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U-TURN

To start by getting this out of the way and for those who may care to know, my real name, if there is anything real about names, is Younis Hossein (for details, I would be glad to have an autobiography ready for you and we can always negotiate the price). I have in the few times that I managed to write anything been using the Pen Name “Ali Salim”. My apologies to anyone to whom this might have caused any inconvenience – above all the Awate Team and especially my good friend Saleh “Gadi” Johar (for taking some good knocks). For some reason, I seem to like the Pen Name better and if you all do not mind, I will keep using it. However, that is not what I am writing about, and please do not ask any more questions. Excuse me – here is a New Born and a total Amnesia.

Disclaimer: This is not an academic journal written for the esoteric value of intellectual consumption – it is a blog written on personal initiative to promote a specific ideological point of view of the PFDJ paradigm. SENSITIVE READERS – PLEASE, STAY OUT.

I have become an evangelist and I am on a mission to convince you to join me in taking the detour and making a U-Turn. It took me a few years to understand that we are heading the wrong way and to gather some courage, stand up and say, “I am sorry” – tetallile antum metalelti. I am serious by the way! “Metaleli” is always the case when you follow the policy: “Zib’ee, siga ms’belwo, nabey keybele goyu”. I might, in my “Zib’ee” state, have done some biting, but it was all with the intention of forcing people to talk about what I considered to be “of critical urgency”. Once, “what I considered critical” had been settled (by almost all taking note of the seriousness of the subject and many of those who took an initiative in response shooting it out or flashing it down) I had nothing to say and very few to listen (a point of saturation was reached). Therefore, I quit.

My primary argument has always been this: if you take the “land grabbers” (and, hence, all competing ethno-religious interests) out of the equation of Eritrean politics, the best alternative that Eritrean politics can ever offer (given the circumstances and the “opposition” that you don’t need me to tell you more about) is the PFDJ (defined in terms of a one-man-show). In whatever I will be writing from now on, I have in response to the wish of the majority of readers taken “the land grabbers” out of the equation (and with them of course their governance structure: the “neo-Nazi” dimension). I have simply assumed them out: we have never seen or heard of them, they have never existed and “indi’elom”.

Hence what I will write is nothing but what a good PFDJ should be writing at his or her best.  I am expecting this to be a reasonably long set of articles hoping that it would contribute renewed energy to our political debates. This article is “dah’sas” (a survey of points of resistance) to why so many people are insisting on heading the wrong way even when they know it is a no-go. Why did I do that myself? One reason why any two of us would disagree, on virtually everything (such as whether that thing that just took off flying is “abagumbaH”), is partly because we do not have shared tools of arriving at conclusions. I am hereby sharing how I ended up on the U-Turn. Anyone may Google any of the terminologies and concepts and so I have not added any references in order not to restrict their definitions to standard academic interpretations. All the words used here mean what I have said they mean. If there is any conflict with how a certain concept is usually used in academic literature, please use their conception as used in this article. The arguments, here and forward, rest on one assumption: that “ALL OTHER THINGS REMAIN EQUAL”. This is to say that whatever we may imply in our writings (or the writings of any human being), is pure speculation – not reality – because reality is so complex that it can never be written, described, represented or even known by mortal humans, who are themselves part of the things they claim to know. Nothing has confused philosophers, old and new, more than the challenge of proving that we actually know what we claim to know. That is why Muslims add after every claim of knowledge the profound statement: “Allahu-A’elem” (God is the Knowing).

My hope is that we try to rationalize possible ideological underpinnings of the PFDJ paradigm and to invite all Eritreans irrespective of their positions on the PFDJ or the Opposition to come over. Here, I will try to promote the idea that there is no credible opposition (that you can trust) to the PFDJ regime (“regime” defined as system of rules that govern) and that whatever the opposition organizations as we have known them for years have been doing so far was “selling out” on Eritrea. I need to say a few words to show that, what I mean is not pointing fingers to specific “sell outs”.

The claim rests on a consequentialist point of view, where our struggles are judged by the consequence of what we do, not by our intentions or material inputs into the production process. Given what you know about the history and practice of Eritrean politics, your starting point (I am sure) is that “the PFDJ is good intentions with bad consequences – the opposition is bad intentions with potentially good consequences”. Of course we may argue endlessly about who has better intentions and “how do we know” – but that is the subject of the debate that this “zereba Hareg” is supposed to introduce. However, I do not think there is much argument (especially in an extreme opposition website hosting our debates) about the second part of the claims: that the PFDJ is bad consequences – the opposition is potentially good “unintended” consequences.

Assuming basic rationality in most of us, you would expect ordinary Eritreans to apply the logic of “nifelTo sheyTan – kab’zeynifelTo mel’akh” and vote for the PFDJ. If you are of the kind that believes “the PFDJ is good intentions with bad consequences – the opposition is bad intentions with potentially good consequences”, the logic you would be applying is actually: “nifelTo mel’akh – kab’zeynifelTo sheyTan”. In theological terms (I assume in all the religious inspirations that I believe structure the way we reason) the proposition is that an angel (mel’akh) is innocent and always with good intentions. It cannot be assumed, that all the consequences of the deeds of angels produce good things. On the other hand, a devil (sheyTan) is inherently with evil intentions, and by the same logic, we cannot claim, that all the deeds of devils always (without exception) produce bad things. You probably have your own reflection of things you did and are sure were the motivations of “sheyTan” but nevertheless would not argue that the experience itself (judged categorically as an end independent of the means) was a net plus on your “utility function”. You also have many counter examples to the contrary of the claim above, where you got in trouble (bad outcome) for trying to help someone (good intention). However, because religion is about the purity of means, not ends, we are always advised to side with angels against devils not only because in repeated trials good intentions are more likely to produce good results but also because good intentions are ends in themselves.

You go to the grave with your means (intentions) not with the ends that those intentions achieved in this world. In the next world you will be deprived of all capabilities, (you will not need to dream if you are in heaven, where all dreams are true – you would not be able to dream if you are in hell). Ends are of this world and this world alone. If you jump into a river to save a drowning person, it does not matter whether you actually saved that person or whether he/she died in the process – you still get the same credit. We call martyrs all those who died in battles that we won as well as those who died in battles that were lost.  In the case of the drowning person, for instance, the outcome of your action is irrelevant as it is what you do that matters – not what others do to you. Based on your intentions, you decide whether your action was good. You are the only one who can do that because you are the only one who can possibly know the goodness of your intentions. Based on the outcome of your action, the other (second) person decides whether your action was good. Only that person can know and hence decide if you did a good job. God as we all know judges each individual on his/her own and that implies two things: (1) there is no “Class Action” in the next world, (2) there is no good-intention charity that flows from one person to the next. Even in those stories where whole populations are stomped for transgression, God’s actions are never arbitrary and indiscriminate. Similarly, even the Prophet could not save his own father with his own good intentions.

Say if we had only two criteria (and in fact there are only two criteria that make sense in cases of responsible evaluation of action): (1) intention as means, (2) outcome as end. Which criteria would we (responsible and prudent citizens) be applying to judge whether the PFDJ regime is good and hence deserves our support or bad and hence deserves our blind condemnation? Having seen the horrific stories of “slave labor”, refugees and horrors at sea, I have no doubt that even the PFDJ people would not argue that applying the “outcome” criteria is the way to go. In fact, that is what classic PFDJ supporters actually do and that, I believe, is why they keep losing supporters. They keep stubbornly defending the construction of micro-dams and achievements in education, health care, and above all the border and cross-border conspiracies with the neighbors trying to play down the horrific costs of those achievements. Applying the logic described in the preceding paragraphs, only the first-person can make any legitimate claim on intention and only on intention (nothing more than intention). The actual fruits of those intentions are the exclusive domain of the second-person (those employed as means to those intentions as well as those final consumers of the fruits).

You may have made the conclusion that the outcome from PFDJ’s action is terrible; and hence either the intention is irrelevant to you deciding on whether to support the PFDJ; or you have drawn your decision backwards from the statement that “bad intentions lead to bad results”. Applying the reverse logic, you would say, if the outcome is bad it is more likely than not that the intention was bad. “Intention” here is broadly defined to include and reflect all ideological, institutional and policy expressions of the means that one employs to deliver outcomes. Say the PFDJ has a dictatorial regime as a means to achieving its ends, then the intention we are talking about is the expression that finds itself in the dictatorial regime and everything about the PFDJ is nothing but “intention”.  One way I believe (the only way) to know you have made the right choice is to check the consistency of your choice process. How about applying your choice process to post-Saddam Iraq where there is a relatively much more democratic regime with elections and freedoms. If you were an ordinary Iraqi citizen, would you say what you have now is better than what you had under Saddam? I am not trying to pick a bad example and feel free to pick any other country where change did occur such as Egypt, or Syria or Libya (just stay close to the region for fair comparability).

Of course, you would turn the table on me and say “intention” as expressed in the “democratic” institutions of these countries is perfect (at least much better than a dictatorial regime), even if the outcome (just as the PFDJ’s) is horrible. If we ended up justifying the PFDJ on consideration of “intention” irrespective of the catastrophic ends, we should have no problem justifying other regimes on the same grounds. However, what you would effectively be saying is that intention, whether it is expressed in democratic or dictatorial regimes, is irrelevant. Or at least, you would be admitting that intention is at its best only one factor that may or may not lead to predetermined ends. If you have a TV at home and are able to see for yourself and entertain the possibility that the damage that the “democratic intention” caused in Iraq, Libya and Syria at least is much more immediate and horrific than that caused by the “dictatorial intention”, you would be able to entertain this fact: where intentions go wrong in translating into coherent institutional means, the destructiveness of the “democratic intention” is actually much larger than that of the “dictatorial intention”.

Most Eritreans and many peoples under dictatorships know this fact and that I believe is why every call for the so-called “democratic alternative” comes crumbling under one question: when something does go wrong, under which regime would it be possible to restore order more easily than in the other? I don’t think you would even try to convince people who have known nothing other than disasters that nothing would ever go wrong. Moreover, this I believe is because democracy empowers individuals and groups at the expense of the totalizing power of the state. Dictatorship empowers the totalizing power of states at the expense of intention of individual liberties. And the state is nothing but a totalizing intention.

It is your responsibility and that of any political entity to define the “Categorical Imperative” of good intention. Intention, as you know, is not a straight line that can go either way – it is a vector with direction. For instance, if you say “I have an intention to buy a car”, there are a few things that you are saying without saying (basic economics). At the very least you are saying: (a) “I have a gap in my utility, that I want to fill with what the car will offer to me”; (b) “I have an idea of what the car is capable of offering to me”; and (c) “I know how my state of utility will be transformed when I actually buy the car”. The reason we do not say all these things is that, “they are known” and therefore internalized in the definition of the word “intention”. Every intention (means) necessarily has more than just an end built into it. The end need not be unique to the means, and there might be ends without means (such as those ends in dreams) but there can never be means without ends predetermined.

Anything that is “predetermined” then necessarily rests on the assumption that “ALL THINGS REMAIN EQUAL” because it involves a process of knowing. As defined or presumed in this article and subsequent ones, you do not apply a process of knowing to something that is known just like you did not bother to say all those things just to say you intend to buy a car. Knowing is beyond known and hence is prediction and prediction is probability that, in every single trial, has a much greater chance of turning wrong than right. Known is the situation where ALL THINGS WERE NOT EQUAL. It is what you get after everything that could possibly go wrong, in every iteration of your intention processing, did actually go wrong. A baby stumbling between the coffee table and a chair is in the process of knowing how to walk. Walking for you is known, and you probably appreciate that, learning actual walking, required more than hoping that ALL THINGS REMAIN EQUAL except for the teacher’s input that you hoped would work. Hence, you cannot even explain if you know how to walk or describe if your walking is different from any other way of walking (of comparable creatures). You just stand and do it. You can help babies to stand on their feet and walk but you can certainly not teach babies to know how to walk. Known things are internalized into reflexive action – and reflexive action is the exclusive intransitive function of the self. Known things become part of you and you cannot isolate a part of you and know it independent from the rest of you.

I know it sounds crazy but it is an important premise when later we try to challenge those who fall into the temptation to “democratize” Eritreans – i.e. those who would apply a process of knowing to connect Eritreans to predetermined end of specific forms of democratic institutionalism. We will come to this in later articles but just think of the following for illustration. Once you have determined that the intention of Eritrea should be to set up a well-defined and specific form of democracy (say elections), then just like the example above: (a) Eritrea has a gap in its utility that can be filled with democracy (say election, for simplicity); (b) you know what democracy will offer to Eritrea; and (c) you know the state transformation that will take place when a democratic regime has been implemented in Eritrea. Mind you: you are not talking about something as trivial as an individual deciding to buy a car, where if something does go wrong with the car it is very unlikely that it would usher-in a national catastrophe. The magnitude of the implicit claim in something as simple as “Eritrea should implement this or that democratic system”, should be understood in light of the discussion above. Presumably, for both the claimant and his/her object of analysis, Eritrea, the answers to those questions are known. This of course means that both parties has so internalized the prerequisites of democratic practice into their reflexive action they do not even think of the answers to those questions as implicit in their claims.

Now compare these grand claims with the PFDJ’s version of what Eritrea should intend to do. The PFDJ’s philosophy starts from the proposition that Eritrea is not a baby, where we may presume a clean slate that would sponge and absorb spoon-fed new knowledge completely replacing existing internalized knowledge. I do not think you would disagree with that simple proposition that Eritrea did not fall from the sky. Hence, you would agree that Eritrea is a culmination of a system of historical dynamics. You cannot imply any history to thinking human beings without also implying at least two things: (a) presuming existing internalized knowledge (stored in some form of collective reflexive impulse); and (b) some system of accumulation and internalization of that knowledge. If you agree that once something is known (and hence internalized into some reflexive system), it would be reasonable to expect limitations to forms of intentions that would be compatible with the bounds of expectations that may be presumed on the capabilities of the reflexivity of the system as a whole. Even if you assume zero reflexivity (i.e. no subconscious resistance to change), people do not live in vacuums and they will still be bound by some resistant reflexivity introduced by material circumstances in their environment.

You may shoot this argument down by simply pointing out that it is the PFDJ, which is assuming Eritrea was born in 1991. It is the PFDJ, which is trying to download all kinds of spam-software on Eritreans. Your challenge would then be to propose an alternative premised on the same logic that recognized the restrictions imposed by stored knowledge.

You may also point to the inherent flaw in the argument: the assumption that Eritrea’s collective reflexive impulse is incompatible with election-centered democratic change. If you do that, you would be caught-up in the chicken and egg question: do elections bring democracy or does democracy bring elections? The PFDJ as you know views democracy as a set of guiding principles, whose compatibility, to what we have described as collective reflexive impulse, must be proven through a protracted process of trial and error. The difference between the two views is a difference of degree in that while one side holds the intention of a “top-down radical change to democracy”, the other envisions a gradual and “bottom-up piece-by-piece process of transformation”.

The only material difference between the two views lies in that: while one party views elections as the starting point of democratic transformation, the other (PFDJ) views elections as the culmination of a process of democratic transformation. The first view of course has been tried in the “democratizations” of Palestinian Authority, Iraq, Egypt and Libya to say a few. There are very few who would argue that what followed the elections in each of those cases was the start of the anticipated democratic transformation that the election were supposed to trigger in the first place. These potential counter-examples to the rosiness of election-centered democratization initiatives do imply that those who promoted these ideas made unfounded claims in answering the three questions implicit in the statement of intentions (described above). For convenience, we may say, they did not have a sufficient specification of intentions. Now here is your question: if there is any chance our intention may be under-specified (by admitting that we do not know what will come out of it), would you not think the one who is raising the red flag on democracy has an equal chance of being right as the one raising the green?

Say you are someone who believes that elections do not create democracies, but democracies create elections. Here you would be defining elections as a “mechanism for administering existing democracies”. You would of course be suspicious of those who call on employing elections where no democracies pre-exist those elections and there is a good chance that the intention might be under-specified. If you assume that those promoting this kind of change are intelligent and rational people, and that as defined above you believe that every intention necessarily has a predetermined end built-into it, what kind of outcomes would you think they would be expecting out of elections? My guess is that, if you are extremely decent and have a bit of respect for the intelligence of the promoters, you would say they want elections for the least of what elections are supposed to achieve – regime change. That I believe is part of the logic behind the PFDJ’s fixation with the CIA. If you know of other alternative entities, other than the CIA,  that are running around changing regimes on this planet, please feel free to suggest.

Note:

Neither this article nor those that will follow is intended to bleach the sins of the PFDJ. Horrible things did take place and do continue to take place. However, it is one thing to say that horrible things have happened in Eritrea and we need to talk and find remedies so that they do not happen again. It is another thing to say that everything that happened in Eritrea was horror and terror.  It is one thing to point out that the regime is responsible for some of those horrors and even most of the horrors that happened to Eritreans. It is another thing to think that every tornado in the Diaspora was caused by a conspiracy in Asmara and it is another thing to hold the regime responsible for every fever that befalls an Eritrean across the planet. Shame on us for exploiting and abusing such horrible tragedies as those that Eritreans continue to face in the Sinai and the Mediterranean for cheap political ends and trivial PR campaigns.

Contrary to the mainstream of our opposition, the suggestion here is that the horrors did not happen because of the “one-man-show” (the Nsuness of the regime), but in spite of it. Let us assume that we entertain your view that the “one-man” is responsible for all the horrors and hence must go. What alternative are you suggesting, now that he has decided not to go? Don’t you think it is a little dumb and irresponsible to suggest we follow the Syrian example and torch the green and yellow in the process?

The hope here is to try to reverse the way we see Eritrea and interact with its developments towards the optimistic point of view that THE GLASS IS HALF-FULL – NOT EMPTY. There is much more that Eritrea and its people can gain by all of us doing our parts in defending its interests. No decent person would go to bed in peace having lobbied and kissed to restrict the possibilities of thousands of people who are literally digging the grounds with bare hands in search of a better future. If you are one of those who do that – Please do it during the night and in the dark – as a decent Eritrean, you make me sick. I am of the conviction that we can do better.

About Ali Salim

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  • Amanuel Hidrat

    Merhaba Saay,

    What Amazes me is, your mind is the archive of Awate.com even something which is not in awate.com itself. Good to have someone who has archive-mind which is inaccessible boot drive difficult for virus to attack. You are a damn good. You See Sal your argument has always fluidity which no ordinary people can follow it. Believe me. You say many thing in one topic that implies many things. When you move from one idea to another idea you never leave it without connection to your previous idea and I always see at the end of every essay of yours a suspension thread waiting for a new thought argument to fit in. No regular politician will understand your position and your thought process except few savvy politicians.

    From the days of “twgah imo” to your last article in this home of diversity idea website (aside the ones in the 90s) I am following the trend of your position and your thought process. It scares me a lot. Is Saay is going to make a U-Turn political course like of that another dynamic man “Younis Hossein” an angry man who has always a provocative idea? Well, Well, I hope not. Your argument of separating “Issays from the culture of the organization” or of your believing Issayas is the culture, and by removing him the culture of the organization will fade away is a fodder prepared by an artistic creation of genius man for the consumption of the average and below average men/women of our population (in the exercise of Eritrean politics).

    What does it provokes me to to pen down this? It is your last comment to SalaliA and the link of your article you provided us. In your article in its sub-heading “the culture factor” pulls me to say something. Let me quote from your piece then: ” Adhanom gives further examples in his aforementioned The Hybrid Philosophy of the PFDJ.” Adhanom who was one of the main actors of PFDJ then, was trying to explain the hybrid philosophy culture of the organization not of Issayas. And further when he explained to you about the prevailing culture, he said “the ruling regime in Eritrea is one based on “Jahran, TimkiHtin, Hasotn”—bragging, superiority complex and lying”. Adhanom the product of that culture who knows better than us about the political culture of PFDJ is testimony for us that he is fighting now against the PFDJ culture. He knows a culture that took decades of years to have roots in the psychic of Eritrean people can be altered by removing by removing one or two or three men from that political circle will give birth to new political culture. And according to you speaking about that culture “it turns out, suffering silently is also a defining feature of the same culture. We think to suffer quietly is a form of piety.” Indeed, it is a form of piety of that political culture (of PFDJ) understood and accepted by all its members. So my friend Saleh are you trying to make a U-turn from that understanding to a different understanding? Or are you giving them a ground for argument to PFDJ to make a kind of lip service argument in their political rebuttal like of that of the “medrek” to give them a green light to the driving seat?

    Obviously, I am not making any judgement but I am connecting your arguments from early on up to now to see the logic of your movement whether it has a consistency or not, in terms your principal argument and whether all your arguments fits and enhances to your principal argument. Now don’t ask me what is your principal argument? Just check them and open the archive of your memory. All the years, the fight was against PFDJ and its culture and now against the single man. Hisebelu De’A. I could visualize how the chips of your mind running to sort them out to answer my questions. Cheers!!!
    With all Respect,
    Amanuel Hidrat

    • saay7

      Selamat Emma and SelaliA:

      SelaliA: you talked about how senior government and party officials were corrupted by Ethiopia and the US, etc? How do you know that? Remember, in 2002 (that’s 12 years ago) the Eritrean National Assembly directed the President’s Office to inform the public about the the case the State has against the G-15. The President’s Office said, yeah, we will but it is tied to ongoing investigations we have. That was 12 years ago. Now, do you really believe that deep in your heart that, for example, Ogbe Abraha (one of only two full-star generals Eritrea produced) is guilty of treason?

      With respect to Abdella Jaber, the only reason you even know he is under arrest is because opposition media told you. Not only has the Isaias regime not brought a case against Abdella Jaber, it hasn’t even admitted it has arrested him. Now, honestly, is that the standard you apply to yourself? How would YOU like it if you, in your personal life, were accused of something, found guilty, without having a chance to defend yourself? Doesn’t that violate your standard of FAIRNESS? Isn’t that what you are upset about at the UN and US: that they violated the standard of fairness? How do you then accept for 14 years a standard of common decency and fairness being violated? Hsebelu de’a.

      Emma:

      Thanks for your ever-generous words. I have a long line of friends, acquaintances, family members who would dispute a virtue you attribute to me–excellent memory–and they would be right. My memory is very selective.

