Inform, Inspire, Embolden. Reconcile!

Ali Baabe, Adolescent At Seventy

Sometime ago I discovered Banyan is a name of a tree, but I don’t know why the Indian community that lived in Eritrea was called Banyan. As a child, I was a client of a Banyan barber until he left town. Then I shifted to Aya Estifanos, who also moved to Tessenei. My next barber was the stern Gilay who had a suqren, the traditional earring. One time I had my hair cut by a barber who had a shop set under a tree at the police camp. A few times I went to Sereqe or Solomon, basically because my dear martyred friend Bashir Neberay convinced me Sereqe was the best barber in the world, in a time when our world was Keren, extending to Asmara and Agordat beyond the horizons. Apart from that, I never went to other barbers, not even in Asmara, but stayed a loyal customer of Gilay.

When I joined the armed struggle, I didn’t cut my hair for three years and it became so long and thick. Once, while we sat on the edges of Barda’a, looking at Asmara from a distance, a witty colleague joked, “while we struggle to liberate our capital city, Eritrean lice have already declared your hair their capital city.”

At one time a farmer in Seharti came to us looking for the “Beni-Amretay boy” to cure some skin disease that plagued his cow. I confessed I was not Beni-Amretay, and I knew nothing about cows. He wouldn’t budge and blurted, “don’t try, your hair gives you away, chiw zbelka Beni-Amratay!” I had to improvise something and told him to fetch olio Bruciato, burned out engine oil. As a child I have seen wood-sellers paint their diseased camels with burned engine oil.  The man went to Asmara and brought some burned oil; we brushed the cow with it. Stories circulated about a Beni-Amretay who cures cattle and I became a popular, blessed veterinarian son of Saharti, thanks to the capital city of Eritrean lice, on my head. When I returned to Saharti a few weeks later, the people were just short of handing me the key to the village.

Like the mythical Samson, who had all his power in his hair, I refused to cut my hair until Hamid Mahmoud, the military commander of the Hamassen region, came with scissors and pronounced what sounded like an ultimatum: your hair or your head! He mowed my hair and left it barely an  inch long. First, I remembered Delilah, and then I wished he was Gilay. My head felt like a clay pot until my hair grew back again.

Years later when I lived in different Gulf states, I preferred Pakistani barbers. After they cut the hair, they work on the scalp and the temples, then they skillfully spin a thread over your face to pull out all the facial hair. They leave you feeling like a groom walking out of a massage parlor.

Once in Hong Kong I saw a barber sign on a door and entered… the stairs took me to the second floor, and into a big hall that looked like a pharmacy–shelves full of different plastic bottles and cans, covered the walls. Gilay would never work in that place even if they transported the entire shop for him to Keren, for free. Too effeminate, he would have said of the oils and creams!

Barbershops fascinate me, the old magazines, the stories, the news, the gossip;  the wisdom that one picks from there is immense.

Three years ago in Australia, a Chinese lady gave me a haircut and I shared the story, “Wise Barber, Ravens and Machiato.” Now I am once more pulled to the topic of hairs after I saw a picture of a Ali Baabe haircut. I have no idea what Ali baabe means, but that is what it’s called in Eritrea. if it is a corruption of Ali Baba, it fits the capo and his forty thieves.

A head could either be fully shaven, or it’s Gotena (Afro). Otherwise, it’s Ali Baabe, the haircut that inspired many traditional songs before Bereket Mengisteab killed it with his song, “gotena Hdmo.” Of course there was the craze of the seventies, the flat top haircut–no one sang for it.

Isaias’ Ali Baabe

In a drama, the Kuwaiti funnyman Abdulhussen Abdulredda played the role of a fifty year old man who behaves like an adolescent; the play is aptly called Murahiq fil Khemsin (adolescent at Fifty). Last week, a picture of Isaias with an awkward haircut was widely circulated in the social media; it reminded me of both Ali Baabe and the Kuwait play. But be careful, I am not saying Isaias Afwerki is an adolescent at fifty, but at seventy.

Some years ago Isaias displayed the “Johntra” haircut, apparently a style popularized by the American actor, John Travolta. Poor Isaias must have missed out on the natural neighborhood adolescence, I am not sure if he wears sagging pants. But those who know him say he didn’t miss adolescence. Worse, he has always been engaged in a more severe type of adolescence, spilling blood and leaving stains on his wake of adventure, causing fragmentation and mayhem that Eritreans are still suffering from. He had just started his second phase of adolescence when he gambled with the fate of the Eritrean revolution and passed the wool over the eyes of many of his naive colleagues to achieve his goal. Viola! He became the neighborhood bully, again. Now he is the uncontested bully, not over the kids of Geza Kenisha only, but over the entire country, intimidating Eritreans into submission. But who in his seventies would have that kind of haircut unless he has a severe longing for adolescence?

A friend was kind when he tried to explain the haircut. He said, Isaias suffers from alopecia areata.

That awkward medical name has a simple equivalent in Tigrinya: Latsaayto. It’s the patchy hair loss that kills the hair and leaves smooth bald patches on the head. If Isaias is inflicted by Latsaayto, he is absolved. However,  someone should have brought him chicken poop, the traditional medicine that is smeared on the affected patches–they say the hair grows again!

If Eritreans were lucky, a brave adviser should have told him to either leave the patches be, shave his entire head, or pull one of his dozens of baseball hats. However, he doesn’t have brave advisers to tell him he is driving the country into the abyss, let alone have a say on his haircut. At any rate, to show your face in that haircut? That is embarrassing to his opponents, let alone his cult-followers.

The Yemane Gebreab Logic

Just like his government’s position in the Saudi led military campaign in Yemen, Yemane Gebreab would say, “I don’t like the haircut, and I like it, and I am not indifferent about it.” Maybe he gave Isaias a similar advice. Incidentally, there should be a Latin term that describes such illogical position–the political equivalent of a hair loss, which entangle the nerves of the brain, short-circuits them, and the malfunctioning mind can’t process logic. Let’s call it Alopecia irrationalata.

Once I talked to a person who wanted to write for awate.com and I explained the mission and policies of the website. The person surprised me with an awkward view. It could have been Alopecia irrationalata. The person told me, “I don’t support the PFDJ; I don’t support the opposition; I am not neutral; and, sometimes I am neutral.” Now. you might ask me, what’s the color of photocopy paper?

According to the Yemane Gebreab logic, my answer would be: “it could be white, it could be non-white, but I am not saying it is or it’s not, and it doesn’t mean I do not know or I do not have an opinion about its color!” That kind of reply will certainly make you feel you are punished to run around Gira Fiori a hundred times. I know, I know. It’s tough and dizzying!

Everyone in the Eritrean justice camp calls for unity of purpose, for a unified struggle; that requires a certain level of loyalty to each other, which is the basis for building alliances. Anyone who is opposed to the Isaias’ regime is technically part of the opposition. And all genuine people expect a certain level of affinity, loyalty, and honesty from individuals who are supposed to be their allies. I wanted to say more about this, but HaileTG of the awate forum articulated it better. I copied his comment and took the liberty in altering it to fit the context of this edition.

“Who do you have in mind when you say “Opposition”? Let’s assume it means ‘Everyone who opposes Isaias Afwerki’s regime’ –that is how the opposition understands the term. All the combined voices crying for change are the “Opposition”.  Popular uprising requires critical mass and in that mass, some people are organized as movements, parties, facilitators, think tanks, activists, media persons, artists…. Still others lead individual activities, group activities, clandestine activities. Yet others break out of the iron walls, crossing the border at any cost. Therefore, when one criticizes the “opposition” it is assumed to be a misgiving directed at the entire mass of voices. For example, rarely do we see such mass coming out in force as in the case of the Geneva demo of June 26. No segment of the “Opposition” from those  described above would have brought such strength to the Geneva showdown, alone. So, when criticizing the opposition, unless it is clarified and is specific, it implies that it is targeting the entire opposition.”

If I add anything, I will spoil it. Ca suffit!

The Saxophone Runs for the Eritrean presidency

In the last edition of Negarit I expressed my final-and-binding hate for the saxophone. Surprisingly, I faced a barrage of comments. Ethiopians and Eritreans showed a rare solidarity. They provided me with links to tens of clips, all starring the saxophone. They hoped I would get used to the donkey bray-sound, and be convinced to like the saxophone, this is one thing I wish both people didn’t agree on. For God’s sake, they are denying us one reason to fight! However, though I tried to be friendly with the instrument, I failed. I was so agitated by the Saxophone Lobby that at night, I found myself supervising a presidential election in Eritrea. Two things were running for president, two un-animated presidential hopefuls: Saxophone against Isaias Afwerki.

Naturally, a few voters were captivated by the Ali Baabe haircut of Isaias, and voted for it. However, most of the people voted for Saxophone which won the election, by an astounding ratio of 10-1.

