.

      I assume the government may get an opportunity (to disarm) on the eve of the 2020 election.

      In the mean time he have to keep his fighters together and intact, which is extremely difficult for Dawud Ibsa.

      The same goes for “the king of Kerroo”.

      Thanks

    • Mitiku Melesse

      Hei Horizon.
      Opposition doesnt mean to live in a foreign country and list the ways how a dictator government abuses its own people. It is more than that. Olf left Ethiopia and when it came back the politics has been changed.

  • Blink

    Dear the truth
    I think the evil Meles was born to lie , he openly lied to 100 million Ethiopians so making outlandish lie to SJ means nothing but I admit I missed the interview of that part . The flip flopping is a prescription to be a leader in Weyane circle , it has been like that ever since . Meles the scam is below the ground with debilitated ugly legacy .

    • Reclaim Abyssinia

      Hi Blink,

      Do you know who said this one of the world greatest speech once upon a time?

      “Until the philosophy which holds one race superior and another inferior is finally and permanently discredited and abandoned, everywhere is war. And until there are no longer first-class and second-class citizens of any nation, until the colour of a man’s skin is of no more significance than the colour of his eyes.

      And until the basic human rights are equally guaranteed to all without regard to race, there is war. And until that day, the dream of lasting peace, world citizenship, rule of international morality, will remain but a fleeting illusion to be pursued, but never attained… now everywhere is war.”
      Cheers,
      Reclaim

      • haileTG

        Hey RA,

        Here is the song that popularized the the speech of HS. Looking down the comments, some think it belonged to Bob 🙁

        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4XHEPoMNP0I

      • Blink

        Dear RA
        Just to clarify, I never believe anyone is superior to anyone. I don’t see the Tigrians as inferior to anyone, I see them as equals of any man’s walking and expressing my feelings about weyane should not be looked as if I am accusing the general public . Let’s be straight here TPLF is not Tigray people. It’s like the phobia thing in the west , anyone who challenge the horrible things about migrants is called racist, that’s becoming old and not productive as people are waking up to the reality.

        • Reclaim Abyssinia

          Dear Blink,
          I was actually trying to see if anyone would be able to pick the choice and usage of the same wording by the two different Ethiopian leaders.

          “the colour of his eyes.”

          First the choice of this word was used by “By the Conquering Lion of the Tribe of Judah, His Imperial Majesty Haile Selassie I, King of Kings of Ethiopia, Elect of God”.

          And then by the “Prime Minister Meles Zenawi, chairman of the Tigray People’s Liberation Front (TPLF), and the head of the Ethiopian People’s Revolutionary Democratic Front (EPRDF)”

          Why this “the colour of his eyes.” ???
          Thanks,
          Reclaim

  • haileTG

    Merhaba Aman-H,

    Thanks for putting my idea to the test here. I enjoyed the laser sharp focus you’re bringing to the heart of the issue.
    If you feel I strayed too much, please bear with me, I will do my best to focus it into practical relevance towards the end.

    You see Emma, to everything, there is the center and the periphery. For practical purposes, man needs to apply narrowest focus on the center. But he does so at the cost of ignoring or ignorance as it were. A blank space on paper is not a writing. Again, an undifferentiated steam of ink is not a writing either. We must have both of it, i.e. a stream of ink spaced by blank parts in a certain way to call it writing. However, you only focus on the ink, ignoring the blanks when utilizing a written text. Even though both must happen at the same point in time-space to create the required perception of a writing. This is true at all levels of reality as we know it. Language itself has only one purpose at the root, to distinguish. You have no language to describe one that can’t be distinguished.

    So, when I say we both effect and not effect it, its deeper meaning was’t to sugar coat criticism. It is how it is. Your perception, determined your action. Then your action creates further perception. Which is not different from the initial one unless you were to be disillusioned and alter the first perception. The object can’t help you to formulate your perceptions or be disillusioned by it so as to alter it. The object doesn’t have such changeable quality in it. It is what it is. At the same time, you will be effecting it by changing the interaction through changed perceptions or the absence thereof.

    Thus, as I said at the first post, as perceptions fall and rise, open mindedness would help to bring us closer.

  • Mitiku Melesse

    Hei Alex.
    Girmay and Blink know what they are talking about. Since 1995 in both Ethiopia and Eritrea the movers and the shakers of the war have been the two tigrinya peoples or people.

  • Berhe Y

    Dear Tesfu,

    Good question? I don’t know. IA has eliminated all possible threat from the rank and file. If there is anyone, he should be from the younger generation that we do not know much about.

    Berhe

  • Amanuel Hidrat

    Selam Dave,

    We are fighting this evil man as a dictator and not because his roots is from Tigray. We are fighting him not on identity based, but based on his character and his criminal act on our people. And you are right the ID-politics is driven by the Christian highlanders. Once we fall in to this trap, we can’t exercise the rule of politics based on ideological philosophy. Good observation on your side.

  • Acria

    Selam Abraham H.,
    Why don’t we establish a de facto government with full parliament in Diaspora just in case the PFDJ collapses to prevent the vacuum that might cause disaster. Is there something at work in this nature that I am not aware of? This should be beyond the opposition camps and, ideally, inclusive of every Eritrean.

    • David Samson

      Selam Acria,

      I do not believe we need government in-exile. What we needed badly is the removal of the regime in Asmara. People who live in Eritrea are largely law-abiding and God-fearing citizens. They can administer themselves either though local and religious laws; they do not need fancy terms such as government. Italians had let people in Eritrea to organise themselves in Adi and Awrajas. Despite these admins did not resemble government, they functioned well, and Eritreans had the best stable Environment for over centuries. Every region in Eritrea has its local customs and religious laws which have been used for millennia.

      I do not buy the narratives that Eritrea will be another Somali, or there will be a vacuum and chaos with ensue. The state has been running like Fiat trentacinque. The Kebeles we had during the Dergue were better than government run by Wedi Memhir and Wedi Kebede. When many Eritreans complain and feel nostalgia about the previous Ethio government, they are not admiring or condoning the Dergue. They are merely expressing how they feel about the admin. I know many people have been trying to twist this sentiment.

      We need to park somewhere this abstract notion of Eritrea for a while. We need to focus on its inhabitants as the state has nowhere to go, but people who live in it will not return for good once they cross the river.

      • Acria

        Selam David,

        As you have said it above,” people who live in it will not return for good once they cross the river “, might be true for individuals in the affluent western countries and who are doing well. Nevertheless, Eritreans in Ethiopia, Sudan, and the Middle East will definitely would like to come home once things are normalized to ‘our expectation’: some livable environment. To effect this and to make the transition smoother, we in the diaspora (everyone living outside of Eritrea) can play a significant role in building Eritrea by establishing a de facto government. To what extent and in what details, we will need guidance from our premier educated individuals. I think to that end we can provide the knowhow and the hard currency to supplement the rest of the Eritrean people, I am not sure how many will remain that are unable to cross the Mereb River, who are back home.

        • David Samson

          Selam Acria,

          I could guess–close to 1milllion Eritrea immigrated to Ethiopia up to 91.
          How many of them returned to Eritrea after independence– may be a tiny bit? In fact, one could argue migration has accelerated–if any. There could be many reasons for the trend: higher expectations had quickly turned in to disappointment, lack of hope, and frustration. These behaviours are normal in post-independent-countries. What makes ours unique is the guerrilla turned semi-government had their own hidden agenda: to social engineering Eritrean society. Eritreans of old generation, city dwellers, the educated, and wealthy are impediment to the project. All these groups have not been spared the wrath of the new boys in town.

          The Amiches were the first victims. Keen to connect to their newly-created- country, armed with resources and relatively liberal views, few returned to see the facts on the ground. The nostalgia and dream had quickly turned in to nightmares and the guinea pig have always regretted their move. We had similar story with the diaspora Eritreans, and Eritreans who have lived in the Sudan camps since the 60s–It is all too familiar stories.

          While we keep dreaming “once we have a new government”, Eritreans in neighbour countries will return, by the time most able-bodies had crossed the rivers, we will have left with the concept of ‘Eritrea’. We might as well establish it somewhere where the majority Eritrean immigrants are settled. Why does have to be where it is now?

  • Blink

    Dear readers
    As SJ forget to ask Meles about 90,000 Eritreans deported in the most inhuman way, his question was all about Ethiopia and that can be described as what ? Meles who roped Eritreans couldn’t be asked about 90,000 Eritreans as well as the war he declared over Eritrea, in the above article Meles openly lies about the bomb and many things . I am not journalist but from the Eritreans point of I feel the questions were all how to make the evil Meles more human.

    The love shown by the so called Habesha to one another can be shown here .

    I find this link quite interesting, Can the Amhara and Oromo TV run this video , I would have payed big money to show this in OMN and ESAT because the Eritrean opposition website and radios refused to acknowledge the suffering of Eritreans at the hand of Meles and yet we are asked to read Meles false reply .

    Enjoy https://youtu.be/M28lFmk8dYQ

    • Abel

      Dear Blink, your eyes flicker, wink and blink often, making you see only one side of the story .
      Fyi, 1- Eritrea invaded Ethiopia,
      2- Many Eritreans in Ethiopia where openly declaring support to the invasion, many were actively organizing and fundraising to the war effort, hence a security threat to Ethiopia.
      3- 140,000 Tegaru and other Ethiopians where also inhumanely deported empty handed by Eritrean leaders. The sad thing is that, you like a most half mart Eritrean elite do not see /refuse to see/ in many instances careless about the other side of the story.
      The blame lies squarely on your own leaders, Meles’s action was purely defensive.

      • Blink

        Dear Abel
        Weyane startes the war in 1997 , second there were two independent study 1. By UN , 2 second one by Australian .

        The findings reported by the UN and Natalie Klein are summarized in the following section. Neither team was able to confirm the reports of mass expulsion and inhumane treatment of Ethiopians. The interviews do confirm Eritrea’s allegations that individuals of Eritrean national origin are being expelled from Ethiopia in mass numbers.The reports also confirm allegations that the deportees are being treated inhumanely by the Ethiopians. The accounts of beatings and harassment by military officials, however, appear to be more pervasive among deportees who travelled through Tigray on foot .
        The UN finds your accusation false and as usual a weyane lies rooted in the asmera keren road .

        Here is how UN put it , The deportees reported being picked up at work, home, church, and “in the streets” both during the day and night. 9 Often only one family member was arrested. There are also reports of mass arrests of all the Eritrean nationals residing in a village, presumably as a result of the kebelle registration.In Tigray,entire villages were reportedly evicted.”‘
        Some deportees reported being coaxed to the police stations
        under false pretenses, such as to make a statement . Deported from Tigray were not allowed to contact to family members or pick their belongings. Abel you get rich by roping as always can be find in your TPLF gem.

        To the opposite of your claim not a single Ethiopian was forced or deported without the Red Cross knowledge.

        • Abel

          በይዛኻ እቶም ዩኤንስ ናዓኻ ንበይንኻ ድዮም ሕሹኽ ኢሎምኻ ? እሞ እት ስጋብ ሕጂ ተግባራዊ ኮይኑ ዘሎ ማዕቀብ ደኣ ንምታይ ኣድለየ?
          ሚስኪናይ፣ ትጽሑፍካ ዋላ ኩሉ ኣይነንብቦ እምበር ብገለ ዝኾነ ናይ ስነልቦና ጸቕጢ ትሳቐ ዘለኻ ኢኻ ትመስል፣ስለምንታይሲ ባዕልኻ ዝሓለምካዮ ሓቂ ኮይኑ ይረኣየካ ኣሎ፤ ምሕረት የውርደልካ። እት ዝነበረ ኣድላይ ዘኮነ ሕትኽትኽ ኤርትራን ትግራይን ድማ ግዝያዊ ምድንጋር ሕግደፍ ዝወልዶ እዩ ነይሩ ኣብ ክልተና እውን ዘይከሓድ በሰላ ኣሕሊፉልና እዩ፣ኣማኣኢት ኣሸሓት ተጋሩ(2) ኣመዛቢሉ፣ ዓሰርተታት ኣሸሓት ሂወት ቀጢፉ ሓሊፉ፣ እዩ፤ ካብ ኣልዓልካዮ ኢለ እየ እምበር ሕዚ ቁስሊ ምሕኻኽ ኣይመድለየን፣ እት ኣረጊት ዝብኢ ገዛኹም ኣንቅረባ ምስተፋነወ ናብ ንቡር ክምዝምለስ ርግጸኛ እየ።

          • Blink

            Dear Abel
            You and Your weyane cunning world has been you using the telescope in a wrong way ( reverse way ) it shows you your enemies ability minimized and by that view you misunderstood the whole concept. There is nothing more nothing than trying things you do not want them for. The truth about the deportation is open and you can find them all over but as I told you it is the wrong usage of your telescope.

          • Abel

            Blink, It seems ur stupidity has no bound, you no longer deserve my time.

          • Blink

            Dear Abel
            I know long time ago that You can not handle the truth and it is in the DNA prescription of Weyane so the blame is not in you squarely alone . Remember you interacted with me un invited, so the outcome was already stamped . I was just trying to make my point incase you guys get some evolution to honesty with time, yet you disappointed me .

      • Nitricc

        Hi Abel; nice name but I think you should just say you and your people were wrong. Remember when your people crossed the Eritrean border waving white flag; the Eritreans are trying to understand what that means i.e. your are saved from being a sandwich, get it!!! No Eritrean person waved white flag and inter your land, you did. So, if I were you I shut up.

        • Abel

          Dear Nitricc,
          Game over? kkkk Never seen such a die hard mind, ur audacity to defend the dead system is rare. I mean, the entire Eritrean youth is telling you, including ur own parents and siblings are in Tigray as we speak.The links below speaks volume, as to who saved who , who waved white flag and why or the feature of ur failed state,testament of Adhanom Gebremariam interview.
          ttps://www.sbs.com.au/yourlanguage/tigrinya/ti/audiotrack/eereteraa-aabe-qaraanaa-magadi-zayekonate-zalaase-zewadaqhatene-zefashalatene-haagareyaa?language=tittps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=65wldLRmwDo

    • Lamek

      Blink, wow! Do you ever take a break and breath some fresh air and get yourself out of whatever you are smoking? You are here day in and day out trying really hard to sow the seeds of animosity between Tigrayans and Eritreans. It is not working sir. Try another tactic, which is maybe to take a much needed break. The war is behind us. That is it. Nothing that can be done about it now. None of what is happening now on the ground is as a result of the war but despite it. Despite the war and all the destruction, Tigrigna speakers are unifying and separating the wheat from the chaff. People like you will never sleep when they see such harmony of centuries coming back to life once again. All Afars in Ethio, Djibouti, and Eritrea consider themselves as one people or one nation, although they are a kebila in my mind. The same with Kunamas and Somalis, etc. Why would you not let the Tigrinyas be the one people that they are and not are they a people they are a civilization. Check your history books, the civilization or 3000 history of Ethiopia is actually that of the nation of agaizian. There you have it. hiji kid mendek abashawl gahats.