      Now then, first a correction: the “suffering quiety is a form of piety” is an extrapolation of what Dawit Mesfin believes based on his interview with Michella Wrong: she quotes him in her book (“I Didn’t Do It For You”) as having said that “quietude” is ingrained in the Spartan Eritrean culture. So, that is not a Meda/ELF/EPLF culture; it is an Eritrean society culture that has nothing to do with Ghedli.

      Second: Remember that selective memory? Ok, here it goes: the story that Adhanom Gebremariam told about an EPLF central committee meeting in 1990 about Big Names accepting Isaias Afwerki verdict is very similar to the story of the incomparable Aklilu Zeru* told about the future EPLF central committee meeting accepting meekly a verdict Isaias Afwerki passed in 1976. Here it is:

      “The meeting took three days in complete secrecy. Out of all that was discussed there, there was one question I will never forget. If my memory served me right it was raised by Afa. The question was about the situation (kunetat) of the imprisoned Menkat.

      “Isaias, as I have observed him on many occasions, had a habit (by design of course) of sitting three feet away from everyone, thus disturbing (breaking) the perfect circle of the attendees. The closest persons sitting besides him were Sibhat to his left and Sherifo to his right.

      “Isaias brusquely answered the question by saying- in his exact word- ” they are done”…(tewediu iu) and in a threatening gesture said the question should not be raised by anyone, anymore.

      “I reflexively looked at the faces. It was dark and I was sitting between [Ibrahim] Afa and Mesfin Hagos and what I saw froze me in time: abject trepidation.

      “There and then I knew that I couldn’t stay in that organization any more.”

      http://www.ehrea.org/The%20birth%20of%20despotism.htm

      That was 1976, Emma. So, while I have a great deal of respect for Adhanom Gebremariam, and while I will listen to his first-hand testimonies of what happened, I have to respectfully disagree with his assessment that it was the ideology that created the man (Isaias) and that if any other Central Committe member had prevailed and become president of Eritrea, they would have been just as bad as worse than Isaias. Nope, Isaias was always Primus inter pares: first among equals. All the EPLF claim to a culture of “collective decision making” simply meant this: Isaias came with 50% of the vote, and all the others had to compete to get the 1% and then they said, “oh, it is collective decision making: it is a consensus decision!”

      To imagine EPLF without Isaias Afwerki is like Apple without Steve Jobs. He was, since its founding, its alpha male. The EPLF culture was the Isaias Afwerki culture; the PFDJ culture is the Isaias Afwerki culture. This is because, as Herui T Bairou explained, while the rest of Jebha and Shaebia were lost in “the mist of idealism”, Isaias was busy creating his permanent power base. Or as an Agelglot told a Yka’alo: ኣንታ ንስኹም ጀብጀብ ኽትቋነኑን: ሳጓ ከተውጹን: ኢሳይያስ ቢሮ ሒዙ ይጽሕፍ ንየሩ:: While you were braiding each other’s hair and picking cute nicknames for each other, Isaias was busy writing (the plan for his permanent presidency)

      Going back to my evolution…well, Emma: There was a time that I believed firmly that Isaias can evolve and the absolute way to ensure he doesn’t evolve is to confront him. there was a reason why I didn’t join G-13. Now, I believe that PFDJ 2.0 (which, I am sorry to say, is going to be a Second Republic) cannot happen with Isaias Afwerki at the helm because he cannot be reformed—but the PFDJ surely can because it is doing whatever it is doing to enforce the Isaias vision and not necessarily because it believes it.

      And, come on, Emma, if you are going to pick the Arab Spring as an example, you cannot pick the one that is the exception–Tunisia–as the rule. Please consider Ali Salim’s input and focus on Egypt, Libya, Yemen and Syria. These are countries that answered the question, “nothing could be worse than this” with, “oh, yes, there can be.”

      saay

      *Aklilu The Great, we miss you terribly at awate. We know why you are absent: I just want to say we miss you and awate is not the same without you.

    • SM

      Wedi Hidrat,
      Here you go Aman–Do NOT live in “Yesterdays”.
      What if Sal is making a U-Turn–in fact, a legal ONE?The guy knows what he is talking about and every thing he says,as you may agree, makes a ” perfect” sense,except when he acts like a simple human being.
      That is my point,i.e.,try to balance things and avoid extreme actions and thoughyts as they will never help us to resovle our problmes.
      Compromise!!!!
      Respect each other and each others’ opinion!!
      Come to the table!!
      Give DIALOG a chance -;avoid being prematurely judgemental.
      Make Legal “U-TURNS”!!
      Reconciliation without preconditions,would have been the Pefect Solution,but your “extremism and exclusionism” wil take us NO WHERE.
      Let’s practise what we preach!!

    • SM

      But it is a ” Consensus” thing though.What if the majority wants ” a parliamentary” Election system rather than the messy African Pseudo–democracy style.I think the Good professor clarified it as to why we would like to have a ” Parliamentary” style considering the complex-ethno-religious culture in our system.
      Are you ok wuith the EPRDF style,where the party picks up its leader?
      If so, then why is it aproblme in eritrea?
      Your arguement makes a perfect sense in an ” ideal ” situation but you have to take into consideration the complexity of the system.
      Weeding out PFDJ culture may not be as easy as you may think and it may take yrs to do so.But why can’t we try the “easier” and more practical way ?
      Just a thought.

  • haile

    Hey Rodab (I am bringing up our discussion here since it is straight forward: can PFDJ be reformed?)

    Let me first say that no need to part ways ምስ መን ገዲፍካና ክትከይድ ኣንታ? let’s work it through, you never know, we might bridge the gap 🙂

    To me the notion of “Reformed PFDJ” is a day dream. Imagine what it means in reality. All of its past transgressions would be whitewashed, all its victims shoved out of the way, all its arrested political development making a sudden comeback, all its tarnished image wiped clean and it would all be hunky-dory and back to the good old early 90s.

    Even if we were to play dummies to assume that it is that easy to simply press the RRW button and start again, you have a big impediment in the nature of IA. After all this years of thoroughly humiliating, insulting, degrading and brutalizing the Eritrean people, do you ever see IA ever coming to terms to speak and act as one among equals in the nation? Such a person would go down in the manner he lived all his life. True, it is terrifying to imagine how bad the end result would be, but would even be more terrifying to see people lured into such daydreaming of a non-possibility scenario.

    Here is the crux of the contradiction, in order to support the reform of PFDJ, one needs to support PFDJ. Reform is essentially an internally driven process and not a powerful wish projected by interested outsiders (the people). There are indeed good people such as yourself who wish well and peaceful resolution to current quagmire of our country. But, there is no sign of such conciliatory tone from the regime itself or its blood stained operatives. The regime is on record calling for armed conflict inside the country and bluffing the the Eritrean people’s call for peaceful handover of power to the people. The regime’s ambassador in Israel has made such an open call for armed confrontation not once but twice. Parroting this, many of the regime’s operatives incessantly indulge in their invincible military prowess to quash any insurrection aimed at restoring rule of law. This is how low the regime can go. It not only set the stage to leave Eritrea under arms embargo, unable to defend itself legally, but also wish to ignite civil war that it hopes would trigger an intractable internal conflict that would cover its crimes by creating new facts in the ground. Few people remember about the crimes of Said Barre in Somalia now that they have more recent tragedies to deal with, the same logic is applied here.

    To hope an organization like PFDJ that is reported to have murdered and detained, without recourse to law, its top leadership people that asked it to reform barely less than 12 months ago, to reform and deliver on anything tangible that would break the current dead-lock of isolation, misery and tense instability is indeed a day dream.

    እዋእ ክካረጅ ዝደለየ ድማ ይፈትና፡ ኣብኣ’ረኽባ 🙂

    • Saleh Johar

      Okay Haile, your greatness is restored. Weed the bastards out of power and politics. Put the instigator general, the abuser in chief and his known associate criminals behind bars. The rest, either the courts or a reconciliation panel can take care of.

      • haile

        Saleh, are on for “by all means necessary?” approach though? Saay seems to toy with this “minimal violence” theory. When kids fight, sometimes they set the rule “Testa zebla” but end up blowing their heads like bulls with horns once they get going 🙂 Let’s check with qedamay zur saay first 🙂

        • SM

          Haile ” The Great” said that?
          Uffff,thank God!
          I thought you are one of the “BEST Students” of Meles Zenawi.
          By the way, can you give me a single example where an Eritrean,who was robbed off his/her lifetime earnings during 1998-1999 inhumane deportation claimed back any thing?
          The AIGA Forum and Tigray-online have different stand though, FYI, Haile “the Great”.
          My family lost a hotel and bakery/cakery but we failed to reclaim them.
          Sorry dihri ghibri—-too late.
          You CANNOT remove that SCAR by any kind of surgery–be it excisional procedure or latest Laser Therapy.
          A theoretical and rhetoric reaction by PIA–saying : “We can strike at the middle of Addis”, should NOT have led to that inhumane deportation.Yeah, I guess, you were not or your family might have not been victim(s) of such an atrocity.

      • Jo

        What an extremely irresponsible thing to say!!! You people; Saleh Johar, Haile, and Haile Zeru, your hearts are so twisted with hate you have veered from the Eritrean way of civility and magnanimity. To hate the system or the people who are running it is one thing, but to immerse the whole nation into an endless cycle of retribution and counter – retribution is another. Having all the shortcomings of the GOE in mind, when I think of the alternative (you guys), it scares me to death. if you start huffing and puffing to wag you sword now, I wonder what you are going to be doing, God – forbid, when you get to power. The notion of change at all cost is a luxury entertained only by those who are far away and who are going to be impacted the least by the aftermath. Thank you, but no Thank you!!!

        I think the key issue is the implementation of the constitution, let us all push for its implementation, and everybody will be held responsible for their actions accordingly. The rest is stupidity if you ask me.

        ” The greatest enemy of knowledge is not ignorance…. it is the illusion of knowledge” Stephen Hawking.

        • Rodab

          Good point Jo.
          Some people put too much focus on what to do with the PFDJ or how to punish them as if that is all there is to it to deal with Eritrea’s problems.

        • SelaliA

          [Moderator: watch your language. Don’t insult people.]

          Dearest Jo:
          No worries! They are just daydreaming anyway. If it were only that easy. These are people who live in the world of fantasies. People like haile “his greatness” are dreamers not doers. They dream about things in front of their computer and then they mistake that for some kind of “jigninet” or “action” while bashing the people who are true jignas and battlefield heros who sacrificed for their people and are now building the country from the ground up. Some of them are paid Weyane agents. Some of them are just plain internet geeks. It’s like that famous cartoon that shows a dog sitting in front of a computer and typing, “No body knows if you are a dog on the internet.” I can tell you that these Weyane xxxxxx xxxxxxx xxx xxx xxx xxx..

    • Rodab

      Hailat,
      Your argument is as clear as it can get, and it would even make more sense if the issue is a choice between good and better or bad and worse. But what we have here is a little more complicated than that.

      In connection to what I asked you earlier, let me set the scene and we will go from there. Let’s say one morning the nation wakes up to a breaking news of the removal of the president from power. Due to the lack of constituition, no one knows what happens next or who takes over the leadership role. As a result, confusion decends. Now, what would the general public do? At a critical moment such as this, where does the nation look for for a leadership? Do people expect the oppostion they might have heard exists somewhwere to suddenly show up and lead thru, or do they still go for the PFDJ with all of its shortcomings? To me the answer is obvious. Keep in mind I am not discounting the crimes and abuses the regime is responsiple for; its just there is no other realistic way where you can get rid off the entire leadership and find replacements somewhere.

      The orderly way of moving would be for a PFDJ with a significant improvement to lead the 4 to 5 years of transitional period at which point we will have an elected and mandated formal administration. Orderly way is the key here.

      • haile

        Hello Roadab,

        ( Let’s just overlook Jo’s and SelaliA’s views, as they are nothing more than self serving desperation)

        I do totally understand your wish to see a peaceful and orderly transfer of power. Truth be told, that is also the wish shared by great many Eritreans. This of course doesn’t invalidate the armed struggle waged by many people around the world for justice and democracy. Those peoples are no less bonded to each other than the Eritreans are. All conflicts have a set starting conditions and all have a certain ending points. The conditions for armed conflict would either exist or not. It is difficult to start or win an armed conflict when the situation is not ripe for it. Equally, it is next to impossible to prevent the start of an armed conflict should the ground is fertile for it. In a nut shell, it is not something to be wished for or against. A chain of events lead one after another and throw things out of control into an all out armed conflict.

        The ground for such conflict has long existed in our case but other important qualifiers also formed a counter resistance to the idea. The main of such issues were the current perceived hegemony across cultural and religious divides seem to have given a false impression of an unfolding nightmarish scenario should one try to change the status quo. Suppose if the current situation was to be the same but the Kunama were dominantly in power and causing the current miseries? I would have imagined many highland people would have raised arms. The same had been the case during the attack on ELF, i.e religion was a central factor. And, Eritreans were involved in conflict with each other unreservedly.

        The natural lever that moves a political struggle into an armed struggle have long completed several full revolutions past the needed trigger factors. IA has openly told the young generation to “go to the moon” if they desire change. Nothing can be clear cut than that. It is illogical when people say that it is those far away who promote armed conflict and not those nearby. That is a fallacy. Those faraway typically opt for prolonged and pacified resolution as they have little to suffer, where as those nearby have no option but be drawn into the prevailing situation as they have all to risk.

        Our wish is of course for a peaceful handover of power, but you can easily scan the posturing of the oppressing side and it is hard to imagine they would give in without the stick. Trust me, I am all for peaceful resolution but not that is intended to perpetrate injustice and lookout for one’s own. Your hypothetical situation is a good start. But seriously, you are saying that one day people wake up and find out that the pressure valve has been removed and they would casually and simply opt for the best available option and continue!!! So, why on earth do people worry about transitions if it was that simple. Among things that would happen under such scenario are:

        – Since some one/group must be responsible for bringing about the removal of the pressure valve, they would likely have their own set demands and conditions. And they may or may not have consensus.

        – The military operates within separate zonal commands that has no inter-zonal command and highly volatile rivalries

        – The people inside and outside would be more emboldened now that the source of their fear has been removed (trust me IA has destroyed the Eritrean self esteem so systematically that many are victims his intimidation)

        -There would be external interference due to the obvious power vacum and IA’s involvement and meddling on the affairs of others as well as unresolved external conflict.

        – Many family would demand immediate release of their loved one’s from PFDJ dungeons, total chaos and fallout from that due to mutual recriminations.

        – Mass uprisings of the youth in protest demanding demobilization, mass uprisings of hundreds of thousands of refugees in bordering countries to return to their country

        many many many more things….

        So, Roadab, tell me how it would be possible for you or anyone to ignore all the variables and reduce the eventuality to a matter of making a simplistic choices?

        It is damn if you do and damn if you don’t. The fear and reservation is understandable but must also be clear that no problem can be wished away or solution prayed for like a manna from heaven. Some say that this is the struggle of the new generation. The old generation managed to bring about independence but failed to institute even the most basic standards of freedom by African and third world standards. That generation, however, has done its part and passed the torch to the new one. The new generation has a responsibility to take any action that it deems right that would ensure its part that would be treasured by future generations. People in Eritrea are now openly calling PFDJ S’RAt shefatu…this is how bad things have gotten to. We all wish for peaceful and enduring resolution, but it is hugely hypocritical for us to state the preferred resolution when we have nothing to risk.

        Regards

        • Jo

          Haile,

          “Self serving…” Really???

          You said, “Suppose if the current situation was to be the same but the Kunama were dominantly in power and causing the current miseries? I would have imagined many highland people would have raised arms.” Then to support your “IMAGINATION” you said, “The same had been the case during the attack on ELF, i.e religion was a central factor. And, Eritreans were involved in conflict with each other unreservedly.” I think you are wrong to think that the conflict that was ignited between ELF and EPLF was supported by the whole population. No body, except those who were involved or belonged to those organizations, was involved. In the contrary the population either condemned it or withdrew from it because it couldn’t subscribe to the agenda of both organizations when it came to the internal conflict. Was there mistakes by the leadership of one organization or the other? Yes. Whose mistake was worse is just a matter of individual judgement. But that was organizational politics. To superimpose the organizational politics of yesteryears to the whole society (nation) and define it accordingly, then come up with wild imagination is beyond me. If that is not “self serving” I don’t know what is.

          You are right when you say, if the ground is ripe for any revolution then there will be a revolution. Where I don’t agree with you is, whether any revolution needs to be facilitated or not, either by inviting external actors or adding catalyst to it – in our case from Ethiopia to USA and wild imaginations of non existent tribal and religious resentments. It is like the physics of elasticity; if you stretch an elastic band hard enough it will reach its breaking point. Not to break it you have to relax it, if you didn’t it will break and it will change its form, for better or for worse, for good. That is a phenomena of nature. I believe if the GOE keeps stretching the society, there will be a point in time where the society will reach that crucial breaking point and revolt, if that happens then be it. That revolution, I believe, is a natural one and it will lead to more progressive social development; it is the result of either the system lagging behind or the society outgrowing the system.

          Either way, whether the government realizing its wrong ways and decides to change, or it goes beyond and the people revolt and bring change – change is good, and it is inevitable. Where I beg to differ is, the “A’Kli Tsibet” and the vendetta mind set (of some “self serving” individuals) that triggers the destructive desire to bring change at any cost.

          Luwam zelewo mealti!!

          • haile

            JO

            Notwithstanding that no section of response stated the Eritrean people supported the ELF/EPLF conflict, could we agree that it did actually take place? So can it be said that Eritreans were fighting each other? Does the fact that various Somali segments fought each other mean the Somali people as a whole supported their internal conflict? Why do you want to get to the low bottom of self service? In fact is there a party of any people who ignited war for the heck of it? Everyone does for a reason. Right? The Eritrean struggle for self determination was an Arab war by proxy as far as the oppressor of that time was concerned. The Eritrean struggle for justice is a Woyane/USA war by proxy as far as the current oppressor is concerned.

            If you are telling me that the ELF-EPLF conflict didn’t have the religious undertones sold to the respective peoples, then I would just have to retire it to the best of your self serving statement. Why do you think the Ethnic or religious based organizations find armed conflict as a first stop reaction more often and in many places? Janohoy metsi’u b’semay weylKa aslamay? wedi kristian nmedda wedi aslamay n’jeddah? and what was the reverse rhetoric from the other side? What was the undertones of Forto2013 used by the regime? You know something? We can’t just lie to each other to reconcile, truth and reconciliation are usually paired together. What are you serving by reducing the then politics to “organizational differences”? If you re-work the logic in reverse, it explains the reasons for our distinctive lack of eager to pick arms (there are those who did and others doing though).

            In a matter of opinion, I differ from you whether there could ever be any relaxation from the regime. My view is that the possibility for doing so does no longer exist. It is fraught with high stakes risk for the survival of the beleaguered regime to attempt any relaxation at this time/stage. It has far too fewer pieces left on the board and wouldn’t be able to properly guard its rear strongholds. It has reached a dangerous and delicate stage and many things can go wrong. Armed conflict is one among many problems ahead.

            There is nothing new in the denial of Eritrean’s birthright identity, attempt trying to link their legitimate call for justice to futile propagandist fear mongering. Regardless, there can only be one result in the end. Yet, we’re all entitled to our individual points of views.

          • Jo

            Haile,

            I agree with most of what you said. Ethnic and religious undertones have been used, by the organizations and those governments that came, before and after, to rule Eritrea, for political expediency. And they may have managed to fool some gullible sections of their constituents. My point is, and if I am wrong I am willing to be enlightened, would using certain undertone (ethnic or religious) for political expediency by any organization or government justify its existence in the bigger scheme of things? Don’t you think things like that are used for tactical manoeuvring to gain a timely advantage or to get sympathy by trying to show affiliation of anything (…people picking sea shell)? However vain they are, and they will remain as such – vanity. Don’t you think the Eritrean population rendered them vain by virtue of standing up for the rights of all, Moslems along side christians, lowlanders along side highlanders, merchants along side farmers…? During the struggle the priority was independence, now it is governing, rule of law, social justice and all that comes with it. Let us focus on the major issues and the vanities will fall in their place as a jigsaw puzzle once we get the pillars in place. Let us implement the constitution.

            In a matter of opinion, if the current government is beyond relaxation, as you said, then be it. Revolution! I am all for it. That may be our destiny in how to shape our nation, and as long as it is left for the Eritrean people to deal with it without the interference of external actors, I am hopefully confident on the civility and magnanimity of the Eritrean people to overcome any outcome.

          • Saleh Johar

            Jo,
            I totally agree with you that our situation is, “…like the physics of elasticity; if you stretch an elastic band hard enough it will reach its breaking point. Not to break it you have to relax it, if you didn’t it will break and it will change its form, for better or for worse, for good.”

            The PFDJ has stretched that elastic band and it is reaching its breaking point. That point could well be what we all are scared of. And I believe the fingers that are doing the stretching should be broken before the band snaps.

            The point that I found disagreeable is the fact that you describe organizations in the abstract, as if they dropped from the sky. I believe they are the products of the society; whatever their actions, and inaction, are manifestations of the state of the constituency from which they emerge. Taking the Kunama example since you and Haile brought it, an organization that claims to represent them would not exist one week if the constituency objected to it. Objection could be in many forms: passive attitude, advise against a move or an outright confrontation to stop the organization that claims to represent them. Even if they have misgivings against that organization, if they feel its decisions to bear arms are right, the least they can do is stay passive, nothing more. That applies to any organization in existence (this doesn’t apply to the ones that are hastily formed by a group of friends in a teashop).

            During the the assault on the ELF by a joint EPLF/TPLF forces in the eighties, we can’t claim Eritreans had similar positions. They differed based on the the outlook of their respective “meriH wdb” whichever the organization was. Whatever decision the offshoots of the ELF did thereafter reflects the aspiration of their respective constituency. If you are serious about this, you can carry out a study and check out who-was-who in the organizations that splintered, the factions that surrendered to the EPLF and who formed ethnic and religious organizations. So, social problems cannot be wished gone and disappear. We all have to work to ameliorate the situation. What we wish to achieve in terms of social cohesion and cultural harmony cannot be achieved in isolation from our realities. If we do not understand our realities, and accept them for what they are, we will always remain handicapped in dreaming to solve them.

            Finally, you said, “That revolution, I believe, is a natural one and it will lead to more progressive social development; it is the result of either the system lagging behind or the society outgrowing the system.”

