Tuesday , September 25 2018
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Cadres For Holy Men; Containers for Churches

The warm sun enticed basking; it was a spring morning. I was sitting in one of the street cafes in Bole Street , Addis Ababa. There were more shoeshine boys than patrons around. Across the street was another cafe frequented by ferenjiaized Ethiopians and Eritreans showing off. But not my cafe where most of the clientele were Dellalas, city hustlers who broker the sale of anything from cars to furniture to real estate.

And they like to have their shoes shined every day.

They call the shoeshine boys; check if they have proper brushes and brand name polish before they give them the job. They enjoy ordering the poor boys around; the boys keep repeating, “eshi getaye”. They order them to wash the shoes nicely, put some more polish, brush the side of the soles, use felt cloths… You could easily tell who acts like a mouse in front of their wives.

Preoccupied with the shoeshine boys, their coffee gets cold. They call the waiter: “your coffee is cold; come here, warm it up a bit!” “eshi gashie” murmurs the waiter as he conceals his true feelings: “merz yargllh!” Then, after licking the coffee cup clean, the customers stand up in slow motion, reach for their pockets and come out with a handfull of stuff: rusted keys, lottery tickets, pieces of paper, a crumpled handkerchief, and other things one wonders if they know what they were. Meticulously they search for coins from the hardware store on their palms. They pay the shoeshine boys 25 cents, Ethiopian currency, and they pretend as if they handed the boy a fortune. Then they approach the cafe cashier and repeat the same process before they leave to catch a pickup car otherwise known as a taxi. They jump and stand on their toes, supporting themselves with a finger secured around something on the taxi. And they disappear in the herds of navy-blue taxis. Meanwhile, another Dellala comes to take their place in the cafe. I order another Cappuccino.

A boy who just washed my car the previous day comes smiling and asks if he can wash my car; I ask him to call a cigarette vendor instead. He hollers for one from across the street. Obviously, he gets a commission from him. I light up. I didn’t see a “No Smoking” sign. No one here knows such a ban exists. It is a free atmosphere.

Meskel Adebabai: Stifanos Church for sale

Minutes later, the newspaper boy came. Everyone bought a paper. I had last week’s Reporter which I bought the day before but I didn’t read yet. Instead, I observed and enjoyed the chatter from across the tables.

In those cafes, everyone holds a newspaper and if you would take a poll there, you would declare the literacy rate in Ethiopia is 95%. With over a dozen independent newspapers, everyone is tempted to share what they read because everyone has a different newspaper. “Ererrerrerre, baandie sebat lj weledech!” says one man. “abiet guuuud, w’sha dmet weledech, al semahm endie?” exclaims another. I smile: some cruel independent papers were feeding the people useless translations from the tabloids of the world. But every now and then, someone yells a serious piece of news or a rumor, the sale of Stifanos Church, for example!

A day earlier, I was sitting in the same cafe when I saw a group of angry Bozene being dispersed by the police. Apparently they were demonstrating against the intention of “the patriarch to sell the Stifanos Church”, the one smack in the middle of Meskel Square! One person authoritatively said, “ere guuuud, abunu bete-krstian lekaatolik lishetut n’w blewal tebale? Endie!”

I thought that was serious and wanted more information, “for how much?” I asked.

“enye’nja, gn bzu n’w tebale, Vatikan ykeflal tebale”.

They were apprehensive of the patriarch not only because of his intention to sell the church to the Catholics, but even worse, he dressed himself in white robes, “just like the Catholic patriarchs!”.

It dawned on me a few weeks ago, I know why the PFDJ closed the private press; they didn’t want them around when they sold Endamariam church. Otherwise, people in the cafes of Asmara would be discussing that: ewa’e, betekristian ksheTu! But since the PFDJ is into selling everything–honor, integrity, as well as the honor and dignity of Eritrea–let us see another sale that didn’t materialize.

The Araada Salesman

The best salesperson is one who knows all the attributes and benefits of the product he is selling; one who closes a sale by convincing a buyer of the qualities of his product. Those who don’t know their products hardly close a sale. Anyone trying to sell Eritrea is expected to know its composition. But a run of the mill thug, an Arada cultured Wedini, wouldn’t disclose the true attributes and make up of his product. Instead, he would distort and deceive to sell.

Apparently that is what happened when the Aradaw ex-Ambassador of the PFDJ to the USA (I always picture him in a pink suit, hat and bling-bling) was hiring a salesperson to sell the PFDJ packaged as Eritrea. He hired a certain McKeawn to sell Eritrea in the Capitol Hill. The salesman (here known as lobbyist) was hired by Girma Asmerom for $15,000 a month. You can guess how many Drar Tegadalay contributions were siphoned by the PFDJ blackmailers to cover Mr. Bob McEwen’s pay!

I would have loved to listen to the briefing Girmachew gave McEwen. But since I didn’t hear it, I can only guess. Obviously Girmachew lectured McEwen how the PFDJ pursued a popular democratic (as opposed to Machiavellian) scheme to conquer Eritrea. He must have also told him that Eritrea is a Christian state surrounded by Muslims who are terrorists and how the USA needs to build a base in Eritrea to fight the terrorists in the neighborhood of East Africa. Obviously this was before the PFDJ embraced the Somali Mullahs. [AlShabab were not created yet]

One thing we conclusively know is that, when McEwen was accused of working for a government that “persecutes Christians”, he replied, “I didn’t know”. The probe into Mr. McEwen’s deal with Girmachew and the violations of his government resulted in McEwen losing a closely contested election in May 2006 to his rival, Ms. Jean Schmidt. What briefing did Girma Asmerom give McEwan? To guess that, we need to see correlating activities in which he was involved.

In July 2002, when the Eritrean opposition held a big demonstration in DC, Girmachew sent his errand boys to distribute leaflets accusing Eritrean opposition demonstrators of being members of AlQaida. This was just before the time Isaias jumped on the bandwagon of the “coalition of the willing” to secure an American base deal in Eritrea and guarantee his stay in power and his authority. This was the time a kid called Joel Mowbray was aggressively selling the PFDJ to the Bush administration by writing flowery praises for National Review Online:

Eritrea has struggled to carve out a unique niche in that region of the world: free-market democracy. Private-property rights are enforced in the hopes of luring capital to the mostly rural and still-poor nation. Eritrea is in the middle of local elections, having completed a round in southern regions in the past two weeks, and voting in the remaining areas in the north scheduled for this month. At the national level, the independent Electoral Commission is finalizing plans for a timeline on national Elections.

Karma, or the Eritrean curse, is still working. The master Delalla, Abramoff is in jail. Decent people everywhere are laughing at the kid Mowbray (selling Eritrea as a free-market democracy with regular elections). Girma Asmerom is going back to Asmara empty-handed. And the Eritrean dictator has thrown away all pretense of being an ally of the United States.

Importantly, the activities of 2002-03 proved to me, and many others, the bigotry of the PFDJ thugs; no exception here, all of them.  When push came to shove, they were willing to declare war on their own countrymen.

The Learned should Teach

I don’t understand how supposedly learned men with PhDs, and sometimes tenured scholars would not have a bleep of conscience! I become very disappointed when I see such persons applying “moral relativity” and use double, triple and a dozen standards to measure the situation in Eritrea. But there is hope; everyone has a passionate issue that triggers his rage. And since tyrants and oppressors never stop stepping on people’s toes, the few that are left with the PFDJ will come to their senses, eventually.

A friend alerted me to a posting by a PhD; the friend is aware of my views on the behavior of “silent intellectuals.” But contrary to his expectations, the posting gave me more hope and I commented that it was an admirable and a positive milestone. Unfortunately, now that the gentleman has aired his concerns regarding the interference by the PFDJ in the affairs of the Eritrean Tewahdo Church, something considered off limits by many, an old Ninja friend from the Internet has spearheaded a serious attack to discourage the man from speaking out his mind. There are indications that the Choplla order had been given to the doghouse; the Dobermans are next.

However, I have issues with the following that came in the gentleman’s posting:

Eritrean religious groups; particularly those Eritreans of the Muslim, Catholic and Protestant faiths will team up with the government and reconcile the hierarchy to its institutional status quo.

First, I don’t think it is wise to appeal to a killer to investigate his last murder. Likewise, you shouldn’t expect the destroyer of all religious institutions in Eritrea to look to their welfare.

Though many preferred to close their eyes to it, the PFDJ’s meddling in Church affairs is not new. It has been going on since the PFDJ conquered Eritrea. The PFDJ has nothing to do with the workings of religious institutions. That is why I aired my objections when the lethal tool of the PFDJ, Yeftahe Dimitros, started to interfere in the affairs of the church.

What is happening to the Tewahdo church is abominable. I have said before, that unprincipled, treasonous and wimpy Ethiophiles should not be allowed to wreak havoc in our religious, political and social affairs. They are destroying our formula for coexistence thus helping the reckless oppressive projects of social reengineering. I am not enraged only because those Ethiophiles are interfering with the church affairs, but because they are the cause of the sufferings of our people.

The PFDJ is fond of intrigues and deceit. They mention, “Mohammed Omer Isamel from the Ministry of Foreign Affairs” without giving his title–but we know that they referred to him as acting foreign minister upon the death of Ali sayed Abdellah. The same vague references abound from the tyrant’s office to the ministry of information. Now the same trick is being applied to the supposed “patriarch”: PFDJ’s shabait.com refers to the imposter as “Abune Deskorios from the Eritrean Tewahdo Orthodox Church.” What is that supposed to mean? Is he just “a common priest from the Tewahdo church” when we all know the mechanization and interference by their errand boys who appointed him patriarch? Are they retracting from their decision of appointing him a patriarch? If so, why is the true patriarch, Abune Antonios under house arrest and prevented from carrying on his church duties? The Tewahdo Church represents the faith of a big chunk of the population; who benefits from the chaos and interference in its institutions? Who is behind the disrespect of an anointed patriarch? These are the questions that should be answered.

When the PFDJ started to interfere with the Muslim faith, it demoralized and excluded almost half the Eritrean population. The Muslim religious institutions have been emasculated a long time ago. Now that it has been interfering with the Tewahdo church, the adherents of the Tewahdo church are being marginalized. The fact that our professor wants Muslim, Catholic and Protestant faiths” to reconcile the Tewahdo church is ridiculous. That is because 1) no other faith has any business meddling into the affairs of the Tewahdo Church which has dealt with its issues internally for over a millennia, and 2) even if those being called upon to reconcile were to do the job, the majority of the supposedly religious leaders controlling the religious institutions in Eritrea are wimps and tools of the PFDJ. Their cowardice will prevent them from talking about the issue let alone face the government with that kind of intention. They are simply “PFDJ Cadres” and not spiritual leaders.

Let’s be even more open. There are exceptions: the banned churches that refused to be as docile as the others, they refused to be cadres but holy men; that resulted in the establishment of PFDJ’s favorite churches: metal Containers, which are used as prisons. To emphasize the point, they are metal shipping containers, with no windows and they refer to  them as “rehabilitation centers.” That is where the PFDJ throws political and religious prisoners. The more “fortunate” are being harassed day in and day out; isn’t this something to be outraged about?  Why are people’s consciences selective?

The doctor has done a good job of identifying a problem; too bad it took the attack of his church to bring about his outrage, and people argue that he is a good Tewahdo, but a dismal citizen, unconcerned with the screams of his compatriots who worship differently from him. Again, where is the outrage for people languishing in containers?  Where is the outrage for Eritrean Muslims who disappeared in 1994, and only God and the PFDJ brutes know where they are?  Isn’t the definition of good citizenship to care about all your compatriots, regardless of religious, regional differences you may have with them?

It is also too bad that, having identified the problem, he surrenders his analytic skills to his need to avoid being ostracized or excommunicated from another church: the PFDJ Church! Why else would he ask the sole cause of the problem, the PFDJ, to be the mediator? It is like asking an arsonist to be a firefighter.