      • Nitricc

        Hi Mizan; no wonder why you couldn’t cut in toothless Asmara University. did they teach this on your the only freshman class when you said ” . Check your history books, the civilization or 3000 history of Ethiopia is actually that of the nation of agaizian” lol what a dush.

        • Lamek

          Nitrrrick. Okay, I am a dush but you are a douchebag. Why do people think you are this young guy who grew up in the US? You are not, your embarrassing spelling shows you grew up in Africa with little to no formal education. Reading a lot of your posts, you might be an Oromo. Certainly, you are not Eritrean. Nothing you write here remotely shows anything that implies you are Eritrean. Stop with this. If you go low with me, I will go even lower. I have no reputation to protect.

          • Mitiku Melesse

            Lamek.
            You are insulting yourself by assuming Ntiricc is from other nation. He is 100% tigrinya from Eritrea. Refer your agazean history book.

      • Acria

        Selam Lamek,
        Wey Lamek arkey! Abashawal de’a mendek ma’as terifewo! Mendek zelewo bota de’a haberelu.

        • Berhe Y

          Hi Acria,

          I think he meant to say mendeq enda Aba Habesh. May be he forgot or he didn’t want to mention it for his twisted reason 🙂

          Berhe

    • Saleh Johar

      Blink,
      Do you ever stop to contemplate you might be wrong on something? I always think of you as an intelligent person in spite of your visible flaws. See my dear,don’t expect everything you fancy to be covered in one interview. Wait! I am not making excuses. I asked him your favorite question a few years earlier. Don’t be lazy, google it. But I will post the link over the week end. Just for you. I do not expect you to retract your remark.

      • Blink

        Dear SJ
        My bad if you did ask him , I apologize but since the damage is done my choice is to retract because deleting or editing is simply will not convince you , I guess . As SJ one of the guardian of this so called Habesha , I thought you will give him a pass on that and many other topics .

        • Saleh Johar

          Hi Blink,
          Still. You have some aspects of your communication that needs to be polished: “As SJ one of the guardian of this so called Habesha..”

          What does that mean? What is a guardian in your view? How can one be a guardian of a nation of tens of millions? You can say anything but please let’s keep it honest. I objected to racist remarks, against Habesha or anyone else. That has been my record. I also told you, whether you like it or not, I m Habesha. Why do you want me to disown my identity? And that my friend, doesn’t make me a guardian for a people who existed for millennia simply because Habesha doesn’t need a guardian (unless it is from those who want to paint people with new, manufactured identities at whim). I and many others are Habesha, deal with it like you would with any other identity. I am not questioning your identity, what gives you the right to question mine? I am HABESHI, POLISH it my friend.

          NB: I appreciate your retracting of the earlier comment.

          • Blink

            Dear SJ
            I am sorry for missing your message about this issue , I tried to understand but I always have been short . I really don’t want you to go lecturing me about Habesha identity and I am not asking you to disown it either but my understanding about Habesha is simply a word used so often to connect the sides of mereb as “ brothers “ as lamek implied it . I believe you guys have nothing in common that you wish to show or Bragg about it except coloring us with many bloody decades. What exactly is Habesha ? What do you guys have done with it ? I mean I can see your views but I refuse to see it as a proud identity that someone get to be part of . I sometimes find many Ethiopians and some Eritreans refer or as if “ ሓበሻ ነኝ ? ሓበሻ ዲኻ ? Again I believe they are referring to the coffee , shiro , dance , kuno , Zuria …. , while forgetting how many decades these people has been killing each other plus taking other with their disease to death.

            The reason I said guardian was that SJ you are the only one who keep putting my view as racist towards that word .
            If it was not for the disagreement and plotting between the two mereb , I could have been in Eritrea enjoying with my people.
            I need SJ definition of Habesha so that I could hold mine without pocking anyone. Has it been any war that between Sudanese and Eritreans that was rooted in the identity of the common border in between and reached the level of , hailesilassie, Dergi and weyane war ?

          • Saleh Johar

            Blink,
            Lecture? I am not lecturing you but that tactic is stale. When some people are challenged they try to make those who remind them to feel guilty or intimidated by you claiming they are lecturing!!

            On the source of our problems coming from the Habesha, I said it eons ago at a high cost to me. I think now it is your turn to stop lecturing me in my own field 🙂

            Imagine the French or English being racist against the German race similar to the indefensible position you have against Habesha. Enlightened people do not do that my dear. I will call you out (or anyone else) when I see a racist remark, stereotyping to the extent of wanting the Habesha to drop their identity because of some ill feeling you have is unbecoming. I hate Haile Sellasie and other killers more than you can imagine–but not because they are Habesha. Call Isaias any race you want and then try to apply yor judgment about him to anyone who shares his identity. It is absurd. That is why I never mentioned Isaias’ race for any reason, I will not be caught dead doing that. My friend, you have a race, you belong to some “racial stock” and even if your race has done what the oppressors did to us, we should not try to erase that identity. Where does this madness of reengineering identity stop? Who has the right to change the identity of others? No one. And the more you keep doing it (with obsession), yet, you complain when someone takes you to task, it doesn’t look good on you.

            Now I am curious! I am doubting if you understand what Racism means 🙂
            I am volunteering the following from google, just to save you some time:

            rac·ism
            /ˈrāˌsizəm/
            noun
            prejudice, discrimination, or antagonism directed against someone of a different race based on the belief that one’s own race is superior.
            “a program to combat racism”
            synonyms: racial discrimination, racialism, racial prejudice, xenophobia, chauvinism, bigotry, casteism
            “Aborigines are the main victims of racism in Australia”
            the belief that all members of each race possess characteristics or abilities specific to that race, especially so as to distinguish it as inferior or superior to another race or races.
            noun: racism

  • Acria

    Hi Alex,

    That was last year. You need to go now and see how the country is. On your way back, make sure to visit Ethiopia, particularly Tigray, and take a good heart at what you see at and hear from Eritreans. Then, tell me if I am exaggerating. Expand your horizon. Going to Asmara in your nice house and dollar provided service are not how we measure home situation. Feel the pain of your people! Be in their shoes! This was solely caused by the irresponsible and greedy management of PFDJ and their supporters. So corrupt to the core that they don’t care about their own people! Why did people die for the liberation? Please, don’t try to defend the un-defendable.

  • Blink

    Dear all
    Who is Ambassador Adhanom and what types of principles does he follow for the most part of his opposition leadership circle? Isn’t he the weyane ኩርኩር , isn’t he the one who bluffed in Sudan ? Is he ready to come to terms with defeat ?

    Eritrea is here to stay and the way it stays can be bad or good but certainly the country survived the weyane onslaught and that is unbearable to Adhanom and his friends. Eritrea survival depended on its people to reject Mr.Adhanom journey of killing book . The Eritrean youth carried many scratches on their back and refused Mr.Adhanom call to kill their brothers . Still Adhanom is angry because he can’t bear and see weyane thrown out from 4 kilo and he is crying because he will never ever has the chance to get free air ticket.

    • Berhe Y

      Hi Blink,

      Here you go again, charging anyone threatening IA regime. How is Amb Adhanom weyane puppy? He was a war hero and his heroism speaks for itself.

      What’s wrong with you? You are going to keep trashing Eritreans who oppose IA ….Minster Berhane, Amb Adhanom, someone said, I don’t remember who…

      You are even more angry these days because the boarder crossing business you were operating has finished….no more 3000 or 5000 US dollars to smuggle people out of Eritrea.

      I think that’s reasonable assessment….

      Berhe

      • Blink

        Dear Berhe
        Really? Isn’t he one of the problem the oposition find itself in disarray? You see I am not like what you are saying opposing anyone but I don’t go with horrible people too. PFDJ has been a failed entity from the get go but the Eritreans hold on to what they have to wither out weyane plan and that is admirable for me . Opposing the dictator at home with a weyane plan is no way being justice seeker for Eritreans. Last point, I am not like what you stated, I am well
        to do by my own merit and I wish all Eritreans can have the same life as mine . I have been advocating for the closer of Libya roots and also for total shutdown of Eritrean border , imagine if all of us are in Eritrea, do you think PFDJ can hold chair for one day ?

        • Berhe Y

          Hi Blink,

          If you disagree that he went to Ethiopia to fight the PFDJ, that’s fine. But to accuse him ” Isn’t he the weyane ኩርኩር ” is totally a lie. He was in Eritrea when he voted for the implementation of the constitution, and holding an election with the rest of the National Assembly members.

          He did not go to weyane to topple IA and PFDJ, he went there because he had no other choice to fight him.

          I don’t agree to closing of Eritrean boarders or forcing people to stay in their country if they do not want to. The government does not own anyone and I hate governments who act like god and decide on people’s faith. There are rights people are born with such as freedom of expression, freedom of warship, freedom of movement etc..that no government have no business in telling anyone.

          If you believe that you can topple the regime from inside Eritrea, please go ahead and fight. People will follow you..no body is holding you back…but stop accusing others for doing what they believe is the right way to fight including going to Ethiopia.

          Berhe

          • Blink

            Dear Berhe
            You are right but you forget PFDJ has not acted as a government advocating for the people. We could have stayed and demand our own justice instead of running to western countries and help Issias to do what he wanted . I still think staying and fighting the system from inside was the best plan for many reasons .

            You see berhe I can find work where ever I go , I can get a job just within a month where ever I go , how many Eritreans can say that ?

          • Berhe Y

            Hi Blink,

            It depends where you live and if you have the right papers (legal permit to live and work etc). In Canada, I think it’s the case for most Eritreans and I think it’s the same in US, the UK as far as I know.

            I agree fighting the regime from within is the best way and I think there are many who have done it and are trying to do it, like the Minster Berhane but you went all bunkers on him for doing exactly what you believe should be the right way to fight? The same with the Akria incident? WHY?

            That’s why I think you are against anyone who oppose the PFDJ regime and you use different ways to deflect and divert those who fight.

            Berhe

          • Blink

            Dear Berhe
            Read the book and if you read it the Book for most part is a failure , for example calling for Issias to have a meeting, calling for Issias to debate you and many many things plus he know everything about PFDJ money but refused to give in . Second I refused to clap with people who had been at weyane payrolls and now to insult them.

          • Acria

            Selam Blink,

            You stated above “I still question these [those] who migrated with nothing to show too”. It is like the PFDJ will provide you with identifying information for you to show when you ask for asylum in other countries. You know you can’t just leave Eritrea legally if you are over 5 years old and under 50 years old? It means you can’t get a passport, which is the most acceptable form of identification document accepted by most western countries. Not only that, most of the youth don’t have the luxury of asking for new form of document like birth certificates. The only form of identification I.D. they have is even too old to identify them. I.D. cards were supposed to be renewed at least every fiver years to reflect your aging process.

            Ideally you should have some form of identifying information to ask for asylum in any western countries (Europe, Canada, USA). The interesting thing about these countries is that they have a way of granting you asylum without identifying papers as long as you can prove that you are from Eritrea and can show that you have a reasonable fear of persecution either subjectively or objectively.

            Now, that is besides the point. Why are Eritreans so desperate that they are leaving their country now to Ethiopia after the “peace” is announced and the border is open? They have been under the PFDJ subjugation for the last 27 years. Can’t they wait fear more years to see how things might turn instead of going aimlessly to Ethiopia? This shows how people are so desperate and have no confidence not only in PFDJ but to Eritrea itself! If nothing happened to stop this degradation process anytime soon, we will have Eritrea as a memory but not as an independent country. Any person who really cares about the independence of Eritrea has to do something now before it is too late!

          • Nitricc

            Hi Acrya; you said “This shows how people are so desperate and have no confidence not only in PFDJ but to Eritrea itself!” NO, they just want free food and getting aid. So, just call them for what they are lazy people.

          • Acria

            Selam Nitricc,

            I would like you to visit Asmara and talk to the people there first and then talk to the Eritreans in Ethiopia and you might change your mind of labelling them lazy.

          • Selam

            Hi Nitricc (ንትርክ)
            ንትርክ will be the best nickname for you. I think either you or your family migrate from Eritrea in the same way or some thing similar. Only the idiot insulting himself. May be only may be the one who has the courage or capability to face the situation in Eritrea can say what you write. Even if he said, it will not accepted by human moral value, because the capacity of human being absorbing a problem varies from person to person.
            Otherwise a person like you enjoying a western life but his origin is from the same country to say such kind of thing exposes his stupidity.

          • Nitricc

            Hi Selam; you must be one of the lazy people who keep looking for hand outs and free things. Good luck with that and enjoy 10 kilo wheat and a can of cooking oil. what a lazy creature you are?

          • Selam

            Selamat NeTReK
            Ah that means you are lazy, that is why you migrate to the west to get Wheat flour.

          • Blink

            Dear acria
            I believe that they will not find what they are looking in Ethiopia unless they have someone in the west with a reason to bring them to the west and as my information I believe most are expected to go to west with family reunion, marriage and other reasons . Amanuel eyasu on his radio , radio Erena and others has been telling Eritrean youths news like , today 10 Eritreans relocated to this by the help of UN this happened for almost 20 years, the impact on the youth is unmeasurable. Here don’t forget it is a very small number. The humiliation Eritreans face in Libya, Italian cities as well as all over is unbelievable. The understanding of Eritrean about migration to the west is idiotic as well as unwise. I believe most people throw their life to their disappointment. Where I live I see Eritreans and Ethiopians working the lost job ever available in the west like cleaning, lowest possible job in the health sector and some getting hand out from social safety net of the public ( the help is simply beyond their expectations and is bad to them as well as their kids )

            We all agreed PFDJ is horrible and Issias is horrible dictator but what we didn’t know is we are giving him space to continue by moving away from our own house . Blaming Issias will not work and it didn’t work, we should explain to our society that life in the west is horrible but we can make it better at home if we can remove him.

          • Acria

            Selam Blink,

            You can’t possibly compare the west with the home country at any level. Any Eritrean who can reach the west, will definitely have his/her asylum claim properly adjudicated in favor of granting them permanent political asylum. Life is harder in the west; nevertheless, it is full of democracy and opportunity ( at least in the US). The only problem now is it is not easy reaching the west these days. The false ‘peace’ with Ethiopia is another reason giving the western countries reason to pause their adjudicating process of asylum claimants.

            The best alternative will be to instill democracy and job opportunities in Eritrea. The PFDJ, or whoever is in power, should immediately rectify the Eritrean problem; otherwise, people will explode from within. It is high time that the regime start reconciliation and true peace with its own people rather than become the only mediator of peace between Ethiopia and its opposition forces. Are the PFDJ society and its supporters evil forces or just ignorant remnants that are playing with the Eritrean people? This was never to happen and we did let it happen. It is upon every Eritrean, especially the echelon part of PFDJ, to revert course and start thinking for their people and their country now!!!