            I think the revolution part is absolutely correct. But social development part, mentally and physically, needs a big change within those who dream of it: a mental revolution within the mind of the self. Peace, justice and social development can only be achieved on conditions: a changed mind and changed attitude.

          • haile

            Saleh Johar:

            Taking you up on “…a mental revolution within the mind of the self.”

            I guess each society has a uniquely determined “model goal” for its individual. For example: in US it may be to eat less fat and exercise more often, in a religious society it could be to be enlightened by scriptures and so forth. For or people, I think it is much simpler: Tell the truth to the best of one’s knowledge. PFDJ culture has really played our people in this regard that even the simplest advantages of telling the truth is lost in the mind of its average supporter. Here are some:

            – Truth sets you free

            – Truth takes care of itself (maintenance free)

            – Truth requires the list effort of one’s brain cells

            – Truth stabilizes blood pressure (reduces risk of cardiac problems)

            – Truth frees up more memory space in one’s brain

            – Truth helps keep friends longer

            and much more…

          • Saleh Johar

            Haile, I was shaken for a moment: what did I do wrong! Ufff, I am relieved. I agree with you, please read “Truth” where I put mental revolution gzaE mzaE 🙂

          • SM

            On only ONE condition though:
            When TRUTH is fully TRUTH and when HONESTY is added to it.

          • Jo

            Saleh,

            You know, when you say, “…social problems cannot be wished away and disappear. We all have to work to ameliorate the situation.”, thinking back in 1991, we should have dealt with the ELF/EPLF issue right then and there, and ameliorated “wudubawi Hashewye”; “wudbawi Hashewye terifu eyu!” was, I think a mistake. It reminds how George Bush senior dealt with the Iran-Contra situation. Knowing he was going to loose the immunity of the office and face the inevitable he pardoned everybody, hush, hush – wink, wink, case closed.

            I also agree with you with the change of mind and attitude. Let us change the attitude of change will only come from the barrel of a gun, and try the alternative, as you said, enlightenment in all its forms.

      • Amanuel Hidrat

        Selam Rodab, (by extention Haile and SGJ)

        Giving power to PFDJ without due process, be it transitional or formal leadership is a hell of the same trap. It is the the culture we don’t want to see it again. On that issue I stand by Hailat and SGJ. What I would like to see is the Tunisian way, if the Eritrean people want really a smooth transition. And that is the transition period should be lead by a group of technocrats who haven’t any political affiliations until the Eritrean people with their political organizations will come with the kind of constitution they agreed on and the election law that gives the platform for multiparty elections. This might took us one to two years for a healthy transfer of power. Trust me there is no other way. The Tunisians took them two years just to agree on how the transition will be. Now The parties and the Tunisian people are on drafting the constitution and the election laws. Otherwise always the ruling or transitioning party will dictate the outcome of everything. I hope Haile and Saleh G. Joher will agree on that.
        Amanuel Hidrat

      • SM

        Cannot agree more.Realistic and more practical one than that of the “Haile the Great”,than that of the Clinical Pharmacist , and of course, way better than that of ‘My Way is the Only High Way style of SJG.

        • Saleh Johar

          Don’t you and your likes get tired at picking on me? Anta kab re’esey ‘eba wredu? Okay Mr whiner, do I have any authority over you to dictate anything on you? Don’t you feel ashamed for making preposterous accusation for no reason? Okay drarey Ayni Brur, I will engage you if you clearly state what is that I did to you? Otherwise, hold your peace. If you are here just to poke me, not debate with civility, that is when I will override the moderator and ban you. Yes. A few of us have veto power here, eat your heart. And it is our responsibility to protect it against hooligans. We didn’t sweat for years create awate forum for your graffiti. Now you have a chance to iron out your issues. Bring it on, be a man.

  • Ermias

    Yes I do. By the way, I know full well the current dire state of affairs and that’s why I chose to be a human rights activist. Not interested in politics at all. In my mind, there is no difference between YG and SAAY because they both advocate for an end to the current status quo.

    • warsay

      Dearest Ermias:
      apparently one can become an activist without knowing much about the subject matter he plans to be an “activist for.” you say there is no difference between yg and saay! i guess it is true what they say. Ignorance really is a bliss.

  • haile

    Selamat Aman,

    I was pondering a way of poking a whole on Semere’s “coached arguments”, but you did exceptionally well. Here is one more thing that I would have liked included too in your otherwise splendid rebuttal. That the Tigrigna are 50% thus deserve to have 50% govt. positions and that say Nara are 2% and deserve 2% govt. positions is laughable, if it wasn’t for the reality that such tragic minds are leading us to oblivion. The question is how to enable 50% Tigrigna have 100% representation and also 2% Nara have 100% representation and so does every other citizen would have 100% representation. That means each and every sub-group of our people is the full beneficiary as well as full participatory of our nation building process. Nara can’t be expected to benefit a meager 2% of the nation and give back a mere 2% to the nation because they happen to number 2%. They would have their own power center that not only attract for them 100% of what the nation has to offer but propel them to participate in 100% of what the nation demands in its quest for development and rebirth afresh. Coached arguments are indeed dry-wit as you found them. They lack inspiration and contribution from the soul of the individual to the pool of our collective being. They’re kinda a dead weight in all respect.

    Regards

    • Saleh Johar

      Haile,
      Your greatness is regressing 🙂 You must be against the tyranny of the majority. Shame on you! What is wrong if someone advocates for the majority to own the minority? Democracy shouldn’t aim at protecting the minority. According to the argument at hand, which is absolutely correct, majority and minority determined by number of heads, as in counting cattle, when cows and bulls start to vote. Politically, other variables, like wealth, landmass, etc are insignificant, they don’t matter in politics, . In case you don’t know it, democracy is about enabling a state of perpetual classification of first-class and second-class citizens; the minority should fall inline and be thankful for the generosity of the majority. According the revered book of PFDJ ideology, which I adore, majority and minority is akin to abokha merrq wey abokha rgem!

      • Semere Andom

        Saleh:

        The generosity of the majority also includes that the currency is named after a city of a minority and the emblem is the camel. How dare you forget that ?Also the majority allowed you to speak your own language instead of a foreign one, the majority made your language equal, how dare you do not mention that? The majority,who paid in MAJORITY also allowed you to learn its language, there by allowing you to be bilingual, how dare you do not say temesgen. The majority also developed your land that otherwise was unused due to your nomadic life, the majority removed the veil of darkness and introduced modernity, separating you from becoming the slave of your camel,how dare you forget that. The list to thank the majority is endless and suffice is to say although you alluded to it, you did not thank the majority profusely enough, zgeberelka gberelu wey ngerelu say the majority kmsilu, but because you are minority you cannot do the gberelu, so the majority’s request is modest, negerlu :-). As Paul the apostle said, “if God is with us, who will be against us”. Saleh if the majority is with you, who will be against you, amesghen tiray amesgen, eshi dima aytresie 🙂

        Semere Andom

      • haile

        How sad and true Saleh, it is a case of abokha merrq or abokha rgem for them! Equal access, full participation and fully guaranteed basic rights would become 2% access, 2% participation and 2% guaranteed basic rights. Majority rule by color, creed or religion is, God forbid, the rise of fascism by democratic percentages so to speak.

  • Semere Tesfai

    Senifalu

    “I need your help here. Where did you get all this percentile statistics? Is there any census or statistics that was done recently that you can reference?”

    To be honest, I don’t really know the real ethnic percentage of Eritrean population. My guess is as good as yours. But as you know many people are forming their opinions based on the ethnic percentages they are seeing at Wikipedia. Do I believe that data? No I don’t. I believe, the percentage of ethnic Tigrignas is probably a lot lower (just guessing) than it appears to be. But to answer your question, this is the information everyone is seeing.

    Ethnic groups (2012[3])

    55% – Tigringa
    30% – Tigre –
    4% – Saho
    2% – Kunama
    2% – Bilen
    2% – Rashaida
    5% – others

    As to our 2009 heated discussion, my argument was not about actual numbers/percentages (which I didn’t know the exact % then). My argument was, if ethnic Tigrignas are 50% of the population (the size of all ethnics combined) ethnic Tigrignas having 50% of the positions in every level of government is not ethnic Tigrigna domination that should be viewed negatively; it is their deserved fair share – was my argument.

    And in my last article, observing the unbalanced exodus of our young (ethnic Tigrignas leaving the country disproportionately) my plea was ethnic Tigrignas to understand and to be flexible, to accommodate every ethnic’s fair share, according to its ethnic proportion to reflect the new ethnic reality on the ground; and Muslims to halt the rhetoric of political Islam as it is going to create panic in the already nervous (remember the Neo-Unionists) ethnic Tigrigna community. Wodehanka. I hope I answered your question.

    • Senifalu

      Dear Semere

      Thank you for the clarification I am sure you are not the first person to relay your stats and census information on Wikipedia. Neither Wikipedia nor CIA country profile nor any other has
      accurate and defendable demographic statistics. The most accurate data is with Isaias
      Afework and he will only share that with the rest of us IF & ONLY IF the data is to his advantage.

      I am surprised when you said “No I don’t. ………….this is the information everyone is seeing.” What everybody see and hear is not necessarily a fact, did you forget that?

      As you know anyone who has an internet access and interest in a subject can write an article on Wikipedia and their article as any other article will reflect their viewpoint. Unless the article
      is a major one, no one else spare their time to fact check and correct or proof read it, especially when it has figures, numbers and statists with no reference attached to it.

      Your articles, its conclusion and the followed up heated argument/debate are mostly based on this unscientific and assumption based numbers and that will make your article scientifically very weak in my opinion and I can go as far as calling it a fiction in my opinion.

      In my observation, Eritrean use gut feeling based demographics census figure that supports their ideology but no one has any fact so far and no one know when the last census was done. I will keep reading fiction based debates and arguments in Eritrean online media.

      Regards

  • haile

    Hello Awatista,

    – PFDJ central office conducts meeting with a view to enhancing organizational capacity

    http://shabait.com/news/local-news/16439-pfdj-central-office-conducts-meeting-with-a-view-to-enhancing-organizational-capacity

    Very interesting in a sense that the news above doesn’t indicate who presided over the meeting. Obviously, a meeting like this would be chaired by the Head of Organizational Affairs, because it is to do specifically with “enhancing” his department’s “capacity”. The man tasked with that job was the late Abdalla Jabir. I say the “late” be cause accourding an information by an Eritrean HR activist, Mr Jabir, following his arrest in connection to Forto 2013 operation, has actually lost his life after taking extensive physical beatings.

    So, here we are. A news item of PFDJ meeting run by “participants”, no chair, no speech, no agenda, no announcement, just a picture of those still lucky enough to be alive one way or the other.

    cheers

    • saay7

      Dear Awatistas:

      Sometimes, some of you ask why I call Haile “Haile The Great.” The above is just another example. What Haile writes is always insightful, reality-based, current and relevant. Often, he tackles it from an angle nobody has before.

      Much respect,
      saay

      • SelaliA

        Dear Saay:

        Apparently it doesn’t take much to impress you. What conclusive evidence did haile provide you with to convince you that Abdalla Jabir is dead? haile is just your average bored “rumor monger” who keeps spreading rumours and gossips to no end. What possible evidence does he have on Abdalla Jabir’s death?

        • haile

          Thanks Saay, (I needed the boost:) entay’mo beal selalia kelewu!! nez’om’s hizka sliE’E mbalom’do 🙂

          Selalia, I think you missed saays point – but I won’t bore you blowing own trumpet. (BTW I like “Bored rumor monger” sounds like PFDJ websites in relation to Ethio-Eritrea peace deal!!) To answer your question:

          “…According to credible reports, 60 or more high-level alleged collaborators were arrested, several of whom are now dead, some by suicide. Among them is said to be Abdella Jaber, PFDJ’s chief administrator.” (Country Summary, HRW Jan. 2014, Eritrea)

          http://www.hrw.org/sites/default/files/related_material/eritrea_4.pdf

          Capito?

          .

          • Tafla

            Haile,
            It is an old maxim in the schools,That flattery’s the food of fools;Yet now and then your men of witWill condescend to take a bit.

          • SM

            Again,Haile “the Great”,I am for the Rule of Law and I agree with due process,no matter what.
            But I do not buy the HRW and Amnesty Int’l ‘s one sided and deliberate defamation,which was the real purpose of their creation by the WEST particularly the USA’s Foreign Intelligence Service financed by the National Democratic Endowment and the alikes,as yopu al know better than most of us..
            We have plenty of evidence and FACTS on the perceived and real threats Eritrea,its people and the PFDJ have faced as,as much as you might have on the atrocities of the PFDJ. I think SelaliA’s comments make sense even though they should not be considered as excuses or justification for the “lawlessness”.
            For sure you are going to tell me that the PFDJ and DIA should be ” weeded out by all means possible” and no amtter what,,what the WEST/HRW and Amnesty Int’l are doing incuded.
            Then the PFDJ and DIA have all the right and “by All Means Possible” to defend themselves,for that matter, to defend Eritrea.
            I am with SelaliA on this.
            My dilemma here is: How do we apporoach this issue,other than trying to “weed out PFDJ”?
            Why are we ignoring the bigger picture itself–the almost more than 60yrs old De Facto Declaration by the WEST and its on-going open threats against the existence of Eritrea?Do NOT ask me for referenecs as you have a better access to the FACTS.

        • saay7

          Selamat SelaliA:

          I like your nick; clearly, you are new to awate: welcome!*

          Now then, the issue was not whether Abdella Jaber has been made to disappear or is dead. Those are not small issues; but for the purposes of this discussion, it was his absence from the PFDJ Central Office. He was, after all, the Director of Organizational Affairs of the organization.

          Of course, it is not just him who is missing from the PFDJ Central Office or even its Executive Office: Sherifo, Petros, Oqbe, DeruE, Mesfin, Shengeb: the list goes on. Now, while the Central Office is discussing the “smear campaign resorted against the nation over the past 15 years on the part of hostile external quarter’s vis-à-vis the steadfastness of the Eritrean people”, why is it not discussing the “unilateral aggressive decisions made by one man and his shadow government vis-a-vis its own peers?” Can you please tell us why? Why isn’t the disappearance of its own members the concern of the PFDJ Central Office?

          Until you come up with an answer, here’s one that tend to subscribe to. Of course, I will be corrected if I am wrong:

          “In 1990, the Central Committee was meeting in Afabet. One of its own members, Ahmed Alqeysi had disappeared. Another central committee member, Mahmoud Jabra, asked the whereabouts of Ahmed Alqeysi. Isaias Afwerki responded: “The Secretary General [meaning himself] ordered his arrest for security reasons.” At the end of the meeting the members of the Central Committee were amazed that Mahmoud Jabra dared to ask the question but were not surprised at all that their colleague was arrested!”

          http://awate.com/isaias-afwerki-and-the-eritrean-people-part-3-of-3/

          To me, that narration from 1990, as well the disappearance of Abdella Jaber, is a formidable rebuttal to two Eritrean groups: (1) the Isaiasists who claim that the PFDJ is formidable party (no, it ain’t: it can’t even protect its own members–its most senior ones– from disappearance/torture/killing and all it is now is a tool of Isaias); (2) Those who claim that the top echelons of the PFDJ are the enemy of the Eritrean people and must be targeted: not only is that a misguided policy that will encourage a siege/bunker mentality from well-armed and well-motivated (survival) group, but it is also going after people based on their business card (if they have one): their title SUGGESTS they are gebertn Hadegtn but they ain’t.

          saay

          • SelaliA

            Dear saay:
            Regarding the arrest of Abdalla Jabir, I don’t know the particular circumstances but I have to believe that he violated something. May be even committed crimes against the state. Look, no body in Eritrea gets arrested without cause. The only issue is that of access to a speedy trial and making the case against the individual public. But you have to understand that a great deal of money has been spent to-date and is still being spent by rich countries funneled through Weyane (Yes Weyane is the middle man as well as the agent of the West) to try to bring Eritrea under the control of Ethoipia or outright reverse its sovereignty. The West, particularly the US, has made it clear that strategically it prefers to have Eritrea under the control of Ethiopia.
            So a great deal of money is being spent to try to buy senior individuals within the Government of Eritrea so they can be used as informers. Sometimes people succumb after being targeted for so long and having cash waived at them. People fall to temptations sometimes. SO what is the government supposed to do at that point? They can’t be expected to look the other way. I wish that weren’t the case. I wish Eritrea didn’t have a determined enemy backed by rich economies in the West that wants to reverse its sovereignty but that is Eritrea’s reality. For now, while Eritrea is going through growing pains we need to be patient and give the government the benefit of the doubt. We don’t have to wait long anyway. I think Weyane’s days of control of Ethiopia are coming to an end. Already we are seeing that the West wants to repair its relationship with Eritrea. It is a game of who outlasts who. I think Weyane will lose that fight and once the threat from the evil Weyane recedes Eritrea will ease up a little and open up. For some of you, it can’t happen soon enough. But you also need to be cognizant of the constant threat that Eritrea is under. For now, we need to be patient and support the GoE if Eritrea is going to continue as a sovereign nation. Weyane will disappear in the near future.

      • SM

        I beg to differ.
        Haile also is visually and mentally blind,albeit, deliberately.I understand that you are playing politics but to be credible and to have an acceptance by the majority of the audience, you should balance things and you should be able to call a “Spade,a Spade”.

    • Ermias

      Hailat, some awatista mentioned just yesterday or the day before as to how very frequently the word “vis-à-vis” is used on shabait. I rarely ever visit that site but when I was reading the story on the link you attached I noticed that word. Maybe the awatista (I forget the name) was talking about this same story.

      Sorry for not focusing my comment on the topic you wanted to address. My knowledge of Eritrean history and politics is at best elementary but I consider myself an Eritrean human rights activist.

      Those men in the picture all look super old. How they have been able to have an iron fist on our people is hard to conceive.

      • SelaliA

        Ermias,

        By your own admission, your knowledge of contemporary Eritrean politics and history is nill but yet you consider yourself an Eritrean human rights activist. This is just classic!

    • Mussie Gebreab

      Dr. Hailu, twenty four hours after I provide you the PFDJ meeting news as a gift to you. now you are bring here as breaking news. I real feel sorry for your state off mind that you find yourself. I told you already you have no knowledge about PFDJ and it is none of your concern. Yes, Doctor Haile if you have any clue about PFDJ leadership you should have known/recognized from the picture that the meeting was chaired by its secretary general Ato Al Amin Mohammed Said. Doctor you are loosing your mind minute by minute.

  • SM

    SM Amanul9•a minute agoHold on, this is waiting to be approved by Awate.
    Respected Aman,
    My previous response seems to have been deleted–not sure why–but my apology if I was offensive,which I would never intend let alone to do it.
    While I do not want to indulge into this “We and Them” thing and Tthe EPP,EDP,EPDP1 and 2,as the AT nicknamed them,I need to express few things.
    I am NOT a member of any political group but support any group ,which does/tries the best for my coutry and my people.I still support the GoE simply beacuse there is no better option for now.Show me the moeny and I will follow it–
    Let’s be constructive and do it with civility.Forget the past and old grudges.
    I have found it unfair to be judgemental without knowing the details about the divorce and disagreements AMONG/ between the groups even though I could tell you some facts that I know well.
    As to my wording of 70s,you yourself stated that:”Since I know the old ELF program and was part of it—-“.
    Aother FACT that I know well:
    I read the EDP program well and I listened to the interviews and I also read their editorials ;and I also follow up on their Global activities—open and organized approach—,refugee related issues,their official communications with the world–,their election procedures,-etc—;
    Based on these limited observations,,I support the EPDP,at least their program.
    Are they perfect? No ,they cannot be at all?
    Every thing is relative—-and relatively speaking, they are doing a better job, a fact you cannot deny compared to the others.
    But if U believe that they have failed us, please,come up with a better option rather than rediculing and sabotaging here and there

  • SM

    Respected Aman,
    My previous response seems to have been deleted–not sure why–but my apology if I was offensive,which I would never intend let alone to do it.
    While I do not want to indulge into this “We and Them” thing and Tthe EPP,EDP,EPDP1 and 2,as the AT nicknamed them,I need to express few things.
    I am NOT a member of any political group but support any group ,which does/tries the best for my coutry and my people.I still support the GoE simply beacuse there is no better option for now.Show me the moeny and I will follow it–
    Let’s be constructive and do it with civility.Forget the past and old grudges.
    I have found it unfair to be judgemental without knowing the details about the divorce and disagreements AMONG/ between the groups even though I could tell you some facts that I know well.
    As to my wording of 70s,you yourself stated that:”Since I know the old ELF program and was part of it—-“.
    Aother FACT that I know well:
    I read the EDP program well and I listened to the interviews and I also read their editorials ;and I also follow up on their Global activities—open and organized approach—,refugee related issues,their official communications with the world–,their election procedures,-etc—;
    Based on these limited observations,,I support the EPDP,at least their program.
    Are they perfect? No ,they cannot be at all?
    Every thing is relative—-and relatively speaking, they are doing a better job, a fact you cannot deny compared to the others.
    But if U believe that they have failed us, please,come up with a better option rather than rediculing and sabotaging here and there.

  • Semere Tesfai

    SelaliA

    You said “You call what they have in Ethiopia a democracy? ”

    No, I didn’t say Ethiopia is democratic country; I didn’t say Ethiopia is a stable country; far from it. What I said is; with or without Western help, Ethiopian politicians did everything right after Meles died “unexpectedly”. That’s all.

    Serray:

    You said “Despite the fact that there is an international court decision about the origins of all wars since shaebia came to power, using nothing more than your temekro medda, you dismiss a case litigated by competent legal minds and accepted by isaias.”

    So Serray: where did the court and competent legal minds that litigated the case to your satisfaction got their information? ” From trusted and reliable sources; right? And who are the trusted and reliable sources? You and your likes (people who don’t believe anything that is Eritrean and people with grudge and resentment against PFDJ) + the Woyanes. Right? Therefore, your information (hate of PFDJ and Ghedli) = source for “competent legal minds” decision = Western interest (serve) = your and your likes objective. Now tell, me:

    ንዓኻዶ ተኣመንኩ ይሕሸኒ፡ ዋላስ ነቲ ሓሳዊ ዓይነይ (ተመኩሮ)?

