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The Ethiopian-Eritrean Intelligence War

It has been fifteen years since the bloody border war between Eritrea and Ethiopia ended in 2000. Since then, though the guns has been silenced, and occasional sporadic and limited clashes continued, thousands of Eritrean youth cross the border heading towards Ethiopian refugee camps from where they continue the arduous journey to Europe and elsewhere. Sadly, the region is still licking its wounds.

Though tens of thousands of lives perished in the war, the two countries have failed to resolve their lingering issues militarily, and their diplomatic maneuvers to find a solution has remained abysmal. Worse, both governments have switched full gear to espionage, trying to weaken and sabotage each other in intense intelligence battles, mainly using proxy opposition forces and propaganda onslaught. The intelligence war has escalated so much that an observer commented, “It is like the Berlin wall is transplanted between the two countries, only checkpoint Charlie is missing.”

Both countries have been hosting their adversaries’ opposition forces that they keep under stringent control. However, the Eritrean government has been the worst, extending its intelligence operations to the entire region: Somalia, Djibouti, Ethiopia, and Yemen. That has caused the wrath of the international community which slapped the Eritrean government with several sanction regiments.

Last week’s return of Molla Asghedom to Ethiopia should be seen from this angle. Molla is the leader of Tigray People’s Democratic Movement (TPDM), an Ethiopian opposition group based in Eritrea since the early years after the border war ended.

On September 13, 2015, The Ethiopian Broadcasting Corporation television reported that Molla Asghedom has escaped from Eritrea to Sudan accompanied by hundreds of his troops. According to media reports, “Sudan received the opposition leader and his troops cordially and transported them to Ethiopia in an orderly manner.” Although no sovereign country allows armed groups in its territories without its consent, the unprecedented leniency that the Sudanese security officers showed to the TPDM troops has pleased the Ethiopian government which appreciated the role the Sudan played as a “historical role that the people and the Government of Ethiopia will never forget”.

Over the years, Sudan has seen so many similar incidents. In 1982, it encircled thousands of ELF fighters and disarmed them at gunpoint when they entered Sudanese territories after being pushed by a joint EPLF-TPLF onslaught. And since 2000, it has been receiving tens of thousands of Eritrean conscripts fleeing their country in rejection of the indefinite military service to which they are subjected. But this time the incident involves the Eritrean government, and the cordial reception of forces that escaped from Eritrea is expected to have serious ramification. And though the Eritrean people breathed a sigh of relief for the departure of a chunk of Ethiopian opposition forces, the Eritrean president and his government is the biggest loser because Isaias Afwerki considered TPDM his personal protectors.

Once there was Brig. General Kemal Gelchu

No news has been subjected to so much spin as the Molla Aghedom saga since the escape of Brigadier General Kemal Gelchu. In August 2006, Brigadier General Kemal Gelchu defected from the Ethiopian army to Eritrea together with around 150 soldiers. The Eritrean government-owned shabait.com was quick to report that there was mass opposition to the government of Ethiopia and that “massive uprising is equally being witnessed within the ranks of the Ethiopian Armed Forces.” For months thereafter, linking it to the bloody 2005 Ethiopian elections, Eritrean government media outlets played the news about Kemal Gelchu’s defection and made it seem as if Ethiopia was about to disintegrate due to massive popular uprisings. In the meantime, Kemal Gelchu joined a faction of the Oromo Liberation Front (OLF) and continued to be fattened by the Eritrean government, for some time.

After a few years of cozy relations with the Eritrean government, Kemal Gelchu fell out of favor and conflicting news about his arrest, release, and subsequent house-arrest, started to appear on Ethiopian media. That continued for a few more years until October 24, 2014, when a website affiliated with the Eritrean ruling party reported that, “The Oromo Liberation Front (OLF) Executive Committee today announced the removal of General Kemal Gelchu as its Chairman and purged him from the organization effective immediately.”

That was followed by an allegedly OLF official press release supporting the news that the same website provided a link to. However, on October 25, 2014, only a day later, the same website reported another news stating, “The Oromo Liberation Front (OLF) today denies media reports of General Kemal Gelchu’s expulsion as Chairman of the OLF-for-Change and accused certain disgruntled group of the organization for the baseless report.” Strangely, both conflicting news items were reported by the same website. At any rate, slowly, Brigader Kemal Gelchu disappeared from the scene.

And there was the Eastern Sudan Portfolio

After providing logistical support and training bases for most of Sudan’s opposition forces, in 2006 Isaias Afwerki of Eritrea brokered a peace deal between the Sudanese government and its opposition groups that he had sponsored in Eritrea. The deal provided the leaders of the opposition a number of federal and local government positions. Accordingly, Mussa Mohammed Mussa was given a senior ceremonial position in Omar AlBashir’s office while both Mohammad Yousuf Adam Bashir and Mohammed Tahir Eila were appointed as governors of Kassala and Red Sea provinces respectively. In 2007, Mabrouk Mubarak Salim, formerly the leader of the [Free] Lions Rashaida Group, which was based in Eritrea, became a State Minister in the Ministry of Transport and Roads.

Due to the important appointments that it secured for its Sudanese clients, the Eritrean government enjoyed great influence in the Sudan, particularly in the Kassala and Red Sea provinces that border Eritrea. The Eritrean government deployed its security agents and contraband traders, and started to run Eastern Sudan as a shadow government. Human trafficking with the collaboration of corrupt Eritrean and Sudanese officers became rampant and traffickers increased drastically. Trucks with contraband food and fuel cargo supplied Eritrea where the government set an open contraband markets in Kilo 13, Tessenei, and other villages across the border from Sudan.

All of that started to change beginning last June when Omer Al Bashir began his third term. Among his first decisions were the transfer of Mohammed Tahir Eila from his home province of the Red Sea, to the AlGezira province in central Sudan, and the transfer of Mohammad Yousuf Adam Bashir to a position in the ministry of interior in Khartoum, again away from his home province. They were replaced by Ali Hamid and Adam Gima’a respectively. Immediately, as if to prove they were independence and not beholden to the influence of Isaias Afwerki, both governors adopted stringent border control measures against contraband trade and human trafficking, as well as taking modest steps to curb corruption. The development in Eastern Sudan caused panic in the Eritrean ruling party circles and forced Isaias Afwerki to pay a visit to Sudan to complain about the strict measures that the new governors adopted in Eastern Sudan. However, AlBashir, who was humiliated for years by the International Criminal Court (ICC) which issued a warrant for his arrest, seemed to have regained his self-confidence and didn’t budge. A few days after meeting Isaias, he traveled to South Africa in defiance of the ICC arrest warrant, in addition, he defiantly expressed his decision to attend the upcoming general assembly meeting in New York. Importantly, Al Bashir was emboldened by his renewed relations with the Arab world after he joined the Saudi led alliance fighting against the Houthis of Yemen. Given the above, it is safe to assume that he has freed himself after long years of blackmailing by Isaias Afwerki.

And now there Is the Molla Asghedom saga

In September 6, 2015, reports from Asmara indicated that Dr. Berhanu Negga, the leader of the Ethiopian opposition group, Gnbot 7, became the leader of the four Ethiopian opposition groups that merged under the name of “Ethiopian National Salvation.” For years, Isaias Afwerki was working with determination to create a robust Ethiopian force that he can use to negotiate with Ethiopia for a deal similar to the one he brokered with Sudan in 2006.

Before travelling to Eritrea, Dr. Berhanu lived in the USA until he left for Asmara secretly to avoid the fate of his predecessor, Endarkachew Tsige, who last June was whisked away from the San’aa airport to Ethiopia. He was on his way from London through Dubai and Sana’a, to Asmara; now he is in jail in Ethiopia.

Dr. Berhanu Negga’s Gnbot 7 and four other groups merged and gave birth to the “Ethiopian National Salvation”. Ironically, Molla Asghedom, the leader of the largest group among the four, became deputy to Dr. Berhanu Negga. Eritrean observers widely believed that Molla Asghedom must have been coerced into accepting the arrangement. That is because TPDM forces are estimated to be around 20,000 people as reported by UN Somalia-Eritrea Monitoring Group based on information obtained from a senior Eritrean government official, though judging from Molla Asghedom’s interview, the 20,000 number seems to be very exaggerated.  In comparison, Gnbot 7 reportedly has around 800 armed troops and it has been weakened after its Secretary General, Andargachew Tsege, was arrested.

Molla Asghedom’s TPDM was the Eritrean government’s favorite group until recently when he faced Brigadier General Kemal Gelchu’s fate. However, based on his interviews, it is evident that Molla Asghedom holds the Diaspora Ethiopian opposition in very low esteem; naturally he couldn’t accept a Diaspora member like Dr. Berhanu Negga to become his boss. He must have accepted the merger arrangement under duress and posed for a photo op to fake his acceptance. Remarkably, only a few days later he crossed to the Sudan and surrendered along with his loyal troops numbering about 120 soldiers. Immediately the news about his defection spread in the camps across Eritrea, TPDM forces panicked, and their commanders lost control of of the combatants after the chaos that ensued. The combatants started to flee the camps in all directions, and before the end of the day, around 600 troops ended up in Sudan; some of them were killed in clashes with Eritrean border patrol who tried to stop them.

Every month about 4 to 5 thousand Eritreans escape the country to Sudan and Ethiopia; the security patrol around the border area is very strict and many Eritreans are shot dead by border patrol as they flee the country. The escaping TPDM combatants could have met the same fate, while hundreds have disappeared from their camps—they either headed south to Ethiopia, or are in hiding somewhere in Eritrea, or, apprehended by security forces. Not counting the wounded, TPDM has lost about a dozen lives in the clashes; the number of casualties from the Eritrean side is not yet known.

And there will always be a spin

The Molla Asghedom Saga received huge coverage among the people of the Horn of Africa due to the fact that many individuals and media outlets have put a spin on it to fit each of their particular audience. It became worse because social media is not bothered by accountability or transparency. Unfortunately the official media outlets of the two countries had little to say about it except that the Ethiopian television provided an extensive interview with Molla Asghedom. However, the underlying theme of the news has been the over promotion and lionization of the “magnificent intelligence arm” of the two countries. This has been a major undertaking by the Ethiopian media, emphasizing that Molla Asghedom was a mole in Eritrea. And not to be outdone, Eritrean supporters of the regime boasted about the brilliance of their government’s intelligence units “that exposed the conspiracy of Molla Asghedom and he had to run away in haste.” The counter spin also includes some Ethiopian claims that Molla was planning to lure Dr. Berhanu to the border areas where he would be kidnapped and whisked away to Ethiopia, just like Endarkachew Tsige, which some Eritrean government supporters spin, claiming that Molla Asghedom had to flee because the Eritrean intelligence units uncovered that plot as well.

At the end, the root of the Ethiopian-Eritrean problem remains unresolved, while the saga proved to be one more episode in a series of intelligence games with little value for the players, and with lesser value for the beleaguered people straddling the border areas between the two countries.

Related Reading:

The Ruling Party Of Eritrea And Its Ethiopian Allies
Oct. 24 news title: Brig General Hailu Gonfa Replaces General Kemal Gelchu
Oct. 25 news title: OLF Denies Expelling General Kemal Gelchu

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  • saay7

    Selamat Abay:

    Thanks for joining the conversation at Open Enrollment Awate University. See the registrars office (A Osman) for transferring credits and transcripts.

    I appreciate your well wishes. And while I would LOVE to believe that your “from Addis” is representative of Addis Abeba and therefore Ethiopian views, because some of the most arrogant writing that has ever appeared here at Awate was from Addis, please forgive me for taking it as representative of a writer named Addis. Why?

    1. Because I have watched the debate of your political parties prior to the May 2015 elections and I remember how many parties said that Asab is Ethiopian. This 24 years after Eritrean independence and 15 years after our last bloody war;

    2. A close observer of Ethiopian politics (T Kifle) wrote in these pages that Asab is the Achilles heel of EPRDF;

    3. Eritreans window of opportunity to fix our mess by ourselves is closing and closing fast. And when it closes and the bottom falls then of course Ethiopia will have to move in to “protect its strategic interest.”

    4. If it does (I am hoping it will be an if but I fear it will be a “when” because I have seen no signs from those who call my government that they have any awareness of the danger the country is in), the Ethiopian government is ill-prepared psychologically to contribute positively. The people in charge (that would be YOUR government) will only look at exclusively from what is in their best interest and given the kililization of your country that translates to what is in the best interest of Tigray in much the same way your country is dealing with Somalia (what is in the best interest of the Somali killil). Given Eritrean dynamic–and how laughably ill-informed your government is about what half of Eritrea is like–this action will create a reaction which will create a reaction etc etc that is not good for Eritrea. So “intent” and goodwill is not enough.

    5. Please note that what I wrote was in response to “Abyssinia” who was telling Eritreans that orbiting Ethiopia is our destiny and I was giving the example of small state surrounded by giants—Luxenbourg–that has refused that invitation from France and Germany. But its “fierce independence” was built on a compromise: French is the language of government, German is the language of media; Luxenbourgish is the language of the street. So the proposal to make Amharic a co-official language to appease the empire was a throaway line. But the rest of my message wasn’t: it was written to stiffen the resolve of a couple of Eritrens in this forum.

    Belated Happy New Year!

    saay

    • Semere Andom

      Hi Saleh:This is not necessarily a rebut to you. Also expect incoherence as it will require the elquence of Hemingway and the staminaof Mohammed.Clay to put my thought clearly this late. And I possess none. But for what it is worth, it is here.Jerbe sekay etkeliE bela maleleha Wedi Saleh( Mahmud Saleh) not Wedi Saleh:-)

      The throwaway line that was taken as such by some of us has spurred the response from Abay. I am delighted. Some of us undertood what you meant but Abay did not and for good reason. I agree with almost everything you said in this comment. I am also delighted about your pessimism , contrary to my previous writings dubbing you annoyingly optimistic:-).
      I am sure your read the book “First Break the Rules”, in it, Marcus talks about talent as something you do consistently and if you develop the skills around that thing you do consistently you will be renowned in the subject. I think we need to be so pessimistic about Eritrean current affairs and that fear, that gloom, that no light at the end of the tunnel will jerk many from their slumber to action, Ethiopia got to do what it got to do and we cannot blame it. I also agree even more with you that it was the ruling party of MZ that has suppressed the sentiments of those who think Assab is Ethiopian

      I called for Ethioia to stay put in Badme and even to intervene. I also commented on how Ethiopia is cashering Erittrean soveringity,but not because of the border issue but by their laser focus on their long term security and interest solely by tinkering with the Kunama and Afar movements. The writings of Fanti and Abay and Amde are not main stream

      We cannot think our way out of our mess. The urgency that I always focused on and you teased me for hyperbolizing, has been captured in this comment of yours.

      You once said, economics is a one of this subjecs that any Bahta can debate a person who makes a living with it ( God, do not ask when or where you said it. I should write about what you write) ,so I will quote Adam Smith, who I did many times here because it the only thing I took away from Eco000:
      “It is not from the benevolence of the butcher, the brewer or the baker that we get our food, but from their regard to their own best interest.”
      Removing PFDJ with any mean necessary is the first step to assert our best interest and Ethiopia acting in its best interest will listen to us. The more we dither, the longer PFDJ writes the manual for us, the more our opposition groups mushroom, the more that dread scenario will become reality

      • saay7

        Hey Cousin iSem:

        I think you and I agree on the trajectory–that it is headed the wrong way–but we probably disagree on where it started from and where it is now. Thus the difference in the intensity of the pessimism.

        Well, your call for Ethiopia to stay put in Badme and intervene was when you open the Howard Stern School of Shock’em And Keep’em Coming for More, an un-accredited, un-licensed school within Awate University.

        The interesting proxy-dialogue between Eritrea-Ethiopia is exemplified by Hayat-Mahmoud discussions. She puts demand on him to change; meanwhile she will not change. The foreign policy of Ethiopia is the foreign policy of TPLF simply because that ministry is, to this date, over-represented by TPLF. The Foreign Minister is an Ethiopian who was deported by EPLF and has been given the manual by TPLF. His deputy? Berhane Gebrekrstos–vintage TPLF. Same thing in the Defense Ministry. Again, repeat, emphasis, underline, bold, this is none of our business except that it impacts Ethiopia’s foreign policy and military posture.

        Let me ask you a question, Cousin. If you knew for certain that the Ethiopia that will appear at the negotiation table to pacify Eritrea after the fall of Isaias Afwerki is as biased and as ill-informed about the Eritrean people and their history and their values, isn’t all you are going to get going to be a repeat of Hayat patronizing Mahmouday: baby steps, baby steps, you can do…now put a dagger in that Ghedli…good!…one more step, now apologize for Zalambesa: good, good. I leave you with the words of the great Serray (because I miss him) in a note he wrote Hayat when she was channeling T.Kifle:

        To the extent that you are saying we should make peace central to our existence, I am with you. But it has to be a peace based on realistic expectations; a peace you can sell to BOTH eritreans and ethiopians. Remember, there will be extremes on both sides who would like to go for the maximum advantage, maximum hurt. T. kifle wrote in reply to your post, “Zalambessa who lost all their belongings and/or their loved ones for no other reason than the brutal invasion befallen them unsuspecting. It’s not as simple as you wanted have us believe. The problem is deep in our bones and if for nothing else, we should make sure that we are not going to be stabbed on the back again”. As an eritrean post-pfdj, you have to counter and balance that accusation. If he doesn’t feel responsible for the scars eritreans suffer from thirty years of ethiopian rulers genocidal policy (and he shouldn’t), why does an eritrean who comes to power on the ashes of isaias be burdened with his sins? An eritrean who carries isaias’s guilt to the peace table serves no peace to either ethiopians or eritreans. The scars are too deep to ignore. Don’t get me wrong,though, the ethiopian government can be a partner in peace; we just have to make sure they don’t guilt trip us into tying both our hands behind our backs by pointing at their wounds from our deposed ruler while they ignore ours from their vanquished rulers.

        saay

  • dawit

    Abi,
    Very Mature response based on reality. All other thoughts is day dreaming for those who could not learn from history. But Abi, are you sure you gave up on Assab?
    I wanted to respond to you nun and priest story, but I will not, the last time I followed you, I end up in trouble, in the XXXX territory . I learned my lesson.
    Cheers
    dawit

    • Abi

      Mezmure dawit
      I gave up on both eritrea and Assab long time ago. Assab is yours to lose. Djibouti is getting ready to eat your dinner.
      BTW, you responded to Abay, my brother from the blessed nation of ETHIOPIA.

      Abay
      I agree with you 100%
      Thanks.

      • dawit

        Dear Abi, I don’t know what is happening on my journey on the cyber space, second time in a week that I am confusing names, Amanuel vis Amanuel H. and now Abay vis Abi. Could it be old age?

  • Kim Hanna

    Selam Abay,
    .
    It is refreshing to read such a post. It is calm. It is to the point and truthful.
    .
    I hope you post more often. It would be nice to see you correct some of the detached from reality comments that we read here too often..
    .
    With respect,
    .
    K.H

  • Papillon

    PFDJ pathetic losers,

    Ready for more headaches? Here it is!

    ethiopiafirst.com

    • V.F.

      http://www.tubechop.com/watch/6887530

      I chopped the fun part for Nitricc.

      This comment on Ethiofirst sounds like you Papi:

      Hi Ben,

      I have been following the recent developments regarding TPDM and I can’t help it but admire the sophistication and effectiveness of the intelligence community in our country. It gives me comfort knowing that our country, despite being surrounded by ruthless dictators, war monger and religious fanatics is led by a strong institution and a very capable, determined servant of the people that I can proudly say our own. The greatest weaknesses of the “opposition” groups has always been undermining TPLF/EPRDF, their hunger for power, lack of discipline and shortsightedness. Sun Tsu (The Chinese general and philosopher) said “The supreme art of war is to subdue the enemy without fighting”, “Supreme excellence consists in breaking the enemy’s resistance without fighting” and without firing a single bullet from our defense forces, the intelligence services of our country have effectively humiliated Diaspora politicians and subdued/broke the lunatic in the north.

      Very proud!!!!!

      • Papillon

        Dear V.F,

        I popular TV advert goes, “I can’t believe it’s not butter.” And I say I can’t believe I am not Ethiopian.

        • V.F.

          Good one Papi. Needless to say, I can’t believe they discovered margarine is worse than butter for us.

      • sara

        Dear v.f
        you are becoming by the day the only honest person at this forum,what could we ask
        more than being honest, if Mola could do it and come out of his nest why not the rest
        let them all come out into the open… thanks to Mola..

        • V.F.

          Hi sara. It’s funny to me for people to not be honest while writing using pennames. It’s better to state exactly how you feel. My ideas are not very popular among Eritreans these days but I have done a lot of reflection and analysis in my mind. The solution is of course to get rid of the regime first and then work towards unification. What have we got to lose? Just a symbol. If we bring out one formidable party out of Eritrea, we could win elections and rule Ethiopia. It would take time but very possible.

          Ethiopia is like a chemotherapy for Eritrea, in the sense that it could either be a poison or cure or both at the same time. Let’s swallow the pill.

          • Dear V.F.,
            Suggesting unification and that by an Eritrean is indeed a daring task. Unfortunately, neither Eritreans, nor Ethiopians are going to be ready for this for a long time. But, as you rightfully said, discussing the process and even planning how to go about it, after the demise of dictatorship, is not farfetched.

            It is not easy to bring to mind many examples of two states or countries who merged together to form one united country recently. The latest trend is for partition of countries into entities that were brought together by wars or other methods.

            The case of Eritrea and Ethiopia is so recent, the bad blood so fresh, that entertaining unity soon after DIA will surely have few supporters. The legacy he would leave behind will live for a long time after him, and some Eritreans may even try to boost his ideology. Therefore, unification should not have priority. The pivotal starting point, from which everything will arise by themselves, i.e. cooperation, economic integration and finally unification (in that order),
            should be to bring first and foremost PERMANENT PEACE, which does not mean only
            peace between two governments, but mainly between the two people, a peace that respects and serves the interest of both. Then, everything will work smoothly.

          • V.F.

            Well said Horizon. But I cannot envision how the dynamics of the two states can allow for cooperation. One will always try to dominate and the other will always feel insecure and be defensive. Like I said earlier these competing urges will preclude peaceful coexistence separately. The sooner Eritreans realize unity is in their best interest, the better off they will be quicker.