      • Amanuel Hidrat

        Selam Berhe,

        እቶም ተዋጊኦም ዘዋግኡን ሃገር ዘራጋገጹን: ከም በዓል አምባሳደር ኣድሓኖም በዞም ሃደምቲ : እሞኸአ ብድሕሪ ብርዒ ስም ተሓቢኦም ስም ጀጋኑ ከጸልምዎም ኸለው ብጣዕሚ ዘሔዝን እዩ:። ኣድሓኖም ካብቶም ታሪኽ ዝሰርሑ ጀጋኑ ኤርትራውያን እዩ:: ሕጂ በቶም ጭረኦም ደጉሎም ዝሃደሙ ከም በዓል ብሊንክ ክጽረፋ ዓገብ ክበሃሉ አለዎም:: መን ሃገር ምስ አምጸኦሉ እዩ ሕጂ ልዕሌኦም ሃገራዊ ክመስል ዝፍትን ዘሎ:: Damn.

        Thank you for defending one of our heroes.

        • David Samson

          Selam Emma,

          I am sure you know Wedi Baatay. Right after the end of the war, the Eritrean Ambassador to the UK set up Mekhete junkies. The primary task was to isolate and intimidate Eritreans who were perceived to be as disloyal to ‘Wudbna’. One Sunday, the group called a town-hall meeting and invited all Eritreans. One of my Ex-fighter friend urged me to attend the meeting so as to challenge them. He genuinely believed we could confront them. I laughed at his naivety and warned him something might happen to him.

          The meeting was led by Dr and an Amiche– who was born in Gondar. As with many Eritreans, Wedi Baatay attended the meeting. While the Chairman was about to start announcing the aim of the meeting, someone from the floor came over and whispered to him. The Chairman said, “I am told we have some woyanes and Agames in the hall and as they are not Eritreans, they should leave the building immediately”. Everyone on the hall was gasping for air and was staring at each other. After few whisperings to each other, two guys came over to Wedi Baatay’s line and pointed at him. I think Wedi Baatay at first thought they were looking for a wrong person, but they were not. Wedi Baatay like a criminal was escorted from the hall. To me what saddened me was, people who have known Wedi Baatay during the liberation years stood silent. That said all about the state of Eritrea

          • Berhe Y

            Hi David,

            I think I remember the incident you are talking about.

            Let me focus on the last point because that’s the important point of the whole story

            to me what saddened me was people who have known Wedi Baatay during the liberation years stood silent. That said all about the state of Eritrea

            Even the though there were a room full of people, but the people were all (the majority) in their own. You and your friend may be the two exception, for example if it happened to you, may be your friend will stood up for and if it happened to your friend, may be you would stood up to your friend. The reason is, because you were mentally prepared ahead of what to expect in the meeting.

            Had the wedi Baatay went with another friend or friends with a plan, then they all would have stood up for each other. And once the people stood up, and who know may be other would have joined. It’s how people dynamics work. So it’s not the state of Eritrea but actually the state of those individuals in that room.

            However there was another group who come prepared and organized to the meeting. Those who were leading the meetings. They knew exactly what they were doing and they had planned how they would react if someone they don’t want come to the meetings.

            These are the core group “the secret group” that I am referring who plan and execute everything. These are the secret group, in each city, in each country that we need to know. And if possible infiltrate their network (looking like them) and know their secrets. Right now we are all in our own and they have a well organized and well connected group…

            Berhe

          • David Samson

            Selam Berhe,

            I see your point. The reason for saying the state of Eritrea is because a state is a collection of individuals, so if the addition of individuals behaved and acted on a certain that would be sum up the state.
            How do you we expect Eritreans in Eritrea to revolt against the regime while we, who live in a democratic country and far away from the jaws of a dictator lack courage? As saying goes ‘Charity begins at home’. Do you know the number of cores PFDJs in the UK are not even 100, yet we, the majority, do not have the courage confronting these thugs? We can come up with endless excuses and reasons for not acting, but to me it is very simple: we are trying to hide our own weaknesses. Until we man up and counted, we should not expect and blame Eritreans back home. We need to lead by example.

          • Berhe Y

            Hi David,

            I don’t know if anyone is blaming Eritreans back home, but blaming those in the jaws of PFDJ is wrong.

            Do you remeber when the government send the UoS students to WIA, there was a petition was organized by Dr. Araya and others at Asmarino, asking the government to handle the situation carefully and release the students. If I recall over 2000 plus people signed it. Then there was another one at awate after the arrest of the G-15 I think, that they government lost the confidence of the people. Over 500 signed it.

            The demonstration to the PFDJ was going on since that time, and I think for the most part, the turn out is respectable in my opinion.

            The problem is I think, it’s hard to continue the momentum when the results do not seem to show positive results.

            Now if you say the hard core PFDJ in London are less than 100, and I think in Toronto are no more than that. And I am sure everywhere else are the same.

            What I am saying is, let’s find out and lust those 100 or how ever many they are, who they are, what their motivation is, what their intentions are.

            This may sound vigilant justice but in the absence of real justice what choice do we really have.

            I feel there is nothing wrong in doing so, because as far as I am concerned, they really are the enemies of the people. I am happy to be corrected if I am wrong.

            Berhe

          • Amanuel Hidrat

            Selam Dave,

            You are right on target. The excuses of diaspora Eritreans is endless. They have abdicated and outsourced their responsibilities to our people inside Eritrea who are suffocating under the dictator’s grip.

          • Paulos

            Selam David,

            Same thing happened to Amanuel Iyasu as well. Right? Thing is, most of those who crack down on Oppostion are people with identity crises. Recently, a woman who trolls Opposition with all kind of name calling, tweeted saying that she reconnected with her long lost mother in Tigrai. Go figure!

          • David Samson

            Selam Paul,
            My reply has disappeared– might be blocked by Mr DISQUS. Will wait for a couple of hours before i re-post it.

          • Amanuel Hidrat

            Selam Dave,

            Yes I heard about it at that time. It is unfortunate, all the true nationalist are being bashed and blackmailed by the PFDJ operatives. As a matter of fact, I had faced similar situation in NYC. About 5 to 6 years ago, the Eritrean foreign minister Osman Saleh and Yemane Monkey had a meeting with the Eritreans who live in NYC and it’s vicinity. I went with my two friends to participate the meeting. We went before any body, to sit in the front row of the seats. When the time is up, the two guests came accompanied by Berhane the Charge-D in Washington DC. We have listened to what they have to say. Then the Q&A started. the organizer told Berhane (the moderator) not to take our questions. Right after that, Monkey asked Berhane to comment on us. He said we are told that the wayane are here to disrupt our meeting. By pointing his finger towards us, he asked us to leave the building. We did. They were afraid to the challenge that might come from us. They don’t want to hear questions from the opposition. That is the norm of the PFDJ operatives.

        • Blink

          Dear Amanuel
          It was just yesterday you among many who tried to cut Adhanom EPLF work in to a crime fiction and now you come back to praise EPLF work , how is that even possible? Don’t you see your Facebook page share history filled with Foro lies ? I mean you are shameless in no position to say “ ሃገር ዘውሓሱ ” no way and not acceptable for you to say that. I did not criticize Adhanom achievements at the time of Revolution but what he did after 2000 with weyane is unacceptable and need to be challenged as he is trying to make face shift .

  • Blink

    Dear Girmay

    Your habit has been lying to investors and also your customers in which typically Meles gen . Meles borrowed tons of money and put in the bank account of few while 8 million are getting nothing. You see Meles the fugitives leader is being hated and hunted after his death. Now what can you really do to make saints of TPLF , Meles eat children and pregnant women by his brilliant eye . The genocider Meles and his loan historical lies are all gone .

  • haileTG

    Merhaba Awatista,

    Scanning the web, there have been some descriptions of Eritrea’s current situation being floated around. These include Amb. Adhanom, Dr. Berhe, an Oromo opposition member whose name I forgot but just returned to Ethiopia and our great Mahmuday. Which description do awatista find accurate and why? Otherwise, do you have a different take? Here are the assessments:

    Amb. Adhanom (opposition): ዝፈሸለት ሃገር or bankrupt nation

    Dr. Berhe (Supporter): ፈጺሙ መሽሚሹ or totally rotten

    Oromo Ex-pat (Ethiopian): የወደቀች ኣገር ናት or it is a failed country

    Mahmuday (independent): ዓቢራን ደኺማን or emaciated and tired

    • Kokhob Selam

      Dear haileTG,

      I can see that ” ዓቢራን ደኺማን or emaciated and tired” I like this one honest and to the point ,,ዓቢራን ደኺማን or emaciated and tired” means still, we have to go through tough times but then there a way..to victory ,,the “Mahmuday (independent)”:is more perfect than others…

      KS,,

      • MS

        Dear KS
        It just happened I read your comment here, and it made me laugh. You are Sukkar Nabat, as usual. take care.

        • Kokhob Selam

          Dear MS,

          I have better feeling about you sir. You are like honey since long time. I love the hard job of bee…You already know that..

          love this quote on my notes from the universe deck:

          “Do you know what’s a million times better than getting to the top of the mountain? Getting there after having been lost.”

          We have all been there. It’s the energy of hope, finding the light within the darkness. There are so many hopeless, lost individuals out there depressed, and feeling alone. When we feel hopeless, we are lost and directionless, we need that spark of hope to bring us back to life. To cultivate a feeling of hope, never give up on your dreams, your passions, what does hope feel like to you?

          Never going back – There is only forward.

          KS.,,

    • Ismail AA

      Selam haile TG,

      I would exclude the second and the third for credibility. The first and and the fourth are the same except in degree because the fourth could end up in the first. Mahmuday, according to his known position, is still optimistic that things would not deteriorate to the state Amb. Adhanom described. The latter had been on record that the regime had long become irredeemable since it had become slave master regarding the youth of the country. You asked if there is a different take. It is emanciated failed state that the despot has now put on auction for sale.

    • Amanuel

      Hi haileTG
      In a hope that Eritrea one day will live up to its potential I would go with MS description.

      • Amanuel Hidrat

        Selam Amanuel (Mekusi),

        To be optimistic and hopeful is natural. And is good to be. I have a question to you. We believe the potential of our nation was on its ”human resources.” By that I mean, on the can do nationalistic spirit of Eritrean people. I don’t see that remarkable values of ours in our young generation. The regime had played in making them to lose their hope on their nation and are leaving our nation in droves. So can you elaborate a little more as to what are the basis of your optimism and hopes on our nation? There are many things on the ground that elicit the spirit pessimism. Please share with us the grounds of your optimism. Let us be realistic.

        Regards

        • David Samson

          Selam Emma,

          In this part of the globe, Clocks will go back this Sunday, and it means a couple of things: as the darkness sets in, we will not see the Sun for the next 6-months; It also means, we need to get our winter clothes and rooms ready for winter. In addition, I need to buy some thick clothes(Teyki) while preparing to comment on this topic. In an anticipation of bitter winter on Awate, I wrapped myself with YG and Andnets’ fur from Russia.

          Back to the topic. My answer is none of them. I paraphrase the question as: to begin with, was there a state in the first place?
          While driving on a downhill road , I sometimes switch the engine off and just coast down the other side. I know it is illegal, but I do it when I am feeling lazy. I believe the state of Eritrea has been coasting for the last 27 years and will go on for some time, so long as the Brakes–handbrake and main one– are working. We can easily use a stone as a means of hand-break, but I am not sure the main brake is working or could easily be replaced.
          We have been living on coasting in the hope that tomorrow will be a better day, but now reached a point where an entire village is on the move southwards. We can either blame IA and sleep like a baby ,or look in to park the car with a hand-break, not a stone.

    • Nitricc

      Hi Haile-TG I will say SUSPENDED! POSTPONED! DEFERRED!ADJOURNED!

    • Amanuel Hidrat

      Selam Hailat (H-TG),

      Amb. Adhanom’s description is the exact description of our nation. Who in his right mind will disagree ሃገርና “ዝፈሸለት ሃገር” ምኳና? ሕጂ ትንሳኤ ሃገር ዝግበረሉ መንገዲ ጥራይ እዩ ክናደ ዘለዎ::

    • Paulos

      Selam HaileTG,

      I found the wording a bit problematic. Failed state? I agree. Failed nation or country? I disagree precisely because a state is a political entity where as a nation is a group of people with a shared history, culture, traditions and norms among other things. And what is so unique about Eritrea is that, the state declared unrelenting war against its own people. In a rather paradoxical way, the state has succeeded where it failed through the prisms of the people and through what we call norm as well.

      • Amanuel Hidrat

        Selam Dr Paulos,

        Is a “failed state” a condition to a “failed nation”, where there is an intrinsic relationships between “a nation” and “a state”, and in which one can not exist without the other? There is no a “state” without the “nation” and vis versa. The symbiotic relationship of the two concept can not be overlooked by no means.

        • Paulos

          Selam Professor A. Hidrat,

          Certainly, as you have aptly put it, one can not define a state without having a nation in mind for they are interrelated. The question is, is their relationship based on causality or correlation? Or is it synergistic?

          A state is an abstraction which is a product of progressive human consciousness. A nation on the other hand is something tangible where people collectively share with one another as in common history, culture and traditions among other things.

          The very nature of humanity is, however, an antithesis to an ideal life, as in living in community with shared goals. Simply because personal interests and ambitions give away. As such, infringements on others’ natural rights prevails to the extent of having a societal structure where it is divided between the weak and the powerful.

          If the powerful kills off all the weak, he or she will be left with no subjects and he or she wouldn’t have any other choice but to spare the life of the subjects. The flip side of the argument is that, what if the weak come together and rise up against the powerful? More over, what guarantee do the weak have if one of them becomes too powerful in the aftermath of the defeat of the previous? It becomes a vicious cycle. The only way out of the conundrum is for everyone to give up certain of their rights for the common good. That very statement heralds the formation of a political entity—-State.

          Well, the threat to the community doesn’t end with the formation of the State. What if the State itself becomes too powerful, corrosive and predatory? And a way out for that is the foundation of political institutions to keep the State in check as in Rule-of-Law and Accountability.

          Eritrea is a nation with a predatory state with a complete lack of political institutions. The state has failed to live up to its mandates and responsibilities and the nation is betrayed by the very entity that was supposed to serve it.

    • Blink

      Dear Haile TG
      Argentina , Greece and many African countries are bankrupted countries but not failed countries. I think Adhanom is not talking about Eritrea but he is spewing his anger for his disastrous plan. He failed to build an organization that can bring Eritreans to a united opposition to PFDJ and time is running out for his age. Eritrea is here to stay and this time is an opportunity for Eritreans to kick Issias while holding Eritrea intact . Adhanom and his friends can do one thing to Eritreans and that is step aside as their 17 year weyane game failed to give fruits.