    You said, “It blows my mind that you accept slavery as serving/defending the country…”

    You are as peaceful as your powerful neighbor want you to be. If you disagree, tell me: how could Eritrea be in peace when there is 300,000 killer Ethiopian army + opposition groups that are determined to bring change through blood shed – lined up at your 900 kms border stretch? If you have an alternative idea, I’m eager to hear it. But you don’t have one except it is all our fault (from 1991 – 20014).

    Serray:

    I’m not defending PFDJ. I’m defending the stability of my country. I’m not asking too much. All I’m asking is, peaceful transfer power like the Ethiopians had after Meles passed away. Then we can build democracy one brick at a time.

    • Serray

      Semere,

      Here are the legal mind who represented eritrea in the EECC (make a note what you called the first person I listed). I am sure you haven’t read the decision because temekro medda is way better in understanding EVERYTHING. But in case there is some humility left in you to entertain that there are certain things your medda years don’t answer, here is a link to the decision. Sometimes I wonder how different eritrea would have been if you guys won; sometimes, when I read you, I don’t.

      http://www.haguejusticeportal.net/index.php?id=6161

      Mohammed Suleiman Ahmed, Ambassador of the State of Eritrea to The Netherlands
      Professor Lea Brilmayer, Co-Agent for the Government of Eritrea, Legal Advisor to the Office of the President of Eritrea;
      Howard M. Holtzmann Professor of International Law, Yale Law School
      Ms. Lorraine Charlton, Deputy Legal Advisor to the Office of the President of Eritrea

      Counsel and Advocate
      Professor James R. Crawford, SC, FBA, Whewell Professor of International Law, University of Cambridge; Member of the Australian and English Bars; Member of the Institute of International Law

      Counsel and Consultants
      Ms. Michelle Costa
      Ms. Julie Frey
      Ms. Diane Haar, Esq.
      Ms. Amanda Costikyan Jones
      Mr. Kevin T. Reed
      Mr. Abrham Tesfay Haile, Esq.
      Ms. Lori Danielle Tully, Esq.
      Ms. Cristina Villarino Villa, Esq.

  • Amanul9

    Hi Sem Andom,

    Well taken with minor differences. And that, the idea that says “if the despot removed” everything is simple we can handle it doesn’t cross my mind, as I understood our society.

    regards,
    Amanuel Hidrat

  • Amanuel Hidrat

    Haw Semere Tesfay

    Let me respond calmly to your allegation. From the get go, please understand me if I am attacking, it is not to the person Semere but to his thinking and the idea he espoused. I have never uttered “bigot, racist” to you and to any person for that matter. Don’t try to put words from your feeling into my mouth.Those words are not in my vocabulary for all intend and purposes. If you have a feeling what people are saying for your insensitive argument, that is beyond my control and you have to deal with it. May be the forensic readers like SAAY and Haile might help you on that. Do I see you as PFDJ advocator in this venerating website? yes I do. Because all your argument in your articles and in the Awate Forum clearly displays that. Read and reread your stylist “bumper stickers”. But let me explain how I handle my argument for good and bad, and here are my approach, if it could help you:

    If I want to engage into a debate (a) I first check whether his/her argument is solid and clear (no fluidity in it). then I try to frame the argument in a way readers could follow us. If the argument has fluidity (like that of Serray, Hayat) touching many things, then I cut it into pieces and deal with each of them at time (b) I also check whether the argument is a “coached argument” or a “free will argument” to help what kind of rationale could I employ for my argument. On both category I found reasons to engage with you. And here are the reasons:

    Early on, your first essay appeared on awate.com in response to Younis Hossein aka Alim Salim. Albeit, it was a bizarre, reflexive and insensitive argument defending the interest of your social group (not the interest of Eritrean people). It. touched the nerve and the emotions of our social groups. May be it is one of the polarizing argument ever seen from my Tigrigna speaking that planted the seed of mistrust. As you continue your writing it becomes clear to me to frame my argument as “one who defend the Coercive regime vs one who defend prisoners of conscience” on one hand and/or an argument between ” social activist vs political opportunist.”on the other. Though your argument looks apolitical, I saw on it best “interest argument” in a layman language. So there was no fluidity, straight forward and easy to handle them.

    Second, I found your argument is a “coached argument” that has no elasticity what so ever to entertain philosophical and ideological argument. An elastic debater use an argument which pulls every tool that are available to educate the public in different dimensions. Such as Saay, Serray Hailat, Hayat, Dawit…etc. Watch their debates It is a whole rich with diverse skills and knowledges. Why am I saying your argument is a coached argument? Go and read the statistics you have used for your argument to defend the power of Tigrigna speaking. You brought them from no where, they are just cooked numbers for purposes of defending the interest of your social group……if I am wrong, show us the source of those data and I will apologize without blinking my eye (if you want I will write an apology piece).

    Third, Semere, you always ask us for an idea better than the PFDJ’s has. What a conscious individual has to do is to understand the nature of the regime we have, and advocate for change. If you don’t have that stamina to begin with, you can’t go for “an idea search” which may or may not fit to supersede the archaic system we have. The idea we are looking is a collective idea that serve our people and our nation, and not an idea of one person that govern the modern Eritrea with followers who say “Nehna Nusu, Nusu Nehna.”. Our Eritrea has many bright mind men and women who could not get a chance to contribute to a nation we all love. If you want the idea of individuals for purposes of education they are all over there in the mainstream of Eritrean websites. Sem, if you have a cognitive bias, you will not able to look for and find the ideas you are asking us.

    Fourth, I am sorry you equate “equitable power sharing” to “ethnic equality”. When you debate you should read and understand the terminology your opponent is using. Equitable power sharing means, fair, right,and reasonable power sharing. I debate for the merits of power sharing because it gives justice to minorities and brings stability to our nation. That was the core of my argument and will remain to be until we design a constitution that belong to the entire population not to the winners of the time only (good example the 1997 constitution). Therefore semere, do not bring lies into our argument which I didn’t argue for ethnic equality. I am a social activist, though a social activist couldn’t advocate without understanding the grammar of politics and its mechanics how politics work. So I am social activist first and political activist second. Easy to understand from my argument.

    What is very interesting in your argument is, you try to acknowledge power sharing between the tigre and Tigrigna but not with the rest of our social group (check your bumper stickers). Do you think you are a fair mind when you retort like that? Think about it, how you are touching the feeling of others. You don’t have to be bold to say it for it isn’t right and fair even to the listeners.

    Finally, you have asked me to pock holes on your bumper stickers.I have done so many pocks on them if you are not aware about that. With that I asked you to debate by citing my argument and not by your understanding – just to help our readers. It is good for you and myself. It isn’t fair and honest when you accuse me something I didn’t say. This will be the closing argument as there isn’t any substance worth of debating from your argument. You are always “dry wit” and static. You don.t have the flavor and magnetic pull for engagement. If it touches your feeling, I apolgize in advance.

    regards,
    Hawka Amanuel Hidrat

  • Nitricc

    That is okay reality will do its miracles. You will witness many jaw dropping U-turns as we go forward. Once SAAY wrote in one of his articles, and he wonders what kind of leader PIA will be at the end of the day? Sal, wondered if PIA will be a Capitan that lost the ship on the rough sea in the storm or would he be the captain that will navigate the rough storm and ride the ship home to the safe harbor? Sort of! I am relaying from my memory reading the article long time ago but you get the idea what I am trying to tell you what SAAY once said. Sal, correct me if I am wrong.
    We heard from countless wanna be oppositions; wanna be political analyst; wanna be human rights activists, you name it you heard it that Eritrea is a failed; PIA is destroying the country. PFDJ mismanaged the country and the country is on a brink of to become somaliazation. I mean you heard it.
    And you heard it PFDJ is bankrupt financially and anytime the PFDJ will collapse on its own weight. And you heard it PFDJ is suffering from serious hard currency shortage, so serious, it is about to collapse. At the same time you heard it, Eritrea of PFDJ, supports Al-shebab, Supports TPDM, supports OLF, hack I even once heard Eritrea were supporting Timal Tiger rebels. My question how is it possible for one government about to collapse from financial troubles yet, it supports all those groups. You believed it because when the UN used it to sanction Eritrea, you agreed and cheered. We know the sanction was cooked by your friend in Ethiopia, Zenawi and the rest of the corrupted Africans went along with it and Eritrea become the first nation that the whole Africa to gung up on her. Here you have it the sanction was on and alive and Eritrea was left to suffocate her self to death. If that did not work, there was plan B; due sanction life in Eritrea thought to be unbearable i.e. the people and the army will rise-up against the PFDJ and that way to be the end of PFDJ. Well, that did not work either. Now, after all the sabotages, the war, the sanction and all that happened to Eritrea; Eritrea is well and alive kicking it … in your opinion,
    Is PIA a captain of the ship that he lost the ship in the rough and stormy high sea or a captain that is riding the ship to home, safely and intact from the rough and stormy high sea? I am asking you this; I am trying to save you from heart break and agony. PFDJ is here to stay. Sure, it must reform and must change and adapt its activity in real time but it is going nowhere.
    I am YPFDJ and ultimately to progress to PFDJ! How exactly are you going to get rid of me? You see? Let’s talk sense, please!
    Hate is not the answer. once Serray told us that he stop talking to his brother because his brother belongs to PFDJ. with Serray’s hate and mentality what kind of constitution and election are you expecting to see?
    No thanks, the implementation of the constitution and election must be postponed for indefinite time. If you can’t believe and respect your own brother’s political choice how on earth are you going to respect what Nitricc believes and his political choice are? answer it Serray, you hypocrite . Answer me. there is a reason I support PIA.

    • Hayat Adem

      what is this pattern of ‘lie and run” i see in ypfdjs? when did serray say he hated his brother? if you can’t back up allegations of personal nature like this closing point on serray, don’t go there. a week back, araya brought one quote that belonged to serray and he sandwitched with big bravado, and he threatened if serray dare to deny that he said it, then he had a hidden stuff to surprise him unpleasantly. when serray responded by acknowledging the quote was right and araya could go ahead and make his point, he disappeared and never came back to make his point. are you guys (ypfdjs) inheriting the early years of eplf’s guerella style hit and run, and you don’t want to take responsibility for your statements. i wish awate team had a system that fires at you LAIR! whenever you do stuff like that.

      • Nitricc

        Lady don’t assume everyone lire like you. As far as I am concern the great Araya peeled you like an onion for every one to see. Now, let Serray respond to it. Give him a chance. You just hope serray does not ignor it. If am lying let him confront me. I know Serray when you were playing with your 7 years old sister deep in Mekelle.
        Again, take it easy and let Serray tel the truth.
        Again how do I belive peopl like serray talking about constitution and rights while Serray him self abandoned his own blood, brother at that nothing but his brother believed in politics different than of serray liked.
        Let him the man respond to it.
        And thanks to Araya we know that You are nothing but a lier. So, you know we kno

        • Ermias

          Nitricc anta seraki. Use one nick and debate your ideas. You created Araya otherwise how would you remember what he says as little contribution as he makes here. You also created S Michael just so you can flip flop and debate issues from both sides. Liar is you mor*n. We know who you are.

        • Rodab

          Sal,
          Can we settle this once and for all: Ermias often times claims Nitricc, Araya and S Michael are the same person. Are the messages written by these three nicks originating from the same city?

          • Ermias

            Thank you Rodab. If I am wrong, I will suspend myself until PFDJ falls on its face.

          • Rodab

            Ermias, I don’t mean to dwell but yes AT has the time and the means to check IP addresses. Isn’t that why you see them warning some commenters to quit using duplicate names?
            I have no further comment on this issue. Case closed.

          • saay7

            Selamat Ermias/Rodab:

            We do NOT check IP addresses routinely; we do it only when we have probable cause and we have reason to believe that someone has no intention of debating honestly but creating disruption and chaos:

            (a) Language: Unfortunately, the norm in most Eritrean discussion forums is the use of street language. Those who do it may think that this is also the norm here. If they ignore the moderator’s gentle reminders, if they persist, that’s a clue.

            (b) John McEnroe Syndrome: McEnroe was a great tennis player but he was more famous for his incessant complaining to, and about, the referees. A person who talks about the moderators here with almost every post–how unfair they are, how they deleted his post, etc–is also giving us a clue.

            We tolerate diversity of opinion–some would say we are too accommodating. But when they cross a line of decency (attacking people for their identity, accusing people of treason, disrupting the debate deliberately), there will be due process: they will be warned and if they persist, they will be booted. And when they do, their posting privileges will be suspended (they will be “black-hatted” in the parlance of disqus) and every post they wrote will also be pruned. This means every reply to their thread will also be pruned. This means, further, that you are strongly encouraged to ignore their provocations and to trust the moderators to do their thing.

            saay

      • Ali Salim

        Hayatom (the Proxy)

        It is so annoying to see you here defending individuals who are articulate and capable of defending themselves. Please free yourself from the chains of YG/Serray proxy, ugh 🙁

        • Hayat Adem

          Ali Salim,
          I’ll continue defending ideas and individuals as doomed necessary. no regrets, It seems you and i are chained to these great guys you mentioned. only that the nature of our chains are different, as in positive and negative. which one is annoying?

      • Serray

        Selam Hayat,

        I am a lucky guy; I have a pfdj brother who is one of those loudly and proudly ignorant. He is a fluke in our family. When it comes to eritrean matters, he simply doesn’t exist for me. Sort of what nitricc is to his family. You see, for nitircc, the virtual and real world are separate. During the day he is a soldier doing toilet duties; in his spare time, to get back at his parents for raising him to be nothing more than a cleaning robot, he scribbles gibberish on message boards pretending to be an eritrean human.

        On a related subject, I don’t see the pfdj as an idea. For me it is flesh and blood organization doing horrible things to innocent people. Behind every eritrean who is in the dungeons, behind every eritrea tortured to death, behind every eritrea who lost their lives in sinai, Mediterranean, libya; behind every eritrea in the refugee camps in sudan and ethiopia and concentration camps in israel, is a proud pfdj. These people are somebody’s brother or father. It will be hypocritical of me to pretend that my loudly and obnoxiously proud pfdj brother is harmless when I hold all others responsible for the misery going in our country. For nitricc, since he divorces the virtual from the real pfdj, that someone can connect both is unthinkable. I blame the army.

        • Nitricc

          Serray did you know I have never seen you losing your cool or calling name to any one at any time?
          I rest my case.
          The reason I brought this up is not to attack you or to make any personal stement. Rather to show your hypocrite side. You can even tolerate and respect your own brother’s poletical stand so much so you cut him off how can I belive when you talk democracy, rights and free poletical choice?
          Now, I could have said more but I got to get back to cleaning toilets. Trust me, I am happy doing it.
          I will right you more. But have the dignity to answer my question.
          I Respect you for you addressing my concern.
          Again, my qeustion is how can trust you to respect and tolerate my view when you can’t even tolerate your own brother?
          Hayat it is okay don’t feel idiot; you are one.
          Ermias seriously?
          Rodab you know better.

      • Rodab

        Hayat,
        Here is a lesson for you: ኣብ ክንዲ ብጹሕ ውላድካ ኣይትምሓል

        • Hayat Adem

          indeed. that escaped me big time. note that my trouble was with thinking there were never such an utterance from serray and nothing on what it meant if he did. well, whether serray has such a brother and serray hate him for that doesn’t change anything in the essentially of the discourse. like serray said it only means consistency with what you see as truth and your views are consistent all the time rain or shine.

    • saay7

      Nitricc ma man:

      I don’t remember saying what you quoted me saying, but it resembles me.

      My view was, is, will be that the best (and least risky) path for Eritrea is for some switch in Isaias’s head to turn on and for him to adjust. Not even a U-turn but an adjustment towards 1997: demobilize soldiers, free political prisoners, resume the stalled constitutional process. But because he has cornered himself into a corner (of convincing himself that this can’t happen without the implementation of the EEBC ruling) and because doing all of the above requires putting his faith on the people’s capacity to forgive (he has never trusted any process that he is not in full control of), he is not capable of doing it.

      That being the case, the second least risky corrective action is for a PFDJ-without-Isaias. This is the change from within scenario or what I call a “democratic coup.” It is my view that the “PFDJ” is not some corrupt, cruel behemoth: it is populated by people who want their legacy to be fighters for independence, fighters for Eritrean liberty. Right now, they have rationalized to themselves that they have gone along with Isaias for the sake of “national security”–which is a powerful motivator. Some have been thoroughly corrupted and some are “necesarily corrupt”–which is to say, they cannot support themselves and their families without supplementing their income. All you Singapore fans, please note that Lee Kuan Yew overpaid his bureaucrats so they would never be corrupted.

      Since you summarized my view, let me summarize yours: it was absolutely wrong for Isaias to hold political prisoners indefinitely; Isaias Afwerki has run out of ideas. But let it play out; let him be president. At what point will you say he shouldn’t? Even the last interview he gave, where it was totally evident that the man has completely run out of ideas and is living in fantasy land (listen to Kibrom Daflas’s interview: he is asked about infrastructure (trains) and he replies about cableways (like the ones the Italians built connecting Asmara to Massawa, the one that the Brits disassembled and stole) and then says how it can’t be done because there is no budget. Even that last interview reinforced your faith. And now you are saying “no thanks, the implementation of the constitution and election must be postponed for indefinite time.” You are even less reasonable now and it appears you have joined the dead-enders who think that the way to punish the opposition and all the other “enemies” is to punish the Eritrean people. Or did I misunderstand you?

      saay

      • Nitricc

        SAAY
        My apology if I have ignored few of your inquiry’s . The problem is when I start any engagement with you and with any other person, then when I get pulled to an assignment by the time when I get back to awate forum, then the issues I started debating or engaged has been replaced so to speak expired. So I feel ackwared talking about the issue that has been dead. So, I am getting very close to normality of life.
        I will post some update hopefully tomorrow; so read what I mean.
        Anyway let me explaine when I say let it the house burn or late PIA run its course.
        Say you and I are driving on the highway and say we miss our exit to our destination
        We have few options ……..
        Continue driving till next exit and adjest our rout regardless how far the next exist is.
        Just get out of the highway and try to find away to get back to our destination using by ways dirt roads just exist and don’t worry we will find our way. Just exit anywhere anytime, it does not matter if there is a ditch, river or a clif just exist.
        Let’s exit illegaly risking a collision from one dirction of the highway to the other crossing the highway divider so we can get back to exit.
        So, The right exist was 2001. That was the time we should have exited from PIA and his system. Since that was missed,
        Which course of action would you say to get back to our destination and the right exit best, safe and sound?
        Let me hear your take and let’s settle the matter.

        • saay7

          Nitricc ma nigger-ena:

          I am impressed. I don’t agree with your analysis, but I am impressed by your thought process. From now on, please never put yourself down as somebody who is a simpleton, doesn’t speak English well, etc, etc. You have made you point well. God bless: say it after me: “No Eritrean left behind!”

          saay

      • SM

        Sal,
        Is there a way to convince your best friend,SJG,about your “The least risky way”,please?Then we can be on the same page and the drive will be easier too.

  • SelaliA

    I think you are all losing your mind. If change for the better is what you truly want (assuming you’re not Tigrayans and don’t have sinister motives on the sovereignty of Eritrea) then there surely has to be a better way to go about it than just writing PFDJ this or PFDJ that day in and day out.

    But it all starts with displaying loyalty to the State of Eritrea first and foremost. And that means to stop sleeping with the enemy, Weyane Tigray.

    Unless you display loyalty to Eritrea, the Eritrean people will not give you the time of day. You will not get a hearing. You will be swatted down like a bar fly.

  • Haile Zeru

    correction on my last posting.
    Somewhere in the last paragraph the sentence “…There was much change to the document due to all the theatrics.'” should read read “..There was not much change to the document due to all the theatrics.”

  • Mussie Gebreab

    SMichael, they only deleted the comments they think put their back against the wall. they always they do that.

  • Haile Zeru

    I sent a message like the following yesterday. Some how I do not see it posted..

    Semere tesfay,

    I see you do not like to answer what you are asked. You avoid, evade and totally ignore questions.
    So far no direct answer to all the questions. Even the ones marked yes or no.
    That is normal, it is expected from you. Going after each word you said is waste of time.
    It is shorter to go to the center of your thought. And believe me you have nothing original.
    All what you are saying here is majority rules. Is there anything special about this? No, nothing. Anything Original? No, nothing.
    Apply it to the present reality of Eritrea the way you are saying, and the way your champions PFDJ are doing it for the past 23 years. Present reality. And that is where you should start calculating the cost of Dictatorship, or tyranny of the majority, that you are advocating.
    The most contentious issues is the land issue in Eritrea and that is where Ali Salim comes in. There are other problems too but we can take this as an example. PFDJ (majority Tigrinya, you are lier if you say I do not know or other nonsense) made the law of the land. It said the land belongs to the state. You are saying majority rules. Therefore the state belongs to the majority. By your math Biher Tigrigna are the majority. Needless to say, the state will belong to Biher Tigrinya and the land will belongs to them too. Perfectly legal?
    Is this the crux of your argument or what? How are the minorities looking at this? Do you think they will just accept it and leave with it? Or fight back? Are they going for long term sabotage or immediate uprising? Are they going for a guerilla war or wait an opportune moment to get rid of the usurper. You see you make the law and you make them to your advantage and then you drive them out of the land.
    And your idols PFDJ did not allow them to go back from the refugee camps.
    You think you are smart? You are so biased that you cannot see the position of the other side. That is why I call you whatever I called you before. Now I do not want it to be a diversion.
    Now without speculating too much let me ask you a question. Do you want harmony or acrimony between the people of the country? From what you wrote I would say acrimony.
    I like harmony between the Eritrean people. Why? Because that is the only way you can allocate resources to build rather than to fight and destroy. It is not ideological choice. It is a self serving choice.
    Even though you are digging your heels on the status quo I see you already shaking. Do you remember what you said about the depopulation of Kebessa and the return of the moslem refugees from Sudan back to their homeland?
    This is happening because you know deep inside you that you are rooting for something dishonest and the ground is shifting from under your feet.
    I do not want to keep talking it is better to have it short. The first thing to be done is a Constitution to which all the stake holders discuss and comprise. A constitution that will safeguard the rights of all the minorities. A justice system that have enough teeth to rule according to the constitution ( I know for you justice is relative). The constitutional frame will limit the tyranny of the majority. At present, by your calculation, that of biher Tigrinya and if eventually biher Tigrinya becomes minority the law will limit the tyranny of the new majority. You see this way you do not feel something is being pulled from under your feet. You anticipated it. This is being smart, not original. Almost all countries follow this kind of system.
    PFDJ declared the land law before the constitution and the constitution was not written accordingly,almost no input from the minority. There was much change to the document due to all the theatrics. The result is an usurper system that is going to waste generations to fix.
    Ones you have a Constitutional limit to the rule of the majority the majority may rule according to the law.
    And what you said about majority biher Tigrinya is also not completely true. It is too long to go thru it here. The hint is ones the limits are imposed you have to prove that the interests of all the bihere Tigrinya will be always the same. Interests of some segments of biher Tigrinya may go more in tune with groups other than biher Tigrinya. The other bihers also can form all sorts of coalescence between themselves and some parts of biher Tigrinya. So your idea of a monolithic biher Tigrinya is hollow.