The learned must teach, but first, they must learn.  And when it comes to religious issues, the first lesson is that Isaias Afwerki has nationalized religious institutions. They belong to the state. Not just the Tewahdo Church; but the mosque, the Catholic Church, the Evangelical Church…

[This edition of Negarit appeared in previous edition, it is being republished after very minor editing. ]

About Saleh "Gadi" Johar

Born and raised in Keren, Eritrea, now a US citizen residing in California, Mr. Saleh “Gadi” Johar is founder and publisher of awate.com. Author of Miriam was Here, Of Kings and Bandits, and Simply Echoes. Saleh is acclaimed for his wealth of experience and knowledge in the history and politics of the Horn of Africa. A prominent public speaker and a researcher specializing on the Horn of Africa, he has given many distinguished lectures and participated in numerous seminars and conferences around the world. Activism Awate.com was founded by Saleh “Gadi” Johar and is administered by the Awate Team and a group of volunteers who serve as the website’s advisory committee. The mission of awate.com is to provide Eritreans and friends of Eritrea with information that is hidden by the Eritrean regime and its surrogates; to provide a platform for information dissemination and opinion sharing; to inspire Eritreans, to embolden them into taking action, and finally, to lay the groundwork for reconciliation whose pillars are the truth. Miriam Was Here This book that was launched on August 16, 2013, is based on true stories; in writing it, Saleh has interviewed dozens of victims and eye-witnesses of Human trafficking, Eritrea, human rights, forced labor.and researched hundreds of pages of materials. The novel describes the ordeal of a nation, its youth, women and parents. It focuses on violation of human rights of the citizens and a country whose youth have become victims of slave labor, human trafficking, hostage taking, and human organ harvesting--all a result of bad governance. The main character of the story is Miriam, a young Eritrean woman; her father Zerom Bahta Hadgembes, a veteran of the struggle who resides in America and her childhood friend Senay who wanted to marry her but ended up being conscripted. Kings and Bandits Saleh “Gadi” Johar tells a powerful story that is never told: that many "child warriors" to whom we are asked to offer sympathies befitting helpless victims and hostages are actually premature adults who have made a conscious decision to stand up against brutality and oppression, and actually deserve our admiration. And that many of those whom we instinctively feel sympathetic towards, like the Ethiopian king Emperor Haile Sellassie, were actually world-class tyrants whose transgressions would normally be cases in the World Court. Simply Echoes A collection of romantic, political observations and travel poems; a reflection of the euphoric years that followed Eritrean Independence in 1991.

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  • Shella Morris

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  • sabri

    Papilion,

    As Gadi says Kenisha means church. Keshi Ezra Gebremedhin in his book Kenisha wrote the following:

    “The word Kenisha is of Semitic origin is related to the word kanisa (the commonest word in Arabic for church) and the Hebrew Knesset (a place of gathering). The latter word goes back to a verb that means to assemble. Interestingly the Evangelical Lutheran Church of Tanzania is known, in Swahili, as Kanisa la Kiinjili la Kilutheri Tanzania.” Kenisha p. 26.

    • Papillon

      Dear Sabri,

      Great to see you back. You’ve been greatly missed. Many thanks for the added info. Please tell me more about Qeshi Ezra Gebremedhin and his book(s) for I could learn more. Again, thank you.

      • Amanuel Hidrat

        Hi Pappi,
        Sabri is absolutely correct. The word Kanisha is from semetic orgin , meaning church. As I am from that faith, I have learned it from my young age as to what its’ meaning is.
        regards

      • sabri

        Thank you dear Papilion,

        Keshi Ezra is a professor in theology and live in Sweden He has been written many books. Once upon a time he was leading Mekane Yesus Church in Ethiopia. His recent book is Kenisha. It is about the development of Eritrean evangelical church. Actually the book is written first by another person and then Qeshi Ezra accomplished.

  • Hope

    Dear Haile TG,
    Thank you for your response and advice but NO,”No thank you ” for misquoting me—
    Let me respond to few specific issues you raised:
    1)-My comments:
    Let the Moderators do whatever they want to do with them.Do you think I lose any thing if they do so or even if they bar me for ever?
    2)-As to responding in the jebena section:
    I did only after the others did and I responded only to what people said in that same Jebena section but my apolgy to the SJG for missing his advice and this has nothing to do with your bogus allegation of being disrespectful to SJG but as an FYI though,the Salehs here Do NOT feel disrepected by me and by what I say to them—-there is a secret that you do not have to know about us.
    3)-Respect:
    Yes you are right we need to respect each other but it should be MUTUAL.More over, I only reatc when some one bites me badly.
    4)As to the Role of the Ethiopians and our Refugees:
    -It has been the Ethiopians,who, for the most part, created the situation for our refugees to be in this situation.Do I need to list them? No,coz you know them better than any one here.
    -Our Refugees run to there as the last option and believing that, that will be a shorter path to the WEST,which unfortunately has been the other way round.
    -Our Refugees in the Tigray Camps haves been victims of torture, prostitution, HIV,TB,destitution,human trafficking,death,sabotage,opportunism for the Tigreyans to make money in the name of Eritreans(BTW,why were you silent about the incident in one of the Refugee Camps where some Refugees were shot to death for simply demosntarting for expressing their concerns peacefully—and even accused/killed for being “Shaebia Agents”?)-but still you told us that this is because of th ePFDJ–ok I agree.
    -The Ethiopians selectively enroll few Eritreans to Colleges but are fully paid in US Dollars
    -The Ethiopians /The Tigray Reg Gove,picks up their own Tigreyans and repatriate them to the West in the name of Eritrean Refugees and this is done at the Governement Level
    -The Eritrean refugees have been traded and trafficked on a day light with full knwoledge of fthe Tigray Reg Gov
    -The Tigray Reg Gov makes millions of USD in the name of Eritrean Refugees and eye witnesses testified that the majority of enrollees as Eritrean Refugees have been original Tigreyans in the Camps—so as to make more money($5 per individual per day)
    -Only selected people are alowed to pass to the ethiopian Cities of meklle and Addis and the others remain in the Camps with no access to any meaningful life
    -the EPDP was kicked out when it started to appeal for those refugee so as to make them self -suffient,create Education Opportunities,to rehab them to third party nations,etc—for obvious reasons you and your likes know very well.
    -The Ethiopian/Tigreyans have been on fore front to sanction Eritrea and Eritreans day and night to this minute ,which contributed to the misery of Eritreans-and they officially declared it that they want to revenge on us due to the past history–Yes,I know the PFDJ is responsible for all these.
    -Etc—
    Knowing all these FACTS,you have told me and insulted me mercilessly on behalf of the AT and the Fora that I am disrespectful to those Tigreyans who respected us in the way you want us to believe—but still knowing the horrible facts—To me, this is the prefcet definition of Hypocrisy.
    The respect I expect from the Ethiopians in general and Tigreyans and their Gov in particular is:
    -To respect International Law
    -To respect our national Interest and Territorial Integrity
    -To respect our Refugees based on the International Refugee Convention and to allow the EPDP to have an access to the Refugee Camps and to deal it with the UNHCR directly and to help our people-of course with the Ethiopian supervison as a Soveregin Nation
    -To respect us as their good neighbors
    -to respect us as an Independent People and Nation
    -To stay away from our business
    -To leave us alone to develop our economy and to back off from their daily evil activities of sanctioning us with the help of their masters

    • Hope

      BTW,
      Why and how in the world would I expect respect from the Ethiopians/Tigreyans?

      • Saleh Johar

        Dear Hope,

        Allow me to interject: respect is earned as you well know. And I want to understand this: you do not know why and how to expect any respect for 85 million of them? Do you think your attitude is belligerent, and that invites equal belligerence which we witnessed from Abinet? I just want to know your take, nothing more.

        • Hope

          Mr SJG,
          My apology if you are offended.
          I am not belligerant by all standard but at the same time,it is NOT my culture to keep silent when one insults,abuses,demonizes,dehumanizes and tarnishes me and my Martyrs,Dead and Live Heros and Heroines and Eritrea and Eritreans ,who sacrified themselves to the maximum,never seen in the world history,to my best knowledge.
          FYI,
          Yes, I respect Ethiopia and Ethiopians and I expect them to do the same to me.
          I take it back if you thought that I generalized to all Ethiopians…..
          I have repeatedly called for a constructive debate for Regional Reconciliation and Economic Integration.But you cannot clap with only one hand.

  • Mahmud Saleh

    To saay and his cousin Hope

    I just thought to bring it to your attention; you might be interested in it, hurry up to get registered (saay, you have another material to play with now. What was the last conference’s result?). nitricc will be the receptionist. SGJ and I will be waiting till Eritrean presenters emerge. I just wonder, no Eritrean keynote speaker!

    http://shabait.com/news/local-news/17757-asmara-mining-conference-2014

    • saay7

      Mahmuday:

      Is there a family discount for me and Cousin Hope?

      It is fitting that the new Minister of Energy and Mines is the man who invented the word “handebetnet” (ሃንደበትነት) after Ethiopia’s penetration into Barentu in 2000. After all, how he got demoted from Ministry of Defense to Ministry of Energy/Mines is quite a “handebet”:)

      saay

      • Mahmud Saleh

        SAAy7
        I think handebetnet is the essence of Issayasism. The discount will definitely be there if you treat hope with shaHan Ful and berad shahi.

        • Abinet

          Ato Mahmoud
          You are absolutely right.
          “Lehodam bere chid yazuletal”
          Yibal yele?

          • Mahmud Saleh

            Abi
            But have you Seen what SGJ said to me? Any advice for gashe Gadi?

  • Hope

    —-and if I may add,Dear SheHanful(salivating now for shehanful breakfast with berad shahi):
    -There were 5 Top Egyptian Generals visiting Uganda
    -S Sudan also invited the same Top Generals in a similar manner few months ago
    -SJG also broke the news to us about few GENERALS visiting Gash Barka- of Eritrea-where some Ethiopian opposition Rebels are said to have camped.
    -Few but Top Generals also visited Somalia few months ago/about a yr ago almost
    So,Nittric has points as usual and his points–always make sense albeit said in an ” unpleasant ” way,at least from the AT and Ethiopiann point of view.
    My point is:
    SJG should keep quite and stay neutral in such cases.But rather ,he broke the news in a sensational and in an “Ethiophilc” way when it comes to Eritrea.
    No body wants wars but peaceful co-existence and we should have debated from that perspective but since Ethiopia feels to be the Super Power of the Horn,it has been creating chaos here and there (Eritrea,S Sudan,Somalia)and as Nittric said it,it should deal with its “mesatu” and leave others to live in peace–
    We will see if the Super Power of the Horn will threaten Uganda and Egypt as it has done with Somalia,S Sudan and Eritrea.

    • Abinet

      Doro bitalim Tirewan

      • Eyob Medhane

        Abi,

        Seriously, don’t you feel sorry for individuals, who live with this kind of delusions? Wow!

        • Abinet

          Eyobe
          NO ,I don’t feel sorry at all for these kind of creatures who day and night wish ,dream,pray for some kind of disaster on us. I HATE them. Look at this one here .He is salivating all over just because the Egyptians are in the neighborhood . One of them was dreaming the Egyptians send F16 to bomb the dam.
          The good thing is this kind of good for nothing creatures are getting less and less in number and in the noise they are making. Their whorish behavior will eventually get back to haunt them. They will stand alone naked ,shamefully for the world to see.
          “MesheT yelemede enatun yasmamal……”

          • Hey A-hole: if you “HATE” Eritreans what the F are you doing in here? I know AT don’t appreciate those kinds of words; they believe that Ethiopians and Eritreans are well come on this forum as long as they respect the forum and the people on the forum. But for you to come out and declare you hate Eritreans is out of line and offensive.
            But it is not your fault; I blame the AT. They are looking the other way when your likes the worst Ethiopia has to offer. I know Ethiopians are better than your freaking stupidity but again I blame AT. Stupid. If you hate Eritreans get freaking out of here.