    • MS

      MarHaba HaileTG (Aba Tereg)
      I oppose the use of this term nonchalantly because it is among the most politicized and abused term. When we say a failed state, we have to have some reference as to from where (initial position- P1) the state has fallen, to where (P2). Politically, in fact, Eritrea has not assumed a full blown operational stage, or has not matured to a normal state. The efforts that had started to have it assume that phase were stopped with the war (1998), and since then and until July 9, 2018, the country was run under the auspices of state of emergency. So, we have no way of speaking of a failure of state. The growth of the state of Eritrea had been arrested right after birth. If some one claims Eritrea is a failed state, I want that person to tell me, relative to what stage of its existence. The power of the central government is unchallenged, the integrity of the nation is fine, the government is unchallenged in exercising its powers throughout the country and in representing the nation in conducting foreign relations (internationally recognized), etc. Is it optimum or efficient? Of course not. Are the functions of the government including rendering services to citizens adequate or well managed? Of course, we have a lot to say there. Is it a democratic government? No need for explanation.
      As I indicated in my FB comment, Eritrea is weak, and it risks failure unless we all contribute positively. The worst scenario is a sudden disruption of the ability of the authority and the emergence of power vacuum. Most failed states had one thing in common and that is: the sudden departure of a dictator. To avoid that Eritreans must undergo a sober discussion on creating a landing- cushion that could absorb the shock of the departure of IA. A well thought of transitional mechanism is needed. My current conversation will focus on promoting Eritrean dialogue.
      As you well know, there is a vast literature on failed state. Different theoreticians look at it from different angles. When we use this term I implore that we must apply it carefully. Wikipedia does have helpful summary of the work of many thinkers on this subject. I will just place here how “Fund for Peace” characterizes failed state.
      – Loss of control of its territory, or of the monopoly on the legitimate use of physical force therein
      – Erosion of legitimate authority to make collective decisions
      – Inability to provide public services
      – Inability to interact with other states as a full member of the international community
      Regards.
      [Hopefully, the firing squad is snoring].

      • haileTG

        Thank you MS, Aman H, Amanuel, Paulos, Blink, Ismail, Nitricc, KS, David,

        The votes are in, I think Mahmuday has won in close race 🙂

        Seriously, however, all your inputs (without exception) were interesting and unique to say the least. Thanks. What I am going to say may sound fuzzy but will say it anyways:) Eritrea can’t be different things at the same time. It is one or the other. However, we have varied types of assessment from each person(s). Thus:

        1 – How you perceive the state of the country is wholly dependent on you. I.e. it depends on your views, which means it is you rather than the thing out there.

        2 – Once you perceive in one way or the other, that would limit how you would act, interact, speak and be spoken to. You see, it is you… are you keeping up here:)

        3 – The thing called Eritrea is out there and will not be affected or effected by the perception you created. But you are here with the perception and you will be affected and effected and impacted by it. Still with me? 🙂

        4 – What is out there is dynamic, not static, moving and changing. It is risky to stick to one view long after the movements happened and continue to change. If you look at each of the descriptions given above, there is NO thing that can be shown to conclusively and tangibly show it.

        5 – So the point is to stay open, non judgmental in seeing what is and kissing it goodbye as it changes. It is what it is and our views shape us and our destiny much more than their objective.

        Now where is GeTstsatse when you need him:)

        • Paulos

          Selam HaileTG,

          There is nothing subjective or metaphysical about the whole dynamics. It is pretty clear and can be assessed objectively.

          Here is the deal:

          A. Is there dictatorship in Eritrea? Yes there is.

          B. Is there gross human rights violaion? Yes there is.

          C. Is there lack of political institutions? Yes.

          D. Constitution? No.

          E. Are there independent media outlets? No.

          F………

          The above cited parameters are not limited or exhaustive but can help us gauge objectively the standing of the state.

          • haileTG

            Ah..brother Paulosay

            Trust me I know what you’re saying. But if there is nothing subjective or metaphysical about it, why then is it proving illusory to all the rational and good people of our august gathering here? What is the objective standing that everyone would be able to see and agree with? Much like we can say Eritrea is in Africa objectively, can we say the standing is like this or that? I hope you can sense where I am headed here. It is us who make subjective conclusion about it. This means we can all sympathize with our shared predicament that we are caught up in subjective trap. Hence we can have room to compromise and form unity in opposing those realities that you aptly listed and more.

          • Paulos

            Selam HaileTG,

            Simply because people are in denial. It is as simple as that. In behavioral psychology, they call it rationalisation in one of the eleven or so categories of “Immature Defensive Mechanisms.” More over, people are terrified to the core to call the disease for what it is. And that is precisely the reason we need a leader not only who grabs the bull with its horns but comforts us, unites us and leads us to the aspirations and potentials of the nation we all love.

            P.S. If you have listened to Dr. Berhe, he was not only in a complete denial but terrified to say the disease for what it is. That is not an illusion or a matter of perspective but when people lose courage and retreat into a comfort zone and let something they know too well eat them from with in.

          • haileTG

            Merhaba Paulos,
            At a risk of looking like hair splitting, let me clarify. All the list you put are objective and factual, yet let’s say Paulos agrees that all those add up to failed state as you said earlier. And MS differs and says it is just weakened state and not failed. Where do we go from here? This is not to say the elements are not objective, they are. But the assessment that follows is subjective. And such bickering on subjective matters has a lot to do with the way we have grown intolerant of each other as opposition force. The point is we will make it out to be this or that based on our individual tendecy, how ever that is more about us than the thing out there. The objective elements are agreed upon by everyone, it is whether it is this or that is what gets us down.

            PS: yes I heard Berhe. Guys like him are not straight talkers and he is probably upset that he spent his time with PFDJ when he saw greener pasture in Ethiopia.

          • Paulos

            Selam HaileTG,

            Please forgive me if I sound like a broken record but again we need a leader who can bring us together who capitalizes on our common values and political persuasions as well. That said, what Birhane Abrehe laid out is what needs to be done next. Isaias needs to own the truth and tell the reality on the ground as it is.

            It is imperative to remember that, failed state is not a death sentence where history is replete with failed states which later on found their momentum and rose up as a beacon of hope for other nations. That is to say that, it is perfectly normal albeit painful to say that Eritrea is a failed state. We just have to get up and start all over again if we have to. If we were able to do the impossible and the improbable for thirty years, it shouldn’t be too difficult to build a nation from zero up. ውድቀት ብኣና ኣይተጀመረን ዘሕፍረና ነገር የለን!

        • Selamat HaileTG,

          Am differentiating what is dynamic and what is static. Having lots of difficulty with the calculus of stocastic processes. Then I read which is my choice – your #4

          “4 – What is out there is dynamic, not static, moving and changing. It is risky to stick to one view long after the movements happened and continue to change. If you look at each of the descriptions given above, there is NO thing that can be shown to conclusively and tangibly show it.”

          tSAtSE

          • haileTG

            Merhaba tSAtSE,

            Great catch! The difference between dynamic and static can only be relative. Static is when viewing, thus the viewed is dynamic in relative sense. Dynamic viewing is a paradox, because non static condition precludes viewing to take place. If the process from A to B is being viewed by X, then the viewer X must remain, otherwise if X changes to Y while it views the dynamic from A to B, THEN such perception can only take place in the higher dimensional universe, at least 5 or more dimensions. I hope this takes care of the calculus side of the issue 🙂

        • Amanuel Hidrat

          Selam Hailat (H-TG),

          Let make this comment:

          1 – there is no “me or you” without the object (in this case Eritrea) to perceive and formulate my opinion from the materialist’s point of view. It is “me” and “Eritrea” out there. Perceiving from the real world.

          2- our perception evolve with the dynamics of the object (Eritrea). So our perception is not static.

          3- our perceptions leads to our action. So Eritrea will be affected and effected with our actions. Consequently, we will be affected and effected by the mutual evolvements of the “object” and the “perceiver” (us and Eritrea).

          4- both “us “ and “Eritrea” are dynamic and are subject to changes in continuum.

          5- It is what it is our views and destiny is determined by our inputs and readiness to change with dynamic change of the object (Eritrea). Now it is your turn Hailat.

          • Paulos

            Well put Sir!

          • MS

            Selma Emma
            I think HaileTG is emphasizing
            A. The independent existence of an object, in this case, Eritrea.
            B. Variations in the ways and degrees we perceive that object, which could depend on receiving the right information, process it properly, and the ability to form a realistic picture of what’s going on…which could also be affected by one’s experience such as political biases, and so on.
            Based on the above, each of us may come up with differing verdicts about the same state of an object, particularly as complex as defining the state of a country in which case one has to consider multiple interplaying factors. Therefore, he concludes, better to be open-minded.

          • Amanuel Hidrat

            Merhaba Mahmuday,

            I didn’t interpret to his remark, rather I did comment straight forward to his five points one by one to highlight the dialectical relationship between Eritrea the “object” and the “perceivers” us.

          • haileTG

            Merhaba MS and Emma,

            I think MS has accurately summarized my position. But in order to clarify for Emma, here is a counter:)

            1 – that being the case, we are unlikely to share the same view. But it, the object, is only one thing. This is a many-one mapping in logical relations. Many views to one object. Understanding this would cool down the tense posturings.

            2 – one hard problem we have is changing our perceptions. In fact we are congratulated for not changing. 🙁

            3 – In logic, self contradiction is a defeat, in philosophy it is the doorway to the greatest knowledge possible. You both effect and not effect the object of perception. I know it sounds contradictory.

            4 – 4 and 5 are sound. As long as we know to be accomodating differences.

            Time is not on our side, the sooner we come to terms with it the better.

          • Amanuel Hidrat

            Selam Hailat (H-TG),

            I have a response to your argument on hold in Disqus. Hopefully the moderator will release it, in order, you to make counter argument or to expound it to a higher level.

          • Amanuel Hidrat

            Selam Mahmuday,

            Let me add to my previous comment, something I missed to say it. Your point (A) You stated “the independent existence of the object, in this case Eritrea.” The “object” Eritrea is not “independent” as the object “Eritrea” in itself can not be reflected and defined without the people who reside in it. We are the mirror of the object “Eritrea” within it to the outside world, and hence the land “Eritrea” and the people “Eritrean”. Just think for a moment the description “Eritrean” that bonds the “land” and the “people” like the bonds of the elements in a chemical compound with a distinct name. The psychological relationship of the “land”and its “people” can not be separated. It is only for purposes of explanations to know the make ups, the characters, relationships we try to differentiate and integrate the land and it’s people, Eritrea the “object” and the “Eritreans” the “perceivers and reflectors”.

          • MS

            Ahlan Emma
            Well described, and I completely agree with your eloquent description of the relationship that exists between Eritrea as a state and the people who identify by that state. My thrust was on individual perception vis-a-vis an objective situation. In this case, people may come up with varying degrees of assessment of a particular situation. This is so obvious that we are even not able to form a consensus on describing the current state of Eritrea. Just look how varied the descriptions are. Pro government lots describe it as faring better, the opposition describes it as a failed state or as emaciated, etc.
            In practical terms, even two skilled research teams could differ in their final analysis. That’s because we are humans and we tend to stick to biases (not using it in its bad connotation).

    • Haile S.

      Selam MeKusi,
      Your comment escaped my attention. Too busy. I would say none of the above. Eritrea is always in Ghedli though these recent times for dependence from its independence. Eritrea is an independent country member of international orgs including the human right council, but its leader(s) are bewildered beyond belief that they achieved independence. Permanent admirers of their achievements, they are in front of the mirror self congratulating till now, 27 years after. Instead of elevating themselves to true leaders, they dragged the country backward to their petit capability. They want to continue getting admired by outside and inside, thus their anger and frustration. Confronted by their citizens, mutely with gesture of the face and rolling eyes, saying then what changed following independence? The only means they got is to hold the citizen by his collars and shakes him/her to death, saying you don’t believe you are independent? Look, you are! dummy! They are spending their time fighting convincing inside that they are the champions instead of accepting what they achieved is true and elevating the citizen economically inside & outside. Sorry for the long response MeKusi, but the bottomline is Eritrea is still in Ghedli, though independent, and IA remains leader of Ghedli not truly president of an independent Eritrea. The true president of Eritrea will be the one who will succeed him, hopefully someone completely new.

      • Acria

        Selam Haile S.,

        Very true indeed! It is perplexing scenario. I hope their can fire themselves as they seem to accomplish nothing post liberation.

    • Acria

      Selam haileTG,

      For me, they are the same descriptions of the country by using different phrases and/or language. The description is even worse if you ask the people inside Eritrea. One thing we have to think about Eritrea is from within and not from outside point of view, i.e., diasporic point of view.

    • Abraham H.

      Dear HaileTG, this is just the beginning and the worst is yet to come. It has been very clear for unbiased observer that the objective of Isayas is to break the spirit of the Eritrean people and make the country incapable of standing on its own. I just can’t understand why this evil man has to go this far in his hate towards the Eritrean people. Unless we read the situation carefully and work together, avoiding minor non-essential divisions, then we are doomed. In my view, Eritrea is a failed state, and more is to come if it continues under the existing path.

  • Blink

    Dear all
    The right wing lunatics are at it again targeting the democratic leaders and their political friends. This is a political motive and I guess the Saudi will get a break from the Turkey and Qatari media hoy . Second Tigray is knowing now many economic numbers were false and the Korean dancer told them openly and his main target of export is ዕረ and ሽብጢ .

  • Paulos

    Selam My Good People,

    Funny stuff….

    Appeared today on BBC…. Six robbers walked into a shop [in Belgium] and told the owner of the e-cigarettes shop owner to empty his cash register but the guy said it was kinda early and if they come back at the end of the day, he would have about 3000 Euro. Agreed and came back at the end of the day. The owner of course had called the police between the hours and they all got apprehended. Thing is, one person could be that dumb but six? That is a bad rep for the city.

  • Amanuel Hidrat

    Dear Awatista,

    Dr Berhe who was one of the enablers of the regime and one of the disciples of DIA in the diaspora started to talk about the regime, the Eritrean people, and the current agreement with Ethiopia. He is interviewed in Paltalk, an interview must listen by all Eritreans. Ahmm, ድሕሪ ማይ አብ በዓቲ:: it is also posted at Facebook.

    • haileTG

      Hello Emma,

      I think this guy had just realised that he built his B’eAti ab mai. This ex derg military and later turn coat PFDIJIsta came out of no where after 2001 to help IA slaughter our people. In the process he built a home in Asmara. And as his interview suggests he was disappointed by the bureaucracy in Eritrea. Especially, of course after witnessing what he called a lightening progress in Ethiopia. He is however not willing to talk about the developing justice, constitition and rule of law that he failed to notice in Ethiopia. He is not trust worthy guy at all.