  • Rodab

    You can create an account so you can edit your messages. Of course the challenge for you will be sticking with one nick. An account will not allow you to locate your initials all over the place and in many forms.

    • SM

      Rodab,
      Are you serious?Do U believe that s and S; M and m are different letters?This was a simple technical error.I would rather use totally unmatching names and comments if I want to do that nonesense.I bet you are using a nick but that is me and ONLY me–be it with small or CAPITAL initial letters.
      Saay has my whole private info ,unless he lost it (but easy for him to retrieve it as he knows from where i am writing)and I would not be that much “critical” or say what I am saying if I did not trust him.I was kicked out by most pro-PFDJ websites after I tried to criticize constructively without usig a single offensive language.
      FYI: from now on: SM= SMichael,smichael,S Michael–for the record).Woud that make you happy,Mr. Moderator?

  • Rodab

    Serray,
    Well, no, the new and improved PFDJ (a PFDJ after its current head
    ) won’t be drafting what’s already drafted, it will be working on implementing them. Also, the war with our neighbors and particularly with Ethiopia costed Eritrea everything, this time around, there won’t be any of that for there is no will by ANYONE. So the new and improved PFDJ will be a PFDJ of the 1994-98 minus the major misdeeds that set the ground for the eventual destructions that followed. Keep in mind when I say a PFDJ of the 1994-98, I am talking of the transitional period of 4-5 years till a formal government is established through legal and acceptable ways. All this silly talk about ‘Eritrea’s democracy can only happen in the moon’ will be gone with the man who is saying it.

    Serray, contrary to yours, I actually believe the PFDJ will not be over after PIA, it will be well and stronger once it passes the hurdles at the early stages. At first, sure, there will be some confusion and tensions for there is no known mechanism for an orderly transfer of power (the Woyanes succeeded in that regard because they had two crucial components: (a) they had a constitutional second man in command that was known to the Ethiopian ppl and the world, and (b) they had the all powerful helping hands of Uncle Sam. In our case, our president successfully eliminated these components in what can only be described as bad intensions of dragging Eritrea into chaos should something happens to him). But after few stumbles and ups and downs however, it will get its act together to move on and to set the course to a more democratic future.

    Advantageously, the PFDJ after Isaias will have an enormous opportunity to rectify many of the current destructive foreign and internal policies. Things are messed up so badly right now that any measures in the positive direction will go a long way in helping the PFDJ gain goodwill from the Eritrean people and the international community. To me this is the most likely and realistic scenario that will happen, moving forward.

    • haile

      Selamat Serray Rodab and others,

      (I suspect the question is posed to Haile Zeru as opposed to Haile the great, but here comes Haile the great with his two cents worth 🙂

      On the notion of “reformed PFDJ”:

      – We know that “PFDJ” nothing more than a place holder. What exactly does PFDJ represent? Let alone for actual card carrying members of the group (that is what it really is) to answer this cardinal question, they don’t even have a clue where or why majority of its leadership were disappeared.

      – People are contemplating of “reformed PFDJ” without giving due consideration to PFDJ’s capacity to reform in the first place. Implementing a constitution is not reforming PFDJ, because PFDJ is not equal to the state. Opening a democratic space for contested elections is not reforming PFDJ either, for the same reason. PFDJ as an organization have:

      a) Internal problems: major divisions, lack of communication, aged leadership that is implicated in crimes against the Eritrean people, negative and tarnished image in the eyes of the nation and people, unaccountably managed, lack of transparency, top leadership of impotent men without balls to stand up against the dictator.

      b) External problems: mass opposition, lack of good will from inl. community for its past of involvement in dangerous activities that are unbecoming of a peaceful nation, under severe restriction through external UN monitoring and investigation groups, many victims of the regime that associate the injustice that they suffered as the work of PFDJ (National service that has destroyed many lives needlessly to service PFDJ companies)…

      – If you are thinking of allowing reformed people who previously served in PFDJ in the new transitional set up, that makes sense. Not every single person in PFDJ can be held responsible for actions taken by an organization that doesn’t even hold a belated congress to hear its rank and files. But to hope for a “reformed PFDJ” is frankly nothing more than day dreaming. PFDJ can only force itself on hugely unwilling people to rule them, it lacks both internal and external tactical advantages to do so.

      – Therefore, the “reformed PFDJ” day dreaming is a desperate reaction to a dead beat outcome of trying to unite and galvanize Eritreans into a lean fighting machine against the prevailing injustices. It kind of give people a false sense of reprieve from continuous frustrations resulting in forging unity to move ahead. It is like an Evangelist praying hard believing that his/her dead relative would come back to life. It is sad situation, the truth being that it would never happen that way.

      The only way forward is to take a big jump to the unknown and believe that somehow it is gonna work out. We can’t afford to stick with an employee who is openly stealing from the business, driving customers and other employees away, using the business for illicit activities and bringing it into disrepute because we fear anyone else we might hire might end up being worse. To hope that such an employee would reform, despite knowing that you are wishing him/her to reform because you lack the skill and determination to stand your ground and replace them is futile. Qbexuwa hgdef yelan…qedem moyta’ya

      cheers

      • Rodab

        Hailat,
        So you say the PFDJ is finished and I say not so. We’ll have to depart ways on that one (of course in good terms).
        But if you could indulge me, tell me your theory on this: let’s say for whatever reason PIA is no longer in power, come tomorrow morning. Let’s say he is under arrest. What is the most likely scenario on what happens next? As I stated earlier, my believe is after a stumble here and there, an improved PFDJ will be in full control. What say you?

  • Haile zeru

    Semere,

    I see you do not like to answer what you are asked. You avoid, evade and totally ignore
    questions.So far no direct answer to all the questions. Even the ones marked yes or no.
    That is normal, it is expected from you. Going after each word you said is waste of
    time.
    It is shorter to go to the center of your thought. And believe me you have nothing
    original. All what you are saying here is majority rules. Is there anything special about this? No,
    nothing. Anything Original? No nothing.
    Apply it (the majority rule) to the present reality of Eritrea the way you are saying, and the way your
    champions PFDJ are doing it for the past 23 years. Present reality. And that is
    where you should start calculating the cost of Dictatorship, or tyranny of the
    majority, that you are advocating.
    The most contentious issues is the land issue in Eritrea and that is where Ali Salim comes in. There
    are other problems too but we can take this as an example. PFDJ (majority
    Tigrinya, you are a lair if you say I do not know or other nonsense) made the law
    of the land. It said the land belongs to the state. You are saying majority
    rules. Therefore the state belongs to the majority. By your math Biher Tigrigna
    are the majority. Need less to say the state will belong to Biher Tigrinya and
    the land will belong to them too. Perfectly legal. you, Semere, hate the beni-amer.
    You can use your majority to disband them.
    Is this the crux of your argument or what? How are the minorities looking at this? Do you think
    they will just accept it and leave with it? Or fight back? Are they going for
    long term subbotage or immediate uprising? Are they going for a guerilla war or
    wait an opportune moment to get rid of the usurper. You see you make the law
    and you make them to your advantage and then you drive them out of the land.
    And your idols PFDJ did not allow them to go back from the refugee camps.
    You think you are smart? You are so biased that you cannot see the position of the other side. That is why I call you whatever I called you before. Now I do not want it to be a diversion.
    Now without speculating too much let me ask you a question. Do you want harmony or acrimony
    between the people of the country? From what you wrote I would say you want acrimony.

    I like harmony between the Eritrean people. Why? Because that is the only way you can
    allocate resources to build rather than to fight and destroy. It is not ideological choice. It is a self serving choice.

    Even though you are digging your heels on the status quo I see you already shaking. Do you
    remember what you said about the depopulation of Kebessa and the return of the moslem
    refugees from Sudan back to their homeland?
    You are shaking because you know deep inside you that you are rooting for something
    dishonest and you are noticing the ground shifting from under your feet.
    I do not want to keep talking it is better to have it short. And the first thing to be
    done in Eritrea is a Constitution to which all the stake holders discuss and comprise freely. A
    constitution that will safeguard the rights of all the minorities. A justice system
    that has enough teeth to rule according to the constitution ( I know for you
    justice is relative). The constitutional frame will limit the tyranny of the
    majority. At present that of biher Tigrinya and if eventually biher Tigrinya
    becomes minority the law will limit the tiranny of the new majority. You see, this
    way you do not need to be shaking. You anticipated it. This is being smart, not
    original. Almost all countries follow this kind of system.
    PFDJ declared the land law before the constitution and the constitution was not
    written accordingly.
    The result is an usurper system that is going to waste generations to fix.
    Ones you have a Constitutional limit, to the rule of the majority the majority may rule
    according to the law. without trumpling the rights of the minority.
    And what you said about majority biher Tigrinya is also not completely true. It is too long
    to go thru it here. The hint is ones the limits are imposed you have to prove
    that the interests of all the bihere Tigrinya will be always the same. Interests
    of some segments of biher Tigrinya may go against other group of biher
    Tigrinya. The other bihers also can form all sorts of coalescence between
    themselves and some parts of biher Tigrinya. So your idea of a monolithic biher
    Tigrinya is hollow. your idea of sharply socially demarcated other bihers is also false. by extention your math is a trash.

  • haile

    S Michael

    Please avoid responding without reading. This is really terrible, after telling you all my experience in the sanction saga, you got all that I said factually wrong!!!! Seriously, what is the point of giving me the answer meant for somebody else and sticking Haile the great at the top!!

    I felt like leaving it to you to dig it out and correct your factual error but hey, awate community are a bunch of nice people, so let me oblige. I am actually one of those who opposed the sanction. I am actually one of those who petitioned against the sanction. Are you clear, so I can continue. The meat of the sanction is stripping Eritrea of the right to procure armaments, even for self defense. And that was what made me oppose it and not my support of the brutal regime. EDF can’t even purchase spare parts or even tractors that can be potentially modified in Asha Golgol. It is that bad. There has never been economic sanctions on Eritrea. All the economic meltdown is the net effect of PFDJ mismanaged rule of the country.

    The arms embargo is very stringent and unlikely to be lifted for many years (if not decades to come). Any UN mandated intervention force is mandated to import arms to Eritrea, other than than that nobody could. EDF depends on smuggled armaments or old and rusting assets. That is a serious sh!t if you can reflect on that and what this means in the medium and longer run.

    Please don’t unrealistic in comparing with Iraq. Initially, the proposed sanction had the mining sector included but later watered down. Iraq was under generalized economic sanctions and that is terrible. Half a million children died as a result. That was how close the EWALA IA brought Eritrea to destruction. UN doesn’t go around the world handing out sanctions, the EWALA was involved with al shabab. A UN wanted terrorist Dahir Aweys lived in Eritrea for 4 years, prior moving back to the war zone in Somalia. The Ewala continued daring the world to recognize al shabab as legit force, refused to recognize the legitimacy of TFG….the world almost destroyed our nation. Thanks to Ewala.

    Please read what I wrote before disagreeing, because that would save us going around circles.

    cheers

    • Justice

      You serve are an idiot. Arrogant, pompous, ignorant and confused. Do you honestly believe half of the crap you preach?

      • haile

        ouch!!! truth hurts, right?…stick around, more is coming your way…

    • SM

      Thanks for the clarification.My apology for misreding you but your articles and stand flip-flops at times and that is why I get confused.
      I did it purposely as I tried to avoid at the sametime the real TARGET.

    • SM

      R U happy then with/about the arms embargo and its devastating impact?
      R U that much naive about how and by whom all these sactions were orchestrated—?
      Did U read the Inner Circle Jouranl report about the Djbouti Saga?For that matter–all the AU,Uganda,Meles,A Shebab—–SEMG Report-etc—???
      So the EU worth of 150 million Euro aid and the food aid cancellation, the 2% diaspora sanction,the “PFDJ” Asset liquidation–etc–is NOT Economic Sanction?
      In what part of the world do U live,by the way,or what kind of brain do U have, if you do not believe these sanctions are eonomic sanctions?
      That is exactly what made to be suspicious about Haile” the Great” beause this mentality is that of the WORST and BLOODIEST Enemies of Eritrea and Eritreans.Welcome to that club,Haile the “GREAT”

      • haile

        SM (much better nick)

        Let’s stick to what is commonly known. Economic sanctions are devastating and often imposed as a prelude to or during military attacks. The civilian causality under economic sanctions is exceptionally high and unless the confrontation that lead to such imposition is quickly brought to an end via use of force, many countries don’t allow it. If Eritrea was to be put under economic sanctions, let me boldly predict that the regime wouldn’t stand beyond few months. Sorry, it appears that you are somewhat underestimating a UN sanctions Economic embargo. The children and elderly would die and the young and strong would migrate or engage in conflict while the country is blockaded from importing even the simplest of supplies that has to pass through strict red tape of search and seizure. Trust me, it would be disaster beyond your wildest imagination.

        The arms embargo is a done deal. There is simply nothing more to be done about that. Eritrea has to convince ALL UNSC members that it has fully reversed gear in aiding and abetting transnational armed insurgents for good. You know that would never be possible under IA. Beyond him, we really are up against a wall and would be required to take many rehabilitative steps, that would amount to preventative interference. That, I am afraid, is a legacy from the likes of IA. He will leave behind an Eritrea whose security matters are dependent to the goodwill of others. Mind you, the arms embargo was placed under 1902, before the SEMG was established. Your accusation that Eritrean opposition brought that about is utterly unsubstantiated. The UN moved fast in December 2009 and imposed armed embargo, five years on, it is firmly in place. The information gathered by SEMG is to monitor that the conditions that resulted in its imposition still hold, and Eritrean opposition are not the only source of that information.

        IA refused to recognize TFG till 2013…now he accepted to recognize it
        IA refused to condemn al shabab till 2012 (remember Yemane’s interview with VOA?) …now he does
        IA refused to recognize the legitimacy of SEMG till 2013…now he accepts it and discussed their discharge of duties in Cairo/Paris…

        The sanction is the result of his incompetent diplomacy and haphazard meddling of regional issues. There is ABSOLUTELY no chance that IA would turn around and develop all the skills of leadership that he has shown to lack in the last 23 years. It is better if you work to reconcile with your fellow Eritreans and expedite the inevitable change that Eritrea wouldn’t be able to do without.

  • SMICHAEL smichael

    Modetstor:
    You missed or forgot to delete few of my comments as some still hanging around.

  • Mussie Gebreab

    Hailat the Great, you state “Musseie, you really need to visit Eritrea not just PFDJ websites from here.” really haile when was the last time you visit Eritrea? you don’t need to lie here unnecessary. for your information I was in Eritrea last summer and ready to move to Eritrea for good as soon as I can. how about that!!! As for the Begging staff, don’t even try you said it, you brought it here, I didn’t every one is taken notice about your character now. shove to your mouth and it up your gilt feeling and don’t try to pass on me.

    • haile

      Mussie….hmmm seriously, are you OK? Once you said I was Dr Haile Mezghebe because analysed my writings and proved me positive for Dr Haile test! You kept on harping on how saw the AT moderators torture people many decades ago! You then got kicked out of here and started to regurgitate the same on dehai DMB. They ignored you. Now you came back here spewing bigoted trash against Tigrayans despite being far away from the line of fire. Again, you are rolling in it with your strange hallucinations. Again, are you OK. I suggest you nap twice a day from now one and take more naps whenever you get the urge to write here. Trust me, I am a doctor …haha 🙂

      • Mussie Gebreab

        Dr. Hailuwa, You are the one who need to take not only a nap but long rest, because you are glowing on web sites 24/7 and became restless. it is sad when the good doctors became sick they totally ignore or deny their illness. Get help Doctor before it is too late for you.

  • Mussie Gebreab

    Awate, the two Salihs cousin team/part!!! go ahead and delete all my comments. that is all you had in your power. Thanks god you don’t have power to torture and kill people like you use to do in the Eritrean field. mark my word you will pay for your crimes in the court of law very soon. Torture has no stature of limitation in the United states no mater when and were it per tread.

  • S Michael,SMIchael,smichael,

    Haile “The Great”‘
    Let me get back to your sanction saga.
    You understand better than mos of us.that the whole purpose is to destroy any body or Nation,who/which does not obey to the new world order..
    You proudly stated that you rallied for the petition to sanction Eritrea and you are trying to justify it by claiming that it was meant to destroy the PFDJ.You also stated that it was not economic sanction but military and targeted one.At the same time you claimed that you were against Military Sanction–but apparently only to excuse yourself from any responsibility.
    At the same time you are cursing the PFDJ for being the sole factor for the Youth Exodus–while you are advocating for the economic destruction of Eritrea besides advocating for the destruction of the EDF–militarily.

    Then what???
    Basically, you wished for the Kids of Eritrea to be like the kids of Iraq and for Eritrea as a country,you wished her to be another Libya or Iraq or Syria.
    Hence, MISSION accomplished!Call it the Weyane or CIA or Mossad Mission.
    Congratulations Haile The “Great” .
    Any 5-Star Medal?

  • Semere Andom

    Saay and Emma:

    Saay you make a compelling case on how PFDJ functions and the fact that the “skunis” in chief (as Saleh Gadi prophetically called him over a decade ago), created and shaped EPLF/PFDJ on his own image. This is not to say that everyone was a machine, but enough people were easily programmable due to the high level of illiteracy. Enough people were opportunists and cowards, enough number of people were regionalist, actually enough that they outnumbered those who were the very anti-thesis of Isaiasism from the onset. All the sharp tools that Emma mentions, some duped, some knowingly, constitute a PFD culture, that has been created in his image and the tools are constantly recycled to avoid the entrenched knowledge that may empower them to stand up to him at one point. With Isaias at the helm and the tapestry of the machinery he perfected for decades makes what Emma calls a PFDJ culture. Yes, they are very few in relation to the Eritrean population, but it cannot be reduced to just a few yes men doing all this miracle. It is wrong for us to say all the people were just machines, but how he was able to eliminate many smart people is not that hard to do: he had access to money, therefore control on security and most likely some advice and he learned quickly, which leads us to the Ali Abdu as a next president.

    To envision Ali Abdu as the next president was not that silly if you view it “beti kaliE id”. I see it in the following way:

    We know that we had in EPLF geniuses, courageous, talented young educated, able and just Eritreans who out shined Isaias on many areas from leadership to oratory, pedigree, courage and vision. But why did laeleway idu natu koynu? Notwithstanding the allegations that are piled against him, the reasons can be summed in that he had tight grip on the coffers and security, the two Holy Grail for manipulations and liquidations. Remember when Petros Solomon, the security chief said we had access to money and even he did not know where it came from, showing that DAI and only him had tight control. So since Ali Abdu was an Isaias prodigy of sorts and he mimicked many of his body languages, phraseology and arrogance and insensitive insults unlike any other official except DIA, Ali Abdu at least outwardly showed confidence, people guessed that he was privy to the key and the security apparatus and since DIA’s son was too young to assume the mantle of power, and DIA wants to keep his legacy as pristine as possible as long as possible, until every history of very heroic Eritrean is overwritten by his own. Ali Abdu was behind the campaign of worqawi Qalat, to my mind it was not a silly idea,

    Emma:
    Yes, the fight is against the culture that was created in the image of Isaias, once Isaias is removed, since he has tight grip on everything centrally the culture will be like shumu ztefe nhbi , the cult leader does not furnish his followers with the tools to survive for obvious reasons and after his is removed, they will fight for their survival for sure, but they will not have the stamina, the resolve, the wherewithal to put up a formidable fight, in fact they can cooperate with the democratic movement and will claim ignorance to the heinous crimes, that is where Sal is correct. The very tight grip, central command that is enabling DIA to survive will be the Achill hills of culture in an event of chaos. T

    The Ali Abdu scenario is valid in the case of non-violent power vacuum, such as if DIA suddenly dies. The tight control over every thought and every penny was responsible for DIA’s meteoric ascent and it will responsible for the disintegration of the culture almost overnight in the event of his removal.

    Semere Andom

  • Semere Andom

    Saay and Emma:

    Saay you make a compelling case on how PFDJ functions and the fact that the “skunis” in chief (as Saleh Gadi prophetically called him over a decade ago), created and shaped EPLF/PFDJ on his own image. This is not to say that everyone was a machine, but enough people were easily programmable due to the high level of illiteracy. Enough people were opportunists and cowards, enough number of people were regionalist, actually enough that they outnumbered those who were the very anti-thesis of Isaiasism from the onset. All the sharp tools that Emma mentions, some duped, some knowingly, constitute a PFD culture, that has been created in his image and the tools are constantly recycled to avoid the entrenched knowledge that may empower them to stand up to him at one point. With Isaias at the helm and the tapestry of the machinery he perfected for decades makes what Emma calls a PFDJ culture. Yes, they are very few in relation to the Eritrean population, but it cannot be reduced to just a few yes men doing all this miracle. It is wrong for us to say all the people were just machines, but how he was able to eliminate many smart people is not that hard to do: he had access to money, therefore control on security and most likely some advice and he learned quickly, which leads us to the Ali Abdu as a next president.