          • Abinet

            At don’t mind your language since they don’t expect any better from you.
            Your problem is either you don’t read or you don’t comprehend or both. Too bad. I suggest adult literacy ASAP .
            I did not say I hate Eritreans . I said ,I hate ,I repeat,I HATE some one who wishes us anything and everything bad.
            It doesn’t matter which nationality including an Ethiopian.
            You and Hope are salivating all over for Egypt to attack us . I see you are supporting him. Nothing new.
            YeAyT misikrwa dnbiT aydelech?
            YeAhya bal keJib ayasTlm

          • Hope

            Now ,U R becoming pathologically paranoid.
            Take it easy body.
            Eta zella ab’a ala.
            Egypt and the Sudan from North,S Sudan from S West,Somalia from S East along with the Gallant ONLF, ,Uganda from S West,the OLF from S and Central Ethiopia,G-7 from East and Central Ethiopia,the Gambella from S West Ethiopia,the Gallant DEMHIT from N Ethiopia.
            No worries about Eritrea since “Zeinatna aynidelin,natna dimma aynihibin”–Just Baduma and Peaceful co-existence only.

          • Eyob Medhane

            Abi,

            Have you ever thrown a ball to a wall? It bounces and comes back to you, until the air in the ball start to leak and the ball collapses. having a conversation with hope and that thing is like throwing a ball to a wall, so just leave it as is and let the ball let it’s air out and collapse in its own time…

          • hope

            You too do the same Eyobay me’ar Adi’u.

          • Rahwa T

            Tru blehal, Eyob

          • Rodab

            Rahwa,
            What would it take for you to give Nitricc a second chance?
            You know well he has a big crush on you.

          • Hope

            —Ms rahwit,
            kab behali’uus degami’u zibehal kemzi natiki eyu!

          • Hope

            Mr Abi,
            diros,ke michie kumnegher enna constructive input askemiteh takalehinh?
            It is time to grow up man!

        • Hope

          And who cares ?

      • Hope

        Ato Abi and Eyob,
        No body wished you this and that but the news item came up and people are debating on it.What I said above is what the news said.
        But here is the truth and Pappi will translate it to you:
        “Id Tsenahit,ShenaHit.”.In Eyoba’s own wording,it means:
        :”Their whorish behavior will eventually get back to haunt them.”.
        Yes indeed,you think that since you are the Super Power of the Horn and as such messing around with the innocent people of the the Horn,will,at the end of the day,haunt you back—mark my word.

    • Hope,

      Your last sentence is similar to saying, “I will call my
      bigger brother, and you will see what he would do to you’. As kids, we would sometimes use this tactic, whenever we lost a fight with another kid, and it helped us make sure that there will not be a second time.

      C’mon my friend, you can do more than that. One cannot say, “Nobody wants war” while at the same time interpreting a common and ordinary news
      as a prelude to a possible Ethio-Egyptian confrontation. There is nothing Eritrea would gain out of it. Remember what you wrote last time, “… it is time to work for peaceful coexistence, regional reconciliation and economic integration…”, your own words. Let’s therefore change our belligerent mentality, for our people are disgusted of war and talks of war.

      • Rahwa T

        Thanks Horizon for the nice comment.

      • Hope

        Mr Eyob,
        I stood,have stood,stand and will stand firm on my POSITION now and for ever—-
        What we need is a Regional Reconciliation and Economic Integration along with a Peaceful Co-existence—but you cannot clap with one hand since you consider this cry for a peaceful co-existence as a sign of “weakness”.
        I only react,hit back and become “selectively belligerent” when some one does it to me the same.

  • Papillon

    Dear SGJ,

    I just picked up an interesting conversation between Sal and Eyob and “Protestant” seems to float in between. As you know back in Eritrea we call them Kenisha. I have always wondered why we call them Kenisha. And I have asked many people what the real meaning of Kenisha is and nobody seems to know. I thought you might know. Do you know what the meaning of the word “Kenisha” is?

    Haft’kha.

    • Saleh Johar

      Pleasure Papillon,

      In both Arabic and Tigrayet, “Kenisa” means a church. (If Eyob asks, tell him we have nothing to do with the Arabs, at all 🙂

      When the Tigrayet people who adopted the faith. They used the word so much that it became the identification of the faith . But the moment the name went up the Highlands, it was corrupted and became Kenisha.

      That is what I heard about that.

      • Eyob Medhane

        Gash Saleh,

        Ha! Interesting….

        You taught me something today……Having said that, so how could you claim you have nothing to do Arabs?… hummmmm 🙂

        • Saleh Johar

          No Eyob, remember I am Habesha! As you know we just dropped from the sky, developed our culture, and language with no inter-action with anyone, and never adopted any faith or doctrines brought to us by Arabs or non Arabs–we communicate with God through our own, homegrown faith 🙂 I was talking about the non-Habesha Eritreans 🙂

      • Papillon

        Dear SJ,

        I knew you were the right person to ask. You have no idea how many people I asked and no one seems to know. You’re just amazing. Thank you Ayay.

        • Papillon

          ሎሚሸት ኣብ እንዳ ዓዋተ ወጃዕጃዕ ብላዕ ስተ ጋሻ ተቐበል እዩ ዘሎ ኣየ ክንደይ ይጥዕም ኤሪትራውያንና ኢትዮጵያውያንና ብሓንሳብ ክንስሕቕን ክንጻወትን ግዲ የብልኩምን እቲ ልዑል ፈጣሪ ክብሎ’ዩ ክብሎ ሰናይ ዘመን ክምለስ’ዩ እቲ ጸላም ክቕንጠጥዩ

          • Fanti Ghana

            ቅድመኺ ስጥሕ የብለኒ ፓፒዮን ሓፍተይ! You reminded me Rumi’s “The Guest House.”
            http://www.gratefulness.org/poetry/guest_house.htm

          • Papillon

            My sweet sweet brother Fanti Ghana,

            Many thanks for sharing the link, the beautiful poem. Most of all, many thanks for gracing us with your warm presence.

            Haft’kha.

          • ghezaehagos

            Selam Kibrti Papillon and at Awatistas,

            Enqa’e des beleki! with everyone there. Let us hang in there! SURE ENOUGH!

            Thanks Awate Team for the ‘me’adi’. Some of the ‘weldegnatat’ keep on missing because of ‘Issacian’ (never a word, don’t even repeat it) chores. ‘kimreQa hiredely..’

            So we set on.

            When we came back ‘home’, you see a ‘das’ with 400sth people. .Oh gosh! really!!!!

            Dutifully, as dutiful son, you skin the goa….err scan’ em. Scroll the paragraph…err..the ribs.

            You see endeared, familiar faces among the crowd. You read ’em. You meet new ones. Wow!

            You know why you came!

            Ajokum! Ajona those who love Eritrea!

            ሰናይ ዘመን ክምለስ’ዩ እቲ ጸላም ክቕንጠጥዩ…”

            All the best,

            Ghezae Hagos

          • Papillon

            Dearest Ghezae our brightest star,

            ጠፊእካና ናፊቕናካ ብወገንካ ኩሉ ሰላም ክህሉ ተስፋ ንገብር. If we are to adhere to the true calling of politics, it is the art of the possible. It is not a modus operandi for hate. It is not a mechanism for cynicism either. Please forgive me for going hard science on you but if there is anything in the Law of Entropy, things around us have the tendency to go into disorder. Perhaps, it explains the reason why it is easy to destroy than to build; it is easy to hate than to love. But as much as we are the warriors of light (read: Paulo Coelho–The Alchemist), there is no substitution for love and mutual respect. We can not afford to do otherwise. And as we long for better days and a brighter horizon, the Sun is about to remain risen, the wind is to blow in silence, we are almost home, we are home.

            Haft’kha.

      • tafla

        Beit Knesset means synagogue, not everything of semitic origin is Arabic, just a reminder. Undoubtedly, there are similarities between Arabic, Tigrinya and tigrayet, but unless you know if it’s a lone word or a word of common semitic origin, it becomes another useless politicization of language and identity. Where is the urheimat of proto-afro-asiatic and proto-semitic? What is the haplogroup of semites, horners, North-Africans? J? E? A? B?…look it up, it’s quite fascinating.

        • Saleh Johar

          Tafla,
          You own objection to politicizing of the word is the best example of politicizing it. I could present similar refined sounding stuff like “haplogroup of semites” “proto-afro-semitic” type of material like you did until you head spins 🙂 I didn’t need to. l learned it from breathing old people of wisdom and memory (not google), in the original surrounding and source of the the word Kenisha: Mensa’E.
          Cheers

          • tafla

            So, Facts can not be found by Google? “l learned it from breathing old people of wisdom and memory”? That’s actually humour 🙂 I see a great story teller and great messenger of deception in you, but wisdom is a stretch…

    • Shella Morris

      I Never believed i was ever going to be HIV Negative again,Dr Molemen has given me reasons to be happy, i was HIV positive for 2years and all the means i tried for treatment was not helpful to me, but when i came on the Internet i saw great testimony about Dr on how he was able to cure someone from HIV, this person said great things about this man, and advice we contact him for any Disease problem that Dr Molemen can be of help, well i decided to give him a try, he requested for my information which i sent to him, and he told me he was going to prepare for me a healing portion, which he wanted me to take for days, and after which i should go back to the hospital for check up, well after taking all the treatment sent to me by Dr Molemen, i went back to the Hospital for check up, and now i have been confirmed HIV Negative, friends you can reach Dr Molemen on any treatment for any Disease he is the one only i can show you all up to, reach him on (drmolemenspiritualtemple@gmail.com) or call him on +2347036013351 …

  • Semere Andom

    To Sal and Emma just ንፈገግታ
    ክትሽምጥጥን ክትሸማጠጥን ዝነበርን ዘሎን
    ካብ ጥንቲ ሕንባሻኾሎ እምኒ
    አብ ዝተን አብ ልዝብን
    ስሕት እሉ ድማ ስኽፍ ይብልና
    ክመይ ግሩ ዝይብለና ኦም ዶ ቆጽላ ክሽምጠጥ አይስከፋን
    አታ ምምህር ስነ ቀመም
    ጽወየና እስክ ምሽምጣጥ የብዝሖ ዲዩ ንደም
    ንስኻ አንታ ምሁር ምምሕዳር ድገመልና የነክዮ ዲዩ ነቲ ኢሂን ምሂን ምባል?
    ሸምጥጡ ተሸማጠጡ ፍልጠት ክትድልቡ
    እዩ ዝብል እቲ መጽሓፍ
    ግን እቲ ምዝላፍ ናብ ጎሓፍ
    ይቅርታ ግበረለይ “ሰአአየ” ነ ኑኒ ና አብዚሐ ሓቅየ
    እንታይ እሞ ክገብር ባህሪይ ኮይኑ ንታሕተዋይ ክልቢ ምድጋፍ፡ ፡ -)
    ሃየ ብሉ ሸምጥጡ ተሸማጠጡ እንህለ ዓዋተ እነህለ ፈረሰ

    • Mahmud Saleh

      ዎ ሰመረ ( ዎ ሆይ በል)

      ሰመረ እንከሎ ተሓዝ በርበረ
      ሰመረ ኣብጓይላኡ ማሕበረ
      ሰመረ ኣታዓራቒኡ ሽግረ
      ኣዕንቲ እናንባዕካ በቲ በርበረ
      ዕርቂ ካበይ ይምጻእ ዓርከይ ሰመረ

      NB: The ረ-ረ-ረ-ረ-ረ rhyme is for saay’s dinner.

      • Fanti Ghana

        HEY MAHMUD!!!!
        I just logged back in and saw your name all over the place. Too excited, I couldn’t decide where to respond and say hi. After scrolling up and down a few times here I am. HI (hand wave) and welcome back!

        • Mahmud Saleh

          FG,
          Good friend, I’ve been away for 3 days, good to see you. As you know the kids are also starting school, so you know what I mean.

          • Fanti Ghana

            Somehow, it felt longer than 3 days. Nice to hear from you, and I hope all is well with the kids.

          • Mahmuday
            What is up? How was your vacation? I hope you have some rest. Anyway; I am grateful to see your presence. Now, let’s have fantasy foot ball you, SAAY, Haqi, SG -:) and me. Hahaha what do you say?
            By the way who is your NFL team? I know SAAY team is the Oakland Raiders lol and SG team is the Cleveland Browns and Haqi’s team the Philadelphia Eagles. My team I will let SAAY guess about it.