      • Amanuel Hidrat

        Dear Hailat (H-TG),

        I completely agree. He has never been for “constitutionalism” and “rule of law” in the last 27 years and will not be trustworthy in the effort to bring change in our country.

        • Ismail AA

          Selam Aman H and Haile TG,

          The pop up of such individuals, who are not from ranks of ordinary folks; start to speak when the going on the horizon menace to turn rough; and yet shy away from spelling out their real position vs-a-vis the regime they served and benefited from at the expense of the people, confuse the opposition scene. Had they been sincere and conducted themselves in the expected of them, they could have been welcome addition, despite their past and role. Actually, their posture and demand to have unquestioned place in the opposition pose as rubbing salt in to an open wound. This Dr. Berhe falls in the category until he proves otherwise, which it is hoped he would.

        • Paulos

          Selam Professor A. Hidrat,

          A bit tied up with work related stuff. Can you please summarize his talking points. Much obliged.

          • Ismail AA

            Selam Dr. Paulos,

            Glad to have back. You and others such as Dr. Bryan and saay7 have been clearly missed, to me for the sake of being specific. Your absence from the forum immediately became felt when matters of wide bearing and impact get access to the front page. The books of former minister Berhane Abrehe seen in the back drop of the enhanced emboldening of the despot to inflict more damage to the Eritrean body politik is one of them.

          • Paulos

            Selam Kbur Haw Ismail AA,

            Many thanks. Got busy with work related stuff and got completely turned off by some comments and lost interest to engage.

          • Ismail AA

            Selam Dr. Paulos,

            We all suffer from the severity time constraint causes. When considered on the scale with the mediocrities and idiosyncrasies that often invade the pages of this forum, one confronts the question: Is investing precious time worthwhile? The answer is not at all. But the ordeal our nation is going through poses and looks us straight on our faces. Then, we remember we have at least moral obligation as worthy citizens, and make call on our resilience and perseverance. For sure, neither you, nor any concerned and worthy citizen would dare to take safety in indifference, and leave the field for those who use coarse language as weapon for lack of rationale to defend the indefensible.

          • Abrehet Yosief

            Selam Paulos
            ዋይ ሓወይ! ኣባይካ turned off ይኹን። ኣይትጥፋእ ድኣ ንመን ክሕሾ ። ኣያ ሃይለ ዝተማባጽዓልካ ጭሕሚ ዓንተር ከይበላዕካ ምጥፋእ የለን።

          • Paulos

            Thank you ፍትውትን ክብርትን ሓፍተይ.

          • Saleh Johar

            Ahlan Paulos,
            Was it the comment I made about the sky being amber prematurely? I apologize. Next time, when I make comments that annoy you, just tell me and I will paint the sky with any color of your liking. Welcome and next time, no retreat, please 🙂

          • Paulos

            Selam Kbur Ayay,

            You should see me laughing. Yea that was it. I heard you own a magic ladder that stretches high to the sky but never knew you could pull Michelangelo.

            I have my faults and often times I get carried away and say some not so cool stuff. But never to the extent of labeling certain groups with bigoted remarks. And one chooses to step aside for as they say misery loves company. My respect for you Kbur Ayay is in place, however.

          • Kaddis

            Gash Paulos,
            Lovely to see you around. Some comments here and some days in Ethiopia feels dark. The only Tigrigna word I picked here is Mesfertena. I think it means perseverance? It’s a hopeful time for all of us and wish to see you all capable people contribute more to the community.
            Cheers,

          • Paulos

            Selam Kaddis,

            Many thanks for those kind words. You probably meant to say ብጽፍርና፣ a national ethos for self-reliance. I hear you chuckle for the joke has it that we lost our fingers instead in the end.

            What doesn’t kill you makes you strong said Nietzsche. Dark days are signs when light is about to break through and we should never lose hope and heart for the days ahead are always brighter. And that is precisely the reason we should avoid negative and toxic people for we got nothing to gain from them but lose our sense of humanity.

          • Amanuel Hidrat

            Selam Dr Paulos,

            His talking points:

            (a) about the banking system: He said we have a retarded banking system with poor service to the public. He is viewing for introducing a new system.

            (b) about building constructions: He said they have bad policy for housing and constructions. Since the clouds of war is removed, they have to come with new policy and open the public and private services to the general public.

            (c) No body knows as to the new agreement between Ethiopia and Eritrea. The the general public is in a dark regarding the on going political and economic development between the two nation. He urged the public to demand their rights to know the ongoing agreements.

            (d) The development of Ethiopia in the last 27 years: He visited Addis. He is impressed by the developments he saw in Ethiopia. He felt as if he is in one of the American cities. He admired the internet connections and services in Ethiopia. He acknowledged the infrastructural and industrial developments in Ethiopia and admired the Expansion of universities in Ethiopia, while ours the one we had is closed.

            (e) He indicated that there are no employees of private sectors in Eritrea. All workers are employed in public sector (government offices). There is no recognizable relationship between the employees and government officials.

            When they asked him as to what is the solution to general problem of to the state of Eritrea. He failed to suggest any kind of solution.

    • Alex

      Hi Amanuel,
      He is patriot Eritrean who is speaking to what need to happen now since the issue with Ethiopia is resolved. I listened to his interview and agree with most of his points.

    • David Samson

      Selam Emma,
      He, alongside, Sofia and Geodon have been the leader of ‘Mekhetes’ and Townhall meetings. He was shocked to witness the country banking and financial systems have turned in to Byzantines era. You, I and many others have been crying for help as the country has been sinking for the last 27-years. We have been called all names. Although, it pains me to witness a promising country that has been going back to stone ages, in a twisted way, I also feel relieved and vindicated in a sense that all my cries and pains have come true. It is better late than never for the good Dr to come clean, despite his language was not firm and might be experiencing some doubts, or still in a shock.

      • Paulos

        Selam David,

        I listened to part of his speech aired on Assenna. As you have aptly put it, he has always been a lieutenant in the run-away መኸተ in a breakneck speed to please Isaias by competing with Sofia, Amare and Abbay. Certainly it was all about the Weyanes who were allegedly lying about the double digit economic growth and turning Ethiopia into a country far worse than when it was under the King and the Dergue.

        This is what he said in his speech, “At one point while sitting in a hotel, I zoned-out and came back to my senses when I heard those who were around me speaking in Amharic for I thought I was in any city either in the States or in Europe.” He was blown away with the dramatic change that he had seen in Ethiopia. Thing is, the remarkable change didn’t fall from the sky or a spark of a wand but some body had to work hard for it. He didn’t want to say it simply because it came about by the sweat and vision of those darn Weyanes. He is in the company of the ungrateful lot in Ethiopia and here in Diaspora and Isaias’ lackey at heart as well. Not worth taking him serious either.

        • David Samson

          Selam Paulos,

          Well, he does not need to be explicit; he has already inadvertently admitted it. If I am not mistaken, he left Ethiopia during mid-80s so any change after this period could only attributable to the EPRDF’s government. My question is, when did he visit Ethiopia? Was it after the peace agreement or not? You know it was ‘Haram’ to visit Ethiopia and you loss your ID on a spot. The ‘Haram’ has now turned in to ‘Halal’ with the blessing of Aya Isu.

          • Ismail AA

            Selam Dr. Paulos and David Samson,
            As I had stated in one of my entries yesterday, it’s futile to take such guys, some of them late comer loyalist-turn-patriots during the armed struggle era, serious. They have been popping up here and there for the past decade, especially after the border war debacle. The record is disppointing – none among them made any impression. I do not know what will happen in the context of the circumstances arisen after the ascent of Abij and carrying the despot with him.

          • Paulos

            Selam Kbur Haw Ismail AA and David,

            For obvious reasons, he couldn’t have visited Addis before the peace deal. It must be recent. I suspect it was a directive from Yemane to test the waters and blame it on the middle ranking civil servants and fall guys with in the military so that the ንሱ በይኑ ኾይኑ ዝሕግዞ ስኢኑ mantra could ride smooth in a bid to shift the blame onto others.

            People for reasons only known to them can welcome his quasi change of heart but the question remains if Eritrea can move onto the right direction while Isaias is at the helm.

        • Nitricc

          Hi Paulose ; you said ” Thing is, the remarkable change didn’t fall from the sky or a spark of a wand but somebody had to work hard for it.” No it didn’t fall from sky but it came from debt and credits that will cripple the country for the generations to come. It is your right to be all over Ethiopia but just tell the truth. the next five years Pakistan, Ethiopia and Djibouti will fall in to China’s debt trap and then you can tell us how Ethiopia is progressing.

        • Mitiku Melesse

          Hei Paulos.
          There is a change. How much the change costed?
          How much went direct to the change and for corruption to make the change to be owned and controlled by woaynes?
          How much did cost sending the top woyane politicians to Beging and sign the loan for the change to fall from the sky and only the Chinese contractors do the miracle?

          If you call this woyane’s taking loan in the name of Ethiopia and managing the way they want, then what you call millions Ethiopians who must work for the lowest labor coast in the world to pay the loan and the rent for the coming 30 40 years. The corruption costs Ethiopia more because a 5-6 million minority must pay more for corruption to have such ambitious plan to control 100 or more million people. So millions must work too to pay the money wasted on the corruption plus the rent.

      • Amanuel Hidrat

        Selam Dave,

        These trio (Berhe, Sofia, Gedowon) were the main culprit to the predicament of our people, as they were the spokesmen and drum bitters of the Despot in the diaspora. The guy in his interview was reluctant to say the truth in terms the nature of the disastrous senseless war. He was not happy that our country is lagging way behind Ethiopia in developments. He was mesmerized by what he saw in Addis. Actually, in a sense he sound that the development in Eritrea is incompatible with that of Ethiopia in order the current economic agreement to be successful. Actually he is right in that regard. In my view the current integration can not be successful b/c
        (a) it requires two stable governments (b) it requires two similar governmental system (c) it requires similar economic policy (d) it requires two free people in order to have smooth movements of goods and services (e) it requires to have compatible technocrats to maintain a balanced of interest of both people. Without these stated prerequisites the so called integrations will remain as bogus from my perspectives.

        • David Samson

          Selam Emma and Paul,

          His retirement dream is now in tatters. If I want to be cynical, the reason for speaking out now is largely driven by self-interest. If you listen to his interviews, he kept mentioning the line’ Go and see for yourselves’. I could only imagine though deep down he was well aware of the country’s predicaments, nevertheless, he was shell shocked by its states.

          He could easily retire and live in Ethiopia. After all, He was a Shaleqa in Ethiopian army and knows and feels home.

          • Amanuel Hidrat

            Selam Dave,

            I can’t agree more. After all whether he likes it or not ተደሚሩ’ዩ:: By the way a friend of mine was in a funeral at Philadelphia two weeks ago. Incidentally, Sofia was there and people were teasing her by telling her “ተደሚርኪ ኢኺ:: she was responding to them አይተደመርኩ አይጎደልኩ:: When they don’t know where the despot is taking them and in the middle of the process if they lost their vioces, disgruntlement is enough to redeem themselves. They have to apologize to the Eritrean people for they were instrument of the misery of our people.

          • Saleh Johar

            David,
            For the first time I met Berhe in Asmara in 1991 and I believe we made good friends. Particularly at the airport when a man was treating us like kids: stand in line, then when he discovers the boarding is delayed, go sit on the side, then stand up and form a line. I was mad and refused to stand which he took as disrespect. We had an altercation with him and Berhe came to my rescue by calming the furious man. I had a beef. Someone had told me he was a searching officer (fetashi) under the Derg and was not a good person at all. Now seeing him do what he did under the Derg infuriated me and I was expressing my anger by refusing to obey his orders. But he thought he can order us around, pretending to be “tegadalay” in fornt of those who do not know him.

            I never met Berhe until the wartime when he became one of those who were drawing the war front on napkin papers and making noise. Then he wrote something that really annoyed me. It was about the battle of Halhal where 46 combatants were killed due to a betrayal of a Commandos soldier. Berhe, talking about the battle said… the commandis are brave and etc, etc. I wondered: were they brave because they were Eritreans as he implied, weren’t the ELF combatants also Eritreans? How could they have a different level of bravery?

            I will try and repost the angry article I wrote in response… if I find it.

            Then he became a full-fledged apologist. Even now as he admires what the Ethiopians did in 20 years and boats in a typical PFDJ way, Eritreans could do in ten! What an arrogance and racist take!!! Why? Are we different from the Ethiopians? What is this feeling of superiority that many in our region are inflicted with? It is sickening.

            In short, he is one disappointing fellow. And he was not in the Derg army, but the director of EDDC, the retail trading arm of the Derg. He was sent o the USA and decided not to return to the drawing Derg-ship.

        • Paulos

          Selam Professor A. Hidrat,

          Many thanks. I appreciate.

        • Nitricc

          Hi Aman-H; he said he was surprised by the number of high rise building. I don’t know how you people think but the man just exposed his ignorance. I am amazed by the thinking of Africans. Building high rising building is not a sign of development. this guy must got his doctorate from African universities. What is happening in Addis is nothing but a great mistake. When you build everything in the capital city, people especially the young will go to the capital city and housing, prostitution, organized crime and over population is a must. that exactly what you are witnessing in Addis but no, one stupid African doctor thinks it is development. To give you an idea; as current as today, the Entire Eritrean population lives in the city of Addis. There is one way out for Ethiopia, Invest in agriculture with everything you have. number of building in the capital city is development except to stupid people.

          • David Samson

            Selam Nitricc,
            He has not only received his PhDs from USA, but also, he is/ was a lecturer at Rowan state University. In fact, he might be either a Professor or Associate Professor. It is worth noting that he was commenting as individual, not expressing his professional views.

          • Nitricc

            Hi DS; that is even worst. for an educated man to believe high rise building is a sign of development. is He a historian? he got to be.

          • David Samson

            Selam Nitricc,
            Unless I am mistaken, he is an Economist. He was not asked to comment on pros and cons of Ethiopia’s economical model, but rather as ordinary citizen.

          • David Samson

            Selam Nitricc,
            Just read his auto

            Professor in the Marketing department.
            None of the commentators on his page said anything positive about him. That sure should please you.

          • Amanuel

            Hi Nitricc
            What is wrong with you? Insulting all African universities because you didn’t like what the man said is bonkers. Please blame him individually. I hope you heard the expression of “Uncle Tom”.

            Yes I couldn’t agree more about the development. Narrowing the gap between cities and the county side, in terms of services ( like electric, water, tel, transport and communications) but not the IA way that depriving the cities of their inherent services so the gap is narrowed Negatively. For example both my uncles, one who lives in Asmara and another in a country side use generator for their electricity and donkey (Jirba) to fetch water.