The landslide victory of Saxophone over Isaias irritated the losing candidate and its group who refused to concede. In protest over the outcome and in defiance, they refused to leave their campaign station–a large white tent–where everyone, men and women alike, imitated the Ali Baabe haircut and wrapped themselves in Isaias’ flag. They wouldn’t stop beating the drums. One of the men in the tent screamed, “we will party here until the next election if that is what it takes, we can’t accept the winning of the inferior Saxophone over our superior Koboro.”

Admirably, in its campaign tour, the saxophone promised to change the situation in Eritrea. It declared, “My term will be better than the 24-year term of my opponent; I promise to rip off all the blindfolds that Isaias wrapped around your eyes, though unfortunately, you will go blind once you see my imitation-chandelier shape, and fake gold color. But I promise to pierce your eardrums, Deaf and Blind is what I have in mind!” The people at the tent didn’t hear any of the candidate’s statements, his words were buried under the loud drum beats.

Honestly, I am perplexed, however, I will be at the inauguration ceremony when the other thing, Saxophone, is formally declared the president of Eritrea. The public ceremony will be held at the Awate forum, where some are bent on initiating debates they know they cannot win, and cannot explain why they started it. Join me there and bring your Koboro; Saxophone is not welcome, please!

Damn, why did they create alarm clocks?

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  • Mahmud Saleh

    Dear papi, DEAR ALL.
    Papi: Thanks, no complain at all. You have made good supplemental remarks, and put things in perspective really well. Just for clarification, I was just comparing Ethiopia’s image of 70s and 80s and the vibe and vibrations it’s sending out today. This is a remarkable achievement that Eritreans could learn from.
    For all
    There are some observations I have made in relation to this issue.
    1. PFDJ doesn’t want you to look outside the frame it presents to you
    – The world is chaos except us
    -Ethiopia is crumbling
    -our problems are caused by “them.”
    -etcetera…etcetera…etcetera…etc.
    2. Not only that they will tell you that, but they will judge your Eritrawnet on how you follow that line religiously; you think outside of that line and you are an enemy.
    3. Meanwhile, PFDJ cadres, and others who see their interest could only be guaranteed under PFDJ, drive their patriotic strength from their warped vision of seeing Ethiopia disintegrate (I mused on this one before). Hating Tigray and Ethiopia becomes the barometer of how a patriotic someone is. For a year now, I said so much about individuals I thought were acting opposite to the PFDJ cadres, that’s I complained that some folks wanted to measure how anti-PFDJ people were by looking into how exactly they approved or disapproved. Some forummers avoided making comparisons between the two countries all together. The mention of Ethiopia has become a landmine. Well, sticking to my TBS policy, I will tell the truth. I will try to draw lessons from Ethiopian experience when needed, I will criticize it when appropriate, and I will celebrate its achievement when demonstrated, because, not only as a neighbor, but as an African, it’s uplifting. That presentation falls within this view. I don’t lament on the progress of Ethiopia. I have criticized specific policies of the government(mostly in relation to issues related to Eritrea), and I give it credit for what it did for the country. I have stated in the past united, secure and developing Ethiopia has the potential of lifting the region out of poverty. Poverty and backwardness are the primary cause of stability in that part of the world. And without regional stability, we will continue witnessing the stories of the Sahara desert and the Mediterranean Sea drowning of citizens fleeing for a better life.
    4. Summary: (All what I’m saying is not a direct answer to your reply, you don’t need this; I’m just doing my thing…using your reply as a reason to further elaborate my previous comment). My heart tells me that we should be honest. We should not be victims of PFDJ’s traps. For instance, it will excuse its failures on the border stalemate.
    It could have continued building the political infrastructure, there was/is nothing that would compel PFDJ to resort on maxing its repressive rule on Eritreans. It will continue presenting Ethiopia as the “Hingugu” that should not be raised in any positive light/manner. I believe we should never attempt our strength from a blind hate towards a nation and a people. The primary cause of our problems though happens to be the regime in Asmara. In short, I’m rebelling, we should rebel. The regime should not tell us how to think, who to hate and who to love. Therefore, dear all, the previous comment was my way of continuing the process of disentanglement from the standards…and trap networks the regime placed (wayane, Jihadist…CIA…ETC.) in order to narrow down our maneuvering space. We have to break free from those shackles.

    • Papillon

      Dear Mahmuday,

      It looks like Awate.com has its own cyclical seasons whereby certain issues and I should add heavy weight issues come in turns through out the year. For instance, the language issue is way too familiar for any Awatista to go de ja vu. By the same token, the identity issue has made rounds through out a year many more times till shoes, chairs and menqerqer flew around to knock someone with a differing view. This was way before Haile was promoted to TG and when I was a girl with a dragon tattoo. That said, the ultra-nationalism teetering on fascism is getting too intense to the point of prosecuting individuals “to come clean” where one can see what is being said and written on Meskerem.net. Someone–an artist actually just recently had to recant about his former statement when he claimed to be an Ethiopian when he was in fact an Eritrean. This is sickness of the highest order. Daniel Rezene is in high-tech Salem-Witch-Hunt for his alleged possession of an Ethiopian passport. Again, we can see how the mind set of PFDJ has become not only bizarre but intensely pathological. If anything, this is an indication of a breaking point! With in this rather abnormal world, we see something remarkable. That is, most of the Eritreans who are flocking to Ethiopia are young enough to have come of age after liberation where most of them not only they don’t speak Amharic but grew up under deafening vilification and disparaging Ethiopia. But they dared to trek to the “under world” or “middle earth” where their expectation debunks an age old false propaganda. And the Weyanes are taking advantage of it not only by providing young Eritreans a temporary shelter but by providing them measured opportunities as well. It will be seen if the opportunities will challenge the identity or remain resistant to any attempt to affect it. As the brilliant Ahmed Raji recently put it, “I’m who I say I am, not what you think I am.”

    • Amanuel Hidrat

      Mahmuday,

      Wow! Bold, frank, pointblank, reflective, rebellion, rational, humility. You showed all these characters in one comment of >150 words. Amazing. Thumbs up for you. You are in the same boat with Papi, Hailat and Hayat.

      regards,
      Amanuel Hidrat

  • Amanuel Hidrat

    Dear Papi,

    You asked how the two nations diverged and arrived on two different and opposing pedestals. It all depends on the vision of the leaders. Ethiopia had a visionary leader to put it on the right pedestal, a leader who focused to eradicate poverty and iliteracy. He set the nation on good footing before he passed away – Rip.. Remember the response of the great leader at the time they entered Addis. when he was was asked by a journalist as to what his primary objective was for the Ethiopian people; his answer was to have (them) three meals a day.

    And look the leader of our country (Eritrea), when he was asked by the war veteran( Akale-senkul) to improve the basic needs of their life – his answer was, “me-altawi begi-E kin-hardelkum ayknonan” something to that effect. Issayas put the new nation on war footing with all his neighbor countries. He created a state that repel its young. A stark of difference.

    regards,
    Amanuel Hidrat.

  • Mahmud Saleh

    Dear awatistas
    My heart cries when I see these types of stories/clips. They remind me that Eritrea has squandered golden years of its existence.
    – Golden years of building its political infrastructure
    -Golden years of building its economic structure
    -Golden years of building a sustainable relation with its neighbors, particularly Ethiopia, and the world at large
    – Golden years of empowering its citizens, building unity through diversity…
    This gentle man’s presentation tells a lot about Ethiopia and Ethiopians (like it or not). Indeed, this is not the Ethiopia I grew fighting out of my beloved country. The stories coming from different sources are similar, so this can not be put aside as a governmental propaganda.
    When I hate the despicable PFDJ, it’s because of the fact that it succeeded a country that repels and repulses instead of creating a country that invites, which was the case many gave their lives for. My hate of PFDJ emanates from the fact that it instead of creating a nation where its young people become proud of it and proudly invite foreigners to their country (like what this gentle man is doing), they are fleeing it in droves. The most demoralizing of all is when you see tegadelti who had given their prime time to liberating Eritrea have finally succumbed to the pressures of reality. They too are smuggling their kids out of the country risking the all known perilous journeys.
    Folks time to wake up. At least we have to admit we are nearing a breaking point. When the boat sinks, it will not matter if you are pro PFDJ or against. A nation will sink.

    • Amanuel Hidrat

      Papi & Mahmuday,

      The Gentleman is an excellent promoter and had good selling point. Imagine if Ethiopia and Eritrea haven’t had gone into a war and enter into economic integration, the story we heard from the gentleman could have been tripled the GDP of both nations – All as a result of short access to the sea for Ethiopia and open wide market for Eritrea. What a waste of years. At least Ethiopia have made some tangible strides and will continue to do so. He makes us to envy.