          • Mahmud Saleh

            Nitricc abadahri,
            What’s up?
            Well, I am Seattle Seahawks. Yes, go hawks!

          • saay7

            Nitricc:

            Are you trying to drive SGJ crazy? The pre-season is over Abu Selah now it will be non-stop talk about football until February 2015. And u thought the World Cup took long?;)

            Ok. Nitriccs team is not the Giants. Because an Eritrean who was drafted joined the toothless club by saying: “I’ll be the first Ethiopian player to play in the National Football League,” said Berhe (pronounced Bur-HEY). “That’s huge for me and huge for my family and huge for the people in Ethiopia. It’s a big feat. Not a lot of people from East Africa are in the National Football League. I look at it all the same, Ethiopia, Eritrea, it’s all the same, just different name.” Right?

            Me? There is no way I am sticking with the Raiders and you know what happened to the 49ers. So, I am going with…. the Denver Broncos. They just beat the meqenecha of Mahmudays team.

            You might want to invite House of Stark and Ermias (after he takes a few chill pills) to our league.

            saay

          • Mahmud Saleh

            Ustaz SAAy7,
            Haha…well, remember, we beat you on Super bowl! ! We are champions, you guys just beat non-starters. We will see you in the season.

      • Semere Andom

        Wedi Saleh
        እቲ በርበረ ናእዳ ዶ አሽሞረ?
        እንታይ ክ ብዘይብኡ ዝመቀረ
        ግን ናእዳ ይምስለኒ ካብ ልሳን እሙን ወዲ ሳሕለ
        ምስጋና ዘይመልስ ዘይ ወዲ አረ
        እንቋ ብድሓን ምጻኻ ማሕሙደ
        ጥዑም ድሃይ ክም ጓል መለሰ
        ብርሃን ግዛ ክም ፍኑሰ
        ወዲ ሕሽክብ ወዲ ዓምበርበበ
        ዕውት ክም ዓዋተ
        ይአኽለኒ እንተ ብዚሑ ክይምሰል አገልግሎት-ልሳነ*

        * this is for Sal:-)

        • saay7

          Nice Sem:

          You should TM አገልግሎት-ክንፈረ* 🙂

          saay

        • Mahmud Saleh

          wedi Andome wedi Andome
          Geez de’a yebleyn embere
          mwaTekeulka xbuQ geyre
          wed Andome Hfoone
          nsKa zeybla Aleme
          meQeret neybla TaAame

          • Semere Andom

            Dear Mahmuday 🙂
            እዝስ ውዳሰ ዶ መልቀሰ
            አብዓልም ደኣ አለዀ እወ
            ዃሕ-ዃሕ እብል ክም ዓረ
            አብ ብርክይ የተንፍስ ክም ወዲ አፎመ
            ማንካ እካ ዘይ አልዓልኩላ እዛ ዓለመ፡ -)

          • Mahmud Saleh

            Wedi Andome wedi kanada
            Selam senbet kbl kemey ymesleka
            Nitricc’ do ksedd kesenbdeka
            SAAY ‘ do ksedd ke’edbeka
            Wedi Andome kameAlka
            **that’s your labor w/end treat.

          • Semere Andom

            Dear Teg Wedi saleh
            ተጋዳላይ ወዲ ሳልሕ አይፋልካነ
            ወዲ ዓንዶም አይስንብድ አይሰናበድ
            ምናልባሽ እንተተማቲካ ንማለቱ
            ሕተቶም ነቶም መታዕቢቱ
            ሕቶቶም ነቶም መማህርቱ
            ሓቂ ሒዙ ስማጎተ
            እደብ መሊእዎ አንጀርቢቡ
            ንናይትሪካይ መለቅሖ
            ግን አቦታትካ ክም ዝብለዎ
            ገንዘብ ልቃሕን ልቢ ምዕዳን ናብ ዋናኡ
            ስልዚ እንታይ ክዓብሰሉ
            አቦይ ፍቃዱ ስኽፍ ኢልዎም ባዕሎም ክይናአዱ
            ካብ እኒ ወዲ ሳልሕ ክጽበዩ በለዩ

            About msnibad by Nitricay, I like to say (brag) and Saleh Gadi or you can help me who said it and if my memory is good about the line. It is called the line that killed it author:-)
            AlqurTas Taerufeni
            Wo aleQlemu YaErufeni
            Wo alharba taTaErufeni
            Wo al fursanu taErufeni

            This is your treat for this long weekend

          • Saleh Johar

            Wo Semere, Abu Tayeb is turning in his grave 🙂

            You know I cannot resist commenting on abu-Tayeb al-Mutenebi, my favorite poet! I think abu-Tayeb was a genious (though very arrogant) and he had a way with words a skill that no one ever mastered as he did. The poem you quoted is one of the most famouse lines of his poetry. I will give three separate set of lines from the same poem.

            1. ana ‘lezi nezera alaAma illa adebi
            w’ asmaAt kelimati men bihi sumemu

            (I am the one whose litrature even the blind saw
            And made my words be heard by the deaf…)

            2. [This is my favorite lines]

            iza ra’ayta niyab al leythi barizeten
            f’la tezunena in ‘aleithi yebtesimu

            (If you see a lion’s teeth
            Don’t ever think it is smiling)

            3. And the one you mutilated 🙂

            Alkheylu wel leylu welbeyda’u taArifuni
            we’seifi, w’rimHi, wel qurtasi welqelemu

            The horses, the nights and the deserts know me
            [also] the sword, the spear, the paper and the pen]

            Here abu tayeb is defending his honor, that he as a warrior as well as a writer and poet. But translation doesn’t give justice to his poetry, it doesn’t even touch the surface of how beautiful those lines are.

            NB: But isn’t this Jebena material?

          • Semere Andom

            Thanks Saleh: I knew you will comment to make the author turn in his grave in jubilation:-)
            I never read it, I heard it long time ago, on the BBC, who said and what was the occasion, I think

          • Mahmud Saleh

            Hfoonay wedi Andome
            Ustaz Gadi melisuwa ‘take gTme
            TOUm zereba wedi Hshkbe
            Grm zereba nay memhre
            Grm waza wedi Andome.
            ## The heck of it; let’s drive SAAY crazy.

    • saay7

      ሰባሪ ዜና ሰላሕታ ኮይኑምበር:
      ኣበይ ኔርካ ፈረስ ዓዋተ ክቕበር?
      “ኣድጊ ዘሊልካስ ፈረስ? እዋእ!
      “ኣይትምሃዝ ተረት” በለት ራህዋ:
      ንዕቀት ይሳሓል ኣሎ…..
      ………………ጎቢዙ ጣዕዋ ዓድዋ*

      “ወይ ጻዕዳ: ወይ ጸሊም: ወግደለይ ግራጫ!:
      “ወይ ምሳይ: ወይ ምስኦም ኢዩ እቲ ምርጫ!”
      ክትሰምዖ ኣየወ! ምቁር ዜማ!
      ሕቶ ተሰጊሩ መስለኒ ሕቶ ፈለማ

      ጭርሖ መዝሓል ናህሪ ድዩ ዱላ ተመን?
      ንመራመር ፡ ንሕተት፡ ሓምኹሽታይ ኣይፈንፈን:
      መፈክር ላሕሊሑ ዶኸውን ድሕሪ ቱምኒ ዘመን?

      *inserted purely for rhyming purposes:)

      saay

      • Com´on

        ሰላማት! (ነባር ተኸታታሊ)

        ኣጠቓቓስ ይብሉኻ?
        “*inserted purely for rhyming purposes:)”

        ብሓቂ ጥበብ ዝሓትት ክእለት!

  • Amen

    A little Interjection to the discussion :
    There is no any country like Egypt that represents Africa and who gave
    to much history,culture and civilization to the world representing Africa
    and African peoples. Egypt is the source and foundation not only the
    civilization of colored but also Mediterranean people’s civilizations.
    But it is normal to some people in political sphere to say they are more
    mediterraneans than Africans depending on their location, proximity to
    and contact with the types of peoples in their neighboring areas.
    If one is a politician from Alexandria or Tunisian mediterranian area in the
    Egyptian cabinet there is nothing wrong for him to say he is mediterranian.
    Afterall, this clear cut of black white culture is artificial designed by politicians
    to create artificial boundaries between people.
    Thus it is fair to say norther Africa especially Egypt represent more than 90%
    of African culture, history and civilization as it is known to the world today and/or
    in the past.

  • Fanti Ghana

    Hey ShaHanful,

    Whether positioning to create chaos in the neighborhood or trying to come back to the African fold to re-establish their presence and cooperation with African nations, the initial few moves would look very much the same. Then depending which way the GERD wind blows, Egyptians would be ready for:

    A. Creating scenarios they hope will keep Ethiopia entangled in neighborhood brawls.
    B. Try to bring back as much of the glorious days of Gamal Abdel Nasser as possible by increasing cooperation with Africans.

    That said, the relationship between Egypt and Ethiopia looks promising since the newly elected Egyptian leader. So, I say, let’s accept the positive interpretation first.

    • Saleh Johar

      FG, Anta ezgher yebarekhka! Fora change we have an insightful comment.

    • T. Kifle

      Hi Fanti Ghana,

      The only difference is in the tone. He is only a little “wise” less vocal and a show off ostensibly appear “engaging”. The rest is the same old story. Egypt’s established tradition on Nile and Ethiopia is immutable. It doesn’t matter who sits at the top. The reason Mursi had shown us his futile military posturing is contextual because he thought it would help him calm down the anger of the Egyptian people on his administration taking Nile a a ploy of strategic threat. That didn’t work. Now, Al Sisi seems comfortable with his internal politics and have no reason to disturb the hornet’s nest publicly at least for the time. Egypt’s history of voting on anything involving Ethiopia has been consistently “NO” even if that means the issue is not even remotely connected to Nile. It’s built on a quintessential win/lose paradigm. Nothing can change that except time: time when the mammoth military establishment reaches a point where muscle flexing would no more be the solution. Till then we will see all kinds of machinations, plotting conspiracies, covert and overt meddling through all possible avenues including regional warlords.

      • T-K I do admire your stand for what you believe and I don’t like it but I respect it. Now, you are right my approach to the news was not to the tee, I tried to irritate you guys but fine. But aren’t you down playing it the event we are discussing? I understand your duty is to inflate your military powers. If you ask me, your military as weak as any military in Africa. Say what you want but I have my facts. The question I have for you is this…..
        If Egypt and Ethiopia has to go to war; who do you think the USA stands? With Ethiopia or Egypt?
        The answer should give you the reason to get off your high horse.

        • T. Kifle

          Nitricc,

          Good point. First of all I don’t think Egypt will directly confront Ethiopia militarily. That’s why YM, SK, IA and Al Shabab are essential presumably readying themselves to do the dirty work for Egypt. But if they do, in the most unlikely scenario, Ethiopia is more than capable to defeat Egypt. In fact, defeat is the only outcome of the would be war you seem coveting so much. I have no an iota of doubt on the outcome. It’s only that war is not the answer to the problem at hand. Even after the art of war is being acted, Nile remains Nile, sourcing 85% from Ethiopia and we will be back to square one. So people with at least average IQ shouldn’t seek a solution from the books of destruction and mayhem, i.e war.

  • “The Egyptian Armed Forces have opened a Defence office in Kampala. It has been inaugurated at a function attended by military officers from Uganda and Egypt.”

    Why???????????
    What are the implications in the East of Africa? You know how the weyane and their servant Amara think that Weyane is a super power of the east Africa; what are they going to say now? Very interesting! The Egyptians should have opened the defense office in Asmara so, the weyane and the servant Amhara will wetting their pants. Okay Ethiopians and the weyanes; do you want to be a supper power of the east Africa? Okay go pick on your size. Lol you can’t even eradicate Al-Shebab let alone Egypt. What a joke.

    http://www.newvision.co.ug/news/659151-egypt-opens-defence-office-in-uganda.html

    • Papillon

      Nitricc,

      Why is the good for nothing PFDJ zombies relying more on external forces to destabilize Ethiopia or to remove the Weyanes from power instead of taking on themselves? Really. Is it because they lost confidence on the tyrant? Just think about it. The PFDJ zombies for the last decade have been praying for something to happen to the Weyanes so that Isaias can find a breathing space. You can’t just wish your neighbour to die so that your neighbour won’t nag you about your abusive husband.