            It’s not about rights to be a nation or even viability. It’s about what’s best for us.

            I have to admit though, this is an extremely unpopular idea among Eritreans. Even the elite of elites in the Ghedli generation believe still Ethiopia is public enemy number one and suggesting reuniting makes you ‘he must be agame.’ It’s very unfortunate that nearly all Eritreans still do not know they were Ethiopians first and they could amass lots of power and wealth pledging allegiance to unity. I am being extremely idealistic. But I have to tell you, it’s not an insignificant number who share my views now.

          • Abi

            Ato Very Funny (VF)
            I can’t believe what I’m reading. You want reunification because you want to rule over Ethiopia.
            ” an immature lover says ” I love you because I need you.”
            A matured lover says ” I need you because I love you.”
            If you think Ethiopia is a night club where you can go and come back as you please, think again.
            What are you thinking?

          • V.F.

            Ante timkihtegna. Why not? So should we join you and become eshi getaye min litazez. No. We would be competing like everybody. We would be our own state and send a strong delegation. The kind of ideas you have are the reason most Eritreans are suspicious of being subjugated and enslaved as they are now.

            All I was trying to say was, it’s even possible for Eritreans to be at the helm of power if reunited.

            Are you happy now the Tigrayans dominate you? How would it be different if Oromo or ye asmera lijoch were dominating you if they pledge their allegiance to the bigger Union?

          • dawit

            Abi,
            The Nigerians have a proverb, that fits well the very funny suggestions. ‘You can only cheat a prostitute once’.

          • Kim Hanna

            Selam Abi,
            .
            V.F is really funny and bold. He has courage to say what he says. He is not made out of the same mold as Amanuel Hidrat and Mahmud Saleh for sure.
            .
            The above descriptive post you made also really nails his predicament. You don’t waist a lot of ink, do you.
            I selfishly wished you made your above statement in Gonderigna. Notice I didn’t say Amharic, I am not sure if I can trust you with it after your recent revelations.
            .
            Mr. K.H

          • Abi

            Wedaje Kim

            Na abren enhun enwahad alegn
            Libelagn masebun yehodun man negrogn?

            I am puzzled. What did I reveal recently?

          • Kim Hanna

            Selam Abi,
            .
            Sorry, I was talking about your readiness to dump Amharic for English. Of course, I was exaggerating what you said.
            .
            Thanks for the above post. It is funny as always.
            .
            Special personal story from long ago. It was before your time. Maybe you can date it by the price of the marbles (Biy) at that time. It was 5 cents for two average biy.
            .
            We financed our entertainment expenditures (Like movies) by winning and selling these marbles. At our young age it was a serious business, sometimes fights broke out. I was a fairly good player and I have over a dozen working inventory.
            As it happens sometimes brothers or very close friends make alliances and form partnerships in the business to share risks and stick together for the movie house trips and “PASTE” to eat on a good weekend. Most parents don’t approve this gambling, including the police. My parents were the worst.
            .
            I formed a partnership with two kids in the neighborhood. We were close, I thought. Occasionally they spoke a different language. We chose a safe house for our inventory with one of the kids. He brings in a certain number of biy for the daily operation and take back more if we were successful.
            .
            One fateful morning the calling special whistle summoned me to the outside gate. I saw my two partners almost in tears told me that the kid’s parents have discovered our inventory of biys. We are now all broke. I was so sad, it has happened to me before too. I was trying to console them about it.
            .
            Few days later I was reduced to watching the marble game, I saw one of the specific biy (marble) that was mine to go into the partnership inventory back in circulation. I was stunned. I confronted my former partners and fight broke out. My parents were informed, calamity.
            What can I tell you I don’t like partnerships to this day.
            .
            Please don’t ask clarification or anything. It is Sunday, I read your post and thought of that long ago episode of my life.
            .
            BTW: Did you notice, I am now Mr. K.H now after so many years at the campus.
            .
            Mr. K.H
            P.S: Sorry for the long post.

    • Semere Andom

      Hi Papi:

      It was long before your time but Sal and I were old enough to make fun of this Eritrean guy who wrote a book called Habesha (Ethioipia) shall rise. I am sure there is lots of spin from Ethiopians but the core message, the cream of the defection of TPDM brain leaves PFDJ to dust in many aspects. We laughed it off because given our experience growing in Eritrea where we spend many of our days planning our escape in case the Dergi soldiers came to get us. So we did not trust the former country of those soldiers to rise from the proverbial ashes, but Eritrea , we were convinced did. And in my case we had secret places to hide in our house.

      Now think about it, do you think the 20,000 soldiers in Eritrea will stay put or will desert in droves?

      The Eritrean people like the residents of Adama were also preparing lavish reception just after independence when the some former fighters were preparing to come back home but smelling blood, PFDJ cancelled the event.

      The irony: the former soldiers who waged ware against Ethiopia (TPDM)are welcomed home, in our case the former soldiers who waged ware against Ethiopia (G-15 and veteran fighters) to stop Ethiopia from waging war against Eritrea were rewarded with Sep 18. Are these signs that Habesha will rise?

      dawit will get his “merzen” back and he will interrupt his Sunday sermon;-)

      • dawit

        Hi cousin SEM,
        Frankly speaking the video shows a group of frustrated poor boys who were cheated from their plan of liberating their country and now they are shipped to an alien territory. The said a picture worth a thousand words. You can not see a single smile on those ‘hero’s faces! Unlike those who marched in Asmara on May 24, 1991. If I was Ethiopian propaganda or ‘ignorance’ minister, I would have hide it. Even those who were ordered by kebele to greet them are all frown faces. What a true picture! of EPRDF

        • Fanti Ghana

          Hello Dawitom,
          Hey, they are still mourning about what they almost did to mother country! Do not expect smiling faces for another a month or two.

      • Papillon

        Dear Semerile,

        Do you know what I hope to see? I really want to see you writing a novel simply because you are a brilliant story teller. No kidding! True when I saw the video of homecoming, it reminded me when Tegadelti strolled into the streets of Asmara not of course in an orderly manner but you get the point. The irony as you have put it, we had no idea what kind of monster we had for a hero who had set out to destroy a once promising nation in to the laughingstock of latter day “Habesha Rising.”

      • Fnote Selam

        Hi Semere,

        The Habesha Rise is kind of ironic, implies that Habesha has been subjugated……well, I think there is a good case can be made that Habesha has been the source of a significant portion of problems in The Horn.

        Best,

        FS.

        • Amde

          Selam FnoteSelam

          I don’t know on what basis one can blame “…the Habesha as being the source of a significant portion of problems in the horn…” Frankly, I would expect such a broad brush on Somali forums but not here. It sounds very much like blaming the victim.

          Objectively speaking, the Habesha are some of the poorest people on earth. Other than the Israel Palestinian issues, there is almost no other place on earth that has been continuously at war since the second world war. It is right now on record as producing the largest non-hot-war refugee flow on earth.

          One must ask systemicly why that is instead of blaming the people or the culture(s).

          Even with that, it remains one of the most densely populated, most diverse areas in Africa, and perhaps on earth.

          Amde

          • Fnote Selam

            Hi Amde,

            The argument goes like this:- Habesha (generally referring to people in highlands of Eri and Ethio) could not form a viable nation for themselves, because it would not have any useful land or resources and no sea access. If you consider the other major ethnic groups in the horn, Tigrayet, Afar, Solami, Oromo etc, based on resources and/or sea access they can form viable nations for themselves.

            Debate…..

            Really look forward for your rebuttal.

            Thanks,

            FS.

          • Eyob Medhane

            Fnote,

            And Tigre/Tigryt is not Habesha? God help you… (Smh)

          • Fnote Selam

            Eyob,

            Trust me I know…..but nowadays for all practical purposes, just every one I know in the Eri and Ethio communities (at least it he US) assume Habesha = ppl in highlands of Eri and Ethio. And the person who brought the argument I presented to Amde (or anyone else who wants to participate) definitely sees it that way.

            FS.

          • Eyob Medhane

            Fnote

            I think Amde is a fine and well informed person and I don’t think he lacks the very elementary knowledge that is modified geez speaking people are Habesha… 🙂 Look forward to read your debate, though…

          • Abi

            Hi Eyobe
            Isn’t Fnote Selam a place in Gojam? Or is it at northwest shoa? I forgot.

          • Amde

            Abi, Eyob

            I think Fnote Selam is on the Shewa end of the Abbay gorge. Dejen is its Gojjame counterpart. Now I can’t stop having Efrem Tamiru’s voice in my ears.

            Wasn’t Guad Komche Ambaw’s place just past Dejen on the road to Debre Markos?

            Amde

          • Abi

            Getaw
            Thanks. I asked a wrong person. I was not thinking.
            You have any jokes about Guad Komche?
            My favorite is where he forced people to ” meserete timihirt ” in his awraja.
            Meserete timihirt yemayhed buda bicha new.”

          • Eyob Medhane

            Abi,

            Oh I forgot…I am still mad at you… 🙁

          • Abi

            Eyobe
            Min aTefahu?
            BaTefahu eksalehu.

          • Eyob Medhane

            Abiye,

            You were called on to be judge between me and Sal…and side with me… 😉

            I made a great effort to translate something for you with my meager Tigrigna… Yet you totally ignored it… (Hod asbaskegn 🙂 )
            https://disqus.com/home/discussion/awate/strapping_youth_how_do_you_feel_about_our_incarceration/#comment-2255664580

          • Abi

            Eyobe
            I didn’t see this comment at all.
            Anyway, you are always the winner.
            I already loved this brave gentleman.
            He said they were tricked. I know who tricked them. He is blaming the mass mobilizers. That is the source of all the problems we went through.

            I remember siding with Saay when it comes to language and medium of instruction.

          • Eyob Medhane

            Ha,

            Thank you Abishu…
            I also liked your poke on Amanuel Hidrat.. 🙂

            Kiros’ interview was really great…At some point, he broke into real tears, and it was heart wrenching.

          • Amde

            Abi,

            Haha I don’t think that one was a joke.

            The one I heard is about him stopping a bus in the middle of the road when he heard his name mentioned on the radio. He jumped up and yelled to the driver to stop – “Be abyotu biyehalehu aqum ahununu!!!”. Driver gets the bus to a screeching halt, Komche pointed to himself and tells the passengers, “Ingidih qen alefelachihu, Komche malet enew neN!!”

            Ok your turn..

          • Abi

            Getaw
            Komche was giving a closing speech after a soccer game when he said
            ” zare beAnd kuwas lehaya hulet endetechawetachihu abyotachin gibun simeta behaya hulet kuwas tichawetalachihu.”

          • Eyob Medhane

            Abishu,

            It is in Gojjam right after you passed Debre Marqos and right before you get to Bahir Dar…It is actually bound to be a large town now, because it will be the hub of the north east train to Bahir Dar..and North Ethiopia…

          • Amde

            Eyob,

            You are right. So what town in Shewa am I thinking of?

          • Eyob Medhane

            Amde,

            I don’t know…may be Debre Berhan? Debre Sina? Efrata?….

          • Abi

            Eyobe
            You mean Debre Libanos? Debre Damo ? Debre Komche?

          • Amde

            Abi

            De’re Libanos!!!

            Thanks

          • Eyob Medhane

            Ha.. Abi,

            You need to go back home soon… 🙂

            Debre Damo is in Tigray.. 🙂 By the way, Komche Ambaw is now a low level legal clerk in Debre Markos…I will look the video and post it for you…

            P.S… I found it..

            Here it is..enjoy..Reall Komche Ambaw..still Alive and kicking.. 🙂

            http://www.diretube.com/mobile/watch.php?vid=a0173ab01

          • Nitricc

            Hey Abi, shame on you. you don’t know where Fnote Selam is? and shame to Amde for not knowing.

          • Abi

            General
            It is your gojam . Show me some of your pictures taken when you lived there.

          • Kokhob Selam

            Dear Eyob,
            I think the following are Habesha people, Amhara,Tigringa( Tigrinyqa,) Tirgre, Hareri,gurge, when I see the list from differences sources and when I noted it is Afro-Asiatic I am convinced the entire Eritrea and Ethiopia is Habesha at least I mean if that will not include other horn nations. I don’t really know why some tribes still think they are not Habesha.

          • Amde

            Hi FS,

            I guess if you want to debate it, we’d have to start with a few definitions:
            a) what your definition of what you consider Habesha is.(I suspect you mean the Amharic and Tigrinya speaking people that reside on the mountain range to the west of the Rift Valley – Correct?)
            b) what your definition of a Nation is (Americans casually mix the terms Nations and State so do you mean a State based on a culturally homogeneous society, or just an effectively functioning state that holds within it culturally diverse demographics)
            c) what your definition of “viable” is (do you mean as entities that can be economically productive enough to support their populations or do you mean the additional requirement of finding their niche in the global economic system)

            I will give you a hint: What explains the population densities of the highlands vs the Afar, Somali, Tigrayet lands?

            Amde

          • Fnote Selam

            Hi Amde,

            For starters…

            a) yes
            b) mainly based on homogeneous society (I know Somalia is huge confounder, but it could be argued that Somalia itself could be divided into a few viable states)
            c) politically and economically

            Population densities:- technology (even limited one) and international trade makes the lowlands as livable (now)……

            FS

          • Amde

            Hi FS,

            Well first of all I reject such a narrow definition of the Habesha. For example I know the current political orthodoxy is to pigeonhole the
            Habesha as just the Semitic speaking Christian people of highland
            Northeast Africa, but to me most Oromiffa speakers are indistinguishable
            by livelihood, geography, genetics and history from the Amharic or
            Tigrinya speakers. Are the Agaw or Irob or Bilen for that matter
            considered Habesha? In my book they are. Amharic is basically Agew +
            Ge’ez, and so probably is Tigrinya, the difference being in the blend
            of Semitic Ge’ez to Cushitic Agew. As to the Oromo, that is such a
            huge mystery, the current one or some proto-Oromo culture may be the
            substrate on which many of the currently known ones are placed. (I will
            see if Eyob will correct me on any of this).

            As far as Nations formed on the basis of cultural homegeneity, that is a situation that applies more to low-land, dryer, pastoral cultures than the settled highlands, which for our purposes is where the population is at. Political entities that flourished for years could do so without having to worry about cultural homogeneity. The big one is of course the Ethiopian state itself, but even the constituent units are not easily defined in one size fits all categories. What would we make of Lasta for example today, 100 years ago, and 300 years ago – Agew or Amharic speaking? And yet they had long histories of statehood and statecraft. Cultural homogeneity is not necessary for the existence of effective states.

            The mere fact that the highlands have been able to host such a high population density just tells you that historically they have been able to provide viable sustenance for very large number of people. The history of the region’s trade itself shows that historically it has been able to do more than be viable.

            So that is the history side.

            If the question is about today, the two big factors to retranslate the historic realities in today’s terms are peace and technological transfer. Ethiopia has a viable multicutural state, its people are generally at peace, and in less than a generation, the technological basis to give us the capability to properly exploit our natural resources will be at hand (the number of Engineering schools in Ethiopia are quite high and growing).

            I would say our chances are better than average, to quite crocodile dundee.

            I don’t know why the question of viability is related to “Habeshas being the problem for the Horn”. That is a weird formulation to me – a dangerous slippery slope. I would like to know how that came about.

            Amde

          • Saleh Johar

            Dear Amde,

            Who decides what peoples’ identities are? Are you sure the Oromo consider themselves Habesha? Can you think with me who is pigeonholing Habesha as. AChristian identity? Cnn you think of any historical undertaking to define Habesha in the history of the region ? Thank you

          • Amde

            Selam Saleh,

            Your words “benatem habesha babatem habesha” were actually in my mind when I wrote this.

            For this commentary, I wrote what makes sense to me. You asked me tough questions, for which I am currently indisposed to get you references. In any case, I feel Habesha in general use today has devolved into Amharic and Tigrinya speaking peoples, which are preponderantly Christian. I wanted to broaden out the definition. Incidentally, since you challenged me, I looked up online and was pleasantly surprised to see this in Wikipedia. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Habesha_people. Within its etymology section I find this “In Arabic, the elevated plateau on the east of the Nile, from which most
            of the waters of that river are derived, is called Habesh, and its
            people Habshi” This to me is the closest definition of Habesha, and associates peoples that have evolved and thrived in the very specific geography of the plateaus/mountains. It is free of language and religion. Admittedly, it does not cover the lowland Tigre peple for example,

            As far as the Oromo, right now some Oromo nationalists hew to the narrow Semitic speakers definition of Habesha and thus try to popularize that conception. There are plenty of Oromos I know who consider themselves Habesha. I feel most people that speak Oromo today are from stock that spoke other tongues a few centuries ago. There is no way we can exclude at least the majority of highland Oromo from being considered Habesha.

            Amde

          • Saleh Johar

            Hi Amde,
            Of course you know that identities evolve. In the Beni Amer tribal confederation, a big chunk call themselves Hamassen, but there is nothing that binds then to the Hamassen of today speaking from the tribal/ethnic perspective. Wikipedia, studies by orientalists, are all useless because they forget the emotional side of it and decrease identity to mere math fractions. IIsaias has decreed what the ethhnic identities of people should be but no one is buying it. Identity cannot be decreed, it has to be embraced by the people. There maybe Ormos who see themselves as Habesha, good for them. To them the identity of Oromo and Habesha has morphed and they internalized it. Others haven’t. Do you know the hate mail that I get all all attacking my Habesha identity and worse, that I am anti-Habesha. Even Eyob grudgingly accepted my Habesha identity–and when my identity complexity is stirred, I claim I belong to the original Habesha: Trrt Yale Habesha 🙂 Eyob, it is joke!

            That compartmentalization, whimsical identification and imposition of identity are rampant wherever citizens do not have a say. Please Amde, depend on what the people feel they are, not on scholarly papers. They are valueless unless they describe the feeling and emotions of people. Identity is sometimes very abstract and personal.

          • Amde

            Ato Saleh,

            Following your advice/admonishment I will say that what I wrote reflects what I feel as another “babatem Abesha, benatem Abesha” I would think you would appreciate that I tried to widen the Abesha family – no?

            Amde

          • Fnote Selam

            Hi Amde,

            Thank you for kindly responding to my questions. Given the highly theoretical nature of the original debate, I think I will stop here (you have given me enough insight).

            Best,

            FS.

    • Nitricc

      Hey papi I love you but when you bring Ethiopian last as your source, I wonder who is the loser. Take it easy.

      • Papillon

        Hey Nitricc,

        You see the young kids? They are your age and other commonality you have with them is that they were once duped into believing that a man who is not able to clean up the mess in his house (read:Isaias) was going to help them deliver all the paraphernalia of democracy and what not. As much as they wised up and did the right thing, I won’t lose hope in you either.

  • Music Novice

    Greetings Papillon,

    It was because Japan and China were moving in opposite directions; size has nothing to do with it. Initially, both countries were closed to the outside world. However, following the incident with an American battleship in a Japanese harbour, Japan embraced modernity in order to best protect itself. This started in 1850, and within 68 years Japan was already a force to be reckoned with to be invited to the Versailles conference in 1918. The rest is history.

  • dawit

    Thanks Moderator for your neutrality in enforcing you laws

  • saay7

    Selamat Guest:

    First, I wish you would register your name so that we are not always calling you Guest. We had one who used that and I jokingly said use Guest but translate it to and now he calls himself “Dayphi”. Maybe you can call yourself “Gasha” because you don’t consider awate as a home but a place to visit.

    Second, “my poor English” my foot. You are an exceptionally talented dude–I just wish you would restrain from the flood-or-drought posting system you have. And that you wouldn’t be so abusive: you live on the edge of the posting guidelines and sometimes cross it. That’s what I mean by a sniper. And it is always directed at one person: in this case it is Haile TG* I actually think we all could learn something from one another, influence one another, but it all has to be with a spirit of generosity and kindness (we are only 4 million people, Gasha.)

    saay

    *The reason I know Haile TG is an asmarino is because when he gets mad at you he refers to you as female and conjugates his sentences accordingly.

    • Saleh Johar

      Dear Guest,
      I second everything Saay said above. Please don’t burden the moderators with one more task of babysitting.

  • Amde

    Aman,

    You said, “IA without knowing was riding and beating a dead horse”
    What is the dead horse?

    Amde

  • Abyssinia

    Hi Papi,
    We are focusing on one and the most important variable assuming every other variable is not skewed as to offset the effect of size. There are many other factors when it comes to society, such as external alliances, resources, internal cohesion, level of civilization. I do not think Eritrea has any advantages on the other variables, in fact Eritrea has disadvantages there too. We are talking about open-ended existence, and you can think of your Japan-china example in this context (other variables and long-term state of things).

    • V.F.

      Abyssinia,

      There will always be that insecurity from Eritrean side, fear of Ethiopia reversing our independence. There will also be always a feeling of ‘we are big and powerful so you go by our terms’ from the Ethiopian side. Why would any Ethiopian regime ever give the upper hand to tiny Eritrea?

      These competing forces make peaceful existence nearly impossible. 1991-1997, all these dynamics were there.

      Eritrea is unsustainable. I feel bad to be so blunt and crash people’s feelings. The dynamics is completely against it, from the internal and external components of it.

      I am not arguing legality here. Eritrea has a full right to exist by itself as an independent country. The dynamics on the ground, however – social, economic, and political give it least opportunities for a sustained peaceful existence. Simply put, our geographic location, history, and culture are prohibitive of peaceful independent existence. Rather we were always meant to be one.

      • Amde

        V.F.

        Well put.

        I think people tend to look at “definitive” things like – military victories and legal determinations, and assume pretty much everything is answered. I have a nagging suspicion that a lot of it might be because most of us deal with a historical context of black-vs-white religious characterization of people, and the zero sum game of land ownership. Unfortunately life is not like that. Witness the discussion we had of the economic reasons of how the war came about, and how very quickly things devolved.

        Eritreans might see a threatening Ethiopia that wants to swallow them But in my experience, there is so much bad blood, the number of Ethiopians who want to close the door and throw away the key as far as Eritrea is concerned is not small. I would even venture to say that is pretty much the majority opinion right now – people like me are considered stupid sentimental anchronistic throwbacks. They don’t see any benefit with dealing with Eritrea, and the costs so far (whether within or without) outweigh it. Believe me, i am in a very small minority.