      Regards,
      Amanuel Hidrat

    • haileTG

      Selamat Mahmuday, Papillon and Aman,

      I understand that for those of you who were part of the great sacrifice to bring about the nation, it must be a doubly bitter pill to contemplate the magnitude of our current predicament. What is most saddening however is the fact that the liberation struggle resulted in an almost clean slate opportunity for Eritreans to re-write history, yet we squandered all that opportunity. The liberation struggle resulted an independent nation with no strings attached, an overwhelmingly patriotic and supportive populace and virtually a “the sky is the limit” type of opportunity to build one of a kind modern state. All that has now been lost, with a country at logger heads with the international community, at war with its citizens and hanging on the cliff for its very survival. No two way about it, we all have contributed to its current predicament one way or the other, intentionally or unintentionally, or even ignorantly or maliciously. The big question is that of how much we have borrowed from the future generations and what it [the future] holds for them.

      What exactly are we thinking as a nation and people of that nation? How could a group of individuals be left to more or less gamble away the future of a nation and millions of its citizens? The great march to the bright Eritrean future would have kick-started in the next 72 hours by effectively putting the head of state and his Henchmen under arrest and holding immediate counsel for the set up of Provisional care taker administration while reconvening for a transitional government represented by various section of the society and leading up to constitution ratification, national elections and the rest. The million dollar question is how do Eritreans regain the confidence that this is a job that can only be done by themselves and frankly nobody is quite bothered with it if they don’t raise up to the challenge. What happened at Geneva should really has been the model to emulate rather than a bone to contend on. We need to realize that times have changed and just as the older tegadelti are taking the blame for the mismanagement of the yesteryear, the current young generation would also be held to account for failing to preserve what is left and avert a full blown catastrophic. Everyone is in this.

      Regards

      • Amanuel Hidrat

        Hailat,

        Eloquently well said. I can’t agree more. One expect and hope, that our young generation to take the stock of our nation.

        Regards,
        Amanuel Hidrat

    • Semere Andom

      Hi Mahmuday:
      I am gladhough to see you angry:-)
      Alt anger is not good, like medicine, it is about the dosage:-)
      I always believe and still do believe that the tegadality, you among them their sacrifice was never modest, they gave it all, but their expectation was modest from their future government and even their people: they did not expect a lamb to be sacrificed every year for them, they did not expect to be given salary or house in a silver plate, they just wanted to be respected, left alone and their kids and future generation to go about their lives as normal humans, the famous line: hrses harestay….”
      And for Eritrea it was even less complex and we would have done much much better thatn becoming the homeless of Europe as if buckets of blood has not been spilled on our behalf.
      It is infuriating to see some shameless people like the student of Fermat’s Enigma and others here to preach to us about freedom of speech and predict the disintegration of Ethiopia,

  • Saleh Johar

    Danny,
    That was funny, and I don’t know why you call yourself Amiche with that kind of Tigrinya–you think I don’t know the typical Amiche Tigrinya. Read Abi, he is the best example of Amiche, but not the stiff ones 🙂

  • dawit

    Dear Saleh,

    I hope you had some exercise for your shoulders with the latest Eritrean Kebero beats for a change. How do you like the new PIA Hair cut at 70, sharing the stage with the new generation and inventing new slogan WE ARE # 1 in the WORLD! Did you know he is now the legal owner of “polka dot jersey”, presented to him by Daniel Tesfamariam
    Peace
    dawit

    • Saleh Johar

      Hi dawit,
      I think I expressed my admiration of the haircut. Now i Hope someone would shave him.

      • dawit

        Ya Saleh, some one shaved censored the picture I accompanied with my comment! sorry you could not see it.

  • Philip

    07/08/15 – Nueva RJMI conferencia de audio: · Una explicación de Isaias 25 Isaías capítulo 25 habla de la segunda venida de Jesucristo, su destrucción de todos los malhechores y naciones malvadas de fuego, su protección de los Elegidos (buenos católicos), la necesidad de paciencia para ser salvado, y el paraíso terrenal purificada en el que habrá ser no más pecado, pecadores, o cualquier tipo de mal y en el que Cristo reinará como Rey de reyes y de la Santísima Virgen María como Reina de reinas.

    • Philip

      JohnTheBaptist.us True Catholic Church, outside of which, no one is saved. NM, USA

  • saay7

    Hey Hailat:

    For your consideration, more of The Churn,

    1. this one is from the eternal troublemaker Selam Kidane:

    http://eritrea.asmarino.com/articles/1550-it-is-all-in-the-name

    2. Years ago, SGJ wrote an article entitled “In Search of Moses.” AOsman, our unofficial archivist, will find and share it.

    3. A PFDJista just tweeted “charisma: Bill Clinton had it. Isaias Afwerki has it. None of the opposition leaders have it.” Because of the character limitations of Twitter, he didn’t put scary quotes around the word opposition so that’s progress.

    Put it all in a pot, churn it, and give us something “like hair from dough”, as the Egyptians say, which I used to think is descriptive but think of it as disgusting:)

    saay

  • Abi

    Hi Hayat
    Don’t share our midnight joke to the less fortunate masses. By now Fanti and Sem are pulling their hair .

  • haileTG

    Selamat Awatista,

    The PFDJ goon Dr Gidowon predicts the imminent disintegration of Ethiopia, the meeting reveals the total age gap between PFDJista and the new justice community and PFDJ Toronto works out a new scam of $1200 per year per person contribution to buy a PFDJ community center! Here is the content –

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-sH1o7COyy4

    PS: for those of you not familiar, the meeting is called a mekete seminar and those who air opinions in those meetings are pre-screened at a special organizing committee meeting that is often held privately amongest the hard core PFDJ goons.

    • Bayan Nagash

      Anta HTG,

      This kind of video clip should come with a warning that says, this might cause you heartache, headache, blood pressure, stomachache, etc. Now, I have to go to a nearby pharmacy to get an over the counter pills that will help ease the two things that I am experiencing: namely, nausea & headache. Amanuel H., the pharmacist, haven’t you guys come up with a virtual medication that could heal some such unexpected cyberspace related ailments -:)

      The lies that GA is espousing when responding to the question of needing lobbyists is laughable. Notice the depressed mood the audience is experiencing, very subdued with the exception of GA, who looks like he just had a laughing gas with that jaw aching smile of his:

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4LAalYMrRyo

      • Amanuel Hidrat

        ክቡር በያን

        I will call and consult papi to make a virtual diagnosis, and we shall see from there. Anyway if this is the first time you have those symptoms, then you are better than some of us. Feel better buddy.

        Amanuel Hidrat

    • Mahmud Saleh

      Hello Haylat
      Thanks for the information. And this makes us to wonder where the Toronto Front Commander is. I predicted some time ago that while semere was heading west to liberate awate.com of PFDJ infiltration, his then liberated Toronto would be reoccupied by PFDJ.
      On a serious take though: I always wonder how is it the disintegration of a mammoth neighbor could ensure the Renaissance of your household.

      • Amanuel Hidrat

        Hailat,

        Anyone who think, a disintegrated Ethiopia or Sudan, or a failed state of Ethiopia and Sudan will turn Eritrean in to vibrant nation is not worth of engagement. Because he/she has not a sane and sound mind to think on what a nation makes it a “vibrant and peaceful nation”.

        regards,
        Amanuel Hidrat

      • Semere Andom

        Thanks HTG and Mahmuday too;
        Mahmuday: consider the liberation of Toronto as that of Nacfa;-) It will not be occupied again, but the enemy can sneak in once in a while infiltrate
        If I was not afraid to be banned I was tempted to use the K word. But I will be away from my beloved so, I resist:-)
        Sad Eritrea has been reduced to Dergi likes like Temesgen Hailab and Gideon.

        • Maekebay

          selam Semere Andom,

          You can try for one but you cannot deceive people all the time. Why do you have to go to that extent to accuse people and reduce yourself to a worthless quack? Are you sure Gideon was a former “Dergi tools”? You have been accusing falsely and you think you can get away with it. By the way, the previous questions about “Maetebay and Merhawi” are still waiting for your attention. Stop the pretension. Dr. Gideon maybe on the wrong side of history at this time, but his passion for supporting and defending his country is well known the world over.

          What have you done to Eritrea besides the archaic tribal bigotry that you seem to be still immersed in. Get real and be yourself.

          Cheers!

          Maekebay

      • haileTG

        Dear Mahmuday,

        Once, I remember taking a PFDJista friend to task, and asked him as to why they wish Ethiopia fall apart. My understanding is that it is a desperate attempt to wriggle out of the corner they find themselves in. It is not, in my view, based on an irrational hate as it appears at a glance. My discussion with that particular PFDJista was that we differed on a way out of the current crisis. His point was that we can only get out of it by creating an ambient circumstances for it at first, i.e. we all unite to demand border demarcation and lifting of sanctions and after that it would be rational for people to demand their rights. But my point to him was that given the people are sharply divided and have low confidence on each other there is no such grounds to expect that people would lend a voice by coming together on that. First, rights need to be respected, power needs to be transferred and justice be served and upheld. That would unite the people and can mobilize them for any sort of common cause. So, we differed on justice first vs assurances of safe landing first. As we decided to agree to disagree, I asked what would break the current status qou. Well, his view was that short of Eritreans coming together to have the sanctions, demarcations or diplomacy restored, his other hope is for havoc and disintegration in Ethiopia and that will make Eritrea an indispensable prospective ally to the USA (kinda will make Eritry look sexy by comparison, rather than in its own right). Here you see the desperation that is rationalizing such brutal and bloody fantasy of the demise of a next door neighbor rather than assuming responsibility to one’s own blunders. That is like a criminal who breaks into a home and opportunistically shoot the residents that he meets there when he expected them to have been out. The rational is to evade detection but the length gone to attain that isn’t looked in its proper context and what it means in proportion of losses inflicted.