      • What do you think behind the Egyptians move? What are they trying to accomplish? Why Uganda? What does it mean to the horn Africa in general and to Ethiopia in particular? How is the relationship of Uganda and Ethiopia? If it is good; then what does it mean now? If it is bad, again then what?

        • Papillon

          Nitricc,

          My short answer is I don’t know. Maybe there is some sort of rivalry between Ethiopia and Uganda. Maybe the Egyptians want to check on the fast moving consolidation of power of Ethiopia with in the region. Maybe we are reading too much into it. I would say, the most pertinent question is, why didn’t they open a defence office in Eritrea instead? Isaias is obviously taking more hits than he expected. The Nile and the situation in South Sudan factor in and hard to say how they are going to respond to the recent “development.” As they say, time his the hidden factor and we shall see.

        • Saleh Johar

          Hi Nitricc,
          If you are looking at a landscape picture and trying to describe it to someone over the phone, you cannot describe the a bird on a tree and expect him to imagine the landscape that has a million birds. There is what they call Military Attache in most embassies. Eritrea had one in Egypt, in Ethiopia, in Sudan, in Saudi Arabia, etc. It also had one in Pakistan for a brief period of time when it was negotiating to buy arms (a different story). I think the military office here is an appointment of a military attache. His ervices will be needed for many things: buying or selling arms to the country; an military training agreement between the two countries; an intelligence agreement where the two countries need to coordinate;maybe Egypt wants to monitor militancy in the region; maybe Uganda asked for help in that field; maybe Uganda wants to set up an armament factory contracted to Egypt… and many things. But we should be used to such paranoia and self-aggrandizement which is endemic to Ethiopian and Eritrean debaters: everything is about them, other countries cannot have anything that is not centered around the issues of the two countries. Can’t Egypt and Uganda have a relation which doesn’t remotely factor the two countries at all? Speculations are common, but they can only be acceptable and credible if the person doing the speculation is knowledgeable and does enough research about the subject. Just thinking.Type your reply…

          • T. Kifle

            Dear SGJ,

            Since when does posting a military attaché become a newsworthy? What do you think is the objective of the military alliance forged between Egypt and Kir of SS in the recent past? Why do you think is YM of Uganda is unhappy when he was requested to withdraw his forces from Juba? Of course they do the same with Eritrea covertly for the reasons we all know. Though the way Nitric wanted it appear is understandably shallow, the matter is too familiar to warrant a research for its validation.

          • Saleh Johar

            Hi T. Kifle

            Posting a military attache becomes news worthy for many reasons or it is ignored for many reasons. I simply commented at a “shallow” comment. Are you saying I shouldn’t have done so?

            As for the regional politics, and that every country protects its interest, and how sometimes those interests clash, and when they do, stuff happens, I know a tiny bit about that. But that was not my topic as you have mentioned. Are you objecting that I seemed to diminish the importance of the developments and that I should have said, “this warrants a research”? I just objected to the cartoonish/toothless depiction of the event and explained the context in which countries post military attaches in their embassies–correct me if I was wrong. If not, I didn’t understand your message well.

            But the smell of Somalia and South Sudan has been spreading in the region and Uganda/Ethiopia are either closing their nostrils, or clearing it 🙂

          • T. Kifle

            Hi SGJ,

            No sir, I don’t mean that. I understand the theme of your message that you wanted to bring the ever rising mercury in the likes of Nitric down to acceptable level. 🙂

            My response has to do with your reasoning on the permutations and combinations of Egypt’s intention in establishing the new “defence office”, whatever that means.

          • SGJ the Egyptians never consider themselves as Africans. They have always used unkind vocabularies to describe Africa and Africans. So, it got to be a beef, a jucey beef at that, for Egyptians sudden change of heart. I am not taking this as Ethio-Eritrea beef; rather Abay dam. I think the Egyptians are trying to pressure Ethiopia while not trying to aggravate the matter. But still why Uganda is the big question? i did not see it coming.

          • Saleh Johar

            Nitricc,
            Please describe for me what “Africans” and “Africa” mean to you. We may have something to talk about before we go on a tangent.

          • SG
            Hahaha You are going to get me in to hot waters.
            very interesting qeustion. If i tell how i define it, not only the awate community who comes after me but the whole Africans will come after me with Meshedi to choppe me like an onion. Let me humanize the unswer and i will try to answer it. Once a very wise man told me that at times i need a fillter before i say things. So,let me fillter it.

          • Mahmud Saleh

            Ato nitricc,
            How can’t you see, or shall I say, smell that, Nitricc? Your sense of smell is said to be a stuff of legend. Now here is the beef nitrikay, Egyptians got tired of being herded into prisons in Eritrea, they finished fishing over the northern part of the Red Sea. So, they are salivating on lake Victoria, once they empty that they will hop on to lake Tana, by the time they are through with that they will simply make a bumpy north sail to the Dam. Once they reach that African boundaries will become meaningless. They stay there. Weyne. ..Weyne. ..etiopia kewsTwa bAraboch tebel…finish it my friend, your amharic is better. Fanti and I will sing ” aybelnan’ndo, why where you killing each other?” So don’t listen to Gens. TK, SJG and the rest. Just for fun, I know you are smart not to read too much in to the news. Normal regional maneuvering; these are still too poor to really threaten African War I. I can’t see either of them want a military confrontation that might cover a good part of subsaharan Africa. South Sudan is a country that you will have to watch; probably it will remain to be a theater of regional proxies just so that they get a bit of an advantage in negotiations.

          • Abinet

            Ato Mahmud
            I hope you have heard this before
            “Abay molto Tana molto esat yizorewal
            YiTefatal enji meche yishagerewal”

          • Mahmud Saleh

            salam Abi
            I thought that was when Abyssinyachen was peaceful, or was it? Anyway, Semere Andom (yehe gmashu habesha gmashu demo Arab yehone lj kemsrochu eyetemakere new teblwal. So, watch out for msrochu boats captained by Semere. He will stay there till he grows good-for-something teeth. Can you write some more poems; nice ones though, not Eritranoch ye Arab QuTregnoch. Something the good FG can accept in club salam.

          • Abinet

            Ato mahmud
            I hope your peace club brings peace for the Abyssiniachin.
            “YeAbesha lijoch achachirochu,
            Yinadefalu endenibochu”
            Oops ,it is not peaceful at all.

          • Mahmud Saleh

            Abi
            No, you’re fine. As long as you keep it that way, meaning, habeshochu as a family against intruders. Am I dreaming today? (I will have to ask a habesha scholar, the honorable SGJ, if I may claim the title habesha” I don’t know, but I’m sure your piece is admissible in our club.

          • Saleh Johar

            Nope Pasha, you are out. Find your own tree and shade 🙂 I can accept you, but others would want you to shade off anything else that is non Habesha. If not, ab’aa trekhba, with the Habesha who love Gedli so much:-)

          • Mahmud Saleh

            Abusalah,
            Let me then pack my “Alaat bun” and Rabbah and sing” lilit la barQ wedQeyu”

          • saay7

            … wa Assad, Assad QeTleyu:)

            Details on that punchline from any Keren boy. SGJ will volunteer to tell it, if Sem asks kindly.

          • Kim Hanna

            Selam Abinet,
            .
            I think, the title Fitawrari fits you at Awateland. Your friend, Eyob, must be Dejazmatch.
            .
            We the foot solders will follow until peace reigns in the neighborhood.
            .
            K.H

          • Abinet

            I demand the title Ras. Like my hero Ras Alula. My son’s name is Alula.
            I hope you know about Alula Pankrest.(. Guad Eyob meglecha yisTubet)
            PS
            Where have you been,Kim?

          • Kim Hanna

            Selam Abinet,
            .
            Ras it is.
            .
            I have been around and resting my tired self. Whenever, I peek in and I see all Grazmatchs, Kegnazmatches, Dedjazmatches I just read with a smile. Hallelujah!.
            K.H

    • House of Stark

      Hi Nitricc
      Egypt, have never won any war against Ethiopia, they are not going to win now and they will never win in the future, so bro eat your heart out. The GERD will be finish in time.

  • Fanti Ghana

    Memhr SGJ (PHd),
    Here I was hair splitting whether to pick you or Amanuel Hidrat for minister of justice, and here you are threatening Kokheb Selam for what others did and still doing to his corner. Didn’t he scream and yell “ጀበናይየ፤ ፍንጃለይየ፣ በህግ ኣምላክ!”
    እንታይከ ዘይበለ:: He gave up, and now he is following our time honored say “ዓዲ’ቦኻያ እንትውረርስ ሓቢርካ ውረር”
    ሕሰበላ ድኣ

    By the way, this may be a good opportunity to discuss about granting us the ‘club selam’ page you almost promised, so people have a scratch pad when they need to say something that doesn’t belong anywhere else.

    PS:
    ሎሚ ምሸት ድፈር ድፈር ዘብል ሒዙኒ’ሎ

    • Saleh Johar

      Hi FG,
      True, his jebena and fenajil are all smashed, but he is responsible for his utensils 🙂
      On the Selam issue, I have a suggestion that would produce tangible results as an outcome of the debate here:

      You write an article about the subject, and put your vision on how the relations between the two-countries should be. Then everyone here will give an input, and then we develop it into a real workshop, papers and all. If we can pull this together, I am sure gradually we can attract interested people to participate on a face to face discussion, a seminar. That would be a great practical input instead of the comments here and there that are not pursued. What do you say?

      • Fanti Ghana

        Woohoo! Fair enough and agreed!

        • Kokhob Selam

          Thank you both.

      • saay7

        Abu Selah:

        We should consider re-purposing Jebena from a Poet’s hangout to a Lit-Art hangout. This way, Eyob and I won’t feel like we are crashing Kokhob Selam’s Jebena when we are doing our Saturday Music Exchange program.

        Eyob and I are also thinking of a Book Excerpt Exchange program. This is our parallel track to the Fanti-Ghana/Mahmud Peace Club. The Fanti-Mahmoud Peace Club is probably going to be a serious peace proposal that serious people can gravitate to….. the saay/Eyob Exchange is just one that will show that there are smart-alecs in Eritrea AND Ethiopia. We are co-authoring our version of seleda.com.

        saay

        • Saleh Johar

          Saay,

          Bring it up on the next AT meeting, why are you cornering me here?

  • Rodab

    I am taking attendance roll call. As your name is called out, please confirm you haven’t had chance to interact in a while but you still read at least some of the comments on baytona (Awate forum). Top ten has become my thing lately.
    – Gezae Hagos
    – Mahmuday
    – Tzigereda
    – Yodita
    – Ermias
    – Serray
    – Thomas
    – Tes
    – Amal
    – NMS

    • Fanti Ghana

      Rodab,
      Mahmuday gave us enough warning (kids, kids, kids).
      Tes also said good bye before taking his vacation, but he should be back very soon.
      Tzigereda is still here (bless her heart).
      Gezae, Yodita, Saba, and Ali-S are still missing in action.
      Serray does this frequently, so we shouldn’t be worried yet.
      And finally: Amal, Ermias, NMS, and Thomas are the real mystery of mysteries.
      Selam

      • Rodab

        Thanks Fanti Ghana.
        You are right Saba and Ali-S are missing. Semere Tesfay too. They must be on summer vacation back home.
        Let’s see who upvotes my attendance list – not for my useless comment but because that’s the only way to find out they are reading. I discourage others from voting..that’ll mess up my attendance sheet.

        • Abinet

          Rodab
          You forgot Daniel the artist. I miss his cartoons. I nominate Ato Saleh to take over . What do you think?