    To envision Ali Abdu as the next president was not that silly if you view it “beti kaliE id”. I see it in the following way:

    We know that we had in EPLF geniuses, courageous, talented young educated, able and just Eritreans who out shined Isaias on many areas from leadership to oratory, pedigree, courage and vision. But why did laeleway idu natu koynu? Notwithstanding the allegations that are piled against him, the reasons can be summed in that he had tight grip on the coffers and security, the two Holy Grail for manipulations and liquidations. Remember when Petros Solomon, the security chief said we had access to money and even he did not know where it came from, showing that DAI and only him had tight control. So since Ali Abdu was an Isaias prodigy of sorts and he mimicked many of his body languages, phraseology and arrogance and insensitive insults unlike any other official except DIA, Ali Abdu at least outwardly showed confidence, people guessed that he was privy to the keyl and the security apparatus and since DIA’s son was too young to assume the mantle of power, and DIA wants to keep his legacy as pristine as possible as long as possible, until every history of very heroic Eritrean is overwritten by his own. Ali Abdu was behind the campaign of worqawi qalat,to my mind it was not a silly idea

    Emma:

    Yes, the fight is against the culture that was created in the image of Isaias, once Isaias is removed/ defeated, since he has tight grip on everything centrally the culture will be like shumu ztefe nhbi , the cult leader does not furnish his followers with the tools to survive for obvious reasons and after his is removed, they will fight for their survival for sure, but they will not have the stamina, the resolve, the wherewithal to put up a formidable fight, in fact they can cooperate with the democratic movement and will claim ignorance to the heinous crimes, that is where Sal is correct. The very tight grip, central command that is enabling DIA to survive will be the Achille hills of culture in an event of chaos. The tight control over every thought and penny was responsible for th meteoric ascent of DIA and it will contribute equally to the disintegration in the event of his removal

    The Ali Abdu scenario is valid in the case of non-violent power vacuum, such as if DIA suddenly dies.

    Semere Andom

    • saay7

      Kubur Tegadalai Semere Andom:

      The “Ali Abdu as VP” was beyond silly–something concocted by Ethiopian Review and Dehai Message Board. For the Ethopian Review crowd it was because it was Ali Abdu who was facilitating all their interiviews with kbur president, it was he who was charming the hell out of them (he can speak Amharic!!). And for the Dehai DMB (a nest of bigots, hypernationalists and chiw zbelu Tigrinya supremacists), that was their card to show that they had NO bias at all as to who governs Eritrea so long as he is b’metkel zqyed.

      Of all the busybodies and do-gooders that pretend to know how power is structured in Eritrea, the one that came the closest to blowing the lid is the UN Monitoring Group on Somalia and Eritrea (SEMG). Read its last report. The power structure is populated from the bottom to the top of the ladder by alligators and crocodiles: military men, security men and money men. Do you think that any of those alligators are going to take orders from a man with no military background, not a member of the central committee, not a member of the executive committee of the PFDJ? Really?

      ኣንታ ሃይለ ዓቢ ሰብ (Haile The Great) በጃኻ ሕሹኽ በሎም’ዞም ሰባት!

      saay

      • SM(AKA SMichael,s michael0

        We all know that and Semere can prove that before asking PFDJ cadres–who might have no clue by the way, due to the same reason or explanation you gave.This was an oldie tactic used during the armed struggle—incuding the secret party thing.This tactic has worked well for PIA to disrupt the opposition groups all over.
        The case of Ali Abdu being considered as the VP or next President is/was based on who and what he is—not his alleged closeness with the man of the day,i.e.,–being sharp and and inherently intelligent among others, fits him to be so.—
        But your idea of Reformed PFDJ seems to be plausible but my concern is that no body is buying that as an alternative ,and even, the best and reasonabe idea, rather than talking about the Metaphysics of “Up-rooting PFDJ”
        I was listening to the Trio discussion about National Reconciliation at Naz Radio show.Can we have a summarized article as a discussion point rather than talking metaphysics?I saw Bohashim’s Articel at Awate.com recently.Is there a way to invite him to post an article on this topic as he is an expert on it?

  • Semere Tesfai

    Well, some people are just plain stubborn. I suppose, believing Semere Tesfai is a bigot, with a shady past, you (Haile Zeru) said:

    “What is the cost (he is fond of cost/benefit analysis) to biher Tigrinya to impose its dictatorship on the other Eritrean bihers for the next, let us, 10 ,20, 30 years?”

    Haile: you’re itching to re-visit our old heated debate, aren’t you? Well, you got it. You asked for it; I didn’t. And I’m going to defend with confidence what I said then. If you said the gloves are off. Well, so be it. I won’t be shy to defend every word I said. I believed it was a winning argument then and I still do.

    And this is the bumper sticker that made me “a bigot, a racist, an ethnic chauvinist, an ethnocentric, a PFDJ agent….” and some more. And at the forefront of the vilifying and demonizing, was (and still is) Mr. Amanuel Hidrat – “the champion of Ethinc Equality”. And I suppose you (Haile Zeru) are singing the same song – “biher Tigrinya to impose its dictatorship on the other Eritrean bihers for the next, let say, 10 ,20, 30 years?” in solidarity with the “Semere Tesfai is a bigot” crowd – the likes of Amanuel Hidrat to be exact. Sir, I’m challenging you to pock a hole on my famous bumper sticker #9. If Amanuel Hidrat wants to chip-in as he should, he is more than well come to show me and the whole world his “Bumper Sticker of ethnic Equality”. Again this is the famous bumper sticker that made me Semere Tesfai the bigot.

    Bumper sticker #9

    When An Ethnic Minority Fights to Govern…. It‘s Fighting To Destabilize The Nation

    “One of the Ali Salim’s complaints is ethnic Tigrigna domination on everything. Even though I don’t doubt it, since I don’t know the specifics and the exact numbers in the current government, I don’t want to argue based on assumption or gut feeling. But these are the facts of our ethnic make-up. In a perfect ethnic representation of 1000 Eritreans, 820 or close will be ethnic Tigres and Tigrignas; about 180 will be the other seven ethnics (between 20-30 representatives each). Now do ethnic Tigres and Tigrignas dominate this gathering? Absolutely. Again out of these 1000 Eritreans, about 320 are Tigres and about 680 are Non-Tigres. Yes the Tigres number is considerable – about one in three of the total gathering. Again out of these 1000 Eritreans 500 or close to are ethnic Tigrignas, which means all ethnics combined are equal (give and take few percentage) to ethnic Tigrignas.

    Therefore, I don’t care how you slice it, ethnic Tigrignas are the dominant ethnic group in Eritrea and due to their sheer numbers ethnic Tigrignas right to govern should be honored in order to have a stable and prosperous Eritrea, otherwise Eritrea will be unstable country. This ratio is true when you distribute power and wealth, this ratio is true when you levy taxes and during nation building, and this ratio is true when you serve and defend the nation in casualties. No ethnic group is cursed, no ethnic group is blessed, no ethnic group should apologize for its size; and there is no ethnic group that anybody should feel sorry for. This is the reality on the ground and we have to accept this fact and move on.

    Therefore representation, power, wealth and public services should be distributed, equal to our region and ethnic proportion. Assuming the whole is equal to the sum of its individual pieces, when every ethnic group’s fare share reflects the ethnic group’s proportion to the whole, we will say with confidence we are approaching towards perfect equality of all ethnics and regions. Then everybody can interpret the end result with his/her own prism. You can say the whole pie is sliced into 50% Muslims 50% Christians, 32% Tigres and 3% Sahos or 18% Seraye and 15% Hamasien or 25% from the city of Asmara and 75% from the rest…. Take your pick.” (Semere Tesfai December 09, 2009 – Ali Salim’s Land Argument….A Mirage of Power Ambition)

    I believe, today, Ethiopia is politically unstable because the political power in Addis is dominated by the 6% Tigreans. And the Tigrean domination of Ethiopian politics is unsustainable.

    • Semere Tesfai

      Cont….

      The Ali Salims Land Argument…. A Mirage of Power Ambition
      Semere Tesfai – 12-09-2009

      “In politics faith is not a rallying factor, never was and never will be. You can’t say Muslims are 65% or 80% of the population therefore Tigres should govern the country. Tigres govern the country only if they are the majority, as simple as that. If any ethnic group which is not the majority is fighting to dominate and govern, that ethnic group is fighting to destabilize the country. Don’t get me wrong, I don’t want to send the wrong impression here, Tigres are the second largest ethnic group in Eritrea, anyone who thinks they can be sidelined is a fool, there won’t be any Eritrea without them being happy. It is a necessary, it is a must the Tigres and the Tigrignas to hammer out a meaningful, fair and realistic power sharing mechanism if there is going to be a peaceful, prosperous democratic Eritrea.”

      • Senifalu

        Dear Semere Tesfai

        I need your help here. Where did you get all this percentile statistics ?
        Is there an census or statistics that was done in recent past that you can reference ?
        I always have this issue that people use unknown census statistics that they can’t defend, I hope you are not one of those and would appreciate if you can reference your sources in support of your case. I look forward to your source.

        thank you

      • s michael

        That is why you are tegadalai

    • senifalu

      Dear Semere Tesfai

      I need your help here. Where did you get all this percentile statistics ?

      Is there any census or statistics that was done recently that you can reference ?

      I always have this issue that people use unknown census statistics that they can’t defend, I hope you are not one of those and would appreciate if you can reference your sources in support of your case. I look forward to your source.

      thank you

  • Serray

    Selamat Sal, Haile and Semere,

    If there is no system but Isaias, what is a “reformed pfdj” means? Theoretically, if isaias = pfdj, then, when he is gone, so does pfdj and there will be nothing to reform. One of our problem during the armed struggle was, gradually we all adapted “independence by all means” and lost sight what independence means to us – the people. Shaebia was a hardcore marxist organization while mengistu was showing us what it means for a country to be a socialist. None of us doubted after shaebia pushed jebha from medda thry will be the next government and yet it didn’t bother us that they are communists. Well, that came to bite us. Shaebia ended up adapting a grotesque form of socialism after independence. Without specific recommendations of reform, a blanket “reformed pfdj” suffers from the same weakness. Reform to what?

    The idea of “reformed pfdj” is so elastic it is almost meaningless. Does a reformed pfdj owns our young, our land, our mines and our enterprises? Is the reformed pfdj transparent, accountable, believes in the rule of law, have foreign policy based on eritrea’s welfare instead of ethiopia’s misery? These are reasonable demands but if you answer yes to these questions, then you are no more talking about pfdj, reformed or otherwise, you are talking about a whole new party and this entity is as close to pfdj as matter is to antimatter.

    It is also worthwhile asking whose concerns would the reformed pfdj address; the diaspora or the people inside. I think all sawa age eritreans and younger, about 80 percent of the population, will say for them the issue is nothing less than their status as human beings. Behind every youth who flees the country is statement, a statement that laughs in the face of semere’s “the pfdj is defending the country”; a statement that says to those who put the country above the welfare and humanity of the overwhelming majority “if you want the nation defended, come and do it yourselves you hypocrites”.

    I think it is much better to rally around the constitution. Let the constitution sort out our next leaders based on the party formation rules within it instead of forming yet another party (Haile, even though Sal and Semere have not formed one, you can built a party around the idea of reformed pfdj). I know we had many, many, many, discussions about the right constitution but that was when we ALL thought the opposition or some other power (God know what) will get rid of the regime. Since then we have come down to earth and realized that change is more likely to come from inside, the constitution makes it easier to focus the attention of the change agents. Plus, you can’t stop people from forming parties using what you suggested to Haile, there is no enforcement mechanism. But if we were to somehow tie a change to the ratified constitution and it catches fire, we are half way home.

    If you compare the “implement the constitution” with the “reformed pfdj” approach, I think it will be easier for the agents of change to implement the constitution than try to reform a party that can not by definition be reformed. The beauty of implementing the ratified constitution is, it has more follower than the diaspora based “lets uproot the pfdj” or “reformed pfdj”. (By the way, I am for uprooting the pfdj but I think the ”implement the constitution” does that without pointless bravado).

    I think it says a lot about our regression when wedi Ali and his colleagues put their lives on the line calling for a constitutional governance while we, the beneficiary of that very experiment called the USA, call for a government led by brutal men to reform itself. In politics repetition works; instead of forming, dissolving, forming again and dissolving again parties, if we stay on the constitution until it becomes our second nature, even if the dummy didn’t, the next government would take notice.

    • Semere Tesfai

      Serray

      I believe Ethiopia is still politically unstable. But there is something that I envy (in a positive way) about today’s Ethiopia. They made a successful peaceful transition of power after Meles Zenawi passed away. Meles’ wife and daughter are living in Ethiopia peacefully; his closest political allies (Tigreans and non-Tigreans) are still waking in Addis; the Ethiopian government functioned uninterrupted after Meles’ untimely death; no worker missed a work day; no blood was shed; they are looking forward towards their next election to improve their system of government…….. That made every Ethiopian, every Eritrean and every African proud; and that gave us hope. That is what I’m hoping/wishing/praying for us Eritreans; not too mush. Is that complicated?

      In democracy stability is the most important thing. Liberating your country to achieve sovereignty takes few decades or less, but democracy is perfected by continues improvement, year after year….in centuries time. And the magic for continues improvement is stability. And stability after Isaias and a minor reform anchored on stability is what I’m shooting. And trust me the Tegadelties that you despise won’t run the post Isaias government.

      • SelaliA

        Semere,
        You call what they have in Ethiopia a democracy? You gotta be kidding me. You must not know what a democracy is. Seriously!
        As far as there being no riot after Meles died, do you think the United States would allow chaos in Ethiopia?
        Don’t you know the United States demanded that Meles groom a successor once it became apparent that he was terminally ill.
        Since Ethiopia is dependent on foreign aid (foreign aid comprises a huge perecentage of Ethiopia’s budget — direct budgetary support in fact) it has to do whatever it is told.
        It is being told right now that since Tigray only comprises 5% of the population that it can’t control all the levers of power in order to avoid massive resentment and eventual uprising. It has been told that it has to open up the levers of power to the rest of the Ethiopian population and that this time around the election can not be stolen as in previous elections. So we will see what happens.

      • Serray

        Selamat semere and rodab

        Semere,

        But eritrea WAS stable; the people who made it unstable are the ones who are using its instability to turn our people and our country into their personal property. Semere, what makes the views of people like you dangerous is, you don’t see the circular logic you are creating by inverting the cause and effect of the instability. Let me explain.

        Despite the fact that there is an international court decision about the origins of all wars since shaebia came to power, using nothing more than your temekro medda, you dismiss a case litigated by competent legal minds and accepted by isaias. That would be fine except many of you use this instability to reward the creators of the instability. It blows my mind that you accept slavery as serving/defending the country because, for some weird reason, you created a parallel between your experience as a young man at least 35 years ago in medda and badme. Even after living all these years in countries where the rule of law exists, you still dig deep into your medda years to justify the law of the jungle. Between those of you who think temekro medda is everything and the romantics who repeat your lines because they think they have better knowledge of ghedli (90 percent of adults), you made it impossible to hold isaias and his regime responsible for this instability. Since you made stability priority number one while inverting the cause of it, whatever solution you come up with can be easily dismissed by dangling stability in your face.

        I know for fact the next government will be mainly made up of tegadelti and I don’t resent that. What I despise like hell is, another government of tegadelti telling us that the world hates us and that ethiopia is drooling over us. Because that mindset leads to one and only one place….demand for more and pointless sacrifices of our people, specially the young.

        Say it with me, “The eritrean people deserve a constitutional government. The eritrean people deserve leaders that respects them more than the land that houses them. Sovereignty without dignity is hell”.

        Rodab,

        You are more than welcome to comment, that is why it is there. According to Sal, pfdj between 1994 and 1998 is still an isaias’s joint. Let me be blunt, you are looking forward to an eritrea that brought sawa, ignited wars against sudan, yemen and possibly Djibouti. An eritrea that made laws to allow a governing party to own private property and become a monopoly. Pfdj after 1998 is the logical continuation of pfdj before 1998.

        By the way, how do you plan to reconstruct the pfdj of that era? Don’t answer that because you’ve already missed the point. If you built a rocket to go to the moon (were democracy lives), you don’t rebuilt another rocket to the moon. The only significant and meaningful thing that happened between 1994 and 1998 is the drafting and ratifying of the constitution but you want to relive the drafting and ratifying of the constitution over and over again. When does the loop exist? When do we have a constitutional government? Guys, even if you believe pfdj is more than isaias, a reformed pfdj without a mandate to implement the constitution is a dictatorship.

    • Rodab

      Hello Serray,
      Your message addresses specific addressees but since you didn’t include the usual “no commenting allowed without written permission” discretion, I will comment…

      I am one of those (I dare say the majority of Eritreans) who believe a reformed PFDJ is the best option for Eritrea at this time. A reformed PFDJ is something resembling the one that was there during the 1994-98 period (a little romanticizing involved here:-)). What this means is:

      1) A PFDJ that, following the declaration of independence, convened as a front and transformed itself to PFDJ (not much difference here), and as a government that adapted a governing resolutions for the transitional period of the four years that followed;

      2) A PFDJ that oversaw the drafts of the constitution and party formation rules and that appeared to having a forward looking governing vision;

      3) A PFDJ that, even with its provisional status, had a structure that resembled much of a government particularly in comparison of what it has become today (the National Assembly adapted laws such as the National Service, press law, land and other laws, it approved ministers nominated by Isaias, etc. Sure one can dismiss the Assembly as being a rubber stamp, and I sympathize with that, but it did have some power – wouldn’t that be the reason for the Assembly’s ultimate demise anyway? Had PIA believed he can manipulate the 150 members of the assembly the way he does with the current Cabinet Ministers, he would have kept them functioning for non other than his political gains);

      4) A PFDJ that helped with some positive aspects such as a relatively lower cost of living for families, the presence of the private media and limited freedom, the public discussions on the constitution, a limit on national service duration, a non-existent mass/youth defections, better relations with our neighbors and the world…

      5) A PFDJ that was, relatively speaking, more accessible to the public through town hall meetings and media interviews where there was a greater freedom to ask questions.

      So, these are what I would like to see with a reformed PFDJ. The other two main options – the status quo, and the fundamental changes (where unknown leaders are to assume power) – are unworkable. The former obviously is a disaster as it is while there is no guaranty for the latter not to be even a bigger disaster.

    • Jo

      Hello Serray, Semere, and Haile,

      Serray, I think you made an excellent point about the implementation of the constitution. Everything hinges on the constitution, if it is implemented then there is accountability and consequences for the actions of the governing and governed alike. if the people don’t like the government, they will challenge and if need be force the government out according to the law of the land. No need for other destructive options. More than that, it will create a plat form for everybody to hear or to be heard. No body is asking anybody to like any party or individual, however we have to protect the rights, to hear and be heard even, of those people we resent in the notion and spirit of democracy. The key is the constitution; let us all ask for its implementation, the alternative beside it being waste of time it is also destructive. And who wants that?

      Semere, I think you have raised good points, I wish if people like Haile could answer the question you raised, and I applaud you for standing your ground and yet stay civil. Keep it up!

      Haile, it seems to me that your emotions took over your reasoning in your response to Semere. I wish if you were a bit collected but responded with that same passion and civility, I believe, you would have relayed your message better. Getting frustrated easily will get your message lost in the details and deprive your readers from learning. Argue with passion but control your emotion.

      If I misread your messages, with apologies, I will stand corrected.

      Jo

    • Horizon

      Dear Mr. Serray,

      I believe that you have the following questions in mind when you say that you settle for “implementing the constitution”
      although you would have liked “uprooting the PFDJ”.

      Is implementing the constitution possible with the PFDJ (reformed or otherwise) still in power? (I for one do
      not understand what reformed PFDJ really means, because it is so plastic as you rightfully put, and it could mean a
      different thing to different people, and could be molded to any shape and size).

      Who should be in power to ratify and implement the constitution? How can one expect a different political landscape or implementation of the constitution in Eritrea, when already people are talking of Shabia 1, 2, salvaging PFDJ etc? Who would dictate the terms, the one who is
      with power in his hands and does not have the good will, or the one who has no power at all, be it the opposition or the people?

      Are PFDJ and DIA the same thing, so that sacrificing one person (DIA) could wash the landscape off the crimes committed? Should the constitution demand for justice for the crimes committed by the PFDJ as a political system, on top of implementing democracy and the rule of law in
      future Eritrea? Should nοt the people ask, who is responsible for the last destructive war, and justice applied?

      Who should answer for the death of more than 350 young Eritreans in Lambadusa, the more than 4000 who died a horrific death in the Sinai, those who disappeared and those who are languishing for no reason in dungeons throughout Eritrea? The hundreds of thousands young Eritreans, who
      lost their livelihood, future, and dreams and are forced to live in refugee camps in Ethiopia, the Sudan and elsewhere, and the families who lost their sons and daughters in the four corners of the world, do not want the PFDJ go scot-free?
      Dergue members were put in prison for more than twenty years, and partially paid for their crimes. Do you think that the PFDJ still in power would allow that to happen to them?

      Should the PFDJ be allowed to enjoy peacefully the power and money they unlawfully and inhumanly gained, because one is scared of the nightmare (the consequences of uprooting PFDJ)? Is it possible to say the PFDJ and TPLF should be seen the same way and should have the same fate?

      I think that the above questions could somehow clear the landscape of Eritrean politics, and give us a clear picture.

      For me PFDJ and constitutionalism are incompatible.
      The souls of those who unjustly lost their lives, were robbed of their youth, innocence and dreams are demanding for justice. On top of this, the fear of Ethiopia should be put to rest, at least in the mind of non-PFDJ Eritreans (by the way, this is exploited by the PFDJ to stay in power), because I believe that Ethiopia will never attack Eritrea unless attacked, and Eritrea is not the number one priority for Ethiopia today. Indeed, the PFDJ is not defending Eritrea. It is all about self-sustenance. Remember, Ethiopia is hosting the AU, it is a signatory of the AU charter, which demands respect for the sovereignty of all countries, and Ethiopia is in the middle of a developmental dream (one of the PINE economies), which she would never sacrifice.

      In addition, Eritreans cannot attain their target of a true constitutional rule and freedom and development in the future, by going only halfway. Eritreans are walking on a one-way street, they should unite (this is the alpha and omega of Eritrean resurrection) and go all the way to the end and depose PFDJ, and make the victims (the people) masters of their fate. Otherwise, one is forced to put up with the PFDJ, (there are many signs for this) and wait and see, what the natural process of Eritrean politics would bring.

      The above is the viewpoint of a person who stands and sees things from the outside, and yet tries to understand Eritrean
      politics, which is part and parcel of the Ethiopian and the horn of Africa politics. Regards.