        Regards

        • Mahmud Saleh

          Dear HTG
          Two things:
          1. I want you to see the mistrusts you feel Eritreans display as a sign the lack of leadership. People feel they are at a cross road, and are saying “Gee, Haile Hayal’s carossa is late, it may take to Adi GuaEda…SAAY’s is loaded to max, we may not get a ride…that may go the other way…who is the safest driver for my eggs are so fragile….” you got it. People are looking for direction, for leadership…I believe one a credible leadership emerges, all the talk about mistrusts will dissipate. So brother, just a note that we should not be discouraged by the “chaos” we see….
          2. On your PFDJIsta attitude, what he may not understand is that Eritreans had contributed greatly to the unity of Ethiopia. It may look an irony, but that’s the truth. True, TPLF had controlled its policy refinements and evolution, but one of the thorny issue was EPLF’s insistence that TPLF should aim for united Ethiopia and lead a united coalition. Of course, that was not taken lightly from TPLF. Up to this time, it accuses EPLF of failing to respect the right of nationalities to exercise the right of self-determination. Here is the problem Haile: when I pitch my tent in a camping ground I don’t want to pitch it under a huge tree holding up precariously. So, this guys definitely misses the point that when your neighborhood disintegrates, there is a good chance you will be buried underneath.
          3. He likened Ethiopian political arrangement with that of Tito’s Yugoslavia while the truth is Yugoslavia disintegrated not because of a democratic federation between nations/nationalities but because of ironclad bonding of different nations/nationalities under a communist dictator. I think he got it wrong. PFDJ Hade Libi mantra fits Yugoslavia, pretending harmony while muzzling voices and pens that would create free interactions of citizens in debating their grievances which would have built a truly sustaining unity.

          • haileTG

            hey Mahmuday…disques has held up my comment…let’s give it few tcks:)

      • Ted

        Hi, The greatest MS. Who is inciting war here፦) Look at the clip, none of the women’s ነጸላ is torn or stained with paint. Field marshal, Semere is a changed man, though in progress. May be because we come an inch closer to him than he did towards us. Time will tell where we end up.
        I don’t see either the snot soiled handkerchief under the sleeves of አዴታት. HTG must be happy about it.

        • haileTG

          Hi Ted

          “I don’t see either the snot soiled handkerchief under the sleeves of አዴታት.”.. that is funny you missed it..haha isn’t the whole video a snot soiled handkerchief under the sleeves of አዴታት? Don’t tell me you only say the sweat and ambition soaked youth stampeding, did you?

          • Ted

            Hi, HTG, My bad, i just took it literally looking for the snot under their sleeves. Now you explained it, it is deep without being sexist, ageist and bigot.:-(

          • haileTG

            Hi Ted, it just gets funnier… haha. Some habits, if proven unhygienic and risk contamination, they have to be rejected and be done with. That is regardless of sensitivities. Hence, the PFDJ mind set and the snot soiled handkerchief under the sleeves of አዴታት have to both banished for the sake of national and public health respectively. Choose what you defend carefully Ted, snot will not attract many…haha

        • Mahmud Saleh

          Hello the great
          I think the idea is no more goons to tell us when we should fight and when we should talk. These people have no underpinning moral or legal backing to tell us what we should do, think, perceive…
          No moral, because they are encouraging the regime on its oppressive and suffocating rules exacted against Eritreans, and serving it as cushions for the rocking it feels from its citizens and the world for brutalizing its citizens. They have lost the moral high-ground simply because they have defended a regime that has become a curse to Eritrea and Eritreans.
          No legal ground for them to lecture us: They have menaced the country un-elected for 17 years now, since the time the transition should have taken place.
          Now, Ted the great, think it this way: Who is closer to you? Are you more likely to agree in most of your points of interest with a flamboyant opposition member or with a PFDJ die-hard?
          I think Semere is closer to you than any PFDJ cadre.
          The rest is continued engagement. Just look for the grand principle, that Eritreans should determine what the next move should be, I think small give and take steps actually show your maturity and your confidence in your people. I have a feeling, Semere is waking up from a grand disillusionment that our noble cause was frustrated because of a small “alliance of killers”; he went off a somber assessment of the variables which led us where we are, and in doing so, he found an unlikely alliance of the far fringes. I never thought he harbored bad intentions for his people. I still believe he could play a bridge between the two big segments of our society; I really mean it. Here is the reality Ted:
          You underline the need of reforming PFDJ. I wish if it could be done. For one, only members could reform an organization. I wish it could listen to the calls of nonmembers, it has not and it will not. Therefore, the task of reforming PFDJ is left for the members of that organization. What I mean is: it shouldnot be something that you should people on how they take that call. For the majority, PFDJ has become an the main root cause of what it is that Eritrea is suffering from. I have some important conversations to make with, you but for now, let me stop here. I have almost equal feeling for both of you, each of you offer unique contributions the other doesn’t have. But I want to leave you with this question:1. tell me how is it possible for non-PFDJ members to be able to force a reformation on the organization, a task that had sealed the fate of prominent founding fathers of that organization?
          2. Hasn’t there been calls for reformation from Eritreans and from the international community, tell me what new is there that could persuade PFDJ to reform this time? How is this call different than the calls that have been frustrated?
          3. Tell me what exactly a reformed PFDJ look like. I want to see how the reformation of PFDJ could lead to a completely different political reality; where the field is leveled for Eritreans to freely elect their rulers…

          • Saleh Johar

            Mahmuday,
            Do I have a seat reserved in your bus? There better be one for me and another one for Ted. I am certainly bringing him along 🙂

          • Mahmud Saleh

            Welcome aboard Saleh
            And you know, there is a “driver wanted” sign on the bus. Who else could beat you.
            Driver:SGJ
            Assistant driver: Ted
            Chief Quality Assurance Officer: SAAY
            Political Commissar: Aman Hidrat
            Marketing :HTG
            security Officer: Nitrickay
            Route Manager and Traffic Forecaster: Selam (just back from her vacation; where are you selam? It is 08/11/15)
            Company Historian and archivist: Semere (primary source Radio wagaHta foundation)
            Technical Support: professor tes (R&D Dept, currently developing fuel from mashella and bultoog, the Brazilians have already registered corn ethanol.
            Special agent: Gual Adem. managing director of Asmara Adigrat route, and chief marketing officer, in the territory south of Mereb.
            Many positions to be announced.

          • Abi

            Hi Mahmud
            It looks like you are appointing your cabinet ministers. I like the appointment of Tes and Nitricc. They bring a long experience with them .
            Nitricc– security office/ cashier ( in Amharic weyala)
            Tes– extracting fuel / areqe from mashella.
            Make sure these they work different shifts on the bus. Make sure to put Tes on the day shift for the safety of passengers.
            Don’t let SGJ drive the bus. Saay drive him crazy by playing saxophone. Besides, he can’t see well. His oversized hat is covering his face.
            Hayat , get of that bus now! The plane is waiting for you at dedebit international airport to bring you to me. Let the less fortunate eritreans stay on the bus. Ethiopians don’t ride bus.
            Fanti, get on that bus.

          • Mahmud Saleh

            Congratulations dear abi
            Your application has been approved. You are now the company’s cafe/bunna biet manager. You know where to get the coffee. Yes, it should be produced in Eritrea…haha, your favorite subject.

          • Abi

            Mahmud
            Merhaba, merhaba
            Abol jeba, bereka jeba
            Yifela buna sniw yiderder
            Yidesetlign yene wetader
            Eritrea buna yale meslohal
            Lqlaqi new meche yarekahal
            Awatistawoch tesebasbachihu
            Shumet yadabir belugn ebakachihu.

          • Ted

            Hi The greatest, I hear you. I am not about the personels of PFDJ, but about the attendees who come to the hall in hundreds and demonstrate in thousands. It is my position that some opposition groups has more in common with those PFDJ attende than each other. I am counting on you Semere and co. be working on building bridges than alienating them. You said it yourself Field Marshal, not all oppositions are saints. The more time we spend bashing PFDJ, the less time we have purifying ourselves.
            Dear SJ, for one time we ask for a ride, he want make us አይታንቲን , አውቲስታን. It is Ok. At least the prime Minister be safe you driving and Nitricc securitying. We only need a couple of stop to unload some unimportant hitchhikers.(it is going to a good ride with some black eyes here and there)

        • Mahmud Saleh

          Dear Ted
          my last reply to you has been edited, just FYI.