          • Saleh Johar

            Abinet, and I can do more than what I am doing? Okay, lend me your two hands, send them UPS and I yield 🙂

          • Rodab

            Saleh,
            I didn’t know you try artistic drawings/sketches. tifetatin dikha?

          • Rodab

            yeah Abinet. Dawit the artist gone missing too. Man, the number is much bigger than my original list. If you add those missing and the present, do you think we are around 100 commenters?

          • Fanti Ghana

            You’re right Abinet.
            I was even thinking and missing him a while back, and then, he made a short comment some time later and went hiding again.

        • Amde

          Fanti,

          Speaking of Dawit the artist reminded me of the other dawit (small “d” dawit). We didn’t see eye to eye (to put it mildly lol) but Ioved the story he told of his childhood.

          • Fanti Ghana

            I remember Amde, I had heart to heart talk with him last time he was here, and I was touched by his story too. I still am, so he is not someone I can forget. I saw his posting on another website not long ago. I am sure he is fine.

        • Saleh Johar

          And I miss LT, Rodab.

          • Rodab

            hahaha, oh man! I forgot the most important Awatista.
            Obviously there are a lot I didn’t include in my list. I am overwhelmed and therfore done with this topic:-)

      • Papillon

        Dear Fanti Ghana,

        Obviously Saba and Ali-S have gone U-Turn. Tes is employing Will-Power to resist the temptation of commenting on Awate forum while he is on vacation. Gezae arguably one of the brightest young Eritreans is almost done with chipping away PFDJ’s 2% scheme. Ermias is still shaking off the “bad rap” he encountered between Sal and Haile TG. Amal and NMS are the new “kids” on da block and it is understandable if they got lost with in the colossal corridors of Awate.

        Haft’kha.

        • Fanti Ghana

          Hi Papillon,
          If Ali-S makes one more U-turn it cannot be called a U-turn any longer. We need a new nick for the famous math formula: x squared + y squared = 1 (equation of a circle). ዕንክሊል (in Tigrigna).

    • Semere Andom

      Hi Rodab:
      You forgot an important figure, Sal. Sal has been missing for a long time, do not confuse Sal with saay, they are not the same, I made that mistake too 🙂
      Also you forgot to instruct the missing awatistats how to answer you, if they are male, “wohoy” and if you are a female, “eyey” and if you are Nitricc, :yoyo ma man, I am staying put you wish I was gone” 🙂

      • saay7

        Haha, Sem:

        You know those exercises in school of compare and contrast? I think you will have to do that to help us out. Or maybe a “saay or sal?” exercise for those who like their consistency a little bit more than Oscar Wilde, Ralph Waldo Emerson did:)

        For example: saay or sal for the following:

        ” Take the supporters of the PFDJ, for example and their treatment of Eritreans. Whereas I see an amputation and am aghast at the cruelty of the perpetrator and its witnesses, they see a necessary surgery and recoil at what they consider my sadism in broadcasting this surgery in slow motion, over and over. I still believe they are very, very wrong; I still hate what the PFDJ is doing and I still believe the silence and unconditional support of its enablers endangers the nation, but I have no reason to doubt their patriotism or humanity and should not make their denunciation of PFDJ as a litmus test of both. I should try to win them over by showing an alternative not by trying to bully them to hate what I hate.

        “And who should engage Ethiopia? It should be a strong organization that is taken seriously as a formidable force. It should be an organization that can be taken seriously by the international community. It should have the authority to enter into agreements and the power to enforce them. My first choice is someone who has, on the subject of dealing with the Weyane, the longest experience, the most knowledge of the principals, the most intimate know-how of the inner workings of Weyane. In other words, the PFDJ.”

        I don’t know: is that the future edition of Al Nahda (saay) or a 10 year old one (Sal)?

        saay

        • Semere Andom

          Dear Sal:
          I am not going to quote Emerson or Wilde, I have Sal or Saay. what did he say when Hayat drove him crazy,something along the lines of ” I do not know whether to scream or cry or lecture” I am feeling like that now:-)
          let me explain myself to Sal (Saay) about my comment to Rodab:

          Couple of times when I said Sal said this Sal and Mahmuday said that you would address Sal in the third persons so I was trying to joke about that and was so confident you would make fun of it, but I guess Sal not Saay:-)
          I failed on the joke so let me try qumneger: PFDJ’s perceived experience with TPLF failed and what do you to a party that failed consistently or before I forget experienced or not it is so criminal that the youth are literally committing suicide? So you want PFDJ to represent us, do you mean PFDJ -IA -kisha- monkey -securiy machinery or repackaged PFDJ?
          Finally, the Sal(Saay) that I once wore about in a comment section as annoyingly positive and neither sees half full or half empty glass but always full glass read too much into the comment of Sal and saay are different
          thanks

          Sem

          • saay7

            Selamat Sem:

            Lately, I am getting into the habit of not understanding you:) Don’t blame yourself: It is equally likely that my Sem-comprehension is failing me. I think, half the time, I am subconsciously answering questions asked in different forums, emails or IMs:) And the saay-Sal distinction is one I get asked sometimes or put more bluntly: “what the hell happened to you, man!” A question I have been hearing since…. 1998 in one form or another.

            No harm, no foul, as Chick Hearns used to say.

            To answer your Qumneger question, the excerpt I quoted was from an article written 10 years ago. It is called “The Futility of ‘Hate Whom I Hate’ “. I stumbled upon it when I was looking for another article (“The Problems With Confessions of an Economic Hit-Man”) I referenced to Eyob in another conversation that evolved from god-knows what:)

            Anyway, I think it made sense to recommend that PFDJ handle the border issue with some creativity in 2004. Not sure PFDJ can handle a two-car funeral procession, much less serious issues of national sovereignty, in 2014.

            saay

            *the great (RIP) broadcaster for the Los Angeles Lakers

          • Amanuel Hidrat

            Hey Sem,

            Unfortunately, I felt the same way like you. Saay made a sharp u-turn, that has never been in my mind. When he came with his memorable article “Twgah-IMo,” I think in early 2000, after the cease fire of the sensless border war, I thought Saay understood the reckless and irresponsible PFDJ party and that he will go all the way to fight against the PFDJ. In fact he wasn’t ambivalent in the way he articulate his anger at that time. He was solid clear with his struggle. Since then he was consistent with his message until recently to change his mind. I think human being for good or bad always change with time and circumstances….whatever that circumstances might be. I really felt , that I lost him in the kind of change I was looking for the wounded nation. A wounded nation under PFDJ will never reconcile the Eritrean people by re-naming it PFDJ-2. If the idea is to reconcile the ruling PFDJ and the disgruntled PFDJ, that might happen, otherwise Eritrea will be in a a perpetual crises.

            Regards,
            Amanuel Hidrat

          • saay7

            Ah, Emma:

            Let’s bet $1 USD (40 NKF) that Twgah’mo does not in anyway say what you think it says:)

            TwgaHmo was the original G-13/G-15 letter: a call for reforming PFDJ, not overthrowing it. But people remember it differently because memories are tricky things and revolutions are more fun that evolutions:)

            saay

          • SAAY why are you wasting your time? Till they come-up with the ways, methods and ideas how to dismantle or weed out the PFDJ, whatever the language they are using; the burden is on them. Why bother? You have asked them point blank and none, NONE of them gave you an answer. It is killing them they can’t answer your inquiry, so they have to go back doors and they have to go beating around the bush.
            How fitting two YG’s foot soldiers ……….Covert and overt. Puffffffffffffffffff
            Amed Be Doquat Ysiqal. Alu
            Please don’t confuse Amed with Amde that is if there is any difference.

          • saay7

            Nitricc (Aba Tereg)

            I am trying to get a harmony between us the Toothless and you the Long-Nails because (drum-roll): no Eritrean left behind.

            By the way, if you are equating them with Amed, and Amed Ysiqal, well, Amed is not toothless:))

            saay

          • Amde

            Nitric

            I upvoted you for last sentence. Thanks for the chuckle.

            Amde

          • Semere Andom

            Hi Sal,(saay):-)
            How about “shaebia kithaQiQ alewa”

          • saay7

            Hi Sem (Semere)

            Refer to the answer I gave our good friend Emma (Amanuel): it’s not what you think it is.

            Read it: same $1 wager. The guy who asked me to write it was one of my favorite PFDJs of all time. He was a banker AND a magazine editor.

            saay

          • Semere Andom

            Hi Emma and Sal:
            I understood the “mihaqaq was a play on “ama kithaQiQ iya” usually attributed to IA. But” mihQaQ” is not a chemical reaction, it is a physical change, the former produces new product totally changing the properties of the elements that make the new chemical, that is why NA and CL are separately poisonous/dangerous but in NACL(table salt) they are not, physical change like dissolving keeps the chemical properties of the elements or compounds that make the new mixture, if you dissolve sugar in water, you still have water properties and the sweetness so yea “misaQaQ” is reforming, but if you dissolve a poison, you will still have the lethal properties of poison

            So would dissolving PFDJ work for us 🙂

          • Amanuel Hidrat

            Dear Sem,
            From political point of view the word “liquidation or MihaQaQ” I abhor it and it is against my principle, that I fought for unity. The only thing I resist for PFDJ is because it has never been for justice and will never be for justice. Count my words.- as young generation, you will see many things ahead.

          • Amanuel Hidrat

            Merhaba Saay or Sal (to use Sem’s Humor)

            Let me comment on two things :

            First revolution has never been nor will it be fun. Zegemtawi (evolution) is fun by its nature. Because nothing is serious nor is ready for change if one calls for evolution. Evolution waits for generational change because the existing generation is resistant to any change. Here are where the elites divided. (1) are those who are comfortable with stat sque will resist for any kind of change and defend the ruling regime what ever kind that regime is. Now and then also show ambivalence in their dialectical thinking (more in my coming article) (2) are those who reads the nature of the social contradiction in all its facets, the nature of PFDJ governance, and the grievances of our social groups will look for fundamental changes. They despise cosmetic change. Remember If there is no good will from our elites and intellectual there will be no change the Eritrean people would like.

            Second your famous article wasn’t explicit (either for reform or fundamental change). it only shows your disgust on the government, nor does it tell what kind of change you were looking. So there is a room if one wanted to wobble with it. But your consistent writing (essays) after that turning point in your politics, till the recent days, every indication and interpretation of your writing amount to fundamental change. If you tell me now I wasn’t, I can’t prove it what was in your mind because you weren’t explicit yourself as you were in the process of transforming your thoughts. But one whose family are abused continuously by PFDJ expect him to be against the party.

            regards,
            Amanuel Hidrat

          • saay7

            Emma:

            Sigh. Rather having Emma vs Emma’s memory debate, wouldn’t it be better to research or ask?

            TwgaHmo had the following chapters:

            Chapter 1: Introduction
            Chapter 2: Democracy Now
            Chapter 3: Government & The Economy
            Chapter 4: Government & Society
            Chapter 5: Government & (In)Justice
            Chapter 6: A Call To Disengage From Sudan
            Chapter 6 1/2: Intermission (reader’s messages)
            Chapter 7: Government & Civil Society
            Bonus Chapter: Asmarinos & Democracy

            If you read ANY of the chapters, it will be clear to you what I was calling for.

            The rest, again, you will have to wait for my forthcoming article and I would appreciate it if you would stop the More Catholic Than The Pope routine as it is quite tiresome, really. The problem with Eritrea has been extreme polarization with each side doggedly holding on to a failing approach and congratulating himself for his steadfastness (TsnAtna!) with zero regard for the outcome.

            saay

          • Amanuel Hidrat

            Haw Saay,

            You have said I would appreciate it if you would stop the More Catholic Than The Pope”. I didn’t know you were “the pope” of our politics. Hummmmm.

            Amanuel

          • saay7

            Hi Emma:

            While these “Emma vs Emma’s memories” and “Emma’s Reading vs Emma’s Comprehension” are fascinating debates that I enjoy having front row seats to, they have little to do with what we are debating.

            You did not understand TwgaHmo and when corrected, rather than taking a pause, you are charging full steam ahead and telling the author of the pieces what he really wrote.