    • saay7

      Selamat Serray (The Brain):

      If it helps, don’t think of them as the “Reformed PFDJ” but the “Relieved PFDJ.” Relieved from the Isaias Afwerki tumor, preferably via surgery and minimal chemotherapy.

      Now then, here is our decision tree:

      1. The Isaias-less PFDJ will pursue exactly the same less policy as Isaias-led PFDJ. Yes. No.
      2. If No, the post-Isaias PFDJ will identify the least popular aspects of Isaiasism: political prisoners, indefinite conscription, absence of rule of law. Yes. No.
      3. If Yes, the post-Isaias PFDJ will release political prisoners, end indefinite conscription and introduce rule of law. Yes. No.
      4. If Yes, the post-Isaias PFDJ will want to ensure that whatever measures it is taking are NOT going to boomerang and make it a victim of its own decisions. Yes. No.
      5. If yes, these changes that a post-Isaias PFDJ seeks will be incremental and baby steps. Yes. No.

      Concurrent with this, there will be a huge pushback from the Eritrean people. They will want to expedite the movement towards change. Parents will push hard for the demobilization of their children. Families will push hard for release of political prisoners. Citizens will push hard for constitutionalism.

      Regional powers (Ethiopia, Egypt), international powers (US and USA) will push hard to ensure that the change is being managed in a way to protect their interest.

      What is it that we know about this?

      The PFDJ (with or without Isaias) does not to take orders from Ethiopia. It will be as polite and civil as possible but it is not going to be a satellite.

      The PFDJ (with or without Isaias) is conflicted about the Arab world. Those who were for closer ties with the Arab world (the Ramadan Mohammed Nur wing) have been almost entirely (but not entired) de-clawed. But enough of them will come back in force to make their case, but it will be “unresolved.” This is the same “unresolved” state that the PFDJ ended up when it comes to “official languages” and ended up with working languages that are, for all intent and purposes, official.

      The PFDJ, after Isaias is gone (and the minimal chemotherapy) is NOT conflicted at all about its relationship with the US. It really wants it. (Refer to wikileaks discussion with General Sebhat Ephrem.)

      The post-Isaias PFDJ is extremely protective of its legacy. It is willing to explain its lack of action in the last 14 years due to extraordinary circumstances (just like the G-15 explained their lack of action in 1991-2001 to extraordinary circumstances) but it doesn’t want to be remembered as the group that run Eritrea to the ground, but the group that birthed Eritrea and managed its baby steps.

      So, what we have now is a one-man show (Isaias) and the ideology that governs is that of the man (Isaiasism) which sometimes coincides with the wish of the party he leads (specially in foreign relations with Ethiopia, self-reliance, and guided democracy.) PFDJ 2.0 will disavow some Isaiasism and try to maintain others. Since the parts of Isaiasism it wants to disavow (indefinite Sawa, political prisoners, rule of one man) are the ones that are the most popular, it will start with those and, yes, I agree with you: that includes a call for implementation of the 1997 ratified constitution. And there will be a pushback from those who do not think the 1997 ratified constitution is legitimate or equally protective of all interests (eg: land belongs to the State). But that would make Eritrea something we all want: a normal country where politicians haggle, compromise, negotiate.

      saay

      PS: by the way, Serray, you misspoke: there is NO language in the constitution about party formation laws. That was deferred to the a committee which drafted its laws on party formation, which was never ratified. Kbur president said, nah, I have other ideas and this is premature.

  • tes

    A forum that goes deep into with all its tinglish and entertaining ideas flow. Still I can see some trying to keep the U-Turn tout-droit, (straight for ward). Second part of Younis article is needed write now.

  • Rodab

    Dawit,
    Nope. No sexisizm stated or intended. If you follow the thread, you will see my comments are harmless. Besides, Hayat is one of the smatest Awatistas. She will find nothing bad on my comment. Right Hayat?

  • Eyob Medhane

    Sal,

    As someone with commanding knowledge of the English language as you are, please, I plead to you tell me, if there is any word in Shabia’s English dictionary that is tremendously used and abused as the word “vis-à-vis”… I mean vis-à-vis every single news article they write on. (Did I use it in the right sentence? 🙂

    • saay7

      Eyobai:

      We are going to discuss this in our 12-part awate 7.0 revision which will have a Shabait parody. But for now:

      vis-a-vis is not the most used phrase. Not even close. It has to wait in line behind “rebuff” (“redoubled rebuff”, “resolute rebuff”)… the use of “would” when “will” will do.

      vis-a-vis is used for the same reason people use the word “utilize” when a simple “use” will do. It is the Mr Bates problem as explained by “In Living Color”

      http://youtu.be/uAguP-zY2AA

      saay

  • saay7

    Selamat Emma:

    You answered your own question: ‘The “alekhulu BaEley” has followers of “alewelu BaElu.” Notice, they are not saying “alenalu BaElna”: it is an Isaias-centric* system. All the people you mentioned are Tools–they may be sharp tools, dull tools, but they are still tools who serve solely at the discretion of Isaias.

    Yes, inherent in my belief that Isaias and Isaiasim are Eritrea’s problems is the idea of incrementalism (incremental change.) He goes, then who is going to replace him: somebody that the system (government, party, military institutions) collectively agree on? And who is that? And how would they even do it since they haven’t had a history of building consensus or majority vote? How can they do it if most of them are barely talking to each other now? Power will be diffused. So we will have a problem, but a smaller problem (at least compared to Isaias and Isaiasism).

    saay

    *Isaias-centric politics demands an Isaias legacy. And the only possible way for the Isaias legacy to be perpetuated is using the Iraq, Syria, Libya, North Korea, Cuba model. Can you say Abraham? I think it is only a matter of time: Isaias will do that at a time he thinks is most insulting to the people.

    • Amanuel Hidrat

      Sal,
      Are you telling me the belief of the true believers (including the so called intellectuals in his rank) will be evaporated in the thin as soon as the despot removed? I think this is a wishful thinking. Politics and power politics doesn’t work that way. What I ask from you is a genuine understanding of the Eritrean politics as it stood today. You are underestimating the magma underneath that is shaking all its parts. I am feeling it but not you. Wow!! You remember my push to you to go the kitchen to feel the heat…….and you refrain from it. Ala Ye Areza neger medakemia koinu negeru.

      Amanuel Hidrat

  • Nitricc

    SAAY, I mean to ask you this but keep forgetting what is the status of Jebena? Is it functional?

    • saay7

      Nitricc, Jebena’s comment section is “functional” and all the legacy comments are there and you can build your hdmo there. But it has no new content….it needs new ground coffee and hot water:

      http://awate.com/jebena-awate-open-thread/

      saay

  • Haile Zeru

    I agree Aman. At these times I find it difficult to believe anyone entertains such ideas. He wrote too much to be ignored. I am not sure whether he is acting or he sincerely believes in it.
    PFDJ practiced its policies and utterely failed in all aspects. You would expect people to learn the pitfalls and change direction. As strange as it seems Semere is holding all the ugliest aspects of that policy.

  • saay7

    Selamat Emma:

    Ah, the limits of discussion forums. My fault: I was using shorthand. And now, for the longer version.

    This takes us to industrial/organizational psychology (i/o psychology.) There have been studies made that show that in industries/organizations, the employees mimic the leader. There is a fascinating documentary on this about Japanese companies where the employees mimic the CEO in every way down to his body language. Maybe one of our Fihiras (Haile, Eyob, Dawit) can find it. The “stronger” the CEO, the more he is micked.

    Incidentally, this is where the silly “Ali Abdu is the next president after Isaias Afwerki” crap started–all based on the similarity in body language–a laughable assertion for anyone who has remote knowledge of how Isaiasism works, but that is a different topic which I will discuss on the second Tuesday of the month of Neveruary.

    Now then, to your question Emma. This thing that you are calling an “EPLF culture” or a “PFDJ culture” is really an Isaias culture. The most defining quality is: aleklulu baEley: I am the jack and master of all trades, I got this! It is a culture that is dismissive of everything and everyone who disagrees with the belief of alekhulu baEley. It is a culture whose most productive output is the Insult and Put Down factory; closely followed by the Jahra Factory. It has no respect for any authority–not culture, not tradition, nor religion.

    When you say PFDJ, it implies there is an organization–one that meets, sets goals and priorities, reviews its bylaws, elects officers, etc. None of these are present in Eritrea. The PFDJ is simply a collection of past, present and future victims of one man: Isaias Afwerki. There is no infrastructure to dismantle; there is only one man to remove. Once you remove him, sure, you will have people who want to run on his fumes, but that will be temporary.

    saay

    • ghezaehagos

      Aman and Sal,

      I tend to agree with Sal, here. If there was ever one word to describe what ails our nation, it would be Isaias. It is not to discount or dimiss or factor out (is that a word btw) other problems we have. But, all directly or indirectly (actually just directly) are related to Isaias. To the extent that Eritrea’s abnormalities are protruding out, it has got to do with Isaias. Our nation could have been another boring African nation with the usual issues of religious divide, some corruption, poverty, mismanagement, (all features of developing democracies), or with its unique attributes, that is its hard-working and law-abiding people of proud history, to register awesome miracles. But that would be the parallel universe, our avatar are living as we speak..

      We, poor souls of the nation of Eritrea, are now laboratory rats of Isaias. Isaias is very bitter to govern us. We are too little, too puny, too pathetic, too weak, too disloyal for him.

      The best way to describe Isaias is to think of Hitler in Spring 1945. Except that Isaias is alive and leading a nation that he believes failed him for more than a decade. ” If the he German people loses this war, it will have proved itself not worthy of me.” Hitler said. Now Isaias, the hugely frustrated, the maligned, the failed master of the universe, is left to govern, impoverished, untrusting generation whose first dream is leaving the nation the next day. He hates, despises and mad at us…..And, we ask him to install rule of law and the constitution he adopted?! His mind was not there for 17 years, man! ….phew! FORGET IT! you got first be astronauts ( you know…the moon:) at least these of us who were willing to wait for 40 years learn we don’t have to…
      All the best,
      Ghezae Hagos

    • Amanuel Hidrat

      Merhaba Saleh,

      No! No! salehom.

      My mother use to tell me take this and you will get the rest later on, when I asked her for something. I use to take her words for grant whether she keeps her words or not. That was a gut feeling. That was then. Now my friend you are telling me “once you remove him,sure, you will have people who want to run with his fumes, but temporary”. Aha, you evoked my mother’s words in your own way as “temporary” equivalent to “later on”. Not in politics my friend.

      Issayas is not standing by himself doing everything without enablers that translate his idea (goal) whatever that idea might be. If we think that way we are fooling ourselves and that is why we are ineffective resistance by the way till this date. PFDJ is a formidable organization with Issayas at the helm of power. Issayas is not doing his plan by himself. Let us take for instance outside our country. He sent his top messengers like monkey, Zemhret and the whole diplomatic core to translate his plan in action. The same thing can be said inside our country. He has followers to his idea and they do it institutionally, if not in the universally understood institutional process, but in the way they see fit to them.

      The “alekhulu BaEley” has followers of “alewelu BaElu”. How can one miss this fact a smart mind like you. Who are those “Nusu Nehna – nehna Nusu”. Aren’t they true believers to his idea and still confronting us in the battle of justice? My friend Saleh, think institutionally even if you believe it is a weak institutions, which I believe it is a solid institution for the good of the few. You don’t need a reminder, but keep my words it is a hell to change his institution…and if it happens it doesn’t look with low cost. I hope to be wrong but that is my cognitive reading.

      Amanuel Hidrat

  • Hiale Zeru

    You are barking at the wrong tree. I am not an advocate of Ethnic supremacy in anyway or form. And I am not Ethiopian. You are shooting at open air. Ciao

  • Mussie Gebreab

    Amanuel, the neo Andenet just keep follow your cousin Amanuel A/Michael the old Andenet. I know you are around 68 my uncle was a class mate of yours. so you are also anther retiree and keep traveling to weyane land get an instruction from them. Chaw I am busy for now.

  • Hayat Adem

    Sal says, “Besides, since ehtachen Hayat Adem (graduate gama cum laude, YG Academy, class of 2010) has made “prove a negative!” the new standard for debates,…”
    Sal, if I ask you to “state and prove what Yg thought summary is not about”. I am asking you to “prove a negative”. If you (Sal) say that “Yg thinks X, and he is wrong” and I challenge you to prove that he is wrong, I’m NOT asking you to prove a negative. “The negative” doesn’t establish itself in the grammatical sense. It comes in reference to the initial claim. Whatever you stated as a claim is not to be considered as a negative. Say you claim devil DOES NOT exist. Needless to say, that is a negative statement. In this case, proving the negative would be proving that whatever entity exists in the universe IS NOT A DEVIL, or proving what ever the other side thinks it is a Devil is NOT in fact a devil. But if you are challenged to prove your claim (that Devil DOES NOT exist, that is not a NEGATIVE when seen from the point of your claim.
    Another example, the Bahaullah (behai) believers believe in a non-contradictory universe. They believe only light exists and not darkness. And then, they claim light can be present (therefore brightness) and light can be absent (therefore darkness). They believe only in God and life becomes cooperative when you are blessed with His support or other wise things become harder and slow your way without his blessing. They don’t have to prove the existence of Satan, as that will be proving a negative case.

  • Haile Zeru

    A home work for Semere Tesfay. Just a mental exercise. I am sure it is abhorent to many of you but it does not hart to do some mental exercise, to imagine some hypothetical scenario. We are not in Eritrea, that is you are not going to be accused of treason and rust in jail for entertaining some ideas. As long as you do not act on them.
    What is the cost (he is fond of cost/benefit analysis) to biher Tigrinya to impose its dictatorship on the other Eritrean bihers for the next, let us, 10 ,20, 30 years?
    You do not need to tell me the benefits because in your previous analysis you made them amply clear. Another hint do not base your calculation on the Ethiopian experience of the last 50 years.

    • ciao

      While Semere is working on his homework, here is an assignment that you can do. Calculate the short and long-term cost to Ethiopia of Weyane’s ethnic based politics and bantustization of Ethiopia? Calculate that cost and discount it back to today for the time value of money effect and tell me the present value in today’s dollars?

      • Haile Zeru

        Ciao,
        None of my business. I am not Ethiopian, I am not advocating for an Ethnic Dictatorship of one group by another. None whatsoever. You are barking at the wrong tree.

  • Dawit

    I came across the following article , you might be interested: Saudi Arabia’s interior ministry has banned 50 given names that “contradict the culture or religion of the kingdom” or are” foreign” and “inappropriate”. http://www.ibtimes.co.uk/saudi-arabia-bans-parents-calling-daughters-alice-sandy-linda-1440278

    Some of the names banned are:

    Alice,

    Sandy,

    Rama,

    Elaine,

    Lauren,

    Abrar

    The Saudis must have read YG’s article on how and why contemporary Eritrean names has replaced the traditional one’s. YG argues that the contemporary naming system among Eritreans is designed to remove one as far away as possible from the true identity -habesha idtentity-and to adopt in its place an alien one-ghedli , or western identity.

    Some of the names YG believes are fading away in Eritrea are:

    Ghebe-Egziabher, Wolde-Mariam, Habte-Ab, Ezghi-Amin, Ande-Tsion,

    Some names that have replaced the traditional names include:

    Awet, Salina, Harinet etc.

    • ciao

      Dawit,

      Gereanenya, Geretsadkan, Gerehariat, Mesqela are names that need to be included on that list. You don’t really hear those in Eritrea anymore. Gee, I wonder what happened?

      • Dawit

        Absolutely Ciao!

        Our traditional names are descriptive. They give meanings. When parents name a child , for example, “temmesgen” or “misgana”, it means that the parents have already started using “mekelakeli” or Birth control methods.

        • ciao

          You don’t get it. My comment went straight over your head. Those are quintessential Tigray names. That’s why you don’t hear them in Eritrea anymore. Capiche?

          • Papillonn

            Ciao,

            Your stench is unbearable. I can’t possibly stand low life good for nothing people like you. Pathetic.

    • Zula

      When it comes to names, there are certain female names that poped up in the past depending on the historic era people were going through and just to name a few are
      1. Roma
      2. Ethiopia
      3. Eritrea
      4. Semhar
      5. Issayas

  • haile

    Selam Awatistas,

    Let’s thank Kbur Hawuna Tegadalay Kbrom Dafla for an excellent and fitting analysis of IA interview and what it means not only to the nation but to his followers too. The video is chopped for your convenience and less than 25 min in length.

    Thank You again Brother Kbrom Dafla

    http://www.tubechop.com/watch/2293544

    • saay7

      Haile (The Great)

      Thanks for the chop. Of all the former EPLF/PFDJ Eritreans who have been speaking, Kbrom Dafla is (in my opinion) the most impressive. And the reason is because he is not talking about what happened in the 70s, 80s, 90s, 00s (although those are important, as they are part of our collective) but because he is talking about what happened in 2010s. And he is talking about it from the standpoint of COMPETENCE, not ideology.

      In his analysis of Isaias’s interview, Kbrom Dafla has come to the conclusion that Isaias (his person and his idelogogy) is that of Ewala. My friend Saleh Gadi was way ahead on this: he called Isaias and Isaiasism “skunis.” It is a culture that is based on the belief that you can outsmart people, outlie people and therefore outlast people. It is worse that an ideology like communism because in communism one tries to be at least be bound by its constraints (such as Lenin’s belief that the party is above all, including the State.) In skunism, it is a survivalist culture: kill or be killed, eat or be eaten. A beast ethic.

      saay

      • Amanuel Hidrat

        Hey Saay,

        Now if I am not wrong (hopefully I read you correctly) you are back to our argument that we are fighting against the culture of EPLF that has brought with it and instilled to its institutional governance. So our struggle is not only to remove Issayas but to dismantle the institutional culture. Correct me if I am wrong, in your last article or in our debate you sound “Issayas is the problem” and if we remove him we can manage the rest of the problem.

        So this time you characterized the culture of PFDJ as “a survivalist culture” which I agree and rightly so. Therefore if that is the case, wouldn’t our struggle be targeted to their institutional structure rather than to the man himself? Our position should have made obvious against the institutional skunis culture with intelligible strategy for winning the long game. I am not happy with the outcry that focuses to the single man at the helm. Our problem is the institutional structure that has rooted on the culture of the organization. It is not simple as we think. How do you think brother? On this matter we see eye to eye with SGJ.

        Amanuel Hidrat

      • Amanuel

        It should not surprise us that IA being Ewala or skunis. Twenty years ago his reply to a question about living standard was ” are they asking me to provide a lamb for every household” “Geza Geza Keyde begiA khardelom deEyom delyom”. The difference is that he was on honeymoon then and every one was cheering him up.

  • haile

    S Michael

    Let me take you up first on your “…if they R against the existence of Eritrea…” Trust me, this is very rare and my experience doesn’t lead me to believe there being people who are “against the existence of Eritrea” and oppose IA’s policies. Why would you want to be “against the existence of Eritrea” and call on IA to stop strangulation of the population? I would say that amounts to a case of contradiction in terms, i.e. oppose IA and be against the existence of Eritrea at the same time.

    The opposition movements need to be helped to grow in confidence, grow roots into social and community spheres and we need to be consciously guard against the Eritrean quitter mentality. Eritrea is banned from IGAD now because it walked away at not getting its way of having al Shabab be recognized as a legitimate political force and opposing Ethiopia’s intervention in Somalia in 2006. One Awatista here, Thomas, quite commenting because he was upset with the AT for not sanctioning Nitricc. Many marriages in our communities end up in divorces because young couples are easy quitters.

    Quitting is a huge Eritrean problem. So much so that even PFDJ use it as a predictor of the impacts of public reaction. When Lampedusa happened, many PFDJ said your forget it in no time, when Awate.com first launched PFDJ predicted it won’t last. Virtually any action taken by Eritreans, PFDJ still predicts it wont last because it firmly believes Eritreans are quitters. IA had a new Tinglish ሰንኮፍ to characterize quitters. All letters that are posted on websites announcing splits and re-splits are nothing more than quitters notice boards.

    So, SMichael, I am touching base with fellow Eritreans on this harmful trait and not trying to be involved in individual group dynamics.

    Regards

    • Ermias

      Haile, I feel partially responsible for the eventual disappearance of Thomas. He was a great awatista. I hope he comes back soon. I wish he realized that the biggest beneficiary is Nitricc. I was tempted to part ways as well but someone other than AT needs to keep Nitricc in line.

      • haile

        Hey Ermias, I know Thomas is a fine guy and hope he comes back to contribute. But, I would have thought you would be only responsible if you somewhat convinced yourself by abstaining from participation here that either Nitricc or the AT would do anything differently. Thomas is responsible for his decision to be a quitter in this case and you’re responsible for your decision to stay. I believe in escalation of my drive to get at what I intend to do rather than resign to turn back and disappear. This is an important character building block that says a lot about meaning what one say. Organizationally, if you are pron to walking out on your organization to set up a new one, because you can’t have it your way, then that makes you a quitter in the first place and others can easily control your displacement because they know you’d quite at the first sign of trouble. Don’t feel bad about it, quitting is a deeply rooted character trait of our people. Incidentally, many are quitting Eritrea every month (in thousands) and quitting has been a major national crisis for a while.

        Don’t Be a Quitter!

        PS: the AT call this phenomenon “Baldonga” issue 🙂

        • saay7

          Haile (The Great):

          You have touched on a very important topic–the growth by cell-division phenom in Eritrean politics–and I wish you would expound on it some more. I think just like Eritreans have war fatigue and associate fighting back with war, we have organizational fatigue and we associate the features, benefits, frustrations of any organization with that of PFDJ organization or, in the case of the Ghedli Defamers, with Ghdeli, and at the first sign of confrontation, tension, disagreement, we run.

          I don’t call them quitters, though. Quitters just say, “I give up” and stop participating in the activity that frustrated them. These guys are “political entrepreneurs” because there are no barriers to entry in Eritrea’s Diaspora political entrepreneurship. No capital required. Just a name and a logo, which are always awful by the way (Eyob, this is the part where I would say Eritreans meet me in Camera 3, Jon Stewart style.)