    • Nitricc

      Hi Haile you said ” Dr Gidowon predicts the imminent disintegration of Ethiopia” well, either my Tigrigna has gone south or you are trying sensationalization it. to my understanding; the gentle man asked that Eritrea should have fuel time lobbying body and Dr. Gidewon; in answering the question, he replied by saying, instead of wasting money on the lobbying body; we have a better use for the money by investing in Hospitals, schools and in building infrastructures. if we look around us, he said
      “””Yemen have failed and Ethiopia, we don’t want to wish them anything bad, but if the TPLF continues the way leading the country, it a sure way to meet the with fate of Yugoslavia”””
      I tend to agree with his take. more importantly; why do you just pick the only miss leading and incomplete sentence of Dr. Gidewon by miss quoting him
      ” Dr Gidowon predicts the imminent disintegration of Ethiopia”
      here listen it for your self.

      http://www.tubechop.com/watch/6566637

      • haileTG

        Haha Nitricc, your Tigrinya is perfect my friend, may be the audio play back isn’t good in your area or if Asmarinos calculos is right, you’re scoring great goal, keep it up…haha

        Anyway, here is word for word translation for keeps…

        “We like it or not Ethiopia has failed…”

        “because the TPLF didn’t have the people on their side, Meles and his puppets are where they are now..”

        “We know as a general rule one shouldn’t wish ill of their neighbor, but if it is that we pray it won’t be as what we say, because if Ethiopia continue the current trend it is heading towards former Yugoslavia”

        “Obama’s recent desperate shuttling to Ethiopia will not be enough to avert it either”

        There Nitricc, if that isn’t the headline from the big miserable lair GA prediction, then what is? Wouldn’t it had been better if GA had married and brought up children than to have been reduced to this in his twilight years? defeated, alone and toothless (that is not his real teeth btw…). I said enough right? 🙂

        • Nitricc

          hi Haile, I listened again and it sound the same to me, but you know what; it okay, have it your way. But i do believe you got my point.

    • Solomon Haile

      Selamat HTG and HCA,
      Abba Treg Hydrochloric Acid trrabarebb Lekka ‘ yea krramatt zekhremetto. Dr. Gideon math does not liezeytblo HTG wells shiH gzzie HCA aka Nitric … “A rose buds and it is a rose by any other name. We need Dr. Ishmael and the field marshal for a sub committee on Gideaon in order to scale the walls. Where is Baynakk The Fedayeen. Semmmmm belllll Haile DruE.
      “Young enough old enough”

      I like… This station.

      Solomon

      • Solomon Haile

        Wellaaa shiH gzzie A. Nitric language is math entebele.

    • Hayat Adem

      Hi HTG,
      I’ve read stuff from the past likening Ethiopia with Yugoslavia, Liberia, Somalia etc. But that was a 1990 thing. A lot of water has passed under the bridge and now this country is cruising up and confidently. It is one of the three fastest growing economy in the world. Its growth is characterized as pro-poor and inclusive. It is a global peace actor. It has a growing and swollen diplomatic muscle and has made dependable friends everywhere. It has a battle-hardened and martially-prepared army ranked the 2nd most powerful in Africa. The Obama’s visit was not a sign of a rescuing effort to save a falling nation but a heralding of a rising country and it is an icing of the cake that demonstrates a climax of global cruising towards to a respected and crowned status. For the first time in history, this country has braved the Nile entanglement and started dictating terms on generational demands. It is on the receiving end of refugee flow from left to right. It doesn’t sound a country on the path of Yugoslavia at all.
      And all these should sound good news for Eritrea and Eritreans. A good Ethiopia is good for Eritrea and vice versa. Isaias thinks the only way for him to survive is when Ethiopia disintegrates. His logic is: that way Eritreans will understand his great stamina for non-quitter and how he always endures and prevails all the time; that way the world will understand that it will have no choice but to embrace him for a regional role; that way Ethiopians and the rest of the region will understand going against Isaias is always fatal and costly. And he worked hard for that to happen to no avail.
      His supporters still echo such nonsense. This illiterate mathematician is a good example of that. Nitricc on the other day said: “The only solution for the Ethio-Eritrea problem is for one of them to get weaker. And Eritrea is not going to be the one that will get weaker (read: disintegrated)”. That prompted saay to gently elbow his ex-disciple: “Nitricc, you are not a believer in a win-win solution?”.
      Yes, zero-sum-game is a thing of the past.The modern world is now a days trending to shift even more: from win-win to a win-win-win. Solutions and negotiations are now taking into account not the only the primary parties in conflict but also other parties, or other generations or animals or simply the good of the environment.
      Dr. Gedeon, instead of asking Eritrean to work and pray for the rise of Eritrea, he wants them to marvel at the fall of Ethiopia. There was a student when asked how he fared on a national exam after he received a grade report, his answer was not on telling whether he passed or failed. He said this: “It is suffice to say I scored better than my brother”. And both were a D and F students , and shame of the family. That exactly shows you when Isaias is asked about the conditions of life in Eritrea, he always prefers to say “we are better in the region, or better than our neighbors, or #1 in Africa or in one case we are better than Sweden”. He never use quantitative language to explain improvements or plans for that matter.
      Eritreans should really see this point: Ethiopia’s achievements should be appreciated not only as a matter of advancing positive move but as a matter of Eritrea’s national interest. There is a curse of interdependence where by a drop of regress in one country is inherently bad for the other. Even forgetting the shared past, the culture and everything else, the entire region is one market, meaning one ship. Any dereliction on any part of the ship and the potential of sinking spares no one aboard. But, like our fearless friend bragging of his dumbness, Dr. Gedeon’s cynicism well compensated by his mathematical bankruptcy.
      Hayat

      • Amanuel Hidrat

        Dear Hayat.

        The following is not only a quotation of the day but a living quotation:

        “There is a curse of interdependence where by a drop of regress in one country is inherently bad for the other.”

        Very True. And that is why condemning your neighbor for disintegration is like someone cursing to himself.

        regards,
        Amanuel Hidrat

      • Semere Andom

        Hi Hayat:

        Putting aside how wrong prof. Gideon is, every Eritrean being should be insulted to hear his lies. He is insulting Eritreans when he tells them what he does not tell his American students. Tenured, gainfully employed, Eritrea for him is an exotic place to practice his two crafts: lying and pleasing.

        The contradiction that IA has planted during the armed struggle is this: Ethiopian people are not our enemies, it is the ruling dictator and in the other hand he was prophesying that after Eritrea becomes independent Ethiopia will disintegrate, but it did not because TPLF acutely aware of this danger, created the coalition, they did not create it standing from a point of weakness, but from vision and confidence. IA on his first speech (Mahmuday, I know your prophesied that I will talk a about the first speech:-)), his inauguration as a dictator of Eritrea banned any “hasheiye”, not from strength as his supporters are fond of telling us , but from weakens and lack of confidence. The seeds were there in both cases, but after Dergi was defeated both IA and MZ attended to their seeds. And Gideon is steal repeating unfulfilled and unfulfillable prophesy of IA, the ultimate disintegration of Ethiopia, but as a seasoned liar and a tool of dictator when IA sells him to the river, Gideon will look us in the eyes with his practiced lies and he would tell us the following: “I was not quoting Isaias Afewerki, I was quoting a different Isaias about the disintegration of Ethiopia, but the Isaias I was quoting is in a different time zone so his prophesy has not been fullfilled yet, stay tuned deqi Er, hadnetnetna tray”

      • haileTG

        Dear Hayat,

        GA’s response was deflection of a direct question that asserted the fact that he was impotent to defend the regime’s narrative. The man asked that the regime narrative is lacking in messengers that can deliver it. He was not asking about external lobbyists, rather he was pointing out (even naming names of regime cadres) have failed to make persuasive case. In short, he was telling GA that his band of goons aren’t doing satisfactory job (to regime liking). GA had no decency to admit that the job is impossible because the crimes against humanity being unleashed on the people of Eritrea by the regime, and one he is expected to defend, is causing serious international outcry. Instead, he twisted the question by taking the word “lobby” the man used out of context and saying that “sit still and wait, Ethiopia will disintegrate and we’ll be vindicated” (my re-phrasing). That is called total bankruptcy of clique HGDEF and why it has finally lost traction. GA is now a crime accomplice on the run.

        Regards

  • Haile WM

    Dear awates,
    I was browsing the pfdj-related media for further photos of Kibur president Isu,

    and while reading some news here and there… the news template at the information ministry was quite obvious..I wondered how the haircut issue would have being dealt with:

    ..the minister conducted a seminar on the objective situation of the president’s hair. He pointed out that external conspiracies against his scalp have ended up in utter failure thanks to the staunch resistance of the remaining hairs. the minister explained the futile smear campaigns on the part of enemy quarters in the guise of ‘ Aesthetics and maturity”.
    The seminar participants on their part reiterated readiness to wage resolute resistance against such acts of conspiracy…decided to extend help to the fallen hairs of the president by adopting the same haircut.