            You are telling me what the proper reaction should be to the Isaias regime victimizing my family.

            Yeah, I think I would say the “more catholic than the pope” expression was invented just for these occasions.

            Take a deep breath, pause, then argue with quotes. Aren’t you always complaining that you are misquoted? Why are you often misunderstanding people? Pause, reset, my friend.

            saay

          • Amanuel Hidrat

            Hi Saay,

            Fortunately, You are from the few I keep hard copy for my files. I clearly understood the content of you message my friend. I also told you it wasn’t explicit – whether it is for reform or for fundamental change, but it was something in the right direction and really was in the right direction for years. That is an accolade to you by the way, as there are many who are still defending the rogue regime of our nation. Leaving aside your sarcastic language you coin to every event or individual, I enjoy you even if I don’t agree with you. With that I close my case.

          • Semere Andom

            Hi Emma and Sal:
            Sal rested and Emma closed. Gadi needs to say sustain:-)

          • Saleh Johar

            No Semere, Saleh says, “mutu bqeizikum” translated into Tigrinya by a Jeberti elder, it means, “ab’a kolokhum kumtrrr belu” 🙂 You sustain or abstain my friend, not “my bkeri shaahi!”

          • Semere Andom

            Hiray your honour:)
            FG was doling titles the other day so I was trying to help him. He even gave Saleh AA Younis a title,while way back I already did assign him a tile 🙂
            echiley kumtrrr aybline, “mai kab amiQ mergim dima kab teQawemti ybli abotatka:-)

          • ShaHanful

            Give the guy some slack. He has family members in prison. He has the right to wiggle through and compromise his integrity.

          • Hope

            Ok Wedi Memhir,
            I am glad that ” Mesatukha” have started challenging you,for good.
            In politics,you have to be able to make ” U-Turns/be flexible and accomodating PRN–as needed.
            One of the main reasons that PIA destroyed Eritrea is for being devastatingly Stubborn/my way is the only High Way” style governance albeit deliberately for his own agenda.
            I remeber at one point one of PIA Ministers advisng PIA “to be flexible” but another PIA’s confidente(kurkur-wedi Liche)) reacted saying ” you can be broken while being flexible”-Courtesy of PIA during one of his interviews at Eri-TV.

          • Hope

            Cousin,
            Isn’t it fair to re-publish those articles here as they could be a huge source of a constructive debate,provided “Copy Right Law” allows,which I would think so,as they belong to you but to you??
            To my best knowledge and recall,SAAY’s Comments and Articles have never bored but mesmerized every one who reads them,at leats in my opinion and experience.

          • saay7

            Cousin Hope:

            Thanks for the compliments… But honestly TwgaHmo was a period piece: it belongs in 2000. I was pleased that it became a conversation piece for Eritreans when we had only 2 websites, no. Eri-TV broadcast outside Eritrea, a private press in Eritrea and when there was a huge reform-PFDJ awakening. Eritrea has changed for the worse since then.

            But thanks for the shout-out. Maybe Tes Meharenna (who is right now pretending not to be reading this:) will publish it on its 20th anniversary in 2020 🙂

            saay

            PS: merra tHafen hleka msl jeran. Seber we Aql wde. Seber wdde ba’Al seber Uwut tu bela yikon wad abdelatif?

          • Hope

            Accepted and agreed.will do…!
            Weshukren Ghezillion-/senni hamdeka wed Abuye we huye/wed abi’Ebiye Younis -for the reminder—/big advice.
            You have my old email–not changed.
            With apology as well.
            Men’do’lenna eyu bizeikakhum?

          • Hope

            BTW,I am glad that you have not been labelled like some of us as ” Confused and Inconsistent” for making legal U-Turns–not that I am comparing myself with you.

  • AMEN

    Again I found it that I do not belong at Awatistas politics
    I think I / we are in different SPACE and TIME .
    Because all this what has came up recently is what I / we
    have had said long time ago. There seems to be existance
    of black hole or time lapse as a result of LAPSSET.
    Sorry,
    I do not like it much to repeat what I have already said and lived for.

    • Amanuel Hidrat

      Selam Amen,

      Don’t be disappointed and don’t think every time to find that will interest you. Just engage when you find a subject to engage. I am sure many time you will find issues keep going in circle. Most of the reason is because of the new comers to the forum. Sometimes you can’t avoid it, if a new student or a new perspective comes to us. Don’t forget the veracity of ideas that comes from different individuals. There is always a lesson. But more than that it will help you to know the general consciousness of your people. If you don’t have to say just read your people and know your people, and notice if they making a small stride to the right direction.

  • Amanuel Hidrat

    Dear Horizon,
    First I am shifting my comment from the “Poet’s corner” to this page, to avoid another warning from Salah. He was right to do that anyway.

    Back to our topic, it is not late and will not be late as long as – the long term strategy of the peoples of the region is to build trans-regional highways and trans-regional railways to integrate their economies, with open border for free flow of commerce and services. In our area you can register some differences (some development), but without allowing the things I am talking there will be no significant development in this interconnected world economics. I am still optimistic like T.Kifle that it is a matter of time, this two dynamic people of the region have tremendous potential to change our region. It is not a dream it will be reality as we go forward.

    Amanuel Hidrat

  • saay7

    Hi iTegadalai Sem:

    Unless I am getting our awatistas all mixed up, wasn’t my friend Sem who once said that after the people are liberated, we will be amazed when we find out how many people perished resisting tyranny? If so, isn’t that the very definition of a hero which means Eritrea is producing heroes by the thousands and we just don’t know about them?

    saay

  • Hayat Adem

    Sem (aka my friend)
    Heroism in today’s Eritrea seems to be symbolically manifested in the success of ending up as a run-away from the enemy not in confronting it and prevailing. It is always my nightmare that Eritrean history might be sliding into more of a refugee story than anything else. I have been told recently that several well known Eritrean artists had crossed to Ethiopia. Eritrea is being attacked from inside-out on many fronts. Faith is assaulted. Eritrean culture is being assaulted non-stop. First it was a destruction by replacement: the age-old traditions by mieda culture. And now the assault seems to be targeting the artists themselves.
    Hayat

  • Abinet

    Ato Saleh
    Not all PhDs are educated. Some are just instructed like a horse that pulls the cart.

    • Papillon

      Ato Abinet,

      Your statement is contradicting itself. If they are not educated, how come they have earned a Ph.D then?

      • Saleh Johar

        Papillon. I think he is saying the equivalent of: man Myron’s a’emero. Not they are illiterate. I think!

        • Papillon

          Oh ok. Lacking critical thinking? Possibly. But of course, they also say, zeytemaHre neyedHin, zeyteweqre neyetHin.

          • Semere Andom

            Hi Papi:
            I believe for the most part they are opportunist salivating for power, prestige and privilege at the expense of the masses. But before a prolific writer who used to write for this website and if memory serves me right he name was Sal beats me let me qualify it by saying that, intellectuals becoming tools for dictators is not uniquely Eritrean:-). In Nazi Germany, we know what Dr.Mengel was trying to do
            The old Tigriniya adage of “zeytemaHre neyedHin, zeyteweqre neyetHin’ is one of least deep ones, it only speaks to the functionality when comparing it to “mwuQar” ( sort of sharpening for the grain to be gound). I think it comes from when an illiterate peson carries an open letter that tells the destination to kill him, that is where the “mdhan” comes from:-)
            Tigriniya fans do not get me wrong, I love the our proves in an other life I used to have about 300 collection of them

          • Papillon

            Dear Semerile,

            Folk wisdom needless to say is indispensable. As much as the accepted definition of an intellectual is fuzzy and blurry at best, it is generally taken for someone who is well read or thinks in depth or who employs critical or logical thinking. However, if we veer the discussion at hand into specifics, the academic accolade “Ph.D” seems to have lost its luster or its inherent meaning through generations. Evidently, Ph.D stands for Doctor of Philosophy. Here again, Philo and Sophia are reflections of love and wisdom respectively. Would it be fair then to say, one who is in love with wisdom when we talk about someone who is a Ph.D? If that is the case, what kind of wisdom? I think the striking difference between the real owners of love-of-wisdom and present day Ph.Ds is that, the former (read: Renaissance men) possessed a plethora of knowledge about myriad blocks and the latter knows a lot and in-depth about a specific discipline. In that sense, and in its strict sense of the term, one can hardly be called a Ph.D.

            As you have aptly put it, with in the realm of politics or with in the general perception, intellectuals are taken for pretentious snobs who vacillate with timidity when men of power push them to the corner. They are also taken for opportunists who tend to rip a glory on someone else’s sweat. Tyrant Isaias has plenty of them under his arms where they wet their pants at his sight. However, as much as history is replete with the said perception about intellectuals, there is always an oddity to the accepted norm where Trotsky comes to mind as he was a great intellectual in his own right who stood his grounds to the end when a thug (read: Stalin) finished him off armed with cowardice typical of a dictator—anti-intellectual.

            Haft’kha.

          • Abinet

            Dear Pappilon
            I see you can discuss literature ,science,politics…..effortlessly . You see things from different angles critically . In my book you are educated,a well rounded person. Instructed,as the word implies,is someone who takes order and do just that. They are like robots you can program them to do what you want them to do. Professor Gedion,who teaches Mathematics at a higher level,can be a good example.
            Besides,I didn’t say all Ph.Ds,I said some Ph.Ds.
            Thanks

          • Papillon

            Dear Abinet,

            Many thanks for those kind words and I am sure it is in all of us. As you have pointed it out, Professor Gideon who is otherwise known as the Guru of Hzbawi Mekhete makes a living in logic (read: Mathematics). He grew up in an Adventist household and I think he did some of his schooling in Ethiopia as well. When he is expected to see reality through a logical prism, he talks extensively about illogical threads to defend and please a tyrant who is prosecuting the very church he grew up in. But for a reason only known to them, the intellects who are traveling an extra mile to defend the tyrant seem to have a some sort of psychological hung-ups and perhaps intoxication with a need to be recognized as well. One of the most celebrated French Mathematician Blaise Pascal once said, “All the excesses, all the violence, and all the vanity of great men, come from the fact that they know not what they are.”

            Haft’kha.

          • Abiney

            Yes Pappilon ,prof Gedion went to an Adventist boarding school in Akaki Beseka,out side of Addis.

          • Amde

            Abinet,

            It has occurred to me many times that much of the excessive radicalism in the politics of our region may be explained by a thorough understanding of the boarding school experiences of Haile Sellasie years.
            For a boy just starting teen years to live for an extensive period among an unfamiliar people, and feeling alienated with no close family support could be tough. Not to say it automatically leads to radicalization, but who knows.

            For sure, while the radicalism of the Ethiopian Student movement is mentioned as a University phenomenon, as far as I know most of the main actors were boarding school graduates like Melles and Haile Fida at Wingate.

            Amde

          • Papillon

            Dear Amde,

            Boarding school a prerequisite for radicalism? It seems to defy logic. Don’t you think so? Why would a privileged class be radicalized unless otherwise a sense of idealism kicks in in that particular age range. Che Guevara comes to mind.

          • Amde

            Dear Pappillon,

            I mean more in the sense of public school students that ended up in boarding schools. I am not necessarily privy to the Aqaqi boarding school – I don’t remember if that got nationalized by the Derg or not – but it had a reputation for being an excellent school.

            I was talking about the schools like General Wingate, Kotebe, Teferi Mekonnen etc… and specifically about the generation of students who were born right after the Fascist (i.e. Ethiopia’s baby boomer generation) who had the chance to attend schools up to 6th or 8th grade at a wereda or awraja school, but had to come to Addis to boarding school to attend high school.

            Interestingly, PM Melles Zenawi was of that generation, while PM Hailemariam Desallegn is of the generation that came after that – by which time most public boarding schools had ceased their boarding and national characteristics as high schools opened up in provinces and awrajas.

            I don’t have the statistics (and I am not sure if anyone had bothered to run it), but it seemed to me that most of the radicals that formed the generation that is still essentially in power in the ruling class as well as opposition in Ethiopia and Eritrea might fit that profile. No major political figure comes to mind that wasn’t a result of a government boarding high school.