        In any case, I am like you in that, I do not see how well the two will work without a series of broad agreements on security, defense, trade, finance, diplomacy etc… that would in effect create a confederation of sort without the name. I can see that as a feasible outcome within the next 10 to 15 years. A full union I don’t anticipate I will see any time in my lifetime (another two generations I suppose). A big part is that I think a large chunk of Eritreans and Ethiopians are opposed to it. But the other one is that the political systems between the two are incompatible.

        Amde

      • Abyssinia

        Hi V.F.,
        That is exactly what I am trying to say. I share your view here completely. Talk of legality and other issues are toppings (as in pizza toppings), The underlying currents and tectonics are such that independent Eritrea is not sustainable. It is very unfortunate, but Eritrea is made to break, and its architects were myopic beyond description.

    • dawit

      Abyssina,
      All things being equal
      ‘Small is beautiful’!

      • Hayat Adem

        Small like in small brain?

      • Hayat Adem

        Moderator,
        I was only sarcastically challenging dawit’s absurd logic of celebrating smallness.
        Hayat

        • V.F.

          What’s the scoop here? Please fill us in.

        • dawit

          Moderator,
          And dawit was only sarcastically challenging Abyssinian absurd logic of celebrating largeness
          dawit

  • haileTG

    Dear Papi,

    Narcess! Very true Papillon. I was only thinking practicality though. The reflection on a brownish or muddy water my not be in HD quality 🙂

  • Hayat Adem

    Greetings Exc. Mahmuday:
    My counter will be based on your last reply to me. I’ll not be introducing new issues but try to re-explain what you already said from a different perspective, a non-ghedli perspective, if you will. I know how unlearning can be much more difficult than learning. Ghedli have planted distorted lenses in your brains. So, every time you revisited your brain, you will be offered a compromised view. This should not sound hopeless though. There is a way out to this and an easy road to do the unlearning is: revisit your heart. I call the discovery of this cure an HeartTheGreat, after the man who brought it up for our attention.

    A bit more on this: the heart gets all the relevant information from the almighty truth. It doesn’t need to learn anything or carry anything from the past. There is no need to accumulate information and go on hoarding it somewhere for later use. The heart goes clean and empty, and picks whatever it needs when it needs it. No baggage, no burden or heaviness is needed with the heart. The mind is a different game. It builds its own truth from junky information it has been accumulating with all its wrong perceptions, excesses, irrelevances, deceptive feeds and a multiplied products of all these. And the mind is quick to learn but sluggish to unlearn; quick to judge and label, slow to empathize and sympathize; quick to flag difference and slow to acknowledge oneness.

    You started your reply to me by saying, “Ahlan Hayat, Genuine Eritreans know their future…” Did you see what I just told you above here: the compulsive urgency of jumping to discover differences and point of separation? Who are genuine Eritreans and who are the ones that are not genuine Eritreans? Is there anything like that as to genuine, not genuine- a qualifier tag with the entitlement of being an Eritrean? Who gave you the authority to adjectivize Eritreaness in that way? Eritreaness symbolizes two values: cultural and legalistic. The first is a condition of upbringing and the latter is a matter of a paper work. In both cases, you have no business of calling it on or off. If it was not for the paternalism ghedli has burdened you with, you wouldn’t say stuff like that. So, please, as a future PM, be cautious on using such language.

    [“You tell them “please just zero in on the warts; you have got no healthy skin. You are done.” I say, “Yes we do have some warts but compared to the general look and history of our body, they are correctable. We are not done.”] Look: All Eritreans have a healthy skin as far as I can say, and any warts in those skins or thereof, is not worse than any other peoples’ skins or warts. No skin is correctible including those of Eritreans, and there is no need to do so. If ghedli had thought you skins can be corrected and your brain is still carrying it, you have got to tell it that it is wrong, not only that it is abnormal and undoable but also there is no sense in growing from normal to abnormal.

    “Eritreans are acutely aware of their past, present and future. I think they do understand the difference and unifying significance of “Eritrea and Eritreans.” There are no Eritreans without Eritrea and there won’t be Eritrea without Eritreans. So let’s throw this gimmicks of blurring borders and sovereignty.” Look- why are you speaking for all Eritreans here? I mean, I know you have won my vote and I’m not recalling it, but nobody else gave you the power of speaking for all Eritreans unless I’m to attribute it to the ghedli culture. You had been trained to speak that language, you grew up speaking that language and it becomes a force of habit as a second-to-nature to project that in every conversation. The truth is: all Eritreans cannot have the same awareness about the past, the present or the future. The PFDJ slogan HaDe hizBi, HaDe liBi is a ghedli product made of falsehood and imposed up on all of us. Otherwise, like any other people Eritreans have diverse views on the past, the present and the future, from which the best has to be negotiated and picked.

    The other point in the quotation is about “EritreaEritreans”. The right sense I take from here is “what kind of Eritrea for Eritreans, and not what kind of Eritreans for Eritrea”. Otherwise, there is no need to worry about the existence of just the names. Eritrea became a nation 25 yrs ago but both “Eritrea” and “Eritreans” were there long ago. Palestinians and Palestine have been there. But what kind of “Palestine for Palestinians” is the issue. The essence of change and betterment is a central consideration in caring for the people not for the country. Also, remember, people can exist without a country but I never know a country existing without its people. I can give you a lot of examples on this. It worries me a lot because this kind of view has a far reaching implication. No policy is good if it de-prioritizes the primary desires of the people in the name of the nation. The Eritrean NS, EraEro, Sept 18, the 1998 war are all living examples of this misplaced priority.

    “Your views lead Eritreans to be more careful, Hayat. That’s why I repeatedly said that as long as the opposition is seen as if represented by people who see Eritrea as an extension of Ethiopia, who envision an Eritrea that’s dependent on and subordinate to Ethiopia…it will lose credibility.” Look: A couple of weeks ago, I wrote to the effect: “the quality of the opposition must be measured by the amount of distance they demonstrate between them and the regime”. You are saying the opposite. The truth is harmony and closeness with Ethiopia never hurt Eritrea. Confrontations and antagonisms did. Eritrea doesn’t need to see itself as an extension or subordinate of Ethiopia nor is the cure to that remaining hostile. Eritrea can proudly be a nation of itself confident, peaceful, non-fearing, non-bullying to its neighbors. The way to avoid subordination is peace and cooperation because the alternative path is the one we have seen which is leaving Eritrea weaker every single day, and if that is not checked soon, Eritrea will be very weak- a perfect condition for falling subordinate. The opposition needs to chart its road from a totally different drawing board. They should itemize all practices and theories of the pfdj, and do exactly the opposite. Eritrean problems under this regime are too foggy and too messy to improvise. I recommend a dramatically fresh departure. To the extent that you are trying to craft your doctrine from between PFDJ and the Opposition, you will be risking my vote, and I mean it. But more than seeking any vote, first seek the vote of your heart.
    Hayat, allegiance on hold

    • dawit

      Dear Hayat,
      I endorse your comment to the PM 100%. I am not trying to create division between two lovers, but the PM need to clear his stand firmly, trying to craft a middle ground between PFDJ and Opposition will not work. My advise to the opposition is to follow Molla’s example, lay down your ammunition and join PFDJ and work together to establish peace and justice to the nation. If opposition is not working then try cooperation in finding common solutions to the problems the people and the country are facing.
      dawit

      • Semere Andom

        Cousin Dawi
        Today is a day of agreeing with each other. I do agree that the opposition at least some of them following Molla’s example to join DIA in Asmara, their kin. That would be the break through that the justice movement needs. Some times we as people are hostages of our perceived notions. The copy cat scenario you proposed might help to hasten the demise of the PFDJ instead of ameliorating it.
        To wit, the opposition does not have the army power to threaten Ethiopia or strengthen PFDJ, its surrender can actually detoxify the opposition. The opposition in Ethiopia does not have the intelligence, does not own inside information that will benefit PFDJ. The crowded space will be replenished by new and energetic groups. We often talk about weeding out PFDJ and the connotation is by removing the nutrient sucking weed that debilitates the vibrant growth of the real crop that really nourishes the body will have the unimpeded supply of vital materials. Maybe the opposition needs weeding out of its own and if some follow Molla’s reverse foot steps, it maybe a windfall that will inject some vigor into the oppostion

        • dawit

          Dear Cousin SEM,
          Don’t you think it is a good sign that we can agree to agree in some points, than to agree not to agree in all points? Now you want to extend this weeding business to the opposition too? Are you proposing hand weeding or herbicide application? Cousin stay tuned for my Sunday morning sermon coming soon.
          Cheers

    • Mahmud Saleh

      Salam Hayat

      I’m afraid I have not collected enough thoughts to make የኣንድና መጨረሻ counterpunch. Avery hectic weekend, I appreciate the observation you made in your previous post regarding parental responsibilities. So, we are in one of those cross-state sports’ meets. It looks great.

      Coming to your reply, we have exchanged similar ideas, allegations and counter allegations…So, let me just try to answer some of the points.

      1. Ghedli effects…the message of unlearning: I really appreciate your suggestion. I keep learning new positive ideas and unlearning bad ones. I hope you do so. There are core values that are affix deep in our consciousness; they are so true that any attempts to dislodge them, or disprove them fail. Ghedli did have discreditable fallacious assumptions; time has tested them and could not withstand; and there are true values that survive the test of time. That’s just a hint for you. I don’t want to lecture you on something you know well. On my part, I keep refining things, and if you think the person you are conversing with is the same person who entered Asmara on Friday 24, 1991, you are wrong. There is a reason why you voted me your PM. If you truly believed in me then you should believe in me now, because I have been consistent (read my reply to Horizon), but if it was a lure to affect my behavior, then I will say what Asmarino SAAY says ንኣደኺ ማይ ውረድላ። Injecting words like ghedli cuts off the conversation; it turns it into one of those one-liner curses, and bad mouthing and yelling contests. I would like to stay away from it. But it won’t serve justice without reminding you that we are all fallible. I keep unlearning bad things related to my background, and you keep doing the same

      * I used to be militant and hotheaded: that behavior is now unlearnt, mission accomplished= A+

      ** I used to think Amhara are bad ( I used to take it synanimous to the Ethiopian army=unlearnt=A+

      ***I was trained to be fast on decision making, which would be a plus at that time= unlearnt= I’m now more of a listener= A+

      **** I used to be a blind nationalist. It meant to me to be free from abusive military occupation= Now, open. The bottom line is delivering quality change in the people’s life; strong advocate of regional peace and security; regional cooperation and integration…=A+ (condition= I will never ever tolerate paternalist and bullying attitudes in regional politics; bi/multilateralism would mean to me achievements based on mutual respect). The list is long. Oh one more:

      – I have unlearnt Mao’s “political power grows out of the barrel of a gun.”

      Dear my private Shrink, it is a pleasure to tell you I have done all of these on my own. The last time I checked HeartTheGreat clinic, it appeared that it moved to a different address: Belligerence Avenue, and the doctor there is full of patients who need urgent care, most of them are said to have been afflicted by a condition experts named: The HTG Diaspora Belligerence, in recognition of the doctor who diagnosed it.

      Now please list some stuff that you have unlearnt. Please how the heart/mind illustration you made on me is applied to you. THANKS.

      2. Make no mistake, citizenship is an entitlement. A genuine citizen knows the range within which she/he should maneuver in addressing regional or international issues involving her/his country involves. For instance, a genuine, or a truly patriotic citizen stands with her/his people in internal issues, issues of human right, governance, equitable distribution of resources…but when her/his country is threatened by foreign aggressions she/he stands up on protecting the country she/he alleges citizenship to. That’s a genuine Eritrean to me. A genuine Ethiopian would protect the interest of his/her country. For instance he would do everything that maximizes the interest of Ethiopia in the region, he would encourage Eritreans to return back to their “Mother”, he would knock hard at issues Eritreans bind as separate from Ethiopia such as their Eritrean identity that launched , or the ghedli that solidified that identity, and made them to be the separate nation they are…An aggressively patriotic Ethiopian would probably be abit ahead of things in calling Ethiopia to invade Eritrea in the name of “liberating” Eritreans…In Tigrigna we call this ክትበልዓ ዝደለኻ ቖቋሕስ ኣባጉምባሕ ትብላ (correct me HTG/KS if my Tigrigna is wrong).

      3. “Why are you speaking for all Eritreans?” you asked me because I used the word “we” in my comment. Well, I am sorry but that’s just a conventionally understood way of addressing each other in our culture. If you want to change that, GOOD LUCK. But it has nothing to do with ghedli. That’s how Eritreans address in their mejalis in the lowland and in their Baitos in the highlands. Ghedli did not exist in vacuum, it thrived in and among our people. Now, do me a favor: tell the forum if you never used that collective name, or the plural form “we”.
      4. You said Hadelibi…as a ghedli product “imposed upon all of us.”
      I agree, and the fast learner that I am, I criticized this political sloganeering long before you even heard of me. Hear is my short article on this issue.
      http://goo.gl/DJvn5S
      The TBS holds no one above truth, be it PFDJ or opposition, they will be tested to the core based on their verifiable actions and creeds.
      5. “Eritrea became a nation 25 yrs ago but both “Eritrea” and “Eritreans””
      clarifications: I know this banks on the feelings of OUR people that independence was too costly and little yielding.
      Eritrea: Implies the State, People, and territory. The people and territory existed in their current form since 1890. The State came to being in 1993. You brought in very weak argument to chip of the importance of the State, going as far as the deplorable state and saga of Palestians. Eritreans did not pay all that prohibitive price to second guess the necessity of having a state. Therefore, this notion is totally bankrupt. WE care for the state, people and territory we call ERITREA. I
      were there long ago.

      • Hayat Adem

        Dear PM Mahmud,
        Thanks a lot. You have come a long way and evolved so much since 1991. It is obvious that everyday will make you better. All the A+ grades are justified. But more is needed. Eritrea’s problems demand radical departure. We want you to lead from that notion. The competition with Ethiopia is costly, unsustainable and unwise. perhaps one of the things you need to unlearn is the zero-sum notion when you think of a relationship between Ethiopia and Eritrea. All the issues you raised about the Mola saga, about the Eritrean oppositions presence in Ethiopia, about Ethiopia subordination Eritrea etc… lead me to believe that you are not yet ready to see how interdependent and complementary the two countries are. I am one of the believers, given the right leadership and policies, Eritrea can easily be a hub of serves for the region and can beat poverty and move beyond. We need to create a positive space for that.

        hayat

        • Gud

          There is nothing new on your “how interdependent and complementary the two countries are” . It is the usual Ethiopian sickness, only presented in different form. You people need to forget Eritrea. I mean really forget. We admire your tenacity to sell this idea (Not new) of associating Eritrea and Ethiopia in some form. But, c’mon there are no buyers on the Eritrean side. What part of that don’t you understand?

          The only way forward for lasting peace and beneficial to both Eritrea and Ethiopia is to stop associating both nations beyond the normal relationship two neighbors should have. Period! Ethiopia should not be considered any different than Sudan (Actually less*) and like wise you people should stop looking at Eritrea any different than Djibouti or Sudan.
          Ethiopia claims to have moved on with out Eritrea (Full of croaks, as it is still holding on to certain sovereign land of Eritrea, which is a sign of an obsessive ex who would not allow him/herself to believe the marriage is long time over) . Move on people! abide by law, get the hell out of Eritrea and go find another small nation to cling to. I mean enough. No means no. Go
          *Ethiopia bleed Eritrea like forever, Sudan did not. Even culturally there are certain segments of our people who are closer to Sudan than Ethiopia as there are some closer to Ethiopia. Meaning, your brotherly people linked by culture and stuff is nonsense.

          • Hayat Adem

            Gud, you prefer Sudan to Ethiopia for closer proximity and cooperation?

          • Mahmud Saleh

            Selam Hayat

            Kemey …kemey…

            Just look at the map of Eritrea for a second, then you can wash your hand, or take a pill to help you forget it. Now, if you have the GUT(as cousin Hope puts it), there you will see huge parts of Eritrea closer to the Sudan, there are cousins on both sides as you would say the highland is populated by your cousins. This is the only border we have had working despite ups and downs; this is the border where words and treaties have been respected. This is the border where economic transactions take place, this border has no blood-related issues to settle; this is a border where the cousins from either side respect each other, where the equivalents of “agame and Hamasienay Awan…” are not traded. Sudan is a country that has no historic animosity with us.
            Regarding your recent reply, you keep darting from post to post when you get checkmated. In your last response, you jumped to accusing me of holding the view of zero-sum attitude. Really? I mean how often do I have to do bullet points to remind folks. Not any more. You said “The competition with Ethiopia is costly, unsustainable and unwise.” Well, it is the work of a bussy mind, it is purely a figment of your imagination. We have not had the time to rehabilitate let alone to compete. And what’s wrong with competetion? I do know though what these all are about. Since I addressed this in my reply to Abbyssinia, I am not going to repeat it. But it is a well-taken warning. That’s why I said to Abyssinia not to look at Eritrea as another Djibouti. Any pact not founded on mutual respect and dignified signatories will eventually cvollapse like a cassle built on a sinking sand. Eritrea will have to think deeply about this. If Ethiopian elites are to look at Eritrea as a sattelite, Eritrea will have to work hard to get out of that orbit, speed up its internal strength and strengthen its ties with other spheres in order to link up with a more stable and sustainable orbit, where the influences of all its partners are equalized. That would mean neutralizing Ethiopian threats and bullish attitudes.

          • saay7

            Field Marshal Mahmuday, the Great One:

            Since you asked Hayat to look at the Eritrean map, if you want to understand where some people are coming from when they talk about “Eritrea” or “Eritreans”, this is the loop that runs in their head:

            “Eritrea, which has always been part of Ethiopia, is now found north of Ethiopia thanks to Italians and confused Eritreans. The people of Eritrea, all proud Ethiopians, live between 38-40 East and 14.5-15.5 North. There are rumored to be people (there have even been sightings on full moons) of people who live West of the 38 and East of 40; there are even rumors that some Eritreans live all the way up to 18 North. But for people who focus more on PEOPLE and not LAND (People First!), it is clear that nobody lives in those distant places and they are mostly good for grazing camels and conducting futile wars.”

            saay

          • Amde

            Hello Saay

            ” Here there be dragons” is what you are looking for.

            Fire breathing aliens.

            Amde

          • saay7

            Hey Amde:

            Well, Dr. Who’s fire-breathing aliens and dragons are scary and, if possible, to be feared and avoided. But the”West of 38″, “East of 40”, “North of 16” are, in the Ethiophile version of history, non-entities: they have no history, they have no attachment to land, they are just like, there to provide “living space” to Hayat’s Eritreans.

            saay

          • Amde

            Hi Saay,

            To be fair, I don’t see how you could read that from Hayat’s respone. It is technically true Eritrea shares by far the longest border with Ethiopia. The politically and economically dominant Eritrean demographic is almost indistinguishable from its counterpart south of the border.

            Amde

          • Hayat Adem

            Oh Saay, you are sinning.

          • Mahmud Saleh

            Ahalan SAAY (The ትሕሾ)
            You are putting your professorial skill at work. Yes, sometimes, the shortest distance between two points could actually be the shortest line connecting them (tsk, tsk). or ጉዪ ካብ ምዓል ክሳድ መሓዝ።

          • Semere Andom

            Hi Mahmud:
            Very good points in dissecting the bordering countries.
            Question to you and Hayat an Sal:
            How does the Easter Sudan movements of separation that was quelled by PFDJ temporaril fit in in the scenario of Eritrean Lowlands and Eritrea fit in, This is in line with my long standing belief that in the life time of every awatista, we will see the Eastern Sudan separation/independence movement strengthened with high potential of successful separation in the same time span. So will Darfur. Darfru cannot just live in a country that cleansed its civilized Muslim nations just because of Al-Bashir is two shades lighter than them. Despite Darfur’s weakened resistance now, I envision it to be strengthened in the same time span. Therefore Sudan will be four countries.
            When the belligerent Eritrean Ghedli assassinated each other in Kassala in1986 (Jelani’s assassination attempt), the Sudanese had enough and demonstrated violently and burned most Eritrean offices, under the slogan, “la Tesfay wo la idrissai”, No tesfay nor Idrissai, In a few days there was a huge demonstration mostly by Idrissais, swords were wielded, camels were galloped, spears pierced the mud walls in Kassala. And the slogan was: “Al beled beledna wo al-hakim woldena”: the land is ours and the governor is our son. The then governor of Easter region was from Hadendewa by the name Mohammed Shassha. So I agree with you, border with the Eastern Sudan is blurred when it comes to Eritrea and especially with the Lowlands, two cousins, one is Sudanese and the other Eritrean and as you said there is no bloodshed that warranties settling. But what are the implications for Eritrea, Eritrea that includes the highlands, the Lowlands and now the Midland to be still be glued together as we know it, if my un accredited school of thought that Sudan will be 4 countries comes to pass.