  • tes

    Dear Aron,

    it is good that you came back to your heart. Remember HTG’s: “lets come back to our heart and combine it with our mind” strategy to emancipate Eritrea. This guy has no shame to pretend being a youth.

    if he had some respect for himself, he could have accepted his age, 60+ is is not a curse but a blessing for wise people. DIA, as cursed as he is, he never accepted his age getting that much old. Take a piss of this man instead of defending him. if you want to know more serious things about him, please reach saay7, he is the Grand Master of Issaiasism. SGJ is just trying to discipline him. he is lucky SGJ wrote such advice to this ugly man. He doesn’t deserve this much page even.

    tes

  • Bayan Nagash

    Dear Aron,

    I feel the sincerity in your voice, and I am positive it wasn’t because of the money you lost to your wife, hey she deserves it – you should double the loss just because she has taken you to a point where you now effectively are asking the resignation of this man, because he didn’t just lose his hair but what was left of his head, in every sense of the term head implies.

    BN

    P.S. Ok, if you don’t want to double the loss, at least give her some TLC as SGJ suggested by dedicating the song below. A shout out to you both so the night ends in peace, love, and tranquility. Th song is less than three minutes, but it is worth your while.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5BcWrgmFO1M

  • Abi

    Aron
    When you say ” in any shape or from “, are you talking about the shape and form of his haircut?
    Just curious.

  • Ted

    Hi, all

    It is plain wrong people.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x6euWjeXkTI

    Even snickers commercial people know it sax, pun intended.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PE6ka-Gg6so

  • Solomon Haile

    Selamat SJG and Awatistas,

    One comment and then no comment or more comments??? Links are limited everyday or only Sundays?

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7U-et8qOXLs

    Go figure… Existentialists like John Paul Satre are perplexing to yours truly, Solomon

  • Saleh Johar

    Dear Aron,
    Not this one. No Photoshop except enhancing the quality, and the collage. His haircut is taken from a screen shot of his television broadcast, EreTV. I believe it was on one of those websites that provide EreTV and other clips.

    You better stop arguing with your wife and spend a romantic evening 🙂

  • Pass the salt

    If the haircut is real, the government is in serious trouble. Can you imagine someone unable to control his laughter at the cabinet meeting? Nsu will think they are laughing behind his back too.

  • Kokhob Selam

    Dear Hayata,

    ግርም ኢሉኒ ኳ እዩ ዘሎ :: እስከ በሊ ከመይ ከመይ ገይሩ ክጠዓዓም ከኣለ ? እዚ ስራሕ እዚ ውሃ ዘበለ ግጥምን ናዕታን ዘድልዮ ስራሕ እዩ ::ንግዚኡ ግን —

    ሳንዱ ርኢኺ ዶ ናይ ‘ዚ ደግለል –
    ልቢ ቀላሊዑ ናብ ላዕሊ ዝስቀል –
    ሕንቅል ሕንቅሊተይ መራሚሩ ሓንጎል::
    ቃተኛ ተደረር ፍለጥ ኣሊ ባበ –
    ዲጋታት ክዛወር ጮግሩ ዘዐንበበ ::

    ….መን እዩ ቀላላዒ ብዋዛ ቁም ነገር
    ….ናይ መጀመርያ ፊደላት ኣንብቢ ብመስመር ::

    • Saleh Johar

      Kokob,
      Very strange, this morning my friend Semere Habtemariam was talking to me and he said, “I wish Kokob will compose a poem for Ali Baabe.” And here you are.

    • Hayat Adem

      tiEum lebam seb!!! girm giTmi…my old hard drive was crashed and with it my geez application. So, I got this abi-inspired-laziness of downloading one.

  • rahwa

    Mr Saleh,

    I am very surprised that you do not like Saxophone. Now you are making the choice of music
    very difficult for as when we march to wipe out Isayas and the gangs. You have two
    choices, music with saxophone or without. If you choose without you are a traitor!

    Now watch the following link.

    Without

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DJzeGK6cVQs

    With

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XSt7bqYGWAk

    • Saleh Johar

      Thanks Rahwa. I needed that. Long live the “traitors” of the PFDJ 🙂

      • saay7

        Abu Selah:

        The case for the saxophone. Blackmail 101; If u don’t like this, u don’t like ELF

        http://youtu.be/L9gtArxN7Rc

        saay

        • Kokhob Selam

          Dear Saay,

          I don’t think SGL really don’t like saxophone.

          https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YzdxV6uRZh4

          • Amanuel Hidrat

            Kokhobay,

            I have no clue why SGJ lost his taste on the music instrument – Saxophone. As there is no a Choir without the three voices, Alto, Suprano, and Tanner, there is no music without guitar, saxophone, drums, flute, piano, and trombone.

            regards,
            Amanuel Hidrat

        • Saleh Johar

          This is forgery Saay. You and Mahmuday, inserted the saxophone in the original song. Why? See that forgery Ted, and you are quite!

          Saay, at that time, Abi’s relatives had not even invented that instrument.

          • Ted

            HI, SJ, no cause for alarm. We still like all good things ELF and dislike Sax . i thought we are fool proof with “……, we suggested limiting music and arts to weekends only (that will be Saturday and Sunday,only)” i see their point now Sax is their leader.We have options; while gunning for Sax, we go all Alibaba with Kebero if that’s what it takes. Baning Sax is not about music taste, it is about preserving sanctity. Drugs ruin one’s purity. Why people do drugs? the same goes to SAX. Some people do not want to be helped, but can not be the reason not to stop them.
            Fact: Lice lay eggs only on the side of scalp, shaving the side stops the cycle.

          • Saleh Johar

            Ted,
            I know formally delegate you dejazmatch to take care of the saxophone infantry that is attacking our hearing senses. I am out of it, deal with them. Never seen such fanatic hordes 🙂

          • Mahmud Saleh

            Salam saleh
            You see abu salah, SAAY wants to blackmail you cheap. He brought a horribly recorded song where the majestic saxophone is buried in the sonic nuances. I can’t upload it from my cell phone but there is a saxophone section in an ELF or ELL-PF (sabe) that you can’t turn down. I believe it was in the band which included idris Mohammed Ali and Osman Abdulrahim.
            BTW: Was Hadgu of PFDJ the prominent Saxophonist in ELF? May be our music ambassador SAAY?

          • Amanuel Hidrat

            Mahumuday,

            Bring the 1977 musical tour bands with its full assembled musical instruments. Surely the band includes widi awalom, Abrar, Osman Abderhim, Idris Mehamed Ali, Bereket mengisteab, Eyob, and some from the Tsebah young.

          • Mahmud Saleh

            Dear Emma, I will see if I find the videos I am looking for, but I found some reminiscent videos and here they are.
            I really love Yusuf Said with his box guitar, here he is electrified, the video quality is not good, but it’s history; and good for Ustaz Saleh, there is no saxophone.

            1. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bEgWDFLBiS0
            This band, in some other clips, included string section, and saxophone; will see if I can get them.

            2. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OZqjc2a8qNc

            Here is the majestic sax, saleh is not going to turn it down here. This is the emblematic “baHti meskerem” I don’t think he will hate this one, although sax is the overriding voice.

            3. http://www.tubechop.com/chop/T31geJNkUw8

            One more, and I know I’m breaking the rule; I am ready to get punished for it, but please I never abuse posting videaos, please AT.

            This one was a famous song, anyway, time has its own verdict.

            4. http://www.tubechop.com/chop/T31geJNkUw8

          • saay7

            Mahmouday:

            Three steps to the saxophone. Bring any topic. Like, sickness.

            Sickness = Hmam
            Kab Hmamey Qrub teHasheni = Haile Gebru/Zerai Deres Band
            Zerai Deres Band = great saxophone solo.

            Nope, I am not sharing the video with SGJ. His curiousity and YouTube are his friends. As Younis Shelebi said “Ana Khareg wa mush H’argaE!”

            saay

    • Saleh Johar

      rahwa, what is up? Now you want to smuggle the Waashnt as a saxophone? I delegate Abi chastise you 🙂

    • Abi

      Hi rahwa
      You are the best!
      That is beautiful. Please bring more saxophone.

  • haileTG

    Dear SGJ,

    I admire the story narration and construction of the above article (of course from technical point of examination:). I can’t comment on the individual’s personal taste however, so I will pass that to the department of dress and appearance code 🙂

    I am still scheduled to respond to brother Bayan (Bayan, am I correct to use this? because AOsman uses Beyan?), but let me share the following with awatista. Spiritual leaders of our society are really living in an ironic times. If a priest can’t stand for truth, why the heck is he making a living preaching it to others? Especially the Orthodox church seem to be the greatest offender in duplicity and selfishness. No doubt there are many priests from that church with courage to do the call of their duty, but on the whole, it is such a compromised institution that is not fit to claim the high pedestal implied by its devotion.