            In the sense that they were getting education in a dirt poor nation they were extremely privileged. Their radicalism may ssimly be a result of their idealism, but I am asking if other things also occurred in those years that led them towards radicalization. For example I am told anecdotes of provincial or ethnic or class competition and cliquishness that may have occurred, creating feelings of resentment that later were given expression in radical Marxist ideology.

            Amde

          • Saleh Johar

            Amde, Ethiopian “baby boomers” 🙂

            C’mon, you were baby boomers since God created the country. How else would it be close to100 million? When I was in high school, I memorized the population as 25 million to pass the general exam.

          • Amde

            Saleh,

            Haha yes indeed. We are still booming. The magic of compound interest!! (and constant electricity outages 🙂

            I remember how much of a shock it was to hear that Ethiopia’s population had reached 34million when the results of the first census was announced sometime mid-80s. I too was hanging on the 25 million number. 60 million souls later, whenever I visit Addis now, all neighborhoods I knew growing up as quite and tranquil have disappeared and it seems to me anyway that all of Addis has become Merkato. In my old neighborhood I used to have to wait for hours for the city bus to show up. Now, the sheer number of taxis that spend the night at that exact spot is astounding.

            I meant “baby-boomer” as in babies born after the war – the Ethiopian equivalent being the Fascist war of 1935 – 1940. They would have been teenagers starting 1953, and college students starting 1957. Perhaps radicalization was introduced with the Mengistu Neway coup of 1960, but anyhow you know well the EPRP was formed in 1968, and you can educate me about the equivalent chronology of the Eritrean movements.

            Amde

          • aron

            I grew up in Addis but all my life I did not know there were two Tigres. I only knew there were two provinces until I got to Sudan. Tigrigna speaking people were all the same to me like Amharas’ Gurages or Oromos were. The other thing I have not figured out yet is Tigrinya as opposed to Tigrigna. Even though I do not have a problem with any of them, in my opinion, the former was invented to make it sound it is different language from the latter. If I am wrong I stand corrected.

          • Fanti Ghana

            Hello aron,

            I am sure there are others who may know better, but I want to share with you a similar discussion I had many years ago about the usage of words ending with -nya verses -gna. There was a coffee shop argument about -nya being the proper Tigrinya. There is some credibility to this theory, because in many remote villages of Tigray I have noticed people ending words with -nya where I would use -gna instead.

            If you can read/speak Tigrinya here is an example.
            እቶም ቅኑዕ ዳንያ ዳኒዮምና : correct.
            እቶም ቅኑዕ ዳኛ ዳኒዮምና : incorrect.

            So, the argument was -nya became -gna overtime for reasons unknown so far. This would make an
            interesting chapter for those who like to study the evolution of Amharigna (Amharinya that is).

            Still, this won’t let those who call themselves or their language Tigrinya off the hook, but I thought it may help the discussion a little. If this is not helping at all, I humbly send you ስልጣን በላይ to T.Kifle who tried to set me up the other day (ሞኝህን ፈልግ አልኩት አንጂ.) about similar issue Eritreans came up with.
            Selam

          • Saleh Johar

            Indeed FG, nya is Tigrinya, nga is Amharic (and Italian) For the word Tigrinya (Tigringa) The plural is Tigrigni… thus the theory that Tigrai-Tigringi was coined by the Italians. Because until then, the language was Tigrinya–I don’t have a conclusive evidence as what the Italians called the people of the Eritrean Highlands before they started calling them Eritreans! I have seen Abysini a few times. Anyone who know more about this?

          • saay7

            Selam Aron:

            Let me see what I can do to muddy the waters even more:

            Tigre: the collective name give by Amharic speakers to all people (regardless of their language) who live in the Ethiopian provinces of Tigre and Eritrea.

            Tigre: the collective name of all Tigre-language speaking people in Eritrea who speak a language they referred to as “Tigrayit” or “Higya Tigre.” Tigrayit-speaking aristocrats referred to themselves as Shmagle and this “Tigre” denoted an economic class (serf.) The Tigre-speakers never referred to themselves as Tigre but identified themselves by the tribe, clan they belonged to. But in the new classify-people-by-the-language-they-speak system in Eritrea, Tigre is one of the nine recognized language groups (also referred to as ethnic group or sub nationality.)

            Tigray: refers both to a kilil in Tigray. It also refers to 96% of the people (Tigrinya-speakers) who are citizens of such land.

            Tigrinya: refers to a language spoken in Tigray and Eritrea. In the latter, Tigrinya also is the term used to describe the people who speak the language.

            Tigrigna: How Amharic-speaking Ethiopians refer to Tigrinya. That is the difference between Tigrinya and Tigrigna is the difference between how Obama and Bush pronounce the word “nuclear.”

            saay

          • Rahw T

            “Tigre: the collective name give by Amharic speakers to all people (regardless of their
            language) who live in the former Ethiopian provinces of Tigre and Eritrea.”

            Selam Saay,

            Please allow me to say few words on the above statement. I do not know if I misunderstood your statement. But I think you are giving wrong information to Aron. I don’t think it is true. The Amharic speakers call “Tigre” for the people who speak Tigrigna. They don’t call to the Kunama speaking people in Tigray, or the Afar speakers in the old administration of Tigray as “Tigre”.

          • Eyob Medhane

            Gash Saleh,

            When are you gonna stop making fun of our numbers? 🙂 Hail to the fertile womb of Emama Ethiopia… 🙂

            I see that you have been hanging out at Anbessa bar in Addis Ababa. How many cars did you buy or how many domestic workers did you hire through your meeting with the ‘delalas’?.. 🙂

          • Saleh Johar

            Haha, hiring domestic help was not my department, but most of the people I knew came to Addis and it seems the only reason they were there was meet a delala!. I got used to the place and became a regular–no, it is not Anbessa though I have been there a few times. The one I am talking about is a small place on the same block as Flamingo. I likes cafes and teashops, particularly the ones in merkato and around Ghion. They were lively. But your numbers scare me, how many Eyobs can we stand 🙂 Enough already. 85 million! Maybe the Chinese could convince you to adopt their policy of one child per family 🙂

            liked the place

          • Abinet

            Ante qeshim
            Anbesa is not on bole road.most probably he was at saay cake or kebericho.but since he is not saay type I say kebericho.besides,saay is not frequented by delaloch.

          • Papillon

            Dear Amde,

            It is actually interesting to note that the notable successful or failed revolutionary flairs got underway by people of the privileged class. It warrants to cite a book written by John Young “Peasant Revolution in Ethiopia” where in the very first few pages, the author walks the reader through the social background of the founders of the Tigray People’s Liberation Front. And surprisingly, he noted that most of them were from economically well to do family. The two Neway brothers as well grew up in the Kings court where one of them got Master’s degree from Columbia Univerisity and the other became head of the security of the King’s court. What is fascinating is however, Girmame’s Master’s thesis dealt with Kenya’s struggle against colonialism marinated with Socialistic leanings. My “theory” is that, as much as age was a huge factor in their idealistic streak, it might as well has to do with their exposure to Left’s literature—Karl Marx, Antonio Gramsci, Franz Fanon to mention but a few as opposed to the common people who didn’t have the exposure.

            Haft’kha.

          • Amde

            Pappi,

            I believe Karl Marx and Franz Fanon themselves fall into your description of well-to-do/middle class backgrounds.

            What John Young has stated about the social backgrounds of TPLF founders was actually also remarked to me by someone I know who is from Tigray and happens to be rather well informed about the rather well known aristocratic families. This would be a “side theory” of mine which would likely get me flamed by TKifle and/or Fanti, but I don’t think Tigrayan gentry were particularly wealthy despite the titles and the lineage. A major reason was – I think – a result of the Shewan over-centralization and the attendant loss of investment and development opportunities which intotality meant Tigray was quite destitute by the time the revolution rolled around. The children of the Tigrayan gentry would have had the opportunity to be educated and gain some exposure to life outside of Tigray and would have objective reasons to resent the state of affairs. It is interesting that today there is still a Tigray on the map but there is no Shewa. Co-incidence? I think not.

            For us (in Addis and I am sure everywhere else in Ethiopia proper), a well to do Tigrigna speaker was an Eritrean – pure and simple. I believe this remained true even during the Socialist Derg. I don’t recall of any Tigrayan anybody in Addis could have mentioned as wealthy when I was growing up. But people will rattle off names of wealthy Eritreans as if they personally knew them. (This is part of the resentment many Ethiopians have about Eritrea – in their eyes Eritreans were the privileged group who had the best the poor country had to offer but yet chose to pursue a destructive path)

            I am more inclined to believe that most of us are likely to do things that are psychologically true to us, as opposed to be intellectually interesting. I feel we look for and hang on to intellectual arguments that best meet our psychological needs to give us comfort or strength. In the boarding school experience, for example, a boy who comes from a relatively well sustained family in the provinces comes to live in a boarding school where he is made fun of for his accent, his lack of exposure, his country ways etc etc might create resentment in him that form at just the age when he would be making “permanent” conclusions about the nature of the world and his place in it.

            Now, this will not explain people like Germame Neway (unless he has young experiences we don’t know about). That is why I like weasel words like “most”, “some” etc.. lol

            Amde

          • Papillon

            Dear Amde,

            Sure enough, Karl Marx and Franz Fanon were carrier-thinkers as opposed to “real” revolutionaries who got their hands dirty. To be more precise, Karl Marx was a political economist and Franz Fanon was a Psychiatrist. But of course, Franz Fanon got involved in the Algerian revolution. Hope you got the gist.

            It is undeniable fact that, Tigray was one of the poorest if not the poorest province in the entire nation. And it is fair to conclude that, if there was any class distinction with in Tigray, it would be a bit of stretch to compare the wealthy in Tigray with those who were say in Shewa. Nevertheless there were well to do family in Tigray. And their progeny or offspring set out to Dedebit to fight as they saw it, the political and social reality in Ethiopia was the oppression of nations and nationalities by a particular nationality as opposed to a Marxist take of a class struggle between the haves and the have-nots. Of interest, the latter assessment of the political “reality” was subscribed by EPRP instead.

            I would think, people in the rest of Ethiopia particularly in Addis didn’t bother much to distinguish between Eritreans and Tigrians as they both were known and referred as “Tigre.” I am not sure if there was any condescending and contemptuous tone of voice in it. What seems to be astounding is that, when Tigrians were taken for Eritreans in the rest of Ethiopia, in Eritrea however, the seamless similarity not only lost its meaning but there was a psychological segregation as they were seen as second class citizen. If that kind of gloomy historical trend is a backdrop, the relatively wealthy and educated class from Tigray had every reason to take their case to the mountains and wage a protracted war. The King was determined to punish them for their revolt against him in the early 40s and his war remained relentless as they trekked to Eritrea thinking of finding people of their “own.”

            Haft’kha.

          • Abinet

            Amde
            Interesting observation . If we see just the Adventist boarding school in Akaki,we will find that some students are there because they were born out side marriage (diqaloch to be blunt),so the fathers hide them there. We also find students from a dysfunctional family ,so they stay away from the day to day fights of their parents. The other group would be those students who have a step parent at home,so students stay away from unnecessary confrontation when they come of age. The rest are students whose parents afford to pay their expenses.
            What makes them all similar is they are in most cases bitter ,resentful and unwanted even if they get a “better education ”
            When you meet these students at work place or other similar situations you can observe that they do anything to attract attention,the attention and affection they didn’t get…..

          • Amde

            Abinet,

            Wow that was interesting. The Akaki school had the benefit of being virtually in Addis but yet out of the way – and a foreign run good school. So it is perhaps more tied into the secret lives of the Addis Ababa elite. I know of a lady whose father was implicated in plotting against the King which led to him getting to an unhappy end. She was quite young when it happened so she essentially grew up fatherless. She herself was educated at Akaki, sponsored by other members of the royal family – perhaps as a sign of penance on their part.

            Quite interesting thank you.

            Amde