          • Mitiku Melesse

            Hei Amanuel.
            When you disagree you explain why you disagree. But Nitricc generalizes and insults instead. For him ONE INSULT IS WORTH A THOUSAND WORDS. I think we have many Nitriccs in Eritrea and Ethiopia which has resulted in creating so many political parties which never wish to communicate one another due to insults and generalization instead of explaining the disagreement. God knows how many of them agreed and come together on many important issues if ONLY they change their insults with explanation of what ever they disagree on.

          • Nitricc

            Hi Meles; I could have told you but you are a guest and act like it. there is a reason you are here and not Ethiopian web sites. What a waste of life and dushbag you are.

          • Mitiku Melesse

            Hei Nitricc.
            I dont need to repeat myself. Every time you fail to put words on your disagreement your fresh brain summarizes it to an insult.

          • Nitricc

            Hi Amanuel; don’t get offended now.lol. I have always wondered when I hear people addressed by Doctor-General; only in Ethiopia and Africa. Do you know how long it takes to be a General?
            Anyway; my point is high rise buildings are not an indication of development. Speaking of water Addis is suffering from shortage of water. They may have high rising building but they can’t even use their toilets because there is no water. The city is expanding with no plan.

    • Haile S.

      ሰላም ኤማ፡
      ዘረባ ዶ/ር በርሀ ክሰምዖ ጀሚረ። ኣብታ ዳርጋ “ኣነ ይቕረ ኢለ እየ እሞ ኩላህና ይቕረ ክንብል ኣዕድም” እትብል ዘረባ ምስ ሰማኦኩ ኣቋሪጸዮ። ቀንየ እምበር ሕጂ ክሰምዖ ክቕጸል ኣይደለኹን። ዝኾነ ኮይኑ፡ ዝበልካዮ ቅኑዕ ኣበሃህላ ‘ድሕሪ ማይ አብ በዓቲ’ ብወገነይ ብግጥሚ ኣጣምም ኣቢለ፡ መልእኽትኻ ከግፍሖ እንሆ ፈቲነ፥

      ድሕሪ ማይ አብ በዓቲ:
      ከነዕቅል ኣብታ ሕብእቲ
      ጉድጓድ መሬት ሕምብርቲ

      መሲሉና ማይ ዝወድአ ሃሪሙ
      ኣብ ጽሓይ ክንወጽእ ካብ ህጉሙ
      ውሕጅ መጸ ወሰደና ለኻኺሙ

      እቲ ሓደጋ ኣይነበረን ኣብ ደበና
      ሕጂ’ውን ኣሎ ኣብ ጎንና ኣብ ጥቓና
      ይሰርር ይውሕዝ ሃንደበት ካብ ልዕለና

      ንውሒጅ ገደብ እንተዘይጌርካሉ
      መጻኹ ካይበለ ይወስደካ ከም ኣመሉ
      ንእሽተይ ምኽሪ ነማኸርቲ ‘ንወሓሉ’

      • Amanuel Hidrat

        Selam Hailat (Haile-S),

        እንታይ ክዎጾ:: እጹብ ግርም ግጥሚ:: እታ ሕብርቲ መልእኽትኻ አብዛ ትስዕብ ትጣቃለል::

        “እቲ ሓደጋ ኣይነበረን ኣብ ደበና
        ሕጂ’ውን ኣሎ ኣብ ጎንና ኣብ ጥቓና
        ይሰርር ይውሕዝ ሃንደበት ካብ ልዕለና”

        Thank you.

      • Ismail AA

        Selam Haile S,
        You are simply hard to miss gem. Grace bless you, sir.

        • Haile S.

          Selamat Ismail,
          Thank you! Eritrea has many many gems like you, but unfortunately we are confronted with an administration that doesn’t know the value of its gems. Instead it kills the country trying to turn the basalt into gems saying ብጽፍርና! And now ብጎረቤትና!

          • Ismail AA

            ሰላም ሃይለ፣
            እዝጊ ኣዛረበካ፡ ጎረባብቲ ንሕና ኣብ ገዛ ሰብ ገዛ ከኣ ድሕሪ ድርዂኺት ዝብልሉ መዓልቲ ከይ በጽሓና ይኽደነና።

      • Berhe Y

        Dear Haile S. and Ismail AA,

        I hope I am not going to offend you for asking this question. My reason is because I think you two are the best people to respond with the vast knowledge of history you have.

        My intention is not to pick on any one or to indicate that, a person ancestor has no significant importance to me, as no body choose who his / her parents are. But my intention is, if there is a grouping of certain people within our society and country and are taking advantage the lack of knowledge that we have.

        It is always a mystery to me, why IA does what he does, specially for the unprecedented support that he started with from the public of all religion, or ethnic group. What’s puzzling even more to me is, the people who support him to death knowing all the damage he has been inflicting on the people. Speaking for my self I didn’t know better until 2001 when he arrested the G-15, but before that I believed he was doing ok job as leader given the situation and I believed that he would implement a constitutional government so I held my peace even though there was signs of his dictatorship (they way he handled the Mai Habar incident, the PFDJ creation, the military services, the war on the Hanish Islands, the broke off diplomatic relation ship with Sudan, the arrest of the journalist (Ruth Simon), the way he was responding to Q&A (he was getting bold), the way he handled the war, the G-13, the UofA students and finally the G-15). But after the arrest of the G-15 and reading their interviews and their open letter, I don’t know any one needs more evidence to know where these guy was heading…it was the end for constitutional Eritrea…things got worst since. Knowing all these facts, there are people who are hell bend supporting him and his regime. WHY??? I understand those corrupted military, and I understand those who are doing the job because of fear, but those in Diaspora, those in the president office, those in his embassy and inner circles, the likes of Yeman G. Hagos Kisha, or the Charge de’affair in the DC and other places….what’s their real motivation?

        So I suspect there is an (inner circle of Isayas Afeworki and his groups). I think there is Mafia like organization that only accepts certain type of people to the group. These group are never to freeze, never to lose their jobs, never to get arrested and never to speak ill of the regime. On the other hand, they go out and confuse people purposely and create fear by controlling the people. For example I know a guy called Sirak Bahlibi from back school days and he lives in London. He use to work for BT in the UK and from what I understand he left his job and works for the embassy full time in the UK. If I am not mistaken he left his family lives in the UK. He is one of the main organizer of the yPFDJ in Europe and one can say he is Yeman Gebreab right hand man in Europe. I mention him because he is a public figure and his actions are directly related to the misery the Eritrean find themselves today. I don’t know if the PFDJ are just using him or he is part of the inner circles of the PFDJ but from what I know, these guy is an insider and he does what ever it takes to protect IA and his regime? WHY? Doesn’t he know what’s happening in our country and in our people?

        Sorry for the long winded post ..here goes the questions…

        When Italians come to Eritrea what happened to Ras Alula and his army?

        How many of them were and what’s their numbers?

        Did they go back to Ethiopia or settled in Eritrea?

        I am assuming they were mostly men, then if they settled in Eritrea which part of Eritrea did they stay? And how did they manage to make a living in the country? Where they become solidiers with the Italian army plugged themselves in in the Italian administration?

        Were they resisting the Italian occupation of Eritrea and fought?

        I know it’s wrong to accuse people with one key stroke and I am not intentionally doing these?

        But history has shown that sometimes, people use this type of grouping to ascend to power and stay in power…like the Mafia family as example…No body is allowed inside the group if doesn’t meet certain criteria specially ethnicity, because they can trust each other to benefit for their own kind only…

        What’s also troubling for me is, on how obsessed and diligent the PFDJ are in collecting people identity (መቦቆል) and what’s the reason and purpose?

        Berhe

        • David Samson

          Selam Berhe,

          I will defer the history’s comment to the other two gents; however, I can throw my two cents on Sirak. The points you made by and large are correct except I do not think he worked in UK’s Eritrean Embassy. Despite we are on the opposite sides of Eritrean politics, I have not nothing but admire him. I know this may sound strange, but he has been consistent on his politics since the ‘Wohayo’ days.

          Having arrived in the UK after being fed up with Kebele’s meetings in Ethiopia, I was not keen to join the Wohayo circus. This had put me at loggerhead with many friends and other Eritreans. I remember some of the Wohayo guys were going from house to house to indoctrinated people and collect cash on the name of Wudbna. Two guys came to my flat– with out any notice– and demanded cash. Not only turned them down but told them not to pop in without advanced notice. It did not go well, and I was called all names. Now, as the saying goes the time changes, the same two guys are now turned in to die-hard anti Wohayo. When ever we meet we laugh recalling the Wohayo days.

          It is unlikely that Sirka is an inside; It is more like a mule. He was the organiser of young PFDJs in UK and Europe and get to know Monkey. Monkey was looking for IA’s loyalists in USA and Europe. After he quit his job with BT, he left for Scandinavian region. I do not think he has top position. I heard he works within the Embassy, but I do not know exactly what he does. Recently, I saw him sitting next to Berhane in DC’s meetings. Whenever I bumped in to him, I greet him.

          • Berhe Y

            Hi David,

            Thank you for elaboration. You are correct, I meant to say, he left to Sweden from the UK. And I am not mistaken his family / kids are left back in the UK. I am not going to dwell into his personal life, but it seems to me, such a high price to pay (leaving your job, specially if he left on his own) to work for PFDJ in Sweden and spend a lot of time away from your family.

            I don’t really have a problem with his commitment to his country or to something he believes. I follow his FB pages and I see the stuff, propaganda he posts about the regime. How can people like him, educated people, who are so blind to the lack of justice in our country. Why doesn’t pain him to see the young Eritreans just like him when he was young, dying crossing the deserts (all because of the self inflicted pain) that IA has created.

            How can be so blind that he doesn’t see the pain of the childeren of Petros Solomon, Mahood Sherifo, Germano Nati, Haile DureE and others deprived justice and dying a slow pain ful death.

            What motivates such individual to look the other way, and he is not looking the other way. He is working day and night to beautify the regime that’s responsible for all this, and he is fighting day and and night to color rosy pictures of the regime who is responsible for the damage the country is going through.

            Like I said, it’s no money. I am sure he was paid much better at BT than where he is now.

            These the kinds of things that I am interested to know..because if we are to defeat the PFDJ, I think, we need to know who they are and what their motivation is. Because they know all of us.

            If he is just a lost and confused soul, then there is no problem. May be he is just tegagyu…but I don’t believe so in his particular case.

            Berhe

          • David Samson

            Selam Berhe,

            It is only two-hours flight to London, so he can easily spend every other week-end with his family. Unfortunately, politics is very complex animal, clouded with its own enigmas. History is littered with people who worship dictators, so what we have been experience in Eritrea is not unique. Do you know how many intellectuals, professors and highly successful business people worshiped Hitler? Hitler sold them a narrative: the Jewish were conspiring to control and destroy Germany; the first world’s peace treaty was unfair to Germany and got a bad deal. His message resonated with many Germans from all walks of life.

            IA has successfully sold the following narratives: the whole world, including the USA were conspiring against us. We became and felt victimised by the super-powers. This message resonated well with the prevailing anti-western ideology at the time but went well beyond its expired time. Have you noticed, since the peace agreement, IA has toned down his rhetoric against USA? Even the TV-Hasot does not air such views anymore.

            Many Eritreans are still besieged by this false narrative. Every time, we start to question IA’s narrative, we keep be reminded by the scarify of Ghedli and how the world is trying to get us. It is a strange, it is only in Eritrea where the living is victimised by the dead by invoking ‘Hidi Suwatena’. It seems we are trapped in a vicious circle. I met a veteran Tegadali the other week end. During out heated debate, I said something that upset him. He said to me “Look we have done our bits, we handed over the country to your generation and its your duty to safeguard it”. It is funny this guy fled from Eritrea through Libya and seen many woeful things during his journey, yet he told me to get the guns from dead brothers and sisters. Is not strange the previous generation scarified so much in order for to live in a peaceful country, but it seems we, the living, are fighting for sake of Suwatena?

            Sorry for the Halelew. As many Eritreans, Sirak has own motives for supporting IA. He could genuinely believe IA is the best and only qualified politician who can lead and govern Eritrea, or it could be many other reasons. As the saying, ethics and moralities are relative. What you and I could see and feel the pain might not register with him and others. It is also worth noting that in a totalitarian system there is no middle or half-way. You either have the Full Monty or nothing. DR Berhe is now a traitor, though he did not criticise IA, he crossed the loyalty test.

          • Desbele

            Selam Berhe,
            I think it is unnecessary to focus on the regime enablers. It is futile to win their heart and is waste of resources. Look how much energy wasted on this forum alone to educate the likes of Nitrric. And it doesnt work. I believe they fundamentally are flip-floppers who for sure would flip to the other side when things change.

          • Berhe Y

            Hi Desbele,

            I don’t know if you read what I wrote, I consider the regime and it’s enablersare enemy of the ERITREAN people. What I say is not to win their heart, but Ian saying is, they are engaged in a WAR against the ERITREAN people are we need to know who they are at the very least. How can we fight and win if we don’t know who they really are?

            Berhe

          • Desbele

            Selam Berhe,

            There was a website – not sure , but i think was Salina, that used to blacklist those who literally, as you have said, are waging war against the people of Eritrea. Also in fb under the name “Sacctism” someone has a detailed account of who does what in the Eritrean Security system who i believe are the main terrorists in the country. It feels a conspiracy theory though, to think those who are working with pfdj do have a hidden motive that we are not aware . Think of an economics PhD (Dr Berhe) who just woke up for reality after 20yrs of sleep. Even now ,not fully awake but confused after what he witness in Ethio. You can imagine how deep the rest of the zombies are blinded. My point is, except monster Isayas and few gangsters, the rest are cult followers. By now DIA agenda is very clear. But not for the few zombies left. It is better just to ridicule their stupidity. What more can we do? They already did the damage. They were huge in number but now dwindling with time-thanks to the dictator.
            You may not need to focus on them as their influence especially these days is very little.

          • Berhe Y

            Dear Desbele,

            Thank you for your reply. I did read sacctism o FB few times and I like some the of the information he / she shared. Even for someone who is an insider (it appears) I don’t find all the information very deep in details with facts, it’s more like heresy rather. I understand with limited knowledge and access he has.

            And that’s exactly my point for wanting to inquire who these people are rulling Eritrea. It seems to me that we have very small knowledge about them if any thing at all. What we have is heresy and rumors but we really do not know who they really are, at least that’s what I fee.

            What I am thinking is, we should have “who is who” of those leaders of Eritrea. An Italian author named Guiseppe Puglisi wrote a book titled “Chi e? dell’Eritrea: 1952 Dizionario biografico”. Who is who of Eritrea elites and their biography.