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3191674/I-ll-boycott-BBC-Songs-Praise-filmed-Calais-camp-church-fear-family-s-life-vows-Eritrean-priest.html

    • AOsman

      Dear Haile TG,

      You are being hard on the young man, HGDF is terrorising the whole population. Actually, his refusal does send the right message about the mafia we have at home.

      Poor guy he wanted to avoid attention, now he got more than he wanted.

      Regards
      AOsman

      • haileTG

        Dear AOsman,

        You’re right, there is that too. I wouldn’t have picked up on that if it was a case where the young priest was required to do or say anything. I was just puzzled that his part was supposed to simply conduct the mass and that was it. His panic seizure at the prospect of appearing as a talking and walking human being minding his own business could indeed give a glimpse to onlookers into the world of Eritrea that is ruled by fear and not laws. It indeed goes to prove the the level of repression that has created the current Eritrea, a darker corner in the dark continent. My point is though more of the call of duty of the very devotion rather than an individual’s personal choice. If the potential audience of BBC’s Songs of Praise, that is hundreds of millions people around the globe, are not going to see the plight of the desperate refugees because of this young man, then that is a real piety. And to know the reason for that is none other than a person who took vows to stand for truth in the footsteps of Jesus Christ’s example, i.e. till the last breath at the cross, it makes it all the more strange.

        Regards

        • AOsman

          Dear Haile TG,

          I understand your point, but the young priest probably does not even know the Songs of Praise programme. BBC timetzE alla ilomo….I can imagine his response…waE neger kemtzulna, kab halak nab selam inda belnas……

          Regards
          AOsman

  • saay7

    Ah, Abu Selah:

    Meanwhile, outside the claustrophobic Keren…way up, 7,600 ft above sea-level, in the world’s most beautiful city of Asmara, Settanto Oto (78) which was close to my neighborhood had inda FeTero where, I think, kbur president gets his haircut. Never went there: I was loyal to my Idaga Arbi barber, which is where I first met Habtom Yohannes, as he was hustling tickets to the ugly cinema in his beloved neighborhood: the pink Cinema Hamasien (which will be blown up with TNT in Haddas Ertra.)

    The last time I was in Egypt #thisactuallyhappened. Went to get a haircut in a family owned barbershop which employed kids. Children. The same thing that happened to me at a family owned restaurant where the waiter was a kid. I asked the father why isn’t the kid at school and the father told me and I quote “because he is too stupid for school.” And the kid smiled. Now, decades of living in the US has conditioned me to think “Child Labor!! Child abuse!!!” And I couldn’t relax.

    Back to the Egyptian barber. So, here’s the deal: the kids wash towels and hang them in open air to dry. Same towels that had been used by the customer before me who, most likely, had some contagious disease. I am not saying for sure he did, but I have to assume he did. I know, I know, abu Salah: you will say that is “wahm” and give me some Arabic proverb. But it was tense. I was stressed! I was so stressed I had to have a cigarette. So I said, no, please do NOT wash my hair if you are going to use that damn towel and I felt very guilty saying it.

    He cut my hair and then he had that damn thread to give me a close shave. So I said, whoa, buddy, just the head, leave the face alone. Leave the picture alone, just fix the frame. Then I went to another restaurant, this time no child workers, ordered a meal and when the bill came, the Egyptian waiter did what Egyptians do: he went full Egyptian and went on that fake-no-you-shouldn’t-pay-it-is-on-us: La, ya beh, waNabi, mush MaE’ul… it took me a full 10 seconds to realize that I had to go through that ritual: “La welahi, ma ysa’H’sh….” and then he very, very reluctantly agreed for me to pay the bill.

    Of course, Egyptians are the worst cooks in the world–even worse than the Brits—the difference being that the Brits know they are horrible cooks and the Egyptians actually think that their food is, to use one of their favorite expressions, “finger licking good.” yeah, actually, your food is so bad I am licking my finger because it is a better alternative to your food.

    So, to quote cluless Adel Imam pretending to be knowledgeable, “wada iqtraHi fil gediya, yaAni”

    saay

    • Amanuel

      Hi saay
      come on man, the Brits are not the worst cooks, I think they are better than the American, well if you don’t cook, as the American are, you can’t be the worst. The Brits gave the world fish and chips and the American a burger (industrial made food).

    • Saleh Johar

      IqtraH meqbul Saay, but at least you get to lick your fingers. But, wennebi terjema! What to do?

      • saay7

        Abu Salah:

        What to do? What to do is: “who is the original singer for ‘gotena hdmo'”? Is it Beyene Fre or Bereket Mengistab?

        I shared the Beyene Fren edition here for that dude (I am not going to mention his name) who has gone awol because he is watching Eritrean movies on youtube.

        saay

  • abrham
    • Saleh Johar

      See Abraham!
      I knew one of Abi’s grandparents was responsible for all f that. And they started with a tuba?

      • Abi

        Ato Saleh
        I will take full responsibility on my grandfather’s behalf.
        IA’s hair style is beautiful. He looks like 50 years young as that lady said. I forgot her name.
        He is losing the ” boarder ” of his hair. No big deal. It is s reminder to the people of eritrea that it is ok to lose a piece of hair if you can manage the rest.
        The question should be Is this final and binding? Or is he going to shave more?
        Let’s wait and see.
        Ato Saleh, I really loved the article as always.
        Thanks.

    • Hayat Adem

      Abraham,
      The funny joke I knew from a hair-cuttery (men) is: the barber was very insensitive and looked careless with his scissors while the customer was so anxious and nervous about the barber’s moves. The barber joked freely as it came and he swing his scissors carelessly. Every time, the barber gets closer to the ears area, the customer would say, “please be careful about my ear”. And he would keep saying that 4-5 times. And the barber would say, “no worries. I have been doing this all my career. I don’t remember cutting an ear unless it looked like a hair”. Now, the customer panicked again, “please be careful, you don’t seem to understand my worries.”. The barber: “I don’t think you are trusting me with your ears. So, why don’t I go ahead and give you your ears so that you hold them in your palms until we are done.” He said this as he was chopping the customer’s ears quickly and handed them to their owner.

      • Abi

        Hi Hayat
        This person who lost his ears at the barber , by any chance someone you know?
        If a person lost his ears one or more things happen to him.
        1- always cover his head with an oversized hat.
        2- never listen saxophone.
        3-excellent communicator in writing
        4- he will never respond to this comment.

        • Saleh Johar

          Abi the mischievous, that is exactly what I was thinking about. Hayat, don’t tell him the name of the person.

          Would you rather see an Isaias haircut? I can tell him to torture you with that if it is your wish 🙂

          • Abi

            Ato Saleh
            i don’t call that a haircut . It is called border shaving. He must have been drunk.
            May be he is getting ready for Halloween.

        • Hayat Adem

          Abi,
          4- he will respond to this comment. Now, we have him. He fits the description.

  • senay

    Selam SJG,

    More than the haircut, I liked the “local” media coverage. Here is Shabait.com coverage:

    “Asmara, xx July 2015 – All Middle-eastern and northern Africa leaders sent a NaEmen (ነዒመን) messages of congratulations to kubur president Isayas Afewerki in connection with his latest hair style.

    In their respective messages, the leaders wished the president peace and healthy hair. The leaders also congratulated the people and the government of Eritrea for the exuberant and youthful look of their president. The Gulf leaders also expressed their country’s readiness to further enhance the existing economic ties in hair products for the benefit of both peoples ……”

    Senay,

    • Hayat Adem

      Hi Senay,
      Please beware of the collateral consequences of this man’s hair. If the hair count on Isaias’ head is estimated to be 4-5 million when in its fullest time, and if he is losing 4000 hairs every month, he might end up fully bold by the time Eritrea completes its drain of exodus. We should all pray for his hair to stay as intact.
      Hayat

      • Hayat Adem

        Wow, some one just twitted to me on private, the number of hair follicles on a human head averages 100k, not millions. Why would some one need that kind of knowledge?

    • Solomon Haile

      Senay,

      ነዒመን ! Very original and funny!
      Solomon

      • Saleh Johar

        Solomon,
        I am glad you took that, I was taken aback when I saw it yesterday. Haven’t heard it for a while. Thanks Senay… and Solomon, for reminding me.

  • Haile WM

    Hi Saleh,

    once I asked my father the origin of the word “Ali babbe” or what it meant, after I saw a photo of him in his childhood in which he had a classical “Ali babbe” haircut, he told me it was the name of a tribe between Barka and Sahel whose people used the haircut traditionally… but he couldn’t tell me more. I would like to ask if anybody ever heard of it…

    Iseyas could be in his middle age crisis, I mean (very)late middle age crisis… after all these YPFDJ kids can mean something to him, their motto of nissu nihna might have had it’s proportional influence on him… he might have tough “if they are me… I could be them… let’s start with haircut..” 🙂

    Cheers

  • Amanuel Hidrat

    Hi Saleh,

    I can only say that you are a good story teller. Good ” mezenaghi -ey ” .