          This is a true story. A few years ago, one of these organizations (barely 1 year old) was going through its splitting pains. And an Eritrean, a HUGE name in Eritrean politics, called me to say that he would like me to be part of his mediation team. And he is giving me his wise counsel about how, back home, when a husband and wife are fighting, a shmagle is assembled to mediate…. I listened and then I told him, true, that’s when there is the covenant of”HADAR” and the well-being of “children” involved… back home, do they mediate a fight between a man and a woman who just had a one-night stand? I begged off: he lent his name to it and, of course, it went nowhere.

          What I think is this: Eritrean organizations now associate ordinary organizational frustrations (being outnumbered, outvoted) as uniquely Eritrean and uniquely PFDJ.

          * If the organization has a strong leader, all they see is an emerging Isaias: keygebel nHazo: dictateryawi znbaletat yeree alo!
          * If the organizations executive team is not consulted about every little step by its president, why that is dictatorial tendency. He must be checked!
          * If somebody meets someone for lunch and someone else is not in the meeting, he was excluded not because he was not available, or the meeting was a spontaneous thing. NO. It is because he was excluded because he is (insert appropriate cause for imagined exclusion: region, religion)
          * The Baldonga Issue: that’s when someone really thought he has more to contribute but he is a one-issue person. After he says what he has to say about this one topic that obsesses him, he has nothing else to say, he is bored and he is looking for the exit signs.

          The solution is: make the barrier to entry for Eritrean political entrepreneurship very high. That is to say that We the People should make a pledge to ignore any organization that doesn’t meet the threshhold (numbers, organizational congress, infrastructure, ability to expand and grow, etc.) In other words, if they insist on becoming political enterepreneurs and asking for our support, we need to insist that they give us their feasibility studies or be ignored.

          All this is very different, of course, from those who join awate forum quietly and exit very loudly. Haile (the great), whenever you see that, don’t ask people to re-consider, don’t beg them to stay, just let them go. They will come back, with a different user name:)

          saay

          • haile

            Yes indeed saay,

            I am going to expound on it soon. The “entrepreneur” vs “quitter” description is important to be clarified for now though. The first one describes them based on what they intend or promise to do, often fail. While the second describes them based on what they have just done as it taints the type of personality that they are, quitters. If you apply for a job vacancy, rarely would you be asked on what you intend to do before validating your employment history and how you left any job, if you happen to have had done that in the past. Hence, if you quite a job in the past in a manner that shows your inability to team work and problem solve, then that past is going to follow you. For the people committee, we can have a Shemagle of independent elders that give seal of approval to function as a political organization. All sensible requirements can be included on their approval procedures, and organizations without that seal of approval from the committee of elders can be considered non-legit or off the van 🙂

            What say you?

          • saay7

            Haile (the great)

            Shouldn’t I wait for you to expound on your ideas first? 🙂 I like the committee of elders who will approve the legitimacy of organizations based on “sensible requirements” but…what will be the “sensible requirements” for one to be inducted into the Committee of Elders?:)

            saay

          • haile

            saay, ew’e anta curse-able (as in ተረጋም), why have you killed this idea before the get go? 🙂

            OK here is a 101 in Applied Logic to Eritrean Politics: just like you and another debater were wondering why wuchu had to cross to the other side of Eritrea from Tesseney to Fishe Merara environs to be with IA, i.e while ELF was a stones throw away, just like we saw wedi vacaro to consistently attract large crowd in 20 cities that many opposition struggle to replicate in one and just like we saw wedi Tkabo continue in popularity and do Denver despite many artists that parted ways with PFDJ had to struggle to continue….There are things that just happen in the Eritrean realms that doesn’t really fall into the common inductive reasoning of Because____________therefore____________. Instead we just have ___________happened. No body knows why 🙂 So, the commitee might just appear and we could be reading ayni Eunqi from Holland doing part II and follow up to shmagle men’yom part 1-4 🙂

            Not that it would ever happen 🙂

  • Rodab

    Ciao,
    Actually I can easily imagine a Tigre lady in the Keren or Hirgigo areas sitting on tenkobet in adobe or lakha hut mounting her laptop on her lap and eagerly browsing the web in search of YG’s articles, and once got hold of ’em, devouring ’em mercilessly. Are you saying no chance of that in h***?
    (It is allowed to have fun with silly messages once in a while, right?)

    • Dawit

      What does this sexist remark suggest? Women are less able than men? The message is perhaps too subtle to notice its sexist nature. Privy eyes could recognize that the remark refers all women (by implication) in a negative way. You don’t usually see that in Habesha, it must have come from “ghedli culture”. Come to “nubur” Rodab. Leave the ghedli romantics. I would be pissed if I were Hayat Adem.

  • Rodab

    S Michael, SMichael, s michael, smichael, Smichael…. You are getting away with using multiple names:-)

    • smichael,S Michael s Michael,

      anta seba’y,tiu’y tsilul dicha?S and s;M and m are the same letters.

  • Eyob Medhane

    Ahadu,

    I read that article. Very cool. But, what are you trying to do, man?! Drive Shabians (PFDJ) Isayasists crazy? Tsk tsk tsk tsk….That’s not fair, buddy 🙂 We want them clowning around, as it’s said in Amharic ሞኝ አይሙት: እንዲያጫውት::

    Meanwhile,

    Sal,

    what do you think of the Time’s article. How does PINE sound? Pretty catchy, huh?! 🙂

    • saay7

      Hi Eyobai:

      Thanks for the link, Ahadu and Eyob. Yes, it is extremely exciting. PINE (an acronym that the journalist coined for Philippines, Indonesia, Nigeria, Ethiopia) are part of the emerging market. Whenever somebody talks GDP I look for GDP/capita (the lazy journalist didn’t tell us.) Ethiopia and Nigeria’s economies are projected to grow at 7% “in the coming years”, and, if Ethiopia can maintain its population growth below that, it may actually translate into improved quality of life for Ethiopians. Who wouldn’t be excited by that? Don’t answer that:)

      saay

      • Eyob Medhane

        Sal,

        Can you please stop being Debby Downer. Jesus! 🙂 Just few years ago Ethiopia’s unemployment rate was 22% with in five years, it is now 17.5%. Here is AFP attesting to that, and I quote .. “Four Million jobs has been created in the last two years… the unemployment rate fell to 17.5 percent in 2012…” http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PyQyAlxBChU

        Meanwhile,

        Our former President Girma thinks, the Malaysians missing plane is abducted by UFOs or flew into space… 🙂

        http://www.diretube.com/articles/read-it-might-have-flown-into-space-ex-president-girma_4646.html#.UyJBLVFdVfE

        Here you have it. Laugh your heart out now.. 🙂

        • saay7

          Eyob:

          ante sewye. kbur president-neber is 89 years old. And, in my book, once you hit 80, you should be allowed to say anything you want without being laughed at, or mocked. Besides, since ehtachen Hayat has made “prove a negative!” the new standard for debates, do you have any proof that Malaysian Airlines was not sucked into space and is orbiting the world right now with all its passengers (all alive) waving at your right now?

          Don’t jump to conclusions. Like this guy:

          http://youtu.be/xRxqY4wuTHw

          saay

  • Haile Zeru

    To Semere

    OK, Because PFDJ managed to muzzle not only the mouth of the ones that are inside, from
    what I see, it muzzled also the minds of many that are outside of the country.

    Now, if “confidently” one talks about PFDJ policy as the best alternative for Eritrea, I need to find out were that confidence is standing. Issayas also was confident of his policies. He did not see any alternative to them and he applied them to the bitter end with even worse outcome for the Eritrean people.

    On my previous post I gave the outline of a land policy. Basically it is not the
    problem that is difficult to solve. The problem is the Government (PFDJ government) and its policies that Semere thinks , “confidently”, it is the best available. PFDJ policy, added to the ethnic mix is creating a source of pain on the ground and minds of Eritreans. If anybody asks I will go to further detail on that. For now let me touch on the energy and defence policy.

    Does PFDJ has an energy policy. This days all over Eritrea electricity is scarce or non-existent.
    It was always like that. Now even Asmera tselmita.

    When they (PFDJ) were building the Hirghigo plant I had a conversation with a friend. The argument was, why a plant that uses fuel (Nafta or similar stuff) is being built? Could there be another possibility?

    At that time I was thinking of exploiting Mai-Wu-ui. If you see it now, you can say what about the underground heat in the Dankalia. Do not ask me if I did any study on that specific project because it was/is not my job. But we know that countries like Tanzania are doing commendable attempts at using it. Is PFDJ doing anything along those lines? Not that I know. As usual may be under the table. But nothing that is bearing fruits anyway. Why that is important? It is
    because you have energy at cheap price and you do not waste your meagre dollars on hydrocarbons.

    The most important and life sucking, literally life sucking is the defence of the country. Semere, “confidently” is saying that he does not see an alternative to it. Laughable. I should say very sad.

    Let us say you did not provoke any armed confrontation with any of the neighbours, You could have been looked at as wick but you could have saved tens of thousands of young men and women. And huge amount of dollars that would cover any of the projects that the people need. A stronger economy could have supported a strong and modern army. One could have gained the balance later. I am sure somebody is saying this is a prophecy after the fact. It is not. I was arguing with friends in 1999 why the Eritrean government does not withdraw half a Km from the contested areas and just negotiate for speedy demarcation. To my surprise Beraki (the then information minister) said exactly that. He wrote to Issayas saying exactly that. To his credit Beraki wrote a letter and a copy of the letter was circulating after the war was over.

    What is the best way to defend a country like Eritrea? Just do not go to fight your neighbours. PFDJ instigates a war, and then it says I am the best to defend the country, and when it loses it says, no body could have done any better than I did. After all the incalculable damage.

    Is any body sane to say PFDJ defence policy is the best??? You can go back to immemorable times and you will see that all wars were won by an army that uses science to its advantage. Does anybody thinks closing a university is the best defence policy???

    • Amanuel Hidrat

      Selam Haile Zeru,

      Consider this: Semere has a “cognitive bias”. He demonstrated it clearly in his articles and defended it forcefully as you saw him in the debate. Cognitive bias – is a deviation from rationality and good judgement or it is a flaw in judgement. Brother Semere has to come in to his own sense to avoid his arrogance and see things not only from his instinctual emotions but should harness his emotion with guarded wisdom to sail our ship safely to the promise land.

      Amanuel Hidrat

  • Nitricc

    SAAY I hope I am getting it what you are saying. Here it goes and if I am way off well, you tell me.
    “Wuchu goes to literally the other side to join EPLF (then PLF-2) they ask him why? He says. “It was rumored that Isaias was around that area…”
    “What is the “idea” that was a magnet to Wuchu, who was a shepherd and, by his own admission, illiterate in 1971?”

    I hope i am not taking the words out of your mouth but it seems you are implying to conclude that if someone is illiterate i.e. equates to Unintelligent and Brainless. I hope you are not saying that. If you are, then, I can’t expressed it enough my disagreement with you and the burden is on you to explain to me how an illiterate individual able to become a decorated General.
    Again, I got to believe Wuchu was attracted to EPLF over ELF by the IDEA of the EPLF and by the IDEA of the EPLF leadership i.e. Isaias. He did not know Issaias at that time i.e. he only knew his idea. Right? You see J
    In the mean time you are not suggesting the toothless oppositions are lacking leaders? If you are, again, I disagree, there are plenty of people in the opposition that can lead and be successful to bring change but the problem is they don’t have an IDEA that is, NEW and INNOVATIVE that can revitalize, invigorate and rejuvenate the opposition camp. Like I have shared with you, name calling Issaias, denying his achievements and holding on to the idea of eliminating PIA by any means necessary; even by using the beggar TPLF is not going to get the toothless opposition anywhere. If it does, it is tried for the last how many years? You get my drift.
    SAAY, let’s take a sample of awate-forum participants. I will say they are 99 % of them are anti PIA or members of the so–called oppositions. Please, you know one, direct the person who belongs to the opposition who brought an idea worthy of discussion, a solution worthy of scrutiny, an alternative worthy of debating? Please do! On the same token they are exceptionally good at guessing who is who. Outstandingly they are good at trashing Gedli. Staggeringly they are best wasting time at nothing, for nothing and about nothing. I can only wish you good luck if you even remotely consider working with this kind of people and get achieve any kind of out come. You are wasting your time. i mean it.
    Point blank; Point blank, Ali Salim came out clean and swinging in all cylinders. You think giving Ali Salim’s caliber and his past takes it was an amble opportunity to light a fire under his feet. It was a great opportunity to take him to task and smack him with verity of tangibles. No, no, no, they can not do that. Instead they are more interested in wasting their time trying to figure it out who Ali Salim is? When my good enemy Ermias another toothless member of opposition, said he goggled Younis just to see who Ali is, I almost fall of my chair.
    What I don’t get it is this. The man has told you who he was, what else would like him to do? Why does his name matters anyway? Why do you want to know, for what purpose?
    It should not matter what his name is, but it should mean everything what he think;
    And what his intentions are. At that let me shout my respect to Ali Salim’s courage and I admire the gumption he showed. No, I am not talking about revealing his name, I don’t care if his name is Ali, I don’t care if his name is Younis; rather, I care and respect for him to see the light and tell it as is!

    • Ermias

      Nitricc,

      – Why are you pleading to SAAY like a fat kid begging for cake? He is not going to be on the PFDJ camp any time soon or never for that matter.

      – You mentioned so many big issues but you managed to put it in a comment format rather than an article. I am impressed because it would take me a dozen pages.

      – Wuchu – he is very typical of most tegadelti who joined from small villages with no formal education. Their emotion and passion for Shaebia (rather than Jebha) was based on the song “Isaias Afewerki, tekalakaly tanki, niska tigadel adeka tibeki…” You will even hear Jebha tegadelti saying how extremely curious they were of this guy called IA and the inner working so Shaebia. So nothing special about wuchu but what is curious is why he calls IA ‘AYA.’

      – Of toothless opposition, ideas, and leaders – Well the oppostion is full of wise men (yours truly included). There are also lots of great ideas emanating from SAAY, Serray, YG, Amanuel Hidraat, Haile, Hayat, SGJ, Rodab etc. to name a few just from this website alone. So we do have leaders and ideas. What we lack is I am afraid “ORGANIZATION.” I got this from Semere Tesfai and here is how he put it most eloquently:
      “In life smart people don’t lead, educated people don’t lead, large group of unhappy people don’t lead, Muslims Christians ethnics don’t lead; organized people under strict discipline do. It is all about organization, organization, organization…..”

      – An idea worthy of discussion that came from the opposition – I don’t know where to begin but all I can say is this website is an oppostion website and it encompasses all ideas across the spectrum and that is why you and I are here.

      – Ali Salim – He hasn’t come out clean yet. Nobody knows who he is and his identity matters a great deal. Because what if he is YG playing mind games with us, just as an example? There is what they call in politics ‘diversion.’ Could this guy be Yemane Monkey? Or Ali Abdu? Who knows? We don’t know him. His ideas are very polarizing. There is no possible way to accuse PFDJ of all the things he did in the past, including depossesing people of their God given land and then just a couple years later to advocate the very ideas you oppossed. That is why I believe Ali Salim is either not Hossein Younis or he has really bad intentions.

      Nitricc – that is it for me, my toothless biting to you. Wait to get teeth marks when Sal writes back to you.

    • saay7

      Nitricc ma Negger-erena:)

      I can’t answer your questions without resorting to history and you have called history “useless” so many times I stopped counting. It appears that in the Book of Nitricc, history is a useless thing told by toothless people:)

      I never understood how an Eritrean patriot like you is so dismissive of history. Here’s Osman Abdulrehim talking about it: it is called “Kelem” (ink) and I hope it changes your mind. (Ermias, since you are a huge fan of Abrar, you will see his inspiration here)

      http://youtu.be/f_hEynUuYbA

      ናይ ሎሚ ዘናታት ንጽባሕ ታሪኽ ኢዩ
      ንይ ሎሚ ታሪኻት ናይ ቀደም ዘና ኢዩ
      ይምዝግብ ኣሎ ገና፥ ይጽሕፍ ኣሎ ቀለም

      All the images in the video are from Alemseghed’s “aynfelale.” And all the people you see in the pictures are the ones that YG called “clueless Ghedli generation.”

      saay

      • ciao

        Dear Saay:

        I see lot of resemblance between your pic and Abdelkadir Kebire’s. Any relation.

        • saay7

          Hi ciao:

          No, not to my knowledge*. But you reminded me of a story. There was an announcement made that I was going to address Eritreans in New York in 2002. And one of the writers at DMB said, “hey, Saleh, remember what happened to one of your forefathers when he was on his way to New York!” For 15 seconds, I thought I was going to be assassinated, then remembered that this is DMB after all: the enda swa of Eritrean cyberspace:)

          That was after the panic attack the PFDJ had in 2001. You can always tell the character of a person or an an organization when they are tested and that’s when I concluded that the PFDJ is full of what Karl Marx called the “lumpenproletariat.”

          saay

          * I believe that Eritreans have a 1-degree of separation: everybody knows everybody else just by 1 step, maximum 2 steps. So, applying that rule, of course, I know Kebire’s great grandchildren.

          • ciao

            It’s true. There is less than one degree of separation among Eritreans because it is a small population. That’s why whenever Eritrea gets into war every family is affected. Because literally there is less than one degree of separation between the citizens.

      • Nitricc

        Sal, my man, the catch word is U-Trun
        I have few words to share with you and the awate comunity regarding history and my stand; if I can write it, then the u-turn is in order :-). And I also have a gift to all my nemesis; such as my Ermias, Hayat and the rest of the haters.
        I will post it may be on Monday on the Jebena section.

  • Amanuel Hidrat

    ” Lessons for the ages”

    Selam SMicheal,

    I read your comment of two days ago (of course belatedly). You allegedly accused us (to Saay and myself) that we are still living in the seventies and not in the 21st century. From your reaction you sound either you are a member of EPDP or sympathizer to the organization. For me it doesn’t matter to which association you belong to. So I will prove you whether we (saay and myself) or you and the organization you came to defend in full swing are in the seventies. But as usual I will start with some cornucopia of advice.

    (A) ” Nobody wins unless everybody wins” said Bruce Springsteen, the great singer who cares for his fellow men/women. In the same spirit and passion,I would like to tell you that Eritrea will not be at peace with itself with the narcissistic mind of some organizations who always took themselves as the crown prince for power. I don’t know how long you are familiar with EPDP, but they don’t want to work with any organization collectively even to challenge the despotic regime unless they are in the driving seat. They don’t comprehend the rule of game in modern politics. How? I will come later towards the end of this commentary.

    (B) The concept colloquially known as the golden rule, its origin dated to 5th century BC, instructed by Confucius warns us as to “never impose on others which you would not choose for yourself”. EPDP which took itself as the only organization to be listened accused to its sisterly organizations that “they abandon to listen to them”. Therefore, SMicheal think about this mentality, it is always repulsive to others. With that mentality they couldn’t grow organizationally and conceptually. The only path in front of them is “unity by subtraction” to borrow YG’s conceptual phraseology – shrinking from time to time to build an organization of the same mentality. An organization which doesn’t have a diverse thinking of its members is doomed to be archaic always lagging behind the motion of development and resisting the course of history.

    Now let us check how EPDP received the 21st century. Since 2000 up to now EPDP with its nucleus members ELF-rc undergone an organizational mitosis giving birth to three organizations, namely Dehnet, the Adhanom group, the Amanuel Mengstu group (which by the way have similar political programs). Here is the question to you Smichael, If an organization doesn’t have the ability to hold the unity of its members, how one will expect to unite the Eritrean people and rally in the struggle of justice? A big question to ponder on it. If the organization doesn’t understand how to make coalition with those who have similar political programs, how on earth do they think to be on the driving seat of Eritrean politics? If an organization has the habit of ” in and out ” from any political process, how do you characterize that organization? If an organization doesn’t believe on give and take with its sisterly organization, if it doesn’t understand that politics is the art of compromise with the rest of the stakeholders, what do you think will be thier fate? If they don’t believe on power sharing, how do they want to run the country as a crown prince on waiting? So look the political mind of EPDP and read our articles calling for justice and equitable power sharing among the stakeholders and judge for yourself. Who is in the 21st century for God sake?

    Amanuel Hidrat

  • Dawit

    Take a look at this: even Will Smith can do “Eskista”, it ain’t that difficult.

    http://www.frequency.com/video/will-smith-knows-how-to-eskistalol-by/144184440/-/5-1516

  • haile

    Selamat Awatista,

    On a new topic….

    There use to be an elderly Eritrean gentleman who I have known growing up. They use to say “ኤርትራዊ፡ ሰብን በትርን እምበሪ፡ ነንሕድሕዱ ክመራራሕ ኣይክእልን እዩ!” I brought of this up in connection to the formation of yet two more opposition groups;

    – EMC – Eritrean Movement for Change: a handful (two known) people who somewhat felt their previous organization’s leadership didn’t allow space for their ideas, and since the MUST SURVIVE (their ideas) they had no choice butt form yet another separate grouping.

    – Recently a couple of leadership members of EYSNS Stockholm have expressed disappointment at not being included in their previous organization and decided to form what they called in Tinglish “ኩሉ ሓቆፍ” meaning “all inclusive” group and invited everybody to join and have a party (as in political party – not an all night raving dance party). They still haven’t named.

    So this brings the running total may be something close to 60 (many dormant of course). How many times do you hear an Eritrean who has been having rough time at work saying I quieted? Are we Quitters? I think so, we quiet on virtually anything that we differ with. We can’t work things out, make concessions, admit to shortcomings, accept criticism (mind you, this is not just in politics). We were once talking here about “I don’t mix with habesha” (eyob don’t ask again I have already clarified it:) That is a quitter mentality. If the leadership of your particular organization doesn’t approve your proposals, have a decency to work through your proposal and adjust its contents to try again. Don’t be a quitter, leaving the organization makes you weak, the organization weak and your whole cause weak.

    DON’T BE A QUITTER, BE A FIGHTER – PFDJ’s WAY IS THE SLOW DEATH WAY!!

    Cheers

    • S Michael

      Ahhh,Hailat,you R opening your eyes now.But you did not tell us who is behind those “quitters” and new organizations showing up every morning.U even did not want to tell.us about the obvious “quitters” being sponsored by Aboy Sibhat and Bereket.
      Why R U afraid of, to talk openly about this facts but talk nonstop about PFDJ sins?
      Unless U believe that any and every enemy of PFDJ is your friend even if they R against the existence of Eritrea,which seems to be the case,God forbid.