          • Mahmud Saleh

            Ahlan Semere
            The best scenario is to see reasonable Ethiopian. In that case, market forces will determine which one becomes a hub of the region. The analogy of a planet and moon is an extreme expression of a colonial mind, otherwise, normally, countries think in terms of interdependence. Here the “INTER” denotes mutual benefits. Therefore, when Ethiopia acts reasonably, the region wins. But if we are plunged to the scenario you are raising, then my little knowledge of the region would tell me the following.
            1. The communities living along the border are natural complements of each other without HISTORIC RUPTURES in the threads connecting them. Sudanese communities and Sudan supported and prayed for Eritreans; there is no animosity or rivalry between them. compare it with the Southern border. Of course, culturally, they are the same. However, politically, their animosity goes as far as centuries back, before the advent of European colony. That’s why the existence of Tigrignas along the Ethiopian Eritrean border is a natural defense for each of the regimes who want to destabilize the other through armed rebellions because both would not accept a rebellion that is supported by the other government since they don’t trust their cousin on the other side. There was a chance for this to heal with both EPLF and TPLF coming to power. You know what happened. You know the predicament of each of the countries’ oppositions. It is easy for each of the government to scratch old wounds and call its opposition ” ye shaEbia/ nay wayane”…
            2. On Eritreans splitting to three, I frankly don’t see that unless unforeseeable social shock takes place…it was tried so many times…1940s, during federation…during the most trying times of 1970 (birth of EPLF), HAILESELASSIE campaigns of erasing lowland communities, ELF-PLF/SABE (remember the core elements of each of those organizations represented, campaigned to have represented, or were perceived as representing each of the demographic circles you mentioned. It did not work, because the people were ahead of the leaders. When Eritreans joined the revolution, most f them did the chosing of organizations based on proximity or existing contacts (which organization orbited the area), not on regional profiling; few may have done that. The final test on splitting Eritrea was a big project known as lowland’s autonomy/ye qolamoch ras ghez, and the autonomy of Dankalia/ye dankalia raas ghez…We continue to experience after shocks albeit not to the degree of causing us to be really scared and put us on high alert. There will continue voices of separation like it happens else where. The force that will keep the peripheries pulled by the center will be determined by the feeling those peripheries have towards the center. Do they feel more benefited by their ties to their distant center, or by the foreign periphery of the foreign political entity next door…across the border…(nation, government…country). There you have the laws of physics illustrating my brother Amanuel Hidrat’s favorite topic: We should be careful in addressing the grievances of our social groups…our peripheries…in areas of equitable sharing of everything. Some one from Raas Qiesar should feel Eritrean as strong as someone from Asmara. (WHERE AM I?) Anyway, I am jotting this in a hurry…
            3. On Sudan: I expect that
            4. Given the history and the trajectory of relations we see, where do we see ourselves 25 years from now, 100 years…
            I think it all depends. I will be cautious because the current relations are not good indicators because they are not products of a normal interactions. They are products of a very disturbed region, still roiling of conflicts. What we know is the relation between the people of the Sudan and the people of Eritrea have passed tests, and we can comfortably say, we can have continued relations, mostly positive. The scope of the relationship will depend: a/ on Sudan’s internal stability, b/ Ethiopia/Sudan/Eritrea triangular dynamics.
            On the Eritrean/Ethiopian relation though, there are many unknowns. However, I am not pessimistic. All it takes is two stable, pragmatic, farsighted…leaders. I think that’s where all boil down to.

          • Dear Mahmud Saleh,
            If the winners of the 30 yrs war invested their victory to bring peace to the region and not to humiliate Ethiopia, today we would have been in a better situation. When the two actors, IA and MZ, sat together and decided on the fate of the two people, they were intoxicated with their victory that they did not care to prepare the ground for a peaceful future. They wanted to get even by humiliating Ethiopia and Ethiopians. This lead to the bloody war of 1998-2000, the no-war-no-peace situation with all its toxic effects, and the animosity that does not seem to abate in the near future.

            Ethiopia is a diverse country, so is Eritrea; and whenever the topic of unification comes to the forefront, we Ethiopians seem to forget that Eritrea is not homogenous and we leave out the 50% of Eritreans who are opposed to it, right from the day Italian colonialism ended. They wanted a united independent Eritrea, and if not, a divided Eritrea, but never an Eritrea
            united with Ethiopia. That was the reason for the thirty years war. When today unification with Ethiopia appears in a discussion, that is why we see some people suggesting going westward and even eastwards than to the south, and they say another unification with Ethiopia only over our dead bodies.

            That is why unification does not seem attractive, at least for the time being. Nevertheless, the million dollar question is, can Ethiopia and Eritrea live in peace side by side? This question
            cannot be answered by saying, if Ethiopia does this and that. There is no one side only to any equation. In addition, no Ghandis are going to come to the region, and we should make the best of what we have.

          • Mahmud Saleh

            Hello Horizon
            Throw your first paragraph away, because:
            a/ there is only one story into it; the traditional narration of mahal agher elite. There is no Eritrean narration into it, and certainly there is a lack of including the voices and narrations of Ethiopian peoples and forces that fought for the right of self-determination.
            b/ It’s over. It will not serve our current discussion.
            c/ Wrong assumptions as if the Eritrean independence was decided by two leaders. There is much to the story dear Horizon…let’s skip it. I don’t understand what you mean by “humiliating Ethiopia.” I could tell you though that there were humiliated Ethiopian peoples by their brutal regimes, and obviously humiliated and subjugated Eritreans….
            I agree with most of your three paragraphs. Horizon, all that’s needed is respecting treaties and agreements, and stopping treating Eritrea as the tenth Kilil (not particularly you, but that is what I read from the media; please read this in conjunction of my last reply to you). Once the above are done the rest will be taken care of by laws of economics.
            Thanks.

          • Amde

            Selam Mamud,

            Don’t you think it is fair to think of the current situation as Eritrea treating itself as the tenth killil? There are serious Eritrean state resources being spent to determine who sits in Menelik’s palace.

            Amde

          • Kokhob Selam

            Dear Horizon,
            let me assure you that we Eritreans and Ethiopians will do better in near future. we have experienced enough. We both learned and those who don’t swallow will swallow it that we will fight against poverty united. Horizon, other nations will only fallow to work with us when we two brothers work together. the family will be respected by others when the family is tied and untied only. All we need is dignified and clearly seen nations Eritrea and Ethiopia – that is all. as soon as we have governments chosen by people and a system that puts in to consideration the needs of people those two nations will become the best example of 2 nations but one people who work for the same aim – love -peace and prosperity. time will not be far.

          • Gud

            Hayat,
            For any relevant geography lessons, please refer to what the two fine gentlemen Saay & Mahmood said below. It is free, take it.
            And where did you get the idea that I prefer Sudan to Ethiopia because of its proximity? First of all this was not about preference at all. Nor was it about proximity. It is about your usual bullshit, insinuating that Eritrea’s survival depends on Ethiopia*. You guys make it look like Ethiopia and Eritrea are joined at the hip or something. We are telling you Ethiopia is just another neighbor. Actually, let me take that back and say it like it is: Ethiopia is the most arrogant, abusive, expansionist and bully out of all the nice neighbors of Eritrea. And if Eritrea ever has an enemy, then it is Ethiopia. Out of all its neighbors, Ethiopia bled and is still bleeding Eritrea. You still wona talk about proximity with me?
            Having a good neighborly relationship with all neighboring countries is good. Actually it is imperative. But you can not insult Eritreans more than saying they never knew what they fought for and they were hypothesized or mislead during referendum. Have some respect. You need to stop insulting Eritrea and its people. You should stop defining Eritrea through Eritrea. This is me being nice, feel me?:)
            *Of course you will not say the reverse is not true. Ethiopia is progressing at a lightening speed with out Eritrea and all that jazz, right? So, according to you the question of survival is one way and applies to Eritrea only, right? Meaning your are basically saying Ethiopia is the savior of Eritrea, the only one 🙂

          • Kim Hanna

            Selam Gud,
            .
            One minor clarification requested, in case it is said in error.
            .
            You said, “….Ethiopia bled and is still bleeding Eritrea.” The still bleeding Eritrea part is what I am asking the clarification for. Hopefully it is not described in general terms, but specific enough to understand what you meant.
            .
            Mr. K.H

          • Gud

            Kim,

            In case it is an error? Nah no chance. Re reading it again, sure that post has quite a few typos and errors, but not the one you mentioned, Sorry:) Strangely though, I thought the “still bleeding…” Was the obvious part. I guess, not abiding by the #EEBC ruling, locking Eritrea in to a no war no peace , continuous war footing,continuous threats, working for sanction, chocking etc doesn’t qualify for bleeding in your book. Not abiding by the EEBC and preventing for peace not to reign between the two countries, alone with out including the effects of that action that set a chain reaction in motion, will suffice, no?

          • Kim Hanna

            Selam Gud,
            .
            We have border demarcation problems with The Sudan, Somalia and even Kenya. We have the problem for so long we don’t even talk about it. I am sure a lot of African countries have similar problems. So what is unique about this particular one?
            .
            The more profound question you have to ask yourself is a country like Ethiopia says no to a border line without having to pay any noticeable price and yet is capable to impose such a severe penalty on your country. How is that possible?
            .
            I can ask the question in many different ways but I am not persuaded that the bleeding is caused and maintained by Ethiopia. It sounds similar to blaming the police negotiation team for the torture of the hostage kid, instead of pointing at the criminal, first.
            .
            I hope I have not offended you, but that is what my opinion is from all the information I have read.
            .
            Mr. K.H

          • Gud

            Kim*
            Your reply reflects typical stand of a typical aggressor or a bully, with the typical buzz of superiority that comes with the typical sense of getting away with the act of aggression.
            You might have border demarcation problems with the nations you mentioned above (is this inherent with Ethiopia then? a pattern? ), BUT you DO NOT have one with Eritrea. You are illegally holding sovereign soil of a neighboring country against a legal ruling. What is more your are doing other despicable stuff only an inherent enemy can do. So, you might as well quit the dancing because you are already limping terribly.
            Actually the most profound question should be directed at your country and at yourself as an ordinary citizen of that aggressive nation. Why on earth is Ethiopia hanging on to Eritrean soil illegally and also holding peace hostage? What is so important about Badme enough for Ethiopia to break the law? And, as an ordinary citizen of Ethiopia, how come it is ok with you to see your country acting illegally against a legal ruling? How does that sit well with you? There is no legal or moral ground for that at all. Instead of talking about the legality or illegality of Ethiopia’s actions, you smugly are trying to analyze what should and should not be Eritrea’s reaction to your aggression.
            *By the way, don’t blame people for the gender mix, because I also thought Kim is short for Kimberley, but now it turned out you are a dude 🙂

          • Kim Hanna

            Selam Gud,
            .
            You are offended, let me offend you a little more then.
            .
            Illegality? Was it legal to get rid off the U.N soldiers from the 25 mile buffer zone in accordance to the signed legal agreement?
            .
            Your logic boils down to this. If your “enemy” Ethiopia does nothing, you are willing to have your country bleed to death.
            I can see now we will not understand each other, it is not a normal discussion and only succeed in offending others.
            .
            Mr. K.H

          • Gud

            Offended? Let me guess, we are talking about that Kimberley thing, right? 😉 ah, Ethiopians, you guys are so easy

          • Kokhob Selam

            Dear Hayata,
            There are people still who are modified by our revolutions (some fronts use to expand the hate and exploit Dergs crime). the rumors that says Ethiopia is our enemy is very bad. there are people who don’t know how much attached we are. just watch on this site, have you encountered any Sudan or any other nationalist concerned and write any post to discuss with us? this in itself shows how much the heart and mind is connected. Ethiopians love us even want to see us united. it is due to extreme love you see them sing about us, talk about us etc,

            Hayata, I have visited almost the entire horn, I have seen Arab countries. Ethiopians culture and behavior can’t be replaced or compared by any of the countries I have seen. you never fill you are a foreigner in Ethiopia.

            people need to understand Ethiopians are not responsible for those 30 years war. in first place some one has to be bold and strong to say the truth. the mass of Ethiopia is a victim in this war too. it is the governments of Ethiopia who should be blamed. me as Kokhob I even blame those who didn’t knew to handle the situation from Eritrea during Federation.

          • Mahmud Saleh

            Dear KS
            Kokebay, let’s be clear here. You don’t feel foreigner in Ethiopia. That’s wonderful. That’s because of your cultural affinity. But there are many Eritreans who feel foreigners in Ethiopia. There are Eritreans who feel comfortable in Sudan, others not. Some feel comfortable in Djibouti…This goes with the periphery-center dialogue that we have been doing. It is perfectly OK. But the notion that equates Eritrea to a portion that is culturally connected to Ethiopia is just not right. Therefore, seeing Eritrean Ethiopian relation from this angle is not right. We want to have good relations with Ethiopia just like we want to have good relations with the other neighbors. KS you are well positioned and equipped to explain this better.

          • Kokhob Selam

            Dear Mahmuday,
            I can’t say there are Eritreans who feel foreigners in Ethiopia from our nation but I didn’t experience that. I even didn’t see any form other identities like Tigre or Blen who have such problem (I had friends from Eritrea who stayed long like me in Ethiopia). I feel extremely lonely in Sundan and all Arab counties, I am disappointed very much for their treatment. some time they never consider you human being like them, I am sorry to say that. you are always Ya Ajnebi -Habeshi ! Lol . I have tried a lot to have good feeling about it but I fail. I still love them but that is the reality.

            I am more comfortable, I never go nervous every where and in any place when I am with Ethiopians. if I see any thing wrong I say what I want to say. I criticize in any governmental department if find anything wrong. can you do it in any of those nations as an Eritrean- I can challenge you Ya Habeshi Lol Mahmuday.

            the one who loves you should get back your love. I don’t care if he is poor or rich in this temporary life, I don’t care if he fallows my religion or other, what I care is his love toward human beings and Ethiopians are the first for me.

            so no problem my Brother, let me tell you I respect your view and I expect the same and let us leave things to the mass. I agree with you to have good relation with all countries. for now agree with me, that we have to prevent any war between those two nations, agree with me we have to create and expand love between us. this is very important as that is inevitable more than war with others due to the government we have and border issue.

          • Mahmud Saleh

            Ya Kokebay
            This is a “Huston, we have a problem!” moment for me. I’m surprised. Kokebay, there many…many…sectors of our society who have had no connection with Ethiopia. Some may know some about Ethiopia, but psychologically were disconnected. And that’s the important point.
            Regarding Arab treatment: there are racists and there are God fearing members of that community. I do agree ordinary Ethiopians are among the most decent peoples. I have no problem with them.
            Just for thought: I fell in love with Ethiopian music before I could utter an Amharic word. I learned most of my Amharic in mieda, and now in the diaspora. This is just to show you that there is no sense of cultural aversion. But the truth should not be buried. Eritreans who made it to Ethiopia are few, and those who were in Eritrea were forced to learn Amharic. Now, think of the rural dwelling people particularly in the lowlands who have had no contacts with Ethiopia. I think that’s enough to show you there are many Eritreans who feel foreigners in Ethiopia.

          • Kokhob Selam

            Dear Mahmuday,

            I know this “Habeshtay to” thing. some have been thought and told in such way. sorry, “ኣዲኣ ገዲፋስ ሓትናአ ትናፍቕ” some thought Arabs are more closer to them than Ethiopians. that is not true my friend. Except Rashaida (I only respect the choice of people but I don’t personally believe they are Eritreans) every culture in Eritrea is reflected in Ethiopia.

          • Kokhob Selam

            Dear friend,
            with all past nonstop war and confilicts between those two nations, I still believe no other nation in universe can be more relative to Eritrea before Ethiopia. I think the past conflicts is not between the people or it was not done by choice of the mass. I think when Eritrea is ready (when the dictator and his group depart) the two nations will have a wonderful relation that will only leave the flags and name of nations as different.
            Yet, Ethiopia and Eritrea will also have good relation with Sudan and others,

          • Gud

            Ato Kokeb,
            May be you were sleeping during the 30yrs bloody war Eritreans had to wedge to break away from Ethiopia’s grip, and may you were hibernating during the referendum when Eritreans told the whole universe (The real one and not the universe you couldn’t find any relative:)) that the 30 years war is not a fluke and Eritreans really want to go. Now, please tell us, what else are Eritreans supposed to do? I mean, what does it take for your universe to get it?
            Don’t worry, you can still hang on to your love in the south, just don’t try to make it look it is shared by the whole Eritrea. Those in the south are really cousins to certain segments of our people. That is fine, but if you are trying to stuff that down the throat of the rest of Eritrea, then we have a problem. Mahbet andnet* all over again – degsi or something.
            Eritrea needs to work to have good neighborly relationship with ALL its neighbors. No unnecessary favoritism, no subordination, and no discrimination
            * By the way, it is so intriguing to me to see some ELFites who were so bitter and so angry on Woyanie because of its association with EPLF in the 1980s, all of sudden are telling us they are madly in love with woyanie

          • Kokhob Selam

            Dear Gud,
            so I was sleeping during 30 years war, Allah We’Akber ! at the end of my life I am hearing someone bold trying to tell me I was sleeping. in fact I don’t believe single Eritrea was sleeping even the laziest and selfish one. don’t say it to any Eritrean my friend.
            my friend get you freedom to chose what kind of government you want to have and allow me to have too and let the choice of the mass be the upper. Let the leadership and the system we both chose and decide when we have a government. now, at this time wake lets wake up and fight to ave the democratic nation. is that okay?

            it is my personal opinion and dream to see Ethiopia and Eritrea united working together in all fields without disturbing their national identity. I love Ethiopia very much more than any nation and no one can change the love I have. but I still love every body including you I respect the love you have to Sudan.

      • Amanuel Hidrat

        ማሕሙዳይ

        ግርም ሕጂ ! ነታ ሒጅካያ ዘለኻ ለዓት አጥቢካ ጥራይ ሓዛ:: እዘን ዘቕረብካየን ነጥብታት መስረተት ናይቲ እንደልዮ ዘለና መኣዝን ጉዕዞና እየን:: ጸጋም የማን ጥራይ ከይትቛጻጸ ሐደራኻ:: ብሓፈሻ ውጽኢት ቃልስና ንኾርዓሉ ታሪኽ እዩ:: ናይ መጻኢ ዕድል ህዝብና ንሰላም ምዕባለን ዝምልከት ከኣ ፍትሓዊ መንግስቲ ተኺልካ ምስ መጉራቡትኻ ብሰላም ምንባር ጥራይ እዬ:: ኣርሓ ክትከውን ምንባሕ ናይ ምልካውያን ጠባያት እዬ:: ነዚ ጠባያት ከም ባህሊ ከነወግዶ ምቅላስ ኣድላዪ ኾይኑ ይስመዓኒ :: ምኽንያቱ ነዚ ዘለናዮ ኹነታት ዝፈጠሮ ሓደ ካብቶም ረቛሒታት እዬ::

        ሐውኻ
        ኣማኑኤል ሕድራት

      • Kokhob Selam

        Dear Mahmuday,
        I love people who develop their way of thinking. honestly speaking you are advancing very fast.We must be lucky to have people like you. Keep it up my brother. This time you may have to come with new article with more explanation.

  • Abyssinia

    Some one must upvote this post before the fella throws himself from a cliff. On a serious note, Eritrea’ defeat vis-a-vis Ethiopia and eventual fall into the orbit of the latter is inevitable. If it is not , it is existentially costly. This is in accordance with the laws of nature, the law of gravitational force being the most relevant here. Although the moon and the earth exert the same amount of gravitational force on each other, size dictates that the moon orbits the Earth and not the other way round. Again size makes the Earth and the moon as a bundle to orbit the Sun, not the other way round. The laws of nature, I mean the serious laws, hold in society too and no amount of bravado can change that. Just look at the most powerful countries in the world, USA, China, Russia, the Roman empire, the Persian empire, the British empire. Even in small-sized European countries, the more populous countries such as Germany, France are the hegemonies. Size is at play in Brazil, in India, in Indonesia, and in Ethiopia. Size matters, and it matters big time.

    The unfortunate scenario for Eritrean myopic nationalists is that Eritrea’s defeat and eventual fall into Ethiopia’s orbit is bound to happen wether in hostility or peace, in every conceivable scenario. Just think about it! But to set you on the thought trail, let me help you. In untimed game of staring at each other, that is one played until either of the teams accept defeat by themselves out of exhaustion, and the minimum number of people each team must present to the game at a time is four persons, one team has 100 standby members and the other has only 4. The first team can afford to play the game leisurely, the second not. To not stop this game for the second team and accept defeat is existentially costly and a great folly, because it is not sustainable that they can continue to play this game, much less to win. Playing means they can not move, eat, drink, conduct any other social activities. That is a metaphor for the Ethiopian-Eritrean hostility.

    If you take a peace scenario, Eritrean nationalism will be weakened because many of the ethnic groups will develop relationship with their larger kinships across the border thus weakening the already weak center. Finally, the relationship, business and job opportunities and the larger market will absorb the small population. Add to that the well-marked divide of lowland and highland, muslim and christian, Arabic and Tigrinya, etc. Add to it that the fact that Ethiopia can afford to play many cards with almost no harm to its existence and people. Sometimes, all roads lead to defeat. So damn if you do, damn if you do not. The wisest thing to do for Eritreans, as early as possible, is to swallow their hollow pride, throw themselves at the feet of Ethiopia and accept whatever terms it dictates on them. The alternative is to perish playing the untimed game of staring at each other.

    • dawit

      Abyssinia
      Interesting Habesha Philosophy! Does the law of gravity allow the earth and the moon to collapse and merge with the sun? Is this your Habesha Back to Black Hole movement theory? Mr. Habesha philosopher how do you explain the collapse of Roman, Persian, British and Soviet empires with your Black Hole gravitational theory? Why is Israel exist today as a strong nation while the larger Arab countries surrounding it collapse every day? Don’t you think this ‘Gala bimot Gala yitekal’ war game philosophy that is destroying the Horn of African potential to develop. The Sun shines, because it allows the planet to revolve around it freely.

      • Kim Hanna

        Selam dawit,
        .
        Something scary to me, dawit, I stand with you on this.
        I think, this Abyssinia, read the Field Marshal Mahmud’s post and decided to insult and intimidate him. As a second thought he wanted to negotiate the surrender of Mahmud by presenting an irrefutable scientific facts.
        What are the chances?
        .
        I think in early science studies, I seem to remember, that if one presents one exception to the proposed scientific explanation of natural principles, then that scientist has to go back to the drawing board. Oh dear.
        .
        Keep this moon, earth and the sun thing going.
        .
        K.H

        • dawit

          Dear Kim Hannah,
          We agree more often than what you seem to realize. I have read those words before. Our minor difference rest on Isaias, you refer to him as DIA and I refer him as PIA. Stay tuned to my Sunday Morning sermon on the moon, earth and the sun!
          Cheers
          dawit

      • Kokhob Selam

        Dear dawit, this time you have done it to the point and perfectly. keep that moon, earth and sun thing going as KH said it. it is different from the saying of PIA regarding the sun. there is one truth and no circumstances will change that truth. Eritrea is a nation and respected nation at that- no compromise and no condition can change that truth. Hot or cold, we Eritreans will keep our national identity while fighting to own democratic nation.

      • Music Novice

        Greetings dawit,

        Eventually, in about 5 billion years time, our Sun will start to run out of fuel and it will become a red giant so large that it will engulf our planet. But the Earth will become uninhabitable much sooner than that. After about a billion years the sun will become hot enough to boil our oceans. So what hope is there for little Eritrea and Ethiopia? What about us, evolved apes, sitting on a piece of rock called Earth fighting for territory with every trivial excuse?