            That’s what I am thinking we should have. I believe it’s this lack of knowledge that is hampering us who our real enemies are.

            I am saying we don’t know because I don’t know…and off course there may be many others who know but I am looking to find that information.

            In other words, if we don’t know who our enemies are, then how we are expected to defeat them.

            Berhe

        • Haile S.

          Selamat Berhe,
          Thank you for the confidence. At best, I may be described as an amateur historian for himself. My injera comes from medical sciences. But I will attempt to address your question on the weekend. You asked the great cardinal questions that many of us didn’t formulate in such a way. Regards

        • Ismail AA

          Selam Berhe,

          Seen your suggestion just now. I second Haile’s recognition of the confidence you had expressed in us. Your questions are relevant and important beyond the debate and exchanges in this forum. Research on the questions you had posed, and coming with proper narrative, adds a chapter to the annals of the modern history of Eritrea.

          In fact, and at the minimum, handling this part of Eritrea’s past takes the size and dimension of a first degree semi-final requirement of a history student. Besides rich field work, there are substantial library reference material. One of the major publications regarding the latter is Erlich Mordechai’s well-researched biography of Ras Alula.

          Now, since our Haile has told you he would find time in the weekend to deal with your questions, I am sure he would give you and I, and others interested as well, useful lesson that will broaden our understanding. My limited and modest take might serve as supplement and gaps if at all there would be. ግደ ሓቂ ኣብ ሃይለ ኢዱ ዘእተወሉ ጉዳይ፡ እሞከኣ ስነጽሑፍ፡ ከም ወሓለ እመቤት ዝኸሸነቶ ጸብሒ በሰሮ ብሕጓ መጺኣ ኣነውን ኣለኹ ንማለት ፡ ኣጥዕሞ ኣለኹ ኢላ ጨው ወሲኻ ኣይብላዕ ኣይሰተ ከይከውን፡ ኩልና መምህር ሃይለ ንጸበ።

        • Reclaim Abyssinia

          Dear Berhe,
          Is that the Church ” Lady Mary of Zion” (Mariam Tsion). Provided the protection during the Italian colony, also provide asset protection & its banking ” ባለ አደራ “, then only the church can decide to crown & passon the gold asset to right descendants?
          Cheers,
          Reclaim

          • Berhe Y

            Dear RA,

            If I understand your comments, you are talking about the church in. Asmara build during Italian times. If that’s the one, it’s called Enda Mariam.

            Mariam Tsion, isn’t that in Axsum?

            Berhe

        • Haile S.

          Selam Berhe,
          Here are my thoughts on your questions. First let me say few words on your introductory part. IA did all that blunder especially those pertaining to crushing of his comrades and combattants because he is used to getting away with whatever wrong he does. His party & leadership appears not to have mechanism of accountability or whatever semblance could have existed has been lost since long. Since his accession to power, he placed all the playing cards of the front on his side and was playing them one by one. Whether these playing cards included criteria of birth (መበቆል) when encircling himself with men and women of confidence and whether this was a deliberate act or just pure coincidence feeding rumors remains to be seen or explained by those who know him and his circle closely. What is important is that we discuss the realities and issues of our society so that they helps us to tame the dragons that creeps upon us during difficult times. Anyway, concerning IA, hopefully, what we see him now playing are his last cards. His last spree of mediation role in Ethiopia appears to follow the adage attributed to Jesus “no man is a prophet in his own land”. However, not as naturally and as innocently as it was meant to be in the bible. In IA’s case, it is simply because his prophecies and philosophies failed miserably in his own land and he is well aware of that and the eritrean people as well.
          Now back to the principal question as I understood it. Let me quote Stephen Longrigg*, the British administrator of Eritrea from 1942 to 1944 from his book ‘a short history of eritrea’. It is a very long quote, but worthwhile putting it here.
          “Eritrea offers a mosaic people, whose past history can with fair confidence be traced, and whose present diversity of cultures, languages, and economic habit is instructive. Not differing essentially from neighbouring people in Ethiopia and the Sudan, conditions have permitted them to be more closely studies. A surprising feature is the inclusion of types so various in a single, and a small political unit. Indeed Eritrea possesses none of the qualities of geographical or cultural singelness which should entitle it to be a unit of territory or of gouvernment; nor, since antiquity until its consolidation as an Italian colony, had its various people ever obeyed a single rule. That it now, all undeservingly, so exists is the unplanned result of a seizure in the late ninteenth century of the African territory readiest to hand, by an Italy newly united and competitive; a territory whose boundries were fixed, at points to be condemned by all racial and economic criteria, by the fortunes of war and diplomacy in the years following. Had Italians never landed at Massawa, Eritrea would to-day be partly, as always, the ill-governed northernmost province of Ethiopia, partly a pleasant easter extension of Kasala province of the Sudan, with the port of Massawa perhaps in Egyptian or Anglo-Egyptian possession. And if the battle of Adua had not been lost, or had been quickly avenged, Eritrea would to-day include far larger and homogenous area of northern Ethiopia.” End of quote.
          Suffice to add here that the central physical boundry demaracation of Eritrea was based on the natural and historical faultline (the Mereb river) that separates the land of the tigrigna speaking people of the region, the Beyond- or across-Mereb and Tigray. Now, the rocky relationship between the tigrigna speaking people on the two sides of the Mereb appears to become more apparent, at least as far as written documemts and oral tradition are concerned, following the weakening of the central power in Gonder in the mid 17een hundreds. Before that the administrator of tigray tigre-mekonen (ትግሬ መኮነን) and of Eritrea’s Bahre negash (ባሕረ ነጋሲ) were equal nominees of the king. The Bahre negash had more clout to foreign relations, possibilities of revolt and certain independence due to his proximity to the sea and those who controled the sea, the Naib of Hirgigo and the Turcs of Massawa. Following the weakening of the Gonderian “dynasty” and rise of Michael Sehul from tigre mokonen to a de-facto king, the dynamics of the region changed. What followed was frequent clashes for control and submission and revolt-against resulting in constant wars and razzias fuelling the resentments as we know it now. This was highlighted especially during Dejach Wube more than during his predecessors, Weldesellassie and Sbagadis. Following Dejach Wube, beyond-Mereb was in turmoil in the wars between the two Hamasien nemesis, Ras Welde-Michael and Dejach Hailu and Agew Negussie (Wubie’s nephew). After Wube, King Theodros’s influence on Eritrea was through his friend Dejach Hailu whom he freed from Wube’s prison. Theodrose wanted Hailu to chase away and hunt the pretender to the throne, Negussie. The administration of king Yohannes in Eritrea was more complexe than any of his predessosors and resulted in more resentments towards tigrians and at the same time contributed to the start of theur establishement in Eritrea that continued furthermore when the Italians established Eritrea. King Yohannes nominated a non-resident, Ras Allula, as administrator beyond-Mereb because his (Yohannes’s) game of playing between Ras Welde-Michael and Dejach Hailu had failed. The war between the two Hamasien lords has devastated Hamasien. Depending on time and where their loyalty lies, these two were also bringing help from Tigray & perhaps beyond in the wars against each other, and this might have contributed in the establishement of new population in Eritrea. Yohannes, seeing Ras Welde-Michael stronger and powerfull, sent Allula to control Welde-Michael and administer Eritrea. Allula was not foreign to Eritrea as he was leading the wars against Egypt at Gundet and Gura’e, where it is said 50 to 70K Abyssinians warriors participated. Following his nomination as administrator, Allula established himself first in Adi-Teclai, perhaps briefly in other places, and then for longer time in Asmara. Some of his close ‘generals’ were also established in the surrounding villages like DaAro-Qawlos etc. The establishment of Allula in Asmara is likely started the establishment of population from Tigray to what became Eritrea and its capital Eritrea. The death of Yohannes in Metema, precipitated acutely the condition of norther Abyssinnia that was already devasted by war. People had nothing to eat as war-consumed resources were scarce. People started to move from south as far as Gonder to north in search of food and the relative peace brought by the Italians.
          Berhe, due to time contraints, I will not be able to discuss further in details as much as I wanted, but let me jump to current events to tie it as follows. The struggle for independence of Eritrea passed through some ugly alienation of those that have equally fought for this independence to happen. Not only alienation, but also gradually ended up in centralization of power and leadership into the hands of tigrigna speakers. Furthermore, a large chunk of the core eritrean leadership appear to be Eritreans from Asmara. With this comes the interrogation of who is who and from what background more daringly that if the leadership was, as it ought to be, colorful and representative of the colorful population of Eritrea. The absence of any effort by the Eritrean leadership to reconcile the different parts and segments of the Eritreans society pushes us to question if there is any fundamental flaw in the composition of this leadership. I think the flaw is a simple a very serious incompetency, me know your needs attitude, admixed with obsessive greed to power and control.
          Regards

          • MS

            Selam ZKeberka HaileS
            First I must thank Berhey for his brilliant strategy which was designed in such a way it would prod able folks like you to give the matter a fair treatment, based on historical facts. I must say I’m not good at weaving historical strands, nor do I possess the patience to sift through eras and dates.
            Before I pitch in whatever little I may have to say, I also must thank Ustaz IsmailAA for his soothing voice and for his readiness to always use his knowledge for good.
            Having said that I think we must push back against the current trend that makes its central argument that things are the way they are because Eritrea is ruled by “nonEritreans”. This so called nativist movement is so dangerous and if let unchecked, it may mold into a social scourge. It has all the telltale of racism and xenophobia. Let’s face it. The message is that IA is behaving this way because he is Tigrian (from Tigray ancestry). That’s to say Tigrian people are bad by design. Also, that is to say a “pure” Eritrean wouldn’t do what IA is being accused of doing. Besides the fact that it is not true, it is a dangerous contemplation.
            Why would one go three generations back to establish one’s citizenry? I have widely criticized this tendency in the past and I will continue to push back against it. IA should be held accountable for what he does simply because he is the leader. He should be blamed for his way of ruling and his policies and not because of his remote roots. The subject should be his policies and his personality and not his family tree.
            Besides, half of Eritreans (lowlanders) don’t understand why people spend too much time on genealogical matters. The Muslim population of Eritrea includes recentcomers but little attention is given to such things.
            Additionally, citizenship is established by law. And I think we need to give more time and energy on establishing a constitutional republic. I know many foreigners including Europeans who fought for the liberation of Eritrea. I know many Eritreans of Tigray parents who fought and died in the war of liberation, some of them the sons and daughters of Tor serawit (Ethiopian army). It was sad to see them uncomfortable, a couple of my friends told me point blank that after all the sacrifices they felt people were talking about them as being Tigrians. I was doing the best I could do to reassure them although I didn’t know the nuances and subtleties of the matter.I heard they later packed up and left the country. It is just sad that in this time and age some folks raise these issues as being cardinal to their “just struggle”, hardly a just attitude.
            Regards.

          • Haile S.

            Selamat Mahmoud,
            A great call for prudence. Absolutely! We cannot love Weldeab and condemn Gebreab.

          • Amanuel Hidrat

            Selam Mahmuday,

            In my book, this is the best comment I heard and enjoyed it from your side against “xenophobic nationalist”, who talks about the roots of our people to play it as a wedge issue. They are spoilers in their nature. They must be challenged in order to show them their irrelevance in our politics.

          • Berhe Y

            Dear MS and Amanual,

            MS thank you for your feed back and I am glad that you chimed in. I understand the points you raised and I do understand the “slippery slope” that this could lead.

            I tried to be sensitive when I raised the question and it was not my intention to make this as “racism or xenophobic”. Not at all, IA and his group are Eritreans and as Eritrean one can be. This I have no doubt and I truly mean it.

            Dear MS,
            I do feel that sometimes, we are so naive and in the process of protecting someone rights, we are willing to let people who are not playing by the same rule to confuse and control us and even worse abuse us daily.

            MS, let me ask you this question?
            Do you think, it’s relevant to know the people who they say they are our leaders, what their back ground is? Back ground as in, who their parents are, which school they attended, which neighborhood they grew up, what type of education they have, what type of experience that may have shaped their character, what type of house hold did their grow up.

            I am sure we have seen the scrutiny the US government officials go through when they assume public office as an example. I am not expecting we have the mechanism to do so, but I appreciate the way those people back ground is put to test and questioned because, I think it’s true, their past is a good indication what will they become of the future. And as a society, they have every right to know their back ground before they hand them over the key to decide on their faith.

            This is what I am after….and this is what disturbs me. There is no reason any person whose ethnic back ground is Tigray or otherwise to be ashamed off. NO. NOT AT ALL.

            But if a person was a criminal and he grew up commuting crime, or grew up in a house hold that has no moral value, then I think we the people need to know about?

            Dear Amanuel,

            I think your thinking is right, assuming the other side is playing in the same equal field. But are we sure that, those PFDJ are not grouping themselves based on some value that serves them better?

            So my point is, we as people, should know who these people are? They are Eritreans is not enough. If they are Eritreans and they are minding their business then, there is no problem. But if they are responsible for the faith of the whole country, then I think, we should really know.

            Can you please find any example of any country in this planet that the people do know know who their leaders are?

            Are we then above and we know more than every country and people in the world?

            That’s what I am after….after we know who they are then, it may give us an idea and hint to fight them really better.

            Otherwise we are confused, and we really do know now them and they are taking us for a ride for such a long time.

            Hope this make sense.

            Berhe

          • MS

            Selam Berhe Y
            I understood your intentions and you are the last person I could think of as begotten.
            I completely understand that public officials should be scrutinized from different angles and should assume their post through rigorous vetting. However, our case is different. We have folks who had been in public eye for the last 45 years. Many of them led the struggle for liberation. Beside a family tree and early experiences of childhood, there many other ways one can behave in a certain way. People are by nature resilient and most abused children overcome their past experiences. So, IA and the rest are ours. We have to deal with their politics not with their ancestry. I this with the understanding that I know you are not a bigot; I understand you are broaching the subject for discussion.
            Thanks.

          • Amanuel Hidrat

            Merhaba Berhe,

            This will be a simple and direct response to your question: There were renegade Eritreans to the cause and aspiration of the Eritrean people (to mention few Demetrius and Asfaha Weldimicael). There will be Eritrean renegades still existing against the sovereignty of our land and aspirations of our people (to mention some the despot and his lackeys). Second the Eritrean Elites have the propensity of tyrannical behavior in different shape or form. Therefore, We don’t need to dig the roots of Eritrean citizens in order to know their behavior as political practitioners. Issayas and his followers are Eritreans that happened to be either who adorn dictation with insatiable self-interest or happened to dream to annex Eritrea with Ethiopia like the unionist in the 50s. Just recently Issayas has found himself difficult to say “Eritrea and Ethiopia” at this juncture of our history as has reported by the Ethiopian journalists.