    Amsnuel Hidrat

  • Bayan Nagash

    Selmat Saleh GJ,

    Thank you for the piece, when I first saw the hair do I was beyond flabbergasted. I thought it might have been a hair-cut gone awry, which we experience once in a blue moon. If that was the case, I would hate to know the fate of the barber. The barber may have gotten a jail cell named after him. I have not seen this category in the 361 prison cells that we’ve seen circulated in the social media.

    The two bonuses that I was pleased to read are: The link you shared on the speech you gave related to Religion and Language in Eritrea in 2011 in the DC Metro, at the end of which; you also shared another article you wrote a year earlier about language. I have read neither when they came out, I am sure as heck pleased you availed it for your readers because I just read both and will re-read both again later today. Another bonus is the reference in the first piece, one of which I have been wanting to get hold of is Ahmed Raji’s “…Lost Rainbow”. However, when I tried to open it wouldn’t and when I tried the archives based on the date of citation you provide, there is no lost rainbow in the entire August 2009. Please help.

  • AOsman

    Selamt Saleh,

    For a moment I thought it was a photoshop, if it is latsaito, he should use the Bisha gold to scrub his skin with until it bleeds :), that is what I saw a friend doing…………..it worked…….but am always skeptical of traditional medicine, unless it is a good treat….like that for nifio, chicken pox.

    The facial hair removal done by the Pakistani barber, I found very fascinating and the way they move their head forward and backward. I once went to an Egyptian barber and asked for no 1 cut all round, then kept quite to let him do the job. He just kept on and on, steamed my face and a scrub I never had in my life, he “literally” removed my 6 layers of skin and sent me back home with 1. When I left I could feel my face skin tight and I never went back again.

    Now that you have invited the Saxophone lovers, brace for it as the barrage of links come your way. At least you came up with a solution to keep them all packed in one thread, while following the other debates.

    Regards
    AOsman

  • Amanuel

    Hi Saleh

    Thanks for the entertaining article, I have enjoyed reading it, though you have got to find a place in your heart for Saxophone, it is a cool instrument, played and enjoyed by cool people like Bill clinton.

    On another note, you said you were as Tegadlay around Barda’a, have you seen my eggs? This is a true story, during the 1977-78, when the Eritrean movements (EPLF & ELF) imposed economic blockage against Asmara. All food items were not allowed to get in to Asmara. As most Asmara residents during the late of 1975, we (our family including may dad) left the city and went to our Village, but after about a year my dad got feed up with village life and went back to Asmara and resume his work. After a year or so, my mum told me “in two days we are going to Asmara and see your dad, your friends and our cousins’, I was very exited, I missed my dad, friends and Asmara in general. I was very young, I think, about seven, but i understood there was food shortage in Asmara and I have decided to collect as many eggs as i can and take them with us. I have asked my two grad mums, my aunts and managed to collect about 30 eggs. I was like a modern fundraiser, asking any one who I thought close enough to contribute. Then, the D-day arrived, we set off accompanied by my grad dad and his donkey. I was on the back of the donkey and there was some crops as well. My mum carrying my little brother on her back and the basket of eggs on the other hand. When we got the the outskirts of the village we were stopped by three Tegadelti (ELF) and our food items were confiscated including my eggs. My mum and grad dad beg them that this is for personal consumption, but all their pleas landed on a deaf ear, even one of the Tegadelti tried to hit my grad dad with stick he was holding but my mum got in between them, and told my grad dad to forget it and continue our journey. My grad dad was quite a character, in his young age, he was fighter (tradition KaAlsi) and hunter. But he was forced to continue his journey like mouse. I can read the humiliation he felt on his face. But the good news was that, when I told my friends and cousins in Asmara, that I did bring them some eggs but Tegadelti confiscated them, they didn’t care. Their question was you saw tegatelti, what do they like like? Eat or dress? They could’t believe my luck i was with tegadelti. This was due to the status of the personalty of tegadaly/ tegadalit enjoyed among the population of Asmara, specially the young. Since then this incident affected me, specially when I joined the EPLF, if there is an incidence involving the civilians and tegadelti, i was always on the look out and defend the civilians, at times the surprise of my comrades. I am sorry, I have to let it out, this case has been bothering me for ages, when ever i met an ax ELF, who tells says he was around Barda’a, what comes to my mind is, was him? Or, had he has any thing to do with my egg?

    • Saleh Johar

      Hi Amanuel,
      You are sure you had thirty eggs? Because EPLF combatants believed we lived on eggs, belAti enqwaqho. I think you carried potatoes :-). I haven’t seen that much eggs in one basket when I was there, I stayed in Barda for two days on two potatoes a day. However, Your experience is sad, glad nothing worse happened– it wa a tense situation.

      • Amanuel

        Hi Saleh
        Yes, I had a about 30 eggs and I have heard that nick name as well. There was another one, I think it was, tewolwalay ZeiTi. Like i said most of the eggs were for my friends & cousins who were happy to miss them as far as I keep telling them about tegadelti. What remains with me was the experience of witnessing the humiliation of my grand dad. Still, i don’t understand why the ELF & EPLF chose to treated the civilians badly, while claiming they were struggling on their behalf. I am sure the current treatment of our people at the hands of PFDJ is a continuation of that policy.

        • Saleh Johar

          No Amanuel,
          It’s Always there. We have bad and good people. For many youngsters, carrying a Klashnikov and being louded as a tegadaly inflated their ego. Besides it was a force of fighters, little trained on how to deal with the public. Blame it mainly on ignorance and some sddnet. Such behaviors have been there and will always be.

          Yes, I always tease Abraham Negassi of the EPLF propaganda song which wS composed to discredit him. Abraham was elegant, clean and resolute. They didn’t like his character so the composed a song:
          Abraham Negassi Tewelwli zeiti
          Hinna terifuwo k’kgewn sebeyti….
          General Mahmuday should remember the rest, but Semere heard it when it was pirated to Kessela 🙂 but it became an instant hit.

          • Semere Andom

            Abu Saleh:
            tim alaya:
            “tegadalit jebha abkndi kelashin…….”

          • Amanuel

            Hi Saleh
            I am not sure about the attitude of senior leaders of ELF to ward the civilians, you know better than me on this. But when it comes to the EPLF leaders they didn’t see it as the problem. It was like “gebar denbar” attitude. Aregawi Berh mentioned in his book, that he was shocked to witness the attitude of Sbhat Efrem to wards civilians (who happened to be the head of public administration at that time). Aregawi claims that what Sbhat said was the worst crime under TPLF.

            I heard about Abraham Tekle, but I haven’t heard about Abraham Negassi, please tell me about him.
            Thanks
            Amanuel

          • Amanuel Hidrat

            Correct Saleh, but it was popular in the highland, more so in the akelguzay areas where Abraham Negassi was assigned.

            Regards

      • saay7

        Ha ha ha:

        So that’s where the legend of “ተጋደልቲ ዓማ በላዐቲ እንቃቅሖ” started! I think your guys should have a Special Rapporteur to investigate what happened to Amanuel’s eggs.

        saay

    • Mahmud Saleh

      Hey Aman
      Didn’t you see a handsome young tegadalay with godana hidmo who was peppered with niceties by the villagers because the legend said he cured their cows while scrambling their eggs?
      For ustaz Saleh
      I don’t know how the balaEti enQaQHo stuck, but it was a widely used propaganda tool.
      There was another one too: tewelwelti zeyti.
      Caution: this is Monday’s dardasha.

      • Semere Andom

        Hi teg. MS:
        someone is getting senstive. Those of us who are fans of he “hinna teriffwo” get your dardasha:-)
        But I thought dardasha was reserved fr Wedsdays:-)

        • Mahmud Saleh

          Hala ya semere
          I swear I was expecting your interjection. Well, I didn’t want to finish the two-liner rhymes. You take half of the responsibility if things get awry.
          You seem to be doing fine after all the concerted counter – attack led by azmachu abi. Bruises are OK, they heal fast. The great Ted welcomed you on behalf of talaQu merih Ato Mahmuday, but you ignored him. You know you are going to pay heavily for that. They say he never forgets nor forgives.

  • Kokhob Selam

    Dear All,

    if it was allowed to have an art on this day I could have started by saying
    ኣለኻ ዶ ኣንታ ኣሊ ባባ –
    ትስዕስዕ ዶ ምስ ነጸላ ድርባ –
    ሳክስፎነይ ናጽነት ረኺባ –
    ኣብ ጎይላና ብማዕረግ ቀሪባ –

    see you on Saturday.

  • Mahmud Saleh

    Dear Saleh
    Beautiful. Entertaining. A typical Negarit voice. You always remind me of the late Andy Rooney of CBS. Every Sunday, I would wait for his segment which came at the end of “60 Minutes” faithfully.

    • Saleh Johar

      Thank you Mr. Prime Minister, or is it Defense. The Shum-Shir is so fast I lost track 🙂

  • tes

    Dear Saleh Johar,

    I can’t stop laughing! The cartoon speaks all! haha Ali Baabe!!!

    Funny

    tes

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