        • dawit

          Greetings MN,
          Why worry about 5 million years? I think what you discovery was concluded by a famous Economist of the last century John Menard Keynes, “In the long run we are all dead”, so why worry today?

          • Music Novice

            Greetings dawit,

            5 billions, not millions.

            You are not amused by the futility of Human folly?

          • dawit

            Waw! MN, I have difficulty comprehending with my small brain so large is a number of 5,000,000 is. Now you are talking 5,000,000,000 or 5,000,000,000,000 depending where you live. These numbers are mind boiling! We humans live on this earth, 10, 20, 60, 80 or a maximum of 100 years with all our medical advancement throughout history. Only maximum of two zeros (00) and you telling me to comprehend 9 or 12 zeros! Is that not funny that we hurt and kill one another as if we gone live for ever?

          • Music Novice

            Greetings dawit,

            Why “small brain”? Your brain is as good as anybody’s.

            But agree with: “Is that not funny that we hurt and kill one another as if we gone live for ever?”

          • dawit

            Hi Music Novice,
            “small brain” is a little side seen jock that is going on between me, Hayat and Moderator. V.F is also baffled by it.

          • Ted

            Hi dawit, here is t their reasoning why Empires fail- exhaustion of war- but always fail, their usual fallacy, to appraise the the vanquished’s resistance to surrender for good. The dusty bowl dam, whatever it means, is contempt with itself sitting next to rusted bowl.

          • Music Novice

            Greetings Ted,

            You seem to be clueless about the word ‘fallacy’. The usual meaning a ‘fallacy’ is a ‘logical fallacy’. Are you able to point out any logical fallacy in what I said?

          • Ted

            Hi MN. Why fallacy has to be logical, can’t it be mean just “error” . I took the liberty adding Abyssinian empire to the list of your failed Empires so as too mean Empires fail of their ill intentions and those still harbour those intentions are bound to fail.
            If we are not aware we are clueless, we cease to learn. What gives brotha, last time you posted about investment XYZ, just to say ” Eritreans to cut your loses and join Ethiopia” What comes next is the important thing we all want to know and we are clueless about. Why do we go back to Ethiopia while Ethiopia is a basket case itself. Please school me.

          • Music Novice

            Greetings Ted,

            I only told you that it is the convention. Why don’t you write a thesis on the topic “Why fallacy has to be logical?” to convince the logic, philosophy and mathematics community?

            Empires rise and fall; this is a cycle in all things that are alive.

            Can you provide an original quotation where I said: ” … join Ethiopia”?

            To give you more information, I do not care whether the current Eritrea joins Ethiopia, Saudi Arabia, Yemen, Singapore, Italy or breaks apart due to geological tremors and floats as an island in the Red Sea.

          • Ted

            Hi MN, “Can you provide an original quotation where I said: ” … join Ethiopia”?”

            HERE IS WHAT YOU WROTE.

            [“The cause of the Eritrean movements was supposed to be lack of freedom and democracy. For this cause, a huge amount of time, human and material resources were squandered. The end result has been slavery, more exile, humiliation, death and destruction. What a useless cause!”]

            Sunk-Cost logical fallacy:

            [“I have already paid a consultant $1000 to look into the pros and cons of starting that new business division. He advised that I shouldn’t move forward with it because it is a declining market.However, if I don’t move forward, that $1000 would have been wasted, so I better move forward anyway.What the above person does not realize is that moving forward will most likely result in the loss of much more time and money. This person is thinking short-term, not long-term, and is simply trying to avoid the loss of the $1000, which is fallacious thinking.]

            CAN’T YOU UNDERSTAND WHAT YOU WROTE OR WISH TO HIDE BEHIND DIRECT QUOTE .

            “To give you more information, I do not care whether the current Eritrea joins Ethiopia, Saudi Arabia, Yemen, Singapore, Italy or breaks apart due to geological tremors and floats as an island in the Red Sea.”

            If you don’t care what happens to Eritrea, i have no more things to say and there is NO NEED TO REPLY ME.
            STICK TO YOUR GUNS THAT YOUR POST IS NOT THAT EARTH SHATTERING.

            ‘I had better”

          • Music Novice

            Greetings Ted,

            You shouted: “CAN’T YOU UNDERSTAND WHAT YOU WROTE OR [do you] WISH TO HIDE BEHIND [a] DIRECT QUOTE .[?]”

            Ted, what are you going to do next? Are you going to jump off a cliff?

            You also shouted: “NO NEED TO REPLY [to] ME.[!]”

            Rest assured, I am going to scrutinize everything you write starting from the smallest dot and comma to the largest mumbo jumbo you dump on this site until the sun refuses to rise next morning.

            Can you provide an original quotation where I said: ” … join Ethiopia”?

          • Ted

            Hi, MN the last thing i want is to be scrutinized or jump off a cliff. i don’t need direct quote that you implied it in a very explicit and consistent way that Eritrea needs to cut her losses and go back where it started, Ethiopia.
            X – Eritrean sacrifice to be independent from Ethiopia.
            Y -Independent ERitrea.
            Z- the hardship to keep the Y(Eritrea) afloat.
            Since the Z (hardship and suffering) is not justifiable to keep Y(independent Eritrea), Eritrea has to forget what they lost, X . Where do we go from there except to Ethiopia from where we started.
            SO What do you mean by all this and “USELESS CAUSE”(no shouting)
            PS. FYI, i care what happens to Ethiopians in any eventuality.

          • Music Novice

            I have replied to this weak reasoning. But I cannot trace the post.

          • Abraham Hanibal

            Selam MN,

            You seem you’re very frustrated at the state of affairs of current Eritrea, and your frustration is based on your conviction that Eritrea is incapable of making it to the better. Many Eritreans, me included, are also very frustrated at our current impediment; the difference between us and people like you is that our disappointment arises from the fact that Eritrea is more than capable of excelling, if it were not for the force of backwardness of Isayas. That is what they call in tigringa, መኻልፍ.

            PS. We are also not so indifferent to the extent that it doesn’t matter if Eritrea floats at sea.

          • dawit

            Hi Ted,
            What are you talking about, ‘dusty bowl dam and rusted bowl? Man, people are talking about, planets, stars and galaxies, gravity and relativity theories! The topic is now evolution of the tail. You need to catch up if you want to travel in this modern cyber space travel.
            Cheers!

        • Hayat Adem

          Dearest MN,
          A 9th grade biology teacher was discussing evolution in class. He was telling his class that humans evolved from apes and monkeys. A girl student raised her hand to ask a question.
          Girl student: Teacher, if we all came from monkeys, how did we lose our tails?
          Teacher: (startled and surprised by the question) Well, I don’t know what happened to yours (read:women) but ours (read: men) has been relocated to the front.

          • V.F.

            Hayat, I think we came from apes and they are tail-less.

          • Abi

            Hayat
            God is smart . He removed the woman’s tail and replaced it by ” kimir”.
            Hayat what does it mean when someone says ” eywat chirawan sitiqola “?
            Where is Fanti the expert?

          • dawit

            Abi,
            What do you men by your ‘Smart God”? do you this smart God was unfair to man, and favored woman? He gave two ‘kimir’ in exchange one tail but only one for man? Until you get you answer from Fanti, about “eywat chirawan sitiqola” has to do with the third type of chira that that gave to woman as miriqat down the valley on top of the two kimirs on the mountain..

          • Fanti Ghana

            Hello Hayata,
            How do you up vote a moderator?
            Xibuq geberukhi!

          • Hayat Adem

            St Fanti,
            So lovely to have you around. I must confess that I was worried you would go on leave from Awate for a while. I’m addicted to your presence and grace.
            Yes, the moderator is elbowing me a bit and gently. I thought I found the right spot to insert that joke misjudging how tempting for my sweet Abi would be to go wild on it.
            My personality can be explained as a typical conservative girl bordering shyness and introversion. So, don’t think i’m unhappy with the Moderator’s decision to remove it.
            Hayat

          • Fanti Ghana

            Hello Hayata,

            Leave this wonderful university? That would be even worst mistake than my carelessness that put me on the hot seat in the first place. I was a little disappointed at myself for not paying attention and injuring someone I respect and God knows how many more others. I learned a valuable lesson.

            You leave me no choice but to expose myself.
            Have you witnessed how some parents feel pride internally but feign rage externally when a neighbor visits them to complain about their kid hitting the neighbor’s kid? Well, I was actually proud of you for daring to shock the entire Awate community, but of course, I had to keep appearances.

            “I see you” Princess, no worries.

        • Semere Andom

          MN:Remember before aspiring to become Singapore we had a dream to be like Israel. Still that dream lingers in dawit’s mind.
          He forgets the genesis upon which Israel is built on to become the solution for the middle east: It does not comprise with its survival and the territory it thinks belong to it, yet it does not wait for border to be demarcated for the rule of law, for science, for free thinking to flourish. It will wage a war if one of its citizens is captured by the enemy.

          • saay7

            Cousin iSem:

            Israel? Singapore? We have moved on: we are Luxenbourg: surrounded by giants but fiercely independent. And none the poorer for it: wealth, development rivaling the giant neighbors. And, unlike Luxenbourg, we are not landlocked.

            Luxenbourg has 3 official languages: Luxenbourgish, French, German. It’s equivalent for us would be: Tigrinya, Arabic and Amharic. So maybe we have to consider Hayats idea of adopting Amharic as official language as a token to a neighbor with empire ambitions.

            MN, is your indifference to Eritrea, to the extent that it floats off as an island, with or without its population? You may have just won Most Extreme Statement award. But, hey, at least you are not belligerent so all is well.

            saay

          • Music Novice

            Greetings saay,

            Without its population, but with the PFDJ and all its business partners.

          • saay7

            Hey MN:

            Where will the population go?

            saay

          • Music Novice

            Greetings saay,

            The population will vote with their feet as they have been doing it. Why would they cling to an island which goes underwater during high tide and is full of fanatic/lunatic cadres?

          • saay7

            Selamat MN:

            And so to add it all up:

            You are indifferent to Eritrea the land splintering off as an island (but only the land, the PFDJ and their confederates)

            You expect the people to vote with their feet and scatter all over the world.

            Does it then follow that you are indifferent to the latter–exodus–too?

            saay

          • Music Novice

            Greeting saay,

            What can I do about the exodus? I do not blame them for not standing up to fight the PFGJ bully. Is it worth it ? How many lives do people have in this World? It is better to shift to a safe and dry land and live their old age with the memories of a distant past. In any case, this has been the pattern of migration since the evolved ape, man, was able to stand upright. so, dispersal will happen again and again, neither for the first time nor for the last, until some calamity destroys this earth.

          • saay7

            Selamat MN:

            Thanks for putting up with my series of question. There was a method to the madness that I shall reveal now.

            At some point you had shared with us that your fondest memories will be your time in Eritrea 1991-1997. Memories deal with time and space.

            Something happened between 1997 and now because now you are indifferent to whether the land called Eritrea drifts as an island to the Red Sea and you feel powerless about Eritreans exodus. In fact you see it as a timeless event: used to happen, is happening, will continue to happen.

            Have you read Karl Marx theory on the four forms of alienation? He adopts Hegels theory of estrangement and alienation to economics. In one of the forms of alienation, Marx describes the estrangement/alienation a worker feels from that he produces because he doesn’t own it, he doesn’t even use it: he produces it so a capitalist can make gobs of money with it.

            I have thought of Isaias & Co as the capitalist, the product being ultra-nationalism, and the worker being the Warsay/yekaalo. The estrangement the Eritrean youth feel from patriotism or nationalism (“hagherawi” is now an epithet among some of our youth) is because they got no benefit from it, only hard labor.

            Some Eritrean is going to write the Great Eritrean Novel (my bet is on Ghezae and my cousin Semere A) and it will incorporate all of these themes. On second thought it won’t be Semere A, it will be somebody 10 years younger than him; semere will just remind the world hey my Cousin Saay had floated the subject:)

            saay

          • Music Novice

            Greetings saay,

            Thanks for the pointer.

            I have read it very long ago, when Afro tops, Bell bottoms and being a Marxist revolutionary were in fashion.

            -The product of labour: First, the worker is alienated from the object he produces because it is owned and disposed of by another, the capitalist.

            -The labour process: The second element of alienation Marx identified is a lack of control over the process of production. We have no say over the conditions in which we work and how our work is organised, and how it affects us physically and mentally. This lack of control over the work
            process transforms our capacity to work creatively into its opposite, so the worker experiences ‘activity as passivity, power as impotence, procreation as emasculation, the worker’s own physical and mental energy, his personal life – for what is life but activity? – as an activity directed against himself, which is independent of him and does not belong to him’.

            – Our fellow human beings: Thirdly, we are alienated from our fellow human beings. This alienation arises in part because of the antagonisms which inevitably arise from the class structure of society. We are alienated from those who exploit our labour and control the things we produce.

            As Marx put it: If his activity is a torment for him, it must provide pleasure and enjoyment for someone else… If therefore he regards the product of his labour, his objectified labour, as an alien, hostile and powerful object which is independent of him, then his relationship to that object
            is such that another man – alien, hostile, powerful and independent of him – is its master. If he relates to his own activity an unfree activity, then he relates to it as activity in the service, under the rule, coercion and yoke of another man.

            – Our human nature: The fourth element is our alienation from what Marx called our species being. What makes us human is our ability to consciously shape the world around us. However, under capitalism our labour is coerced, forced labour. Work bears no relationship to our personal inclinations or our collective interests. The capitalist division of labour massively increased our ability to produce, but those who create the wealth are deprived of its benefits.

            Marx’s descriptions of this process in the [Economic & Philosophical] Manuscripts are extremely powerful indictments of the system: It is true that labour produces marvels for the rich, but it produces privation for the worker. It produces palaces, but hovels for the worker. It procures beauty, but deformity for the worker. It replaces labour by machines, but it casts some of the workers back into barbarous forms of labour and turns others into machines. It produces
            intelligence, but it produces idiocy and cretinism for the worker.

          • Amanuel Hidrat

            Selam MN,

            Don’t you think the points you set down in your comment about the nature of capitalist system is true?

          • Music Novice

            Greetings Amanuel H.,

            The content of the Capitalist System is the same and the alienation of the Wage labourer is as Marx described. But there are some changes.

            The labourer is able to buy the products of his labour through credit. He feels happy being able to afford to buy the products of modern technology, and he feels less alienated. But, in reality, through perpetual debt the labourer is putting more chains around his neck.

          • saay7

            Selamat Music Novice:

            Apologies for assuming you hadn’t read Marx: it is based on a wrong assumption I had that you were in your 20s. Why would I assume that? Because the views you expressed–that you are indifferent to Eritrea joining Ethiopia or breaking off and floating in the Red Sea–are those I associated with the young and the disoriented.

            Oh well, it tipped but it didn’t pour out (like it iSem?). I still want your opinion on my hypothesis*: in Eritrea,

            1. The worker is the National Service member
            2. The product he produces is something intangible called “Resolute rebuff”
            3. The capitalist who profits from the product is “Isaias & Co, LLC”.

            The National Service member is alienated/estranged from this “resolute rebuff” product produced at the Ultra Nationalism factory. He sees members of “Isaias & Co, LLC” spend more in 5 minutes card game that he earns in 30 days of hard labor. His instinct is to run as far away from the Ultra Nationalism factory and after he does successfully he never wants to hear anything related to nationalism from anyone. Until such time that he, in his new home in exile, earns enough money doing something less alienating (even cleaning a bathroom gives him the satisfaction of being able to use the clean bathroom) and after saving enough he signs his “Letter of Regret” goes home and can frequent the same joints that his oppressors did.

            Actually, anybody is welcome to pipe in on this hypothesis. Awate University’s schools have to produce a theorem at least once a year.

            Saay

          • Music Novice

            Greetings saay,

            Yes I agree.

            The worker is the bonded labourer aka the National Service member.

            The labourer and all those yet to be born Eritreans are in perpetual debt to the EPLF, and by extension to Isaias, for being liberated.

          • saay7

            Selamat MN:

            Cool. Let me see if I can get you to agree to make one change. You say the Eritrean ruling class is “the officer class of the EPLF/PFDJ.” First, this leaves the ruling class to the Eritrean military and ignores the “civilians” who are very powerful (the two Yemanes, for example: one is private first class and the other is a Hafash Wdbat dude. Or, in the cruel words of Haile DeruE, “although one can’t say that those who now are at the Central Office have never fired a gun…”) Second, this implies that there is some distinct hierarchy in the Eritrean Defense Forces (EDF). But it is an unusual institution where colonels outrank generals, and brigadier general is more powerful than a major general. Hell, it is an institution that, right now, doesn’t even have a cabinet position (we have no Defense Minister.) Third, there is no permanence and there is no entitlement derived from seniority or rank: people can be shifted in and out of power at whim.

            So, isn’t the “Isaias Afwerki Clique” a more apt description?

            saay

            PS: Message to those handling immigration cases in Europe: very, very few Eritreans sign “Regret Letter” and go back home. I sometimes forget how literal the Europeans are.

          • Music Novice

            Greetings saay,

            The two Yemanes are nobodies, they can only exercise power on behalf of Isaias. They are worthless as they have neither a power base (army) nor an important constituency (Adi/Region).

            You said: “So, isn’t the “Isaias Afwerki Clique” a more apt description?”

            Yes, there is an “Isaias Afwerki Clique” within the ruling class.

          • Amanuel Hidrat

            Dearest Saay

            Aha a theorem! Go ahead brother the current Eritrean mind needs a new theorem that defies the conventional theorems out there.

            regards

          • saay7

            Hey Emma:

            Here’s another theorem, but I haven’t worked out the details. Marx’s Theory of Worker Alienation no longer holds because pharmaceuticals invented magical pills to deal with alienation and estrangement:) Here’s a prozac, here’s Lexapro, here’s Zoloft. What’s that Jefferson Airplane song? ”

            One pill makes you larger, and one pill makes you small
            And the ones that mother gives you, don’t do anything at all
            Go ask Alice, when she’s ten feet tall

            And if you go chasing rabbits, and you know you’re going to fall
            Tell ’em a hookah-smoking caterpillar has given you the call

            And call Alice, when she was just small

            Yeah, you pharmacists have solved all the alienation in the world. Side effects include: bloating and suicidal tendencies. Smile, Emma, it is just a theory:)

            saay

          • Amanuel Hidrat

            Hey Saay,

            Psychotropic drugs! oh….No. I still wait you to come up with plausible theorem. You remember Yg characterizing the Eritrean with Ambivalent behavior. I hope you wouldn’t go to a full blown article with that theorem,

            regards,
            Amanuel Hidrat

    • Kokhob Selam

      Dear Abysinia,

      do you heard the Amrharic music እንቆቅልሽ that works also in Eritrea .
      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uGeB72Eith0

      • Abyssinia

        Hi Kokhob Selam,
        I have my guess, but I would like to hear what you think the video has to do with what I said? Do you care to state it here?

        • Kokhob Selam

          Dear Abyssinia,
          I don’t have to go and answer to you long post. but in short you may have to know that we Eritreans have experienced all in the past and we already have found the solution. we are not going to change the already proved solution – a nation. at last you also brought the kinship case if we take a peace scenario which is totally wrong. in fact that will make the peace scenario better by strengthening relation between the nations. እንቆቅልሽ case was perfect to remind you. for me the case of Eritrea as nation is above everything and I will not play with that nor do I allow someone to play with me and almost with all Eritreans. that is the first border line. But hey, even I will not allow an Eritrean to think of monopolizing Ethiopia. my stand is both are nations but sister nations. they can do better by keeping their national identity respected.

          regarding population, Ethiopians are the most known warriors. we all agree the only country that was not colonized is Ethiopia. Eritrea was colonized 5 times. now add the quantity difference between the two. add the support Derg was getting. go and calculate knowledge wise, and you will find the result – Eritrea can’t win at all. but here is the wisdom, Eritrea fought for long and won. knowledge as you have done only calculates the quantity of army plus the equipment.wisdom tells us no one can destroy truth in long run.
          My friend, I know some Ethiopians are waiting to see failed state of Eritrea as there are also Eritreans who want to see scattered Ethiopia. the mass of those two nations wants peaceful and progressing nations.

          • Abyssinia

            Hi Kokhob Selam,

            Thank you for taking the time to state your view here. On the content, I do not know what to make of it. Kokhob, slogans and loud assertions, repetitions may take you only so much, in the sense of motivating, emboldening or empowering people. They can not help you change natural laws, nor socio-economic forces. Eritrea’s problems can not be solved by shouting slogans and pretensions. The problems are existential and solutions shall be sought in radical ways, or else the risk of demise is so large.

            The content of your post is full of wrong assumptions and shallow diagnosis. Let me point out some and leave it for you to think seriously. You said “Eritreans have experienced all in the past and we already have found the solution a nation.” What were the problems and how has the “nation” been a solution for them? To take it one layer down, what is the purpose of having an independent nation if not, on aggregate, to live a better life? How much should be paid to have a nation? Half of the population? two-third, or all the people? When does the cost of maintaining independent Eritrea become too expensive to you?

            The other grave assumption you make is that Eritreans had the truth on their side during the war for independence. I am sorry to tell you, but there is no such thing as truth in social dynamism. Social reality is something humans create as they go along. Another assumption you make is that Eritreans won the war against Ethiopia. I think this is where many Eritreans have a great delusion. They fail to factor in the then prevailing Ethiopian and international reality. To put it in percentage’s, the Eritrean contribution in the creation of independent Eritrea is very little as compared to the rest of the factors. I know it gives Eritreans a good feeling to think they won single-handedly, but that is also what keeps them in trouble after trouble.

            To sum up, we are exploring scenarios, and I am convinced that Eritrea’s wellbeing and existence is highly dependent on Ethiopia’s goodwill. If Ethiopia wants to hurt Eritrea, it can do it with little cost on its part. Furthermore, Eritrea’s antagonistic constituents , its small size, its lack of experience in statehood, confused history, confused identity, progressive weakening of its economic standing, and the change in world order are all factors that are not favorable to its existence. On the other hand, Ethiopia’s large size, large market, its relatively grounded history, its experience in statehood, its resources and and a favorable world order give it a big advantage.

          • Kokhob Selam

            Dear friend,
            allow some time to reply you. I am a bit busy up loading my poem for the day.

          • Fanti Ghana

            Hello Abyssinia,

            Until Kokhob Selam comes back:

            There are several interesting points to digest in your posts I read today.

            Given our recent history, to expect Eritreans to drop everything, discard their aspiration for independence, forgive all atrocities, and discuss unity or federation at this time is extremely naïve, especially when you focus the main reason to be “Eritrea cannot make it on her own.”

            To use your gravity and size scenario, don’t forget that some objects do also have the Neutron Start prosperity: small but terrible, or to use a more practical example, Djibouti is a lot smaller in land mass and population, equally as colonized, and without even a fraction of Eritrea’s natural resources, but it still is a sovereign nation nonetheless.

            To be honest, I think Eritrea’s problem is compounded by our attachment to it. What Ethiopians should do first is learn the history, understand the need, and honestly accept Eritrean independence.

            If one, especially an Ethiopian, presents as drastic proposal as unity, it can only appear as an extension to the original fear of Ethiopia always trying to ‘swallow Eritrea’ or to deny it of its independence.

            In short, let Eritreans decide their, by extension, our fate in this regard. We owe them, at least, that much. In the meantime, let’s not appear to suggest that this temporary hiccup Eritrea is going through, mostly due to a mal governance, as proof for Eritrea’s inability to make it on her own.

            Coerced unity is not any different than the questionable annexation of the past that has costed us dearly. I say let’s stay away from quick fixes!

          • Kokhob Selam

            Thank you FG,
            you have said it and I have noting to add. don’t forget to read the poem if you know Arabic. if you don’t I sure you will still understand what is written by watching the pictures and the sad music.

          • Abyssinia

            Hi Kokhob Selam,

            I wish you could stand on your feet and say something. FG has gave an advice on how to see things, he did not address the questions I asked you. To say “you have said it and I have noting to add” is funny, to say the least.

          • Abi

            Selam Abyssinia
            Actually Fanti said something really outrageous.
            He wants eritreans to decide our fate. I say NO ! They decided their fate in 1993. Whatever happens in the future must be decided ONLY by Ethiopians.

          • Fanti Ghana

            Hello Abisha,
            Okay now that you are in bed, I will talk.
            ‘Symbiosis’ is the word brother. And don’t worry, Isaias will be long gone, Saay will be super cool, and you will be chatting with Hayat uncensored!

          • Hayat Adem

            St. Fanti,
            Uncensored? What transpires between sweet Abi and me would always be unknown to the outside world. But always imagine it to be not different from decent and cultured.

          • Kokhob Selam

            Dear Hayata,
            since you are transparent beyond my knowledge to each other, let me complain about him and help on this, he said I fought for Arabs. Did I fought for Arabs? to be kind for me let me tell you painful truth, part of my body and blood is in Eritrea now, I paid it and still I am ready to put more price as you can see to create democratic Eritrea. I am still writing and challenging against all who want to see Ethiopia and Eritrea in war and hate. will I deserve to be described as slave of Arabs? I am almost crazy to see the post of Abi. this is honest massage and you should help me on this.

          • Hayat Adem

            Hi Kokhobay,
            Abi Described Kokhobay as slave of Arabs? This is a news. I tried to look up for his post that contains the aforementioned phrase. I couldn’t find it. But I will assume this is said and Abi couldn’t have been really more offending than this. It is is factually wrong. It is inappropriate to say that to anyone let alone to you. I hate someone like you being hurt because of offensive views and wrongly chosen words. I also hate to learn that is done by the usually sweet Abi, this is a mistake of erring-to-hurt.
            Hayat

          • Kim Hanna

            Selam Kokhob Selam,
            .
            You don’t have to ask Hayat, you can ask me. You know Abi sometimes goes over the line when Arabs are mentioned. He changes. Have you seen his discussion with saay recently about Arabs. Don’t get me wrong, there is a legitimate concern on the part of Ethiopia about their behavior. Do you remember that open microphone in Egypt when the leaders were openly talking about hostile acts. That is how they talk in private. But, But that is a separate story.
            .
            You have fought over a long period of sustained time to gain independence. That is achieved. You have the first hand knowledge, it is not what you are told or it is not what you have read somewhere. You were in the real world. Now when someone refers to you as Arab slave, that is a childish insult. You should not pay too much attention to it.
            Remember when Ethiopia was invaded by Somalia and almost 1/5th of the country was lost. The eth. government managed to get the Cubans and the Russians to help us with LIVE soldiers and reversed the invasion. (Yemen helped too)
            .
            Now what do you think I will say if Mr. Gud, Semere or someone calls me a Cuban or Russian slave, I will pretend I didn’t even notice it and say nothing. Why give it weight it does not deserve.
            .
            K.H

          • Kim Hanna

            Selam Mr. Kim,
            .
            This is to add a Mr. to my sign out name. Sorry Kokhob Selam, it is a long story.
            .
            Mr. K.H

          • Kokhob Selam

            Dear Abo,
            actually, it is no more the choice of both now. once up on a time it was the choice of both but you governments use force to make Eritrea part of Ethiopia. they fail to solve the case. Eritrean men and women stand for their right. the war was not in Ethiopia, it was in Eritrea. both fought for long and the film is over. now, even Eritrean people can’t change the idea of independent, Eritreans can’t forget their heroes who paid their life, it is like an agreement ” Okay, I will pay everything for you to free you from Ethiopians and you will not come down again at any circumstances” so it is no more the choice of alive Eritrean. it is the choice of those heroes in heaven. Abi, you and me can’t bring them back, it is too late now. Now, I am not allowed and you are not allowed to join those two nations we can only create love and cooperation forever.

          • Abi

            Kokobe
            In case you forgot this is Abi , who always reminds you that your heroes died not for eritreans but for the Arabs.
            You are still in self convincing mode that you brought your people free from ethiopia. I have a bad news for you, Kokobe. They are running away from the free country. Some are going back to the bad country where the mass mobilization to free them happened.
            It is all BS. The arabs are laughing at you.
            I blame all the mass mobilizers who worked tirelessly on behalf of the arabs to bring the past and current misery to our people.

          • Kokhob Selam

            Dear Abi,
            I will ignore this post of yours. it is extremely disappointing, think about it .

          • Kokhob Selam

            Dear Abyssinia,

            if I stand tall when the entire nation (Ethiopia) was against our national freedom do you think I will not stand today? today it is the advice and wisdom of awaken people like FG, Horizon etc that serve us better. It is time to leave that “Zeraf ” thing to the past .

            why do you want me to add more when there is a golden phrase written by FG. what important and practical opinion can be found more than allowing others to decide their fate.

            your logic is too old. you should know we Eritreans will not surrender to the idea of unionists just because Eritrea is under dictator today. you should know by now, the national independent is accomplished and the film is over. now if any choice, then it will be up to the choice of both people no force should be applied.

            Eritrea is rich enough and have everything to be prosperous nation. it all depends on the system and we are willing to change the system. learn from PMM and work for development of your nation. Leave Eritrean case for Eritreans, war to administrate Eritrea didn’t work for you in the past and will not work for you in the future.

            and you said “Eritrea is fallen ” how do you read it? for me Eritrea is getting strong by going through this difficult time. Eritrea is clearing the past mistakes of her own history by suffering under dictator. this suffering is the price of past mistakes for allowing people like IA be around the struggle. but again it is the course and lesson to plan the future. “ሁሉም ለበጎ ነው “. in fact this situation is good for both nations. Ethiopians have learned they can live in peace progressing fast if they use their own internal resources instead of fighting to hold Eritrea. I mean to work for Blue Nile is better than to fight for red Sea for Ethiopia. If you government will accept that “Eritrea is under mercy of Ethiopia” thing and try to catch back, sure Eritreans will fight as usual and Ethiopia will lose the development and peace she gained. war has been tried go for peace my friend.

          • Fanti Ghana

            Hello Dr. KS,
            You really put my Arabic to the test. Simply hilarious. I will have my daughter translate next time you write in Arabic. However, as you said, the video was easy to understand even without the text. Thanks again brother.

          • Kokhob Selam

            Thank you Fanti Ghana,
            the next weak poem will be Amharic, you will enjoy and feel how much we are connected we Ethiopians and Eritreans.

          • Amde

            Selam Fanti,

            Since the other thread is locked, I am using this one.

            You are right on Universe = Biher. That makes Multiverse = BzuBiher or Bezuher

            The person who first explained it to me used the same source “Egzia-Biher” as what you used. Interesting to think that our political discourse has managed to diminish even God.

            My only quibble is that “Biher = Universe” is in Ge’ez.

            There is a purposely coined Amharic term for Universe and it is “Hulent”, as in “Hulentenawi = Universal” I have a feeling the concept of multiverse was not generally known when this term as coined.

            Amde

          • Dear Amde,
            (this was meant to be a response to the discussion on religion/science on jebena before it closed. i hope you will forgive me for attaching it to your comment, which is on the same topic. i donot know if the moderators want to end the discussion. if so they are free to discard the comment and throw it to the bin. you see, i had already written it and i did not know what to do with it.
            regards.)

            if we take christianity and islam, they do not differe in their belief in the existence of God, but in the implementations of the teachings of both religions. the same happens in inter-christian or inter-islam controversies.

            science has discovered all the the things we know up to today; but that knowledge is just the tip of the iceberg. science has yet to prove the non-existence of God, as religion has to prove the existence of God in a tangible physical way, to satisfy inquiring minds. it means that the issue of existence/non-existence of God is going to remain unanswered maybe forever, as long as human being are going to live on the planet earth, and they are not going to venture very far from their small corner in the universe. as scientific knowledge develops and the material world continues to attract people more than religion does, as we are already seeing today, at least in the short term, science is going to have the upper hand. what the final answer is going to be, nobody really knows. before the 20th century human beings lived for the sake of their religious beliefs, in the 20th century for the sake of their nation (country), and in this 21st century human beings are living for their person intersts. one can see how things change.

            if i remember well, einstein had said to the effect that if God were the sum total of all natural laws, he would have believed in Him. the point is that, how and why natural laws that govern everything came to exist in the first place. the theory of chance is not going to help here. therefore, one can conclude that there are much more questions than answers, and it is going to remain so for a very long long time. it is better to see religion on a personal basis, without trying to prove or disprove, who is write and who is not, at least for the time being, and with the limited knowledge human beings have acquired.

          • Amde

            Selam Horizon,

            I don’t think the existence or non-existence of God can be proven. That is why Atheists really annoy me. Atheism – especially the militant versions we have in the west now – is a form of faith. But, it is a bad form of faith which assumes their ignorance of a spiritual (non-material) existence is the totality of actual knowledge about this issue. As you say, better to leave it to each person to figure out what makes sense for them.

            I like Einstein’s definition as God being the sum total of all natural laws. That makes sense to me, but it is the kind of intellectual sense that doesn’t work with the commonly held view of God/Allah as an entity who gets interested in an individual’s life, expressing positive emotions such as mercy or love. Science continually taking away from the domain of God is as you say the reality today, but that Einstein’s formulation elegantly solves that connundrum. On the other hand, the low level of religiosity in cultures with rich material wealth also show that one can make a case for the level of religious observation/affiliation to be correlated to the stresses and anxieties of making a living. Check out the case of irreligiosity in generous welfare state Scandinavia http://www.nytimes.com/2009/02/28/us/28beliefs.html One of the funny quotes in the article: “One man recounted the shock he felt when a colleague, after a few
            drinks, confessed to believing in God. “I hope you don’t feel I’m a bad
            person,” the colleague pleaded.”

            So, the general historical trend as you indicated is for Science to usurp more and more of what was the domain of religion with every scientific discovery, and for people to find religion less and less a reason to organize their life with every resolution of their daily anxieties.

            Amde

          • Dear Amde,
            the values of western societies and their constitutions are anchored on the teachings of the christian faith. they have no problem and they cannot avoid living under the social laws of the ten commandments or the teachings of Christ. otherwise, their society would have been chaotic. if they are a democratic and a just society, it is because they have adopted the values taught by the christian faith. what they have come to question is the existence of the Higher Being (the Creator). even then, they allow Him to live in their subconscious; and at times of trouble they always turn to Him, although they have declared at other times that they are atheists. in general terms, this is what the article points out about the societies of the Scandinavian countries, which depicts explicitly the inner human nature .

          • Music Novice

            Greetings Amde,

            The proof should be supplied by those who claim God exits. If I make an assertion first, the burden of proof is on me. But so far, no proof has been supplied, what we see is the use of the Carrot and Stick method. The carrot is a promise to reserve a place in ‘Heaven’, and the stick is threats of violence in this World and in the Hereafter.

          • Amde

            Selam Music Novice

            I think of science as a completely utilitarian method, rather than a system of belief on par with religion. Unfortunately we are led to believe the two are on opposite ends and in conflict. It is annoying to read politicians pushing the teaching of creationism in science/biology class.. it just reveals the level of ignorance of what science is.

            I have personally witnessed some medical “miracles” (technical term might be “spontaneous remissions”) on immediate family members performed by a bahtawi. So this leads me to believe there is some non-material, or an undiscovered aspect of the material world that science has not discovered yet.

            The scientific method is based on as complete objectivity and distance from the agent and/or observer of the phenomena in question. These spiritual practices (such as the type of healing I am talking about) are so enmeshed with both agent and observer, science is simply not equipped to understand it. Perhaps someone can successfully devise experiments to do so, but my feeling is that a new method will have to be devised and accepted. Whatever that method is, when one thinks about just how much science has changed humanity in 300 years, this new “method” will be just as revolutionary.

            Amde

          • Fanti Ghana

            Hello Horizon, Amde, Mr. Amanuel
            I am worried too what the moderators may be thinking about going on and on about this subject, but ‘Amen’ to Horizon’s last paragraph.
            Signed out!

          • Kokhob Selam

            Dear Amde,
            I love it. in Tigrinya it is Kulentenawi( this just say how much those two languages are connected by Ge’ez
            ,
            you know, if we really see it God is all in all without alpha and omega. searching within the alpha and omega the endless God is not possible. but, you can search within the self. the self which is affected and programmed with time- past,present and future and place above, bellow and all sides is always in trouble too. That is why we are in conflicts and endless contradictions. Again, I am coming to you to say God is within us too and we can go searching by love, love in a sense unconditional love. that is really possible when you know how to run away from space and time. the difficult job man is facing is this one – he couldn’t live in now and here. actually all the conflicts are not present and no pain can be found in now. I have said it earlier in awate the body pain we encounter (any pain ) is not present and if you know how to sake refuge to the almighty which is out of time and space you will not feel it at all. to do that you need to live now, now, now, now no past and no future. that is where God joining temporary system.

            Men, are killing each other thinking the other is wrong and they are serving God. that is the level we live in still. if really man start to search the truth within and study how his 3B dollar worth brain is connected to God through very sophisticated system (the art of God), he will live in peace following the Golden rule which in turn will let man go out of cause and effect .

          • Amde

            Selam KokhobSelam

            You gave me a lot to meditate on. Thank you

            Amde

          • Kokhob Selam

            Dear Amede,
            Now, let’s come down a bit and see the world in mess.Imagine, is man supposed to be so selfish? isn’t man here to learn and develop to the higher? such a wonderful creature who invented all those technology which are fine also to the level difficult to explain using sound and light invisible frequencies is supposed to know the content of his mind which very much developed part of his body. He is supposed to know he is not the owner of his fellow men and use them as slaves and kill, arrest etc. he is supposed to know killing one man is like killing all human beings and going against creator. isn’t possible to live in peace with fellow human beings? here we get the answer, unless man make peace with him self he will not make with others. end of the job, is problems are not going to be solved by searching God outside of self . at least man will see how God is great if he start to know , the energy in his body, the chemistry within, the waves within, the nerves communication to the central control system, the central processing unit, the decision maker within the brain, the permanent memory, the temporary memory part, and then all the line to God etc. will help him to live in peace, isn’t it?

            Here I come to conclusion change should start within.

          • Fanti Ghana

            Hello Amde,

            If they are using Hulentenawi for Universe, I will be seriously disappointed. Hulentena/wi is an expression of behavior not an object. Ge’ez is a good source of uncommon or long forgotten words and phrases. It should not be discarded just because it is “Ge’ez.” We need to seriously address these types of unprofessional translations especially in universities and works of sciences before we are lost for good. We need to look for words within our nation’s languages including Arabic and, most important, we need a committee of experts who should make decisions of this nature.

          • Kokhob Selam

            Dear Fanti Ghana,
            really Ge’ez can help us see those very fine arts of God than Amharic and Tigrinya. That also is difficult sill until man reaches to the level above words – languages. languages are only to communicate still the material and everything attached to it. for example try to investigate the word God in any language, do you ever ask how that everything and but nothing can be called by name? yes, how can we give name to that out of our senses? but again, since we are starters to depart to the higher level, we can’t help but use the name and try to describe.

            the word Hulentena/wi can help us at this moment but still isn’t Hulentena/wi describing content? on choice in our level but use it. the day you experience to be part of all in all you will lough and say this is nothing and everything and no words to use at all.

          • Amde

            Hi Fanti,

            Sorry to disappoint you, but it was a committee of experts who decided on Hulent for Universe.

          • Fanti Ghana

            Hello Amde,
            Are you warning me that my retirement may not be as peaceful as I am hopping will be after all? Please tell me you are joking.

          • Amde

            Haha Fanti

            ingidih irmihin awTaw.

            Yes, I believe this was part of a few committees during the 80s set up to coin/invent technical/scientific terminology in Amharic. Since we were deep in the weeds of Biher/Bihereseb via the dominant leftist worldview on nation/nationaloty, they had to come up with a different word. To change it now back to Biher = Universe would literally take a change of constitution.

            It is interesting to see the flavor of translation by the different committees. I suppose you can start now with your recommendation and see if you can get the new generation to pick it up.

            Amde

          • Abyssinia

            Hi Fanti,

            All good. However, when you add things like “including Arabic”, the weight of your posts become as heavy as feather. Avoid such non-sense inclusions. Really, what is the point of adding that phrase in this post? If it is one of our national languages, then it is already included. If it is not , why should we look in Arabic and not other languages?

          • Fanti Ghana

            Hello Abyssinia,

            We should definitely consider all languages going outward, but

            1. Arabic is the closet to Am/Tigrigna with “you won’t believe” amount of similarities.

            2. It is one of the oldest languages that relate to us, and it may contain a wealth of “undiscovered” words.

            3. It is a language I am advocating should be “our regional” commercial language (a little futuristic).

            4. Most importantly, because it is one of the most elegant languages.

            Arabic speaker created algebra for God’s sake. That alone is reason enough.

          • Abyssinia

            Hi Fanti,

            I am disgusted at the fact that you are advocating Arabic to be our regional commercial language. I feel deep visceral sorrow. I think Mulugeta (MW) described this sad state of affairs in his post at Asmarino yesterday.

            “if someone advances to colonize and conquers your territory, you can fight and recover both the territory and your freedom. However, if your enemy conquers your brother’s mind, you can’t fight and free yourself from it. … it was better the Arabs came and settled, then we would fight to drive them away. But the Arab made our brothers and sisters Muslims. Now the Arab does not have to leave Arabia to colonize us. He has our brethren as agents to do his bidding. What do you do when your brother becomes a Muslim and demands to cater to the Arab desires in your midst? It is not something you can fight, not something you can be free from, it is just an endless nightmare”.

          • Saleh Johar

            Abyssinia,
            According to you and the people who think like you, “The Arabs came and made [your] brothers and sisters Muslims.” A few questions to you:

            1. Does it mean your brothers and sisters are not so anymore because they became Muslims?

            2. Was Jesus Christ an Ethiopian, and he personally converted you to Chriastianity, or some foreigners were involved in the process?

            3. Do you believe the mind of Muslims is more conquered by a “foreign religion” more than you?

            4. Do you still believe Muslims are doing the bidding of the Arabs?

            5. When did Muslims become Muslims, yesterday? Does time has any relevance to you?

            6. When will you call someone a BIGOT?

            Of course, I do not need to remind you that such comments are a violation of the forum guidelines, please check it.

          • Abyssinia

            Hi Saleh,
            Questions 1, 3 , 5 and 6 are either rhetorical questions or they lack any meaningful substance, and so I am sorry to tell you, but I have no interest in such things. Question 2 makes many wrong assumptions about me and so I ignore it. Question 4, yes I do, and they will always do. There is no way that the conquered mind can extricate itself out of it, and that is exactly why MW’s post calls it an “endless nightmare”. On the forum rules reminder, can you cite which rule I am violating? I am completely aware that the forum rules are invoked to deter any serious challenge to the ideas and projects the founders of the forum want to propagate.

          • Fanti Ghana

            Hello Abyssinia,

            Did you purposely post this so I can avenge myself by calling you irrational? Now, who is irrational? Never mind Mulugeta’s automatic Arab – Islam association, but are we preferring English for its Christianity then?

            I know it is not fancy now days to appear “Arab friendly,” but since you don’t believe in “religious dogma non-sense” what exactly is the problem of knowing and using Arabic?

          • Saleh Johar

            Fanti!
            And who said he doesn’t believe in religious dogma? He believes in religious extremism and is showing you his religious intolerance in black and white. And then he pretends to embrace science! Yet, his veins carry all the world supply of unscientific bigotry 🙂

            NB: And I know him since 15 years, we went through this for a long time in San Jose. I wish our Ethiopian friends take notice, we all have our share of sick people.

          • Fanti Ghana

            Hello Memhir,
            So there is history with Abyssinia after all. I imagined him very young and exploring.

          • Abyssinia

            Hi Fanti,
            Do not fall for any non-sense. Your imagination is correct. young, kellamino -MIT educated. Age under 30. Rather, let’s focus on the issues.

          • Fanti Ghana

            Hello Abyssinia,
            In that case, I will continue toning down my attitude toward you.

          • Amde

            Selam Abyssinia,

            What does “kellamino -MIT educated” mean?

          • Abyssinia

            Hi Amde,
            Kellamino is a special high school where the best and the brightest high school students of Tigray study, and MIT, acronym for Mekelle institute of Technology, is the college that takes in the high school graduates from Kellamino.

          • አዲስ

            Abyssinia,

            I thought Kellamino is closed. Is it still open? If so, who is funding it now?

            Thanks,
            Addis

          • Abyssinia

            Hi Addis,
            Kellamino is not closed, never was. It is funded by TDA. MIT was transferred to Mekelle University. Previously it was under TDA and EFFORT. Besides, I said I studied there – past. Your question suggests I said I am studying there.

          • አዲስ

            Abyssinia,

            I didn’t mean to suggest you are studying there now. I don’t see any problem if you do 🙂 Thanks for the info anyway.

            Thanks,
            Addis

          • Amde

            Selam Abyssinia,

            Thanks. I had heard good things about Mekelle IT and its feeder High School but I guess you are the first person I have run across to come from it. Just curious, are you in Ethiopia or outside, and did you choose to follow a technical education/career?

            Amde

          • Abyssinia

            Hi Amde,
            Currently, I am outside, hence the ip address that made Saleh (the moderator that was supposed to stay clear of exposing individual’s personal information) think he knew me for 15 years. And yes, I studied technical education ( if you mean non-social science). There is no social science education there, anyway.

          • Rahwa T

            MerHaba Abyssinia,

            I am not totally trashing Saleh Gadi’s comment. But I am suspecting that there is unwritten rule that says awate visitor would not lend, sell or give (as a gift) his/her Laptop or PC with recorded IP to a close person.

          • Saleh Johar

            Abyssinia,
            And how did I expose your ID? I never did and will never do. But as an individual, long before IP technology, I was engaged with in debates with many people. I read tone, content, and attitude and like an individual, I have the right to reminisce old debates. As for your ID, rest assured. I don’t go there because it is unethical and I never did that, ever. Recognizing that requires integrity, I hope you have it and thus recognize that myself or my colleagues never divulged identities of people, at a very night cost to us.

          • Abyssinia

            Hi Saleh,
            If anybody is sick, I am sure it is you. But do you want to bet on the knowing me for 15 years? For a substantial bet, I am willing to reveal myself.

          • Abyssinia

            Hi Fanti,

            Wait a minute. Let me get into the fine-grained issues here. I have to tell you that I even feel sad that we have to talk about such issues, issues such making Arabic our language of commerce. I know in the confused world of the horn, the abnormal is normal, and the normal is abnormal. But why would someone advocate a language of other culture to be the language of his commerce? Should not the person advocate his own language(s)? I am completely aware why you want Arabic to be the commercial language. It is not for market opportunities for if it was you would prefer English. English offers bigger markets, and much more opportunities. Even in the regional Horn-Arab case, a normal person would choose English (in the case his language is not in the position to be used) for it is an equal-opportunity language for both regions. It is also the de-facto language of science. This is in addition to the head-start that our people have made in learning English. So why does one advocate for Arabic? The real reason is the religious-emotional attachment that you have with Arabic that makes you advocate for it. And that is exactly the hallmark of the conquered and enslaved mind. And that is why I feel a deep sorrow in my bones.

          • Fanti Ghana

            Hello Abyssinia,

            The Arabic language I mentioned earlier was in the context of developing “our own language” and not as a substitute for English or any other language. However, I didn’t expect this kind of extremely backward attitude from someone as clever as you are.

            Judging from your last couple of posts, I see you are either anti Arab anything or anti Muslim anything. Since you seem to see both as one and the same, it is safe to say that you hate them both. So, my non-hateful-toward-Arabs statement gave you a “deep sorrow.”

            Imagine my sorrow for all Ethiopian Muslims who may have read this right this minute. Imagine also my sorrow for not doing enough to protect my Muslim compatriots from these types of bigotries.

            Ironically, I am going to have to quote you: “I know in the confused world of the horn, the abnormal is normal, and the normal is abnormal.”

            Amen!

          • Abyssinia

            Hi Fanti,
            No digression. Stay the course. The statement that triggered my post is not the suggestion of using Arabic in the context of developing our languages. It is the later statement of yours where you stated that you are advocating for Arabic to be our language of commerce. And, I know when it gets tough, the store of insults and defamations is opened wide, but I have no hate for Arabic at all, nor any particular hate for Islam (I do not like any religions in general). Why is it so hard for people to debate the issues with candor? Why run around to pour insults and unleash defamations?

          • Fanti Ghana

            Hello Abyssinia,

            Fine, but it is your fault anyway. You should have posted the age thing before I replied to your earlier post.

            Okay, it must have been a little before you joined Awate.com, but we had a very intense discussion regarding Arabic and our region a few weeks ago. We were discussing about offering Arabic language in Eritrean schools, and naturally, I had to suggest teaching Arabic in Ethiopian schools too. I clearly saw the advantages of that in its contribution to regional harmony, but as you can imagine, my country is not quite ready yet; it seems.

            My finding out how young and brilliant you are made our discussion earlier a little bittersweet. Bitter because I felt that you maybe inheriting dogma like attitude from my generation, and sweet because once you truly see, you will be a strong contributor towards the ever eluding regional harmony.

            You see, somehow, we have been conditioned to view Arabs as our enemies. It is so common and rampant that most of us don’t even ask each other why we are supposed to hate them. Maybe “hate” is too strong a word, but our disregard for Arabs is obvious. I am glad to hear you say “I have no hate for Arabic at all, nor any particular hate for Islam.” I hope you will continue neutral and eventually form your own opinion and become an instrument of change for the better.

          • Abi

            Fantastic
            “Hate” is not strong enough to describe tie Arabs.
            You seem indifferent to the suffering we have been through for decades because of them.
            They chocked us even to drink from our own river Abay.
            I know you love everything arab. They hate you. Once a commenter , a former tegadali, was telling a story in this forum where there was a rivalry between the ” independence fighters ” regarding who gets what weapons. The supplier , who is a SOB arab said ” as long as they fight ethiopia, he care less who gets what.”
            Fanti, You love your people or you love the arabs. You can’t love them both . They are my enemies, I HATE them.

          • Semere Andom

            Hi Abi:
            Thanks for your time in enlightening me that MIT went to that elite Wingate school in Addis before going to MIT, that was not my q to Sem, but thanks for your time. If Eritrea was part of Ethiopia then and MIT was bright what was the big deal, even criminals like HSI and Degi needed mathematicians and engineers.
            I lleave you with your feeling with the Arabs, I am not a fan of them either, what I know is they did not tell Eritreans to fight.
            Your knowledge of the crimes of the Arabs against Ethiopia is impressive, I would like you to elevate your knowledge of the crimes of your country under HSI and Dergi that pushed Eritreans who named their daughtesr Ethiopia and Shewainesh to abandon it and rename their kids Eritrea and Simret and Semhar. You are legendary for hating people in Emma’s age to organize in Addis Abeba, while Ethiopia’s like late MZ and former prime Minister Layne also to fight Ethiopia under those regimes. Those regimes provided dabbo too.

          • Abi

            Hi Sem
            You are all over the map. It is not me who told you that MIT went to Winget. It is bereket. I just emphasized during the Great King eritreans were not discriminated. Tell me I am lying.
            The crimes of arabs is not a secret. I lived it while you were rooting for them.
            Arabs didn’t tell eritreans to fight. I agree. They ordered you to fight.
            Now that both the king and Derg have gone , what are the new names of eritreans? Obama?
            Eritreans don’t need ethiopian names any longer. They need ethiopia as home. Long live mama ethiopia!
            Was there any declaration forcing eritreans to name their children one way or another? And you call it a crime because there are some eritreans by the name ethiopia. You are funny.

          • Semere Andom

            Abi:
            Of course I have some sense of humor, thanks;-)
            Now about the names, I was telling you that Eritreans, at least some of them loved Ethiopia, how hard is it to understand that. Yes Eritreanrs were discriminated ask Emma when he could not get a job he was qualified for unless you talking about the equal opportunity killing that you guys always peddle when we talk about the crimes. If your believe that the Arabs ordered Eritrea to fight, who ordered MZ and Layne and the several Ethiopian movements to fight?
            The crimes of Arabs may is not a secret, I am not defending them, I am just telling you the crimes of HSI and Dergi, both who represented Ethiopia is not secret, and you have uyet to come to terms with it. Many Ethiopians in this forum did
            Yes long live Ethiopia!!

          • Fanti Ghana

            Hello Abisha,

            As much as I love you, my heart bleeds when I ‘hear’ statements like “They are my enemies, I HATE them.”
            That is jus it Abi. If you now had a chance as the weapons supplier, wouldn’t you be saying “I don’t care who gets what as long as they fight the Arabs?” Hate breeds hate. It solves nothing. It makes us less than what we should be. Please brother, let’s not make a few misguided decisions by Egyptian authorities our only measuring rod to the entire Arab world.
            I will always love you.

          • Abi

            Fantastic
            I love you too.
            I’m sorry to disappoint you. I don’t want your heart to bleed.
            We are where we are because of them. We have been bleeding to death, we couldn’t use our natural and manpower resources. Instead we find ourselves begging on their streets, we are their maids, their drivers. Now we are their spare parts.
            Keep loving them . You are a good person one level below Jesus.
            You said ” some misguided Egyptian authorities…” Really? Misguided for how many years? 200 years? How long is it since Atse Yohaness? I need your help. When they can’t do it themselves, they beat us through some misguided eritrean elites.

          • Rahwa T

            Dears Abi and Fanti,

            We are still in «Werha Meskerem». Happy new year! May the new year brings health and prosperity to my brothers. I am/have been/ reading you guys a lot. Today I couldn’t resist ignoring Abi’s comment. Fanti’s position on some issues has been disappointing me. Now I have got a reason to disappoint him in my turn. Abi, you described Fanti as “…I know you love everything Arab. They hate you…” and I would add to your sentence “yes, he loves his people, but he loves his neighbors more than his people as the BOOK says “love your enemy”. Fanti seems to possess rhino’s skin towards the plight of his people.

            Ke selamta

          • Semere Andom

            Hi Rahwa T, nice to see you!
            are your “Nacfatizing” Fanti:-)

          • Rahwa T

            Dearest Sem,

            Thanks sem and I have enjoyed your article. I am sad I am not seeing the “brightest star” of Awate – Hayat Adem. Very few individuals are cruel, boring and thorny. Hope will see her very soon. It is already too long missing her.

            Fanti has long been Nakfatized since he first set his feet to Asmara as a teen-ager.

          • Fanti Ghana

            Hello Rahwani,

            I love the way you say hello to me: “Fanti seems to possess rhino’s skin towards the plight of his people.”

            Are you suggesting that I should start hating Arabs to prove that I love my people? atiyo, entay gudu?

            We, humans, always look at the mirror favorably. We argue against Eritreans ‘we, the Ethiopian people, are not responsible for any atrocities committed in Eritrea by our governments,’ however, we want to hold all Arabs responsible for all of our ills because of what?

            Rahwani, the human fallacy is boundless. When we have a weak position, one of our automatic response is either to give the object, in this case “hating Arabs,” higher moral value (niXuh Ethiopiawinet) and/or discourage any attempt that reflects our fallacy back to us, in this case blaming someone as an “uncaring toward his people.”

            I occasionally visit a few Egyptian sites, and I always leave feeling ashamed and miserable after reading most of my compatriots’ comments. It is always about how we kicked their behind twice before, how we are capable of doing it again, how the Arabs are our mortal enemies, and so on. This is always our theme regardless of the subject at hand and regardless of who the audience might be.

            The Eritrean independence vis-a-vis Arabs is usually what we address here, but the source and purpose are one and the same. After Eritreans fighting for their independence for some 60-70 years, instead of asking what have we done to our brothers and sisters, instead of apologizing on behalf of our successive fascist-like governments’ atrocities, instead of admiring the Eritrean’s determination and tenacity we avoid the self reflection I mentioned above and shout “IF IT WASN”T FOR THE ARABS! Ehh.”

            Embeytey: that is not how we should “love our people.”
            Fairness and justice should never ever be a negotiated event. Either we have it or we don’t.

            With love.

          • Rahwa T

            Dear Fanti, sorry I attached my reply with another comment of yours (somewhere else) sorry for the mistake. Here it is.

            Dear Fanti,

            I know you are so humble and never loss your patient. So this is a reply I expected from you, Fanti nebsi. I didn’t mean to discourage you but that was how I would summarize it if I were asked to read all your comments and present it in two lines. I share your view that it is wrong to generalize and hate people as a whole. To be honest, I don’t feel happy when I read strongly worded comments from any corner. I literally feel ashamed, especially when the writers are Ethiopians, and loss the brotherly /sisterly love that I have in my heart and angered when it is coming from Eritreans, especially from those who pretend to be peace-lovers but saw few grains of hatred in every line of their posts. But yours is just too much. You do not seem to live in the real world. Look how our Eritrean brothers and sisters at awate cautiously handle their message when they deal on their recent and past history. Whenever you write, you should remember that there are hundreds of thousands of Ethiopian mothers and fathers, brothers and sisters… who lost their dears. I don’t want push it further. On the Arabic and the Arabs, I think for them I am just a “khafir, ebeed Habesh” like any black women and men from Ethiopia. And you are no different, Fanti. May be you are waiting to prove it one day. V.F. has said it better. I think we should not go another round on the language issue. But personally, I am surprised and impressed by your daughter’s proficiency of Arabic language (which is much better than you, if I correctly understood from your earlier comment on another thread (and yet she is living and probably born in the US)).

            I wish I were in a relaxed mood and said more freely. I am not in that mood.

            RT

          • Shum

            Hello Fanti,

            Well put brother. I stopped reading what Eritreans and Ethiopians say on posting boards and comments for the most part. There’s no dialogue, just chest thumping, insulting and taking joy in the misfortune of their “enemies”. It’s sad.

            But It’s to be expected. Truth is, we’re a very insular people. We wallow in our filth without asking ourselves, what have our people contributed to the world in science, technology or literature. Very little. Say what you want about Arabs, but if you compare Habesha and Arab contribution to the world, it is not even remotely close. Your NiXuh comment made chuckle a bit. We never fail to talk about our nobility, jigninet. But we fall short on actual contributions. We’ll continue to do so at this rate.

          • Dear Fanti Ghana,
            it is unfortunate that you have brought again to the forum for discussion the topic of the “arabic language for ethiopia”, which was rejected by most ethiopians after a long discussion. let me tell you what worries me most; not that ethiopians do not speak arabic, but the fact that most university graduates in ethiopia find it difficult to express themselves in reasonable english, after so many years of contact with the language. this is an international language ethiopia has adopted almost a century ago. our problem in the world forum does not arise because our leaders or ethiopians within the country and in the diaspora do not speak arabic, but they cannot express themselves well in a language understood almost by everybody all over the world. think of abadula (the president of the ethiopian parliament) and many of our politicians, the ethiopian vender in the usa, etc, as one of the many examples. why can’t we develop our knowledge of the english language, our second language, to the level many africans, europeans and others have achieved? even arab countries resort to english and french in their universities, having in mind international commerce, politics, deplomacy etc. finally, every ethiopian is free to learn arabic on a personal basis, because it is his/her right; but suggesting it to be adopted by Ethiopia is another thing. let us therefore leave it there; because as you yourself said, it is not the wish of the ethiopian people at least for the time being.

          • Abyssinia

            Hi Fanti,
            I am sorry, but I feel you are not engaging me on the core issues. In fact, you are patronizing me. I have to tell you that I do not like that you started to see me differently once I told you I am young. Why would that make such a difference? The best would have been that you see everyone the same way.

          • Fanti Ghana

            Hello Abyssinia,
            Sorry if you felt patronized. I don’t do that kind of stuff; at least not intentionally. The age reference was an attempt on humor, but with the rest I was merely trying to tell you that the ‘Arabic as regional language’ was a left over from some heavy discussion we were having a few weeks ago. Otherwise I honestly don’t remember what the core issue was except my mentioning Arabic triggering this conversation.
            Selam.

          • Abyssinia

            Hi Fanti,

            The core issue is the real reason why one should advocate a foreign language. That is really extremely absurd. I see a troubling and worrying underlying cause for it, and that is more or less what the following statements in the “extremely backward” post is trying to explain:
            “The real reason is the religious-emotional attachment that you have with Arabic that makes you advocate it. And that is exactly the hallmark of the conquered and enslaved mind. And that is why I feel a deep sorrow in my bones.” Colonization’s menace is not the physical presence of the colonizer, but the eternal enslavement of the mind, and the subsequent creation of a chaotic society whose members are discordant strings.

          • Fanti Ghana

            Hello Abyssinia,
            Now I see. A few weeks ago I was fighting tooth and nail about preserving and developing our own language instead of inheriting foreign languages. Now I am being perceived as advocating for a foreign language?
            That is just my luck!
            Anyway, I won’t ask you to backtrack and read all my posts to see how I got to that point, but briefly there were multi-branched discussions regarding languages. The relevant parts to our discussion here were 1) should our schools offer Arabic lessons: my position was/is “absolutely yes.” 2) Should English be our academic language instead of Amharic: my position was/is an emphatic “no.”
            When I suggested Arabic for regional commercial language, I was being realistic. All things considered Arabic has the best chance of bringing our region closer with one another. If we put emotions and false perceptions aside, it is the most logical course which could bring people of the horn closer. I am sad to say that almost every rejection of that suggestion was not based on its practicality.
            Abyssinia, notice how you advocated for the English language, and yet, the mention of Arabic had to be only from someone with enslaved mind and learning Arabic will result in our being colonized.
            Think about that.

          • saay7

            His Fantiness:

            Are you having that feeling? You know that feeling when you sense that you are in Planet Reversium? You know the one: where the reasonable are made to appear unreasonable and the hateful present themselves as caring? But the facts always surface, if you look for them:

            Step 1: The Real

            Cairo – Coptic Orthodox Patriarch Tawadros II left Cairo on Friday, September 25 for a five-day visit to Ethiopia. During his stay Pope Tawadros will participate in the solemn liturgical celebrations officiated by the Ethiopian Orthodox Church in honor of the Holy Cross, and will also visit the sanctuaries of Lalibela, the ancient site of Ethiopian Christianity.

            Step 2: The Surreal

            Translating the patriarchs address from Arabic to Amharic was…..a Muslim, Ethiopia’s ambassador to Egypt? Why? Because Ethiopians were too busy hating Arabs to learn their language. Does the Muslim ambassador know all the vocabulary, nuances of Biblical Amharic. Most likely not.

            Result: Another wasted opportunity.

            saay

            PS: I was not on mod-duty otherwise there is no way I would allow Abi and Abyssinia’s blanket condemnation of Arabs and, by extension, Ethiopian Muslims. It may be a good idea for us to make the posting guidelines a sticky in every thread. I love it when people get shocked and righteously indignant when you point out a specific language in the Awate posting guidelines that do not permit when they are doing and demand impunity.

          • Rahwa T

            Dear saay,
            selam

            1. Axum is the ancient site of Ethiopian Christianity, not Lalibela. Of course, you can present a reference if you have one. Please do not try to create confusion.

            2. The translator has given as the necessary message of the Egyptian Patriarch and that was enough for us.

          • saay7

            Selam Rahwa:

            1. The quoted piece is actually from Vatican News, here’s the link: feel free to correct them:

            http://www.news.va/en/news/africaegypt-patriarch-tawadros-visits-the-ethiopia

            2. Who is this “us” when u say that was “enough for us”? It was one of the “us” (doesn’t include you) who pointed out the absurdity of a Muslim presenting a Christian message because an entire country is allergic to a language.

            saay

          • Rahwa t

            Dear sal, i think the church has never said it is allergic to arab. donnot take our reflection here the official statement of the church. on your first comment, i am sure your anscesters can be the right witnesses than vaticans.

          • saay7

            Hey Rahwa:

            I don’t know what you are talking about anymore. Egypt’s Coptic Pope Tawadros II was on a 5-day visit to Ethiopia. In addition to the Damera at Addis, he visited Axum, Lalibella and Debre Libanos. Which place is more holy than the other is not an issue; this one is: his religious (Christian) speech was translated to Amharic by a Muslim diplomat.

            That is a direct outcome of a culture that considers Arabic (not just Arabs) as a language of the enemy. The most rational person about this, Fanti, is regularly presented here as an extremist because he is not a foaming-at-the-mouth Arab-hater which, judging by Ethiopian comments in this website, is the default position.

            saay

          • Amde

            Hello Saay,

            Wha…..????

            The “his religious (Christian) speech was translated to Amharic by a Muslim diplomat.” is a sign of the tolerance of Ethiopians and the Ethiopian Church. I don’t know how you can arrive at your second paragraph where you said “That is a direct outcome of a culture that considers Arabic (not just Arabs) as a language of the enemy.” How so? Are you saying in the whole Ethiopian Orthodox Church hierarchy there are no Arabic speakers, and we had to drag our one poor Muslim Arab speaking Ambassador from his important secular duties to lend a hand at a very important national religious event?

            Amde

          • አዲስ

            Hi Saay,

            Relax. Hating Arabic is not a default position in Ethiopia. There are a lot of people, mostly in the Muslim community, who loves and knows the language . There’s a clear reason for why the Muslim community learn that language more than their Christian brothers and sisters.

            You are trying to make a non-issue an issue here when you talk about a Muslim diplomat translating the pope’s speech. There’s no requirement that a translator must be of a same religion when translating religious speeches or writings for that matter. It’s advantageous but not a huge deal as long as he translated it properly. If I have to guess the reason the Ambassador did the job is most probably because of his involvement of almost anything to do with relation between the two countries. He’s right there welcoming the pope, right there in talks between the pope and Ethiopian delegates to improve the two countries relationship. So I would imagine they just asked him to do the translation. I doubt it’s because there’s no christian who can translate Arabic to Amharic.

            In my understanding there’s no hate for the Arabic language as also there’s no need to really focus on it as a policy matter. It should be left to the private sector if one sees economic or cultural benefit in developing the language in Ethiopia. If there’s any language issue in Ethiopia than need to be dealt with immediately from a policy point of view, it’s Oromiffa. Oromiffa needs to be a federal working language along side Amharic.

            Thanks,
            Addis

          • Dear Addis,
            it is said that when an arab leader complained to hsi that he does not allow a mosque to be built in axum, hsi responded by telling his guest that he would allow a mosque in axum only if they allow a christian church in mecca. it could be true or a fiction, i do not know. the christian religion is prohibit to be practised openly in saudi arabia. foreigners usually pray in secret in private homes. one can remember ethiopian christians who were put in jail some years ago, because they were caught praying in a privte home. nevertheless, saudi arabia is the main country that demands and builds mosques all over the world, exploiting the tolerance of christians, while herself is the most non-tolerant country.

            now, ethiopioans are labeled as haters of arabs and the arabic language, because they refuse to accept arabic to be taught to ethiopian children. arabic is the only language tied to a religion (the Quran), not even hebrew and not any other language where christianity is practiced; which means that the shipment contains many items. i would have liked to ask those who insist that arabic should be taught in ethiopia, if they would stand for an ethiopian language to be taught to arab children in this globilized world, or would they say the amharic language is less developed (if it really is) and less important, that ethiopians should know that usually it is the language of the master that one should learn and not that of the servant. if an arab businessman wants to do business in ethiopia, it is the obligation of ethiopians to learn arabic and not the other way round. you see, it is not as innocent as it seems. that is why i say the arabic language is a non-issue for ethiopians and let us continue as we are.

            this is an anti-ethiopian cartoon by a racist arab journalist.

            http://ecadforum.com/News/wp-content/uploads/2013/07/Sayel-cartoon-Ethiopian-maid.jpg?687ecd

          • አዲስ

            Hi Horizon,

            It’s a very strange thing. I don’t see anybody debating on giving Arabic some sort of status in Ethiopia except in this forum. If anybody try to gauge Ethiopians reaction from here, it’s mostly in-line of it being a non-issue, nothing to do with hate of Arabic or Arabs. It’s absurd that I see it brought up again and again only in this forum.

            There are people like Saay who present themselves as being offended by blanket statements, yet with the same breath give us blank statements like this one “That is a direct outcome of a culture that considers Arabic (not just Arabs) as a language of the enemy.” The irony.

            Thanks,
            Addis

          • Abi

            Hi Addis
            It can get worse. Saay thinks Arabs and Ethiopian Muslms are one and the same. Very sad when a seemingly smart person thinks all Muslims are arabs.
            He said Abi hates arabs , by extension Ethiopian Muslims..

          • አዲስ

            Abi,

            Well that’s another misguided understanding of Ethiopia coming from Saay.

            Thanks,
            Addis

          • abrham

            Dear Sal
            The Message of his hollyness was not translated by Mahmud Dirrir but by another translater. He himself(ambassador) addressed his message in arabic first. For your info at this time there is no such hatefull propoganda toward arabs in general and it is hard to observe arabs are our anemies type of attitude. Thats why there are many Arabic language schools in the country flourishing contrary to your blanket allegations. But ofcourse, there might be some extrimists in our country so are from your country.

          • saay7

            Hi Abraham:

            Thank you. Let me blunt with you: I honestly do not care if Ethiopians want to be extremist and crazy about this. I care only because (a) I am occasionally a moderator and the extremist “I hate Arabs; they are savages” message here violates our posting guidelines and (b) there are Eritreans here who identify themselves with extremist Ethiopia than moderate Eritrea (c) people who live in the U.S. who would never make blanket statements about Africans, Caucasians, Mexicans, women, lawyers, athletes, or any other social groups feel no hesitation about trashing one particular ethnic groups, Arabs.

            saay

          • Abyssinia

            Hi Fanti,

            Sorry for dragging you to this issue again. However, I do not want to pass without registering my sorrow and indignation about the causes that make us talk stuff such as making Arabic our language of commerce. We have become a humiliated people – people who do not see the structural problems that have trapped us for so long. The fact that you and I have to fight about making Arabic language -a foreign language – a language of our commerce sums up our sad state of affairs. Mind you, it is you and I – not an Arab and you, or an Arab and I. We have lost our compass to the extent of not knowing humiliation from dignity, disgrace from grace! We are hit hard where it matters most – the mind! Thank you for the courtesy you displayed in your posts.

          • V.F.

            Dear Fanti, forgive me for interjecting here but my personal experience is the Arabs look down on blacks like no one else. They couldn’t be more scornful and hateful of black people. Why don’t you try, say, to have the Arabs eat injera once a month to see if they are accepting of anything foreign before you prescribe Arabic on the whole region? You always sounded like a very reasonable person but you lost it on this one. No thank you but no. We all have our own languages where we are very proud of. I am a native Tigrinya speaker. I know much much more people who speak Amharic in the horn than Arabic. If you prescribed Amharic for the entire region, I would have considered it very seriously and very favorably but Arabic, with the exception of its ties with Muslims via their religion, it is as foreign a language as Armenian or Turkish or whatever.

          • Fanti Ghana

            Hello VF,

            Fair enough Vorte. The intent of my initial suggestion was to help us consider all possibilities which may help harmonize the region, and I would be content had the majority said ‘we don’t want it’ and give some reasonable explanation, but it dragged on and on because most of the reasons given were unreasonable. It quickly became a religion issue. The regional history of our Islam-Arabic association made it difficult to argue reasonably on the merits of the Arabic language. In short, the general tone was “since some Muslims speak Arabic, we must reject it.”

            “They couldn’t be more scornful and hateful…”

            That is simple VF. It simply means we are ‘both’ wrong. The trick is who should cast the first flower of peace? You suggested union the other day. So, I know how strong and daring you must be. This one is even much easier by comparison. You see, we have made it impossible for any innocent person to suggest “peaceful relationship with the any Arab country” mostly because WE are unable to separate it from Islam. Who is suspecting who of what maybe trivial, but who should make the next effort to dismantle it is not. Let’s start with an honest discussion and I guarantee it we will all see that we don’t really have enemies.
            Selam.

          • Kokhob Selam

            Dear Fanti Ghana,

            Thank you very much. “The trick is who should cast the first flower of peace?” the one who starts to use the word hate when he says only -I hate to hate – and what else, when some one starts to use the word love to say – I love to love and use it always in every equation even in sad moments. Keep it up Fanti , but remember those old patterns of venom installed in the mind of those who were programmed to hate will not be convinced easily. more psychologists are needed here to work.

          • Rahwa T

            Dear Fanti,

            I know you are so humble and never loss your patient. So this is a reply I expected from you, Fanti nebsi. I didn’t mean to discourage you but that was how I would summarize it if I were asked to read all your comments and present it in two lines. I share your view that it is wrong to generalize and hate people as a whole. To be honest, I don’t feel happy when I read strongly worded comments from any corner. I literally feel ashamed, especially when the writers are Ethiopians, and loss the brotherly /sisterly love that I have in my heart and angered when it is coming from Eritreans, especially from those who pretend to be peace-lovers but saw few grains of hatred in every line of their posts. But yours is just too much. You do not seem to live in the real world. Look how our Eritrean brothers and sisters at awate cautiously handle their message when they deal on their recent and past history. Whenever you write, you should remember that there are hundreds of thousands of Ethiopian mothers and fathers, brothers and sisters… who lost their dears. I don’t want push it further. On the Arabic and the Arabs, I think for them I am just a “khafir, ebeed Habesh” like any black women and men from Ethiopia. And you are no different, Fanti. May be you are waiting to prove it one day. But, V.F. has said it above better. I think we should not go another round on the language issue. But personally, I am surprised and impressed by your daughter’s proficiency of Arabic language (which is much better than you, if I correctly understood from your earlier comment on another thread (and yet she is living and probably born in the US)).

            I wish I were in a relaxed mood and said more freely. I am not in that mood.

            RT

          • Kokhob Selam

            Dear Abyssinia,
            do you really know Ge’ez? and do you know Arabic. here I am challenging you, you don’t know both. why? if you know both you could have know how those two languages are connected. not only that, do you know how wide and fine, abstract are those 2 languages to explain what God is,
            as far as I know, I don’t think other languages can do. read Islam in Arabic and try to translate it, you may put the main principles to some level but you can’t put it correctly as it is written in Arabic. it is the same as far as I know with Ge’ez. in fact we should bring back the lost Ge’ez and let it be known by the world. Bible in Ge’ez is the best I have seen as Islam in Arabic is.

          • haileTG

            Heyyy Fanti, you make us jealous! A comparable Eritrean Fanti Ghana from our side would have been harangued as weyanay, anti-Eritrea, sellout… i.e. only for our lack of a peace constituency 🙂 Does this mean Ethiopia has a peace constituency??

            Bless you

          • Fanti Ghana

            Hello Haile TG,

            Peace constituency? Heck yes. And we are growing very fast.

            It is the nature of the beast my friend. We have the luxury of becoming a ‘misfit’ and get away with it. I hope it won’t be too long before you can afford to be as misfit as you like without jeopardizing your citizenship.

            Please accept my sincere sympathy!

          • Abyssinia

            Hi Fanti Ghana,

            I understand where you are coming from. At the center of my thesis is that if hostility is to continue, it is Eritrea that will die. For Ethiopia, it is at most a scratch in the arm. I am alerting Eritreans to be aware of the lopsided power configuration between Ethiopia and Eritrea, and to come to terms with it. I hope that this is not understood as coercion for unity.

            You stated that Eritrea’s problems are compounded by our attachment to it, and you mentioned that some countries can have “Neutron Star prosperity”. You are right in both cases. My view is that Eritrea is a comet that has fallen, and is still falling. It has not yet found a balance in the gravitation forces of the planets around it, so to speak. Taking the bond (historical, social, cultural, social and economic forces) as gravitational force, Eritrea’s natural place is to orbit Ethiopia. However, Eritrea refuses to do so. Instead, it does either of these: 1) tries to force Ethiopia to orbit Eritrea, 2) asks for equal alternative orbiting (competition), 3) fall out of orbit and run. Eritrea’s refusal to fall into its natural orbit is the problem. And you know a falling comet could hit you, and that is why Ethiopians can not ignore it (can not detach themselves). Djibouti is a comet that has found a stable orbit, around Ethiopia. Note that the gravitational force between Ethiopia and Djibouti is less than than the the gravitational force between Ethiopia and Eritrea, when we consider bond as a gravitational force.

          • Fanti Ghana

            Hello Abyssinia,

            My earlier post was “cumulative response” which I started out as an addition to or to show a different angle to something Amde and somebody else said much earlier, but that conversation morphed into something else while I was contemplating, and I found your post more fitting to what I wanted to say. So, as weird as it may sound, I wrote my response before you posted your comment. That is probably why the “coercion” sounded misplaced. So, thanks for understanding and for not asking “are you talking to me?”

            Mathematically speaking, your points are valid. My only concern is whether we have self examined enough to ensure that we are not directly responsible for the free falling comet’s free falling in the first place. The initial cause of its detour from its natural orbit is naturally linked to our expansion and shrinkage. It is tempting to want to agree with “Eritrea’s refusal to fall into its natural orbit is the problem,” but it is a little too early and maybe even unfair to conclude that, because the collision or splinter took place moments ago. Who knows, eventually, either Eritrea will find its natural and stable orbit and become a planet or succumb to the stronger gravity and avoid free falling indefinitely. Time is the culprit!

          • Music Novice

            Greetings Abyssinia,

            You said: “Taking the bond (historical, social, cultural, social and economic forces) as gravitational force, Eritrea’s natural place is to orbit Ethiopia”.

            Is it possible that Eritrea has an alternative place, or at least a perception, to orbit other than Ethiopia?

            Can you explain the Eritrea-Ethiopia saga only by referring to what you call “Eritrea’s refusal to fall into its natural orbit is the problem”?

          • Abyssinia

            Hi MN,
            In theory, yes Eritrea can have an alternative place, orbit. It can create it even from scratch. In practice, I do not believe it is possible for Eritrea to do so without risking the danger of collapse. My view is that Eritrea is trying to create that space. All the wars with its neighbors, the oppression at home, the isolation, endless propaganda, the revision of history, and the hostility with Ethiopia are meant to help the creation of this space.

          • Music Novice

            Greetings Abyssinia,

            You said: “I do not believe it is possible for Eritrea to do so without risking the danger of collapse.”

            Why is it not possible? Any reasoning or facts to back your claim?

          • Abyssinia

            Hi MN,
            I think you can find the reasons in my posts (that happened within two days). it is not good to repeat them here, nor will it do justice to state it here in few words.

    • Mahmud Saleh

      Salam Abyssinia
      I may have missed some of the discussions, but here is my 2 cents take on this.
      General truth
      * Once the temporary setbacks in resuming normal people to people contacts…market forces…and general peace time bilateral and multilateral pacts that will inevitably be hammered out between the countries of the region will determine how fast those countries move to a more sustainable path of development. They don’t necessarily need to be one in order for both countries to have strong ties. Always economic ties and market forces lead the path of political groupings on sub-regional…regional…continent…etc.
      * You are wrong in your analogy of the “planet/comet/sun”. This analogy represents hegemonic ambitions. Why should Eritrea be dictated to assume its right place in the region? Why should not you see it just like any other nations relationship? Look, if it takes Eritrea to be a satellite of Ethiopia in order to survive, all it needs to do is speeding up is internal energy, speed up and break away from that orbit by enough margin (by broadening its relations with other neighbors and global trade regions) to ensure its survivability. That’s the worst case scenario, otherwise, both countries economies could complement each other. True, Ethiopia by its sheer size will remain to be important for the region. That takes me to my reply to Anmnde’. If Ethiopia advantage is its size (which could also pose as a disadvantage, depending how the rate of its economic growth moves and its distribution…), Eritrea’s advantages are numerous too. Eritrea’s problems are internal. Once it solves its internal problems, there are multiple roads to development. I see folks reduce Eritrea/Ethiopia ties to ports, which is wrong. Ethiopia has shown us it could absorb the cost of doing business with Eritrea, Eritrea also could absorb it by widening possibilities, among which lies leasing its ports to International transit authorities, developing its shorelines, fisheries, leasing of Dahalik Islands…leasing of ports…targeting the middle east and far east/Africa for trading partners…investing in high-tech sectors…etc. I’m not ignoring Ethiopia will also do similar things….just to mention that it is possible to break away from that orbit of your impression.
      The best way is to come to terms that these are two separate countries, and the discussion should be done with that in mind.
      Regards.

      • Abyssinia

        Hi Mahmud,
        The core point I take from your post is this: Eritrea would rather die than being a moon that orbits Ethiopia. While this is the extreme position, the middle ground position is that Eritrea can break away from the orbit by enough margin, to ensure its survival outside the Ethiopian orbit. I say Eritrea has been trying the middle ground position, and it is still doing it. It has not yet shown us if that is possible. So what makes you believe it can do it in the future?

        • Mahmud Saleh

          Abyssinia
          For starter: In international relations, center mass/satellite…configuration is not something you design and launch. That relationship is created peacefully and gradually through market forces. Eritrea and Ethiopia have a lot of issues to overcome before even contemplating that intimate relation. I have no idea why you think interms of moon and planet anyway. Look, I know Ethiopia. It has long way to go before projecting itself as the center of the universe. Eritrea’s bussiness transaction with other spheres of influence could become greater than its economic transactions with Ethiopia; and that’s something that we are painfully aware of. So, feel good about your perceived gravitational force, but
          There are sound indications that Eritrea could become the center of the region.

          • Abyssinia

            Hi Mahmud,
            What is the need to be so defensive where there is no offense? I fail to see the point of pronouncements in discussing issues.

          • Kokhob Selam

            Dear Abyssinia,
            watch the debate Mahmuday just put it clearly in the way you understand. you can close now confronting him and others.

            Ethiopia can survive without Ethiopia and Eritrea can survive without Ethiopia but they can do better by cooperating against poverty and this can be done without applying force. agree on that and take peace of mind.

          • Abyssinia

            Dear Kokhob,
            To be honest with you, I have no appetite nor am I impressed by pronouncements, declarations, slogans, and claims of Eritrean resolve, wisdom, and resilience. Eritreans are just like any other people, so please spare us from these militant pronouncements. Come up with a substance, and I will be glad to engage you, any body for that matter.

          • Kokhob Selam

            Dear Abyssinia,

            you are having difficult time with my view. easy my view is not disturbing you only. it is also disturbing some Eritreans when I write about Ethiopia. both of you who are living in dream to own the other. But what you do, I am your brother and you need to listen my voice as I do yours. I am for love. I love you.

          • Gud

            Kokeb,
            Now you are talking.

          • Kokhob Selam

            Dear Gud,
            what do you mean? do you mean I was not talking with you?

          • Gud

            No, kokeb. That is not what I meant.

            I am just giving my support to your “Ethiopia can survive without Eritrea and Eritrea can survive without Ethiopia but they can do better by cooperating against poverty and this can be done without applying force…..” kind of thumbs up, you know?
            Previously your personal L.O.V.E and affection for Ethiopia (Which is good) was clouding your judgment, or may be it just got lost in translation 🙂

  • Semere Andom

    Dear Papi:
    The Eritrean opposition cannot have easier enemy than PFDJ.
    PFDJ provides dazzling opportunities to defeat it and their power of guns can actually be a weakness as Canadian thinker Malcom Gladwell says in his book David and Galliah. PFDJ is vulnerable and increasingly sow it every crime they commit.
    The opposition is right to be in Ethiopia no apology, the opposition is right to receive help from Ethiopia, no apology. But the Eritrean opposition are impotent, its military power pales in comparison to the 20K strong TPDM forces. Although the 800 soldiers who fled do not make a dent in the man power of TPDM in terms of pure arithmetic, the head had defected and the it houses the most vital asset of the organization: information. Ethiopia has better intelligence on Eritrean than vice-versa, maybe Ethiopia should help us raid Ela-Erro and all prisons to free our prisoners in exchange of Assab and I will vote for it. It is the best investment. Abi second me on this please, if you have no use for the port, it can be used as a drinking center for your large number of camels (source Sal)
    Talking about reunification now is futile, it has to be done with the free will of the people in an environment of freedom of speech and choice. I will never say never but not now, as our problems are not related to whether the border is demarcated or not and equally they have nothing to do whether we are independent or unified.
    I see the TPDM incident in the following light:
    TPDM abused our country by becoming the confidant of DIA and PFDJ. It is good that they left Eritrea.
    TPDM has been compromised when its founder defected no matter why he fled. PFDJ will likely not see the disintegration of Ethiopia and if Ethiopia does disintegrate it will be because of the insidious strife that goes on in highly diversified African country and not because the TPDM/G7 augmented PFDJ might
    TPDM was used to enslave Eritreans ad not to remove Ethiopia from our land or defeat it. The defection is a loss for PFDJ and a victory for Ethiopia and the enslaved Eritrean people.

  • Semere Andom

    Hi All:

    Please get your pop corn, your drinks for the debate between Mahmud and Hayat.

    ጓልያቲ ሓያት ቀሙሸይ ንቁልቁል

    ብጠቀነ ክተብልኒ ዕንክሊል

    ሓሸውየ ሙሽ አይፍቅደን እሊካ እቲ ጎብለል?

    ጓል አደመ ጠቀነ አይኮነን እነሆኒ ጭብጢ

    እደ ፈንጂ ክረኽበኪ ንወያነ ከተዳኽሪ

    ቃላትኪ ኮሓሒልኪ፡ ዘማኺ አጠዓዒምኪ

    ዝኣኽለኪጥሒንኪ በዓል ማርያም ትብሊ

    ጓል አቦይ አደም እሞ በል

    ክልተ ጾግሪ ዞብቆለ አይትዘንጥል

    ክንደይ ዓቅብ ዝይወጻና በለት አድጊ

    እም ንስኻ ዝናርካን ከላሽንካን ውደ

    ጓልያት ድማ ድግዲጊት ተዓጢቀ

    እታ መልሓሰይ ምስ ዕጽማ

    እታ ምዓንጣይ ብሕጽብታ

    እብለካ ብዓውታ

    ምህሮ ሻኦብያ እንተ አዋጺካ

    አብኣ ትደኻ

    እላቱ ወለት አቡየ አደም

    ሃያ አና ወድ ሳልሕ ፡ ወድ ክራር፡ ወድ ጄሚዕ ፡ ወድ ሕዱግ

  • V.F.

    Dear Papi, I understand. It is too soon to bring this up and that is why I rarely talk about it. Most Eritreans are in that ‘tunnel vision’ and still blinded by just having their own country and president.

    The only way to preserve our people from extinction is to find a cooperative way to live with Ethiopia and the only way for that is to be a part of it.

    I am surprised that you were surprised. There is a whole movement of young Eritreans about reuniting. You can check on FB, maybe not in your circles. It is not as unpopular as you might think.

    Just imagine the opportunities for Eritreans in Trade, education, leadership, you name it. And best of all, there would be minimal opportunities for wars. The way things are setup right now, we will always be in war or no war no peace situations. Every Eritrean leader will be insecure of Ethiopian invasion and every Ethiopian leader will feel like we are its lost brothers and sisters and the urge to take us back. I don’t see how Eritreans survive without reuniting with their brothers and sisters south of Mereb. It doesn’t have to be overnight. People of your caliber should be much focused on the long term guarantee for peace than just find ways to dismantle PFDJ ASAP. Then what? Democracy in Eritrea? We already have dozens of political parties and this people have nothing to show for anything. Can you imagine if they were fighting for real power?

  • Mahmud Saleh

    Dear Pappi
    Not at all, I would not place you as a pamphleteering an Ethiopian agenda, no. Pappi I have not read you manipulating Eritrean internal problems in order to use it for a dubious agenda. I have read repeatedly and consistently, though, from Hayat and few others who keep becoming the extension of Ethiopian propaganda machine. My point is simple. There are persons in this forum and in the camp we call opposition whose positions consistently match those of the government of Ethiopia, in some cases even worse. Let them be recognized for that. We have proud Ethiopians who keep their boundary and help us out. I respect them, and they are the basis of future good neighborliness.

  • Mahmud Saleh

    Dear pappi (the graceful)
    Mola is insignificant. I said, “good riddance.” I also added to day, “I wish he took all of his organization with him.” As far as the struggle for change, he is a no-man. Of course, he is a traitor in the eyes of those young Ethiopians who thought he was leading them in their cause. Do they have a cause, I care less. All I care about is they have to leave my country.
    Therefore, I am unhappy when persons who stood up in this forum and tarnished what it meant to be Eritrea come back and pontificate as if they care for Eritreans while everything they say is pamphleteering Ethiopian propaganda. There should be distinction somewhere. People whose priority is the blurring of boundaries of Eritrean identity could not come with lasting solutions to our problems. They have their agenda and they should be recognized for that.

    • Ted

      Hi The Greatest MS. “Wedi kassa” we are looking for is taking shape. You have a work cut out for you with those jugglers in your constituents. And those Molla need to go if you haven’t already