          • David Samson

            Selam Haile,

            I know I shocked you on Italians the other day but not now.
            I have seen Stephen Longrigg’s quotation before, but still left me with none the wiser. Since the topic is on Alula, I stick with it.

            Alula stationed in what now is called Asmara for military reasons. Villago Gene and his surrounding villagers were the hubs of his army. What I do not know and still unable to find is the compositions of Alula’s armies: how many troops he brought with him and how many were recruited locally? It is also natural for troops to mingle with and inter-marry locals. Why am I interested in statics? The issues of who come from where have troubled me for years. Many highlands Eritreans and Tigrayans used these figures for their own’s political ends. The three highlands regions did not exist, but many people twist this part of history to suit their narratives. I do not even think the population of the entire region at the time of was half-million.

          • Haile S.

            Selam David,
            No problem with shocking me the other day. Before I attempt to answer your question, could you explain what you mean by “The three highlands regions did not exist,…”? Thanks

          • David Samson

            Selam Haile,

            My Hateta is going to long so bear with me. I use examples to make my points.
            The three highland regions did exist in physical sense but not in regional identity.

            I watched a historical documentary video made by some GOE’s department. The interviewer backed by some clips and photos interviewed a couple of centenarians. I do not know if their ages are true, but all of them claimed to be between 100-117. Some of them still have excellent memories; they vividly remember the war the fought with and against the Italians. If one pays close attention to words used, they hardly mention the regions, rather they identity themselves and colleagues as from Adi or wedi Adi Ekele. I do not know if there were oriented not to say ‘Awrajas’, but most likely than not, they do not have the concept of regional identity. All they know is their Adis and extended families.

            In Eritrean’s highland hierarchical identity, Geza or Baet is the core or base, followed by Adi. I do not know the exact terms in English. I would use ‘Clan’. When I talk to my mother about her roots and extended relatives, the first thing on her mind is Geza or Baet and then Adi. Even Huruiy Tela uses Adis as his core politics. Some Eritreans who live not only in ‘TsinA Degle’ areas but hail from the region have an association name as ‘Mahber Deki ‘TsinA Degle’. They even have a website named after the clan. If someone claimed to be his ancestral’s land in TsinA Degle’, they call the help of the elders who have a remarkable memory on lineage. What I have noticed is that they put less weight on their region (Akelguzay) and have a strong affiliation with their clan and sub-clans.

            What is my point then? I am convinced that there was not regional identity until the arrival of Europeans. When Alula moved in with troops to Villago, he might have brought troops from many Adis along the way, not from any particular region— as there was none. I know it is not your intention to twist history, but some people who use regions as means of identity and wage wars. They argued along the lines: this guy is from Adi X and must be then from Awraja or region and make their own dotes, as if it were regions with their distinct identities. In fact, one could argue that it was only after the arrival of the British, regions took as a centre of identities. So, the Adi IDs had gradually given way to Regional identities, and many highlanders were happy to identify themselves with their regions, and consequently the Adi’s ID was diluted. We had Deki Akele, Deki Logo Deki Hama clans or tribes, and these clans and sub clans have no regional belonging or identity.

          • Haile S.

            Selam David,
            Thank you for your detailed response. Now I see where you are coming from when you said that. Based on what you said, it appears you and I have similar curiosity about history. Give me some time and I will come bavk to you. If you can get Erlich Haggai’s book on Ras Allula, it is a good book.

          • David Samson

            Selam Haile,
            I googled Erlich Haggai and surprised to learn that the book was written in the 1990s. I do not know why, but I assumed the book was written in the 20th century by a traveller to Abyssinia. My question is directed more towards the Ethios, but you can comment as well. How come Ethiopian’s history is written by non-Ethiopian? I believe ETH has many capable historians and writers. I assume Erlich used Ethiopian’s archives and some historical documents to compile his book. I am pretty sure these documents are written in Amharic, yet a foreigner has to travel to ETH, research the archives with the help of locals as I presume, he does not speak Amharic, and wrote a book. How incredible!

          • Haile S.

            Selam David,
            I am waiting for the weekend and ample time to answer your previous questions. Just few words on the current. First, on our modern time, there are Ethiopians and Eritreans who write the history of their countries, but as you said, not as much as it should be and not comparable at all to those written by outsiders. It boils down to means. Second, before our era, foreigners published so many books as account of their travrl and researched history, again because they had the means. But don’t forget they depended on Abyssinians and Abyssinian memory and oral history to put it on paper. The famous orientalist Ludolf wrote dictionaries and history on Abyssinia/Ethiopia thanks exclusively to Abba Gorgorios who had profound knowledge of the languages including Geez, religion and history. Unfortunately he died somewhere in malta when going back home after prolonged home-sickness.Third, Abyssinians use to write history of kings and rich and known people in the form of chronicles. James Bruce wrote his huge 5 volume books based on this chronicles, abyssinians helpers and his personal observation duringvhis long stay in th country. Regards

          • Ismail AA

            Selam Haile S.,

            Apologizing for that I might distract you in proceeding the exchanges with David Simon if I may, as you have mentioned there were Ethiopian scholars who researched and had written on Ethiopian history since at least second half of the past century. Historians like the late Dr. Sergew Hablesellasie wrote on ancient history from pre-Aksum to heydays of it and up to early medieval period. The medieval history was covered by a study done and published in an important work by the late professor, Tadesse Tamerat under the title “The Church and State”. The period of the Oromo expansion to what makes territories of current Oromiya was studied and published by the late prof. Merid Weldegebriel. These few random examples.

            Many scholars have dealt with various themes of Ethiopian historiography. The fact that published materials is dominated by foreign orientalists is true. The reason, as you have stated, did with matter of interest and capabilities to satisfy the urge and reasons and quench personal academic aspirations. And, prevalence of domination of orientalists is not unique to Ethiopia and Eritrea. It covers most developing countries.

          • Haile S.

            Selamat Ismail,
            No apology applicable here. These are a great examples you cited. Your knowledgeable input is very educational and welcome. Thank you!

          • Amanuel Hidrat

            Selam Dave,

            If the so called “nations” in Africa are an act of the partitions by the colonizers for the exploitation of their resources, which later have evolved in to “national identity”, then the provinces are created for Purposes of administrative units that became eventually one layer of identity. We can’t only talk about Adi with the evolutions of “nations” and “provinces or administrative units” in modern governance. Me think.

            The problem with us Eritreans has nothing to do with the provincial identity. Our problem is, we are not a compromising people in everything we try to do collectively. People are using the “provinces” for escapegoating to our failures in our collective endeavors against the current regime. I have never heard provinces as administrative units are problems to our collective identity or became the cause of our disharmony with in each other. The Eritrean individualism philosophy is at the core of our problem.

          • David Samson

            Selam Emma,

            “We can’t only talk about Adi with the evolutions of “nations” and “provinces or administrative units” in modern governance. Me think.”

            I am sure you are familiar with Hruiu Tedla’s Adi politics. How do you read it, and what do you think the philosophy behind it?
            I have moved out from my comfort zone, as far as African’s history is concerned. For too long, as with many people, I took refuge on building named” colonisation is the core ills of Africa”. I am sure Berhe will politely remind me I am too westernised, or I am suffering from slavery mentality.
            Take for instance Ethiopia. Europeans did not play on the make up its ethnic’s identity.

          • Amanuel Hidrat

            Selam Dave,

            I don’t agree with Hiruy’s “strategy of ADI”. First, he coined that phrase simply to alienate the “tewelige Eritreans.” He said if one says I am from Asmara, he is not from the native Eritreans. Second, he foresees “ADI ” as an “electoral unit” in the election of Parliamentarian representation to the house of assembly, as oppose to the common standard of “electoral districts” drawn by an election committee based on an “electoral laws.” So I oppose on both instances.

          • Paulos

            Selam Professor A. Hidrat,

            Interesting take. Stumped by your last sentence, however. Was wondering if you had “self reliance” in mind when you alluded to individualism as one of the main problems in our society.

          • Amanuel Hidrat

            Selam Dr Paulos,

            Yes indeed. When we relate our nation to other nations in terms
            of economic cooperation, we play the “self-reliance card” to separate ourselves from the rest. When it comes with in us, the “self-interest” dictates our way of life and the common good of nationals fades away to hamper our unity. I have come to that conclusion from my forty years of experience in the Eritrean politics. It is because of those underling philosophical intake that we always failed to lend ears to all kinds of grievances to resolve our differences. The answer to all kind of grievances is “Abey-Key-betsehu” – more pronounced by us the highlanders.

          • Acria

            Selam Dr. Paulos,

            The Eritrean (of EPLF and now of PFDJ) individualism philosophy, what I think Professor A. Hidrat may have alluded to, is the philosophy of ” we are the best people to lead the liberation front, the best people to lead the country post liberation, and to be absolutely ‘self-reliant’ in the process of building our country”. The latter part of the individualist philosophy was miserably indeed a failure.

            This is being manifested recently when Eritreans are leaving their businesses and their homes to go to Ethiopia after the peace agreement was signed between the two countries. What have we done to our people and our country? It is the most perplexing scenario and an abject failure of the regime and the people of Eritrea ( especially the sycophants) for letting this thing to go this far! What is next? I haven’t any clue! Anybody?

  • Brhan

    Thanks awate for the rewind
    Is there a plan to interview PMAA soon?

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  • Dear semere gebrewahid thanks for your kind words but i think you miss my point, am not mourrning about my deportation from ethiopia… it was a difficult time when we were deported but i admire the ethiopian government admitting that they made a wrong decision and now they are working to make that write … on contrary we have a leader who belives HE IS ALWAYS RIGHT belive me eritrean ppl am talking about those who are inside eritrea, not those who enjoy freedom in west but blindly support the PFDJ and its ‘perfect leader’, the real eritreans can’t be fooled by the fact that “ethiopia is going to invade you” my brother did you remember in 1993 referndum people who vote against independence were those who lived in NAKFA … so i belive if ethiopia try, i hope they will’ remove the monster they will get the support of the real eritreans !!!

  • First of all I would like to thank Awate.com for the job they did. Without any exaggeration we are two brothers and sisters and we have to avoid hate,bloodshed and blindly following our leaders. God gave us brain and it is for us to use it for our own judgment and insights. It was very helpful to ask about the Eritrean refugees and any assitance from the Ethiopian miltary while they escape so that they are not accidentaly shot. It was also good to to ask the PM of Ethiopia what kind of assistance he is going to provide the Eritrean oppostion. I really admire the PM for not insulting Issayas and overall he did a good job, given the magnitude of difficult relationship with the regime in Asmera.

  • it is good to know that Mr. Zenawi care only about “ethiopian people” safty ! oh i mean the ‘soft targets’… he do’t give a dam about eritreans who are daying every day in eritrea or traying to fled the eritrean dictator … as long as issayas afewerki stop his terror atempt to ethiopia… the fact of the matter is eritrean and etiopian ppl’s would have been better off if he did’t return from “barento or miayne” in 2000!!! is he gone left eritrean ppl ‘his former coloni’ alone if issays stop supporting anti ethiopian gov. forces ? shame on you!!! do you think UK and France are helping libya rebles for just Oil ? no they alredy got it from him (gadaffi) they doing this for the libyan’s … why do’t you do so for the eritrean’s ? getread of this monster ? i don’t think you ever vist this site but i would like to tell you that i am eritrean who have been deported from ethiopia “my birth country” in 1998 for the reason which i have no anser antil now…

    • Your frustration is understandable. However, I don’t think being too emotional serves our cause. It’s the PM’s priority and responsibility to protect his own people from any threat he perceives dangerous. He certainly knows about people, who die in Eritrea every day, but for him to invade a country, which his country has a very complicated history would be a very risky move. He would be accused of being an ‘invader’ and ‘aggressor’. The move actually could justify Isayas’ excuse to keep Eritreans under his iron grip. It would enable him to say ‘…See? what did I tell you?…They have been waiting years and came back to invade and take over us again. That’s why I, your dear leader have been preparing you for years. It’s now only PFDJ that could protect you from Weyanes and Ethiopia…the oppositions are with them…’ About Eritrean refugees in Ethiopia, I can only say what I saw, when I went there to see some family members few months ago. Though they are frustrated that they are away from home and don’t hear from their family members, some of them actually are doing well. They are allowed to be out of their camps and disburse around the country, which will give them total freedom of movement from one place to another. Some of them are blending so easily with the Ethiopian societies, I have met two young guys, who managed to go to a major University in the southern part of Ethiopia (I won’t mention their names and the University’s name to protect them from being singled out). I do believe that the majority of Ethiopians got over the thought of “Eritrea is ours and the people are the enemy”..The regular person in Ethiopia, don’t even bother to discuss Eritrea or anything related to Eritrean politics. People are so wrapped up with their own day to day lives. I sympathize with you for getting deported from a land, where you were born and always thought you belonged. However, don’t make that to cloud your judgment. A very high number of Eritreans, who were deported then are getting back to Ethiopia these days and trying to reclaim the properties they have lost. I advise you to try that. It may take time, but at the end justice will prevail. Stay strong. I love you, brother.

    • Natom Habom

      selam ahmed
      have you been deported from ethiopia ?
      kind a confused here

  • Very interesting interview. One thing I thought that was left out was, since the PM confirmed that he is on his way out, who he is grooming to replace him as his party’s and next leader of his country. Since the next leader’s policy will have a significant impact on the future relationship between Ethiopia and Eritrea, as well as the Eritrean oppositions, the question would have been most appropriate. Discussing the issue with some of my Ethiopian co-workers and friends, they believe the person, who is being groomed is Desalegn Hailmariam (his Deputy PM and Foreign Minster…(Can anyone imagine the coincidence that someone named ‘Hailemariam’ put in charge of Ethiopia once again?)..It would have been very informative, if this question was included in your interview, as well as the possible upcoming PM’s view of Eritrea. The question about the lost port business of Eritrea to Djibouti was very insightful and appropriate. It helped me to learn even more what PFDJ made us lose on top of many other things. Thank you.

    • Mr. Semere

      He, at least in principle, cannot single out the name of the successor.even if the question was asked he would not tell who the successor will be. It is highly likely that who with the best performance records of the these 5 years would replace him.

  • Hope what I write below is viewed in the sprit it was intended…constructive criticism.

    Although very incisive and penetrating questions were posed to the PM, I have to admit, unlike the trademark artfully suave and smooth writing you penned numerous times, I found the transcribed text very difficult to follow. You either rushed to post it or else was outsourced. It is nowhere near the typical S. Johar or S. Younis output we are accustomed to.

    Unless another installment is in the works, one topic of significance that is glaringly missing and not touched upon in the interview is the National Conference (NCDC) held in Addis last year and the one coming up in July. Also, one would have expected to read the Prime Mister’s insight on the inner nature of the relationship between his government and both the EDA and those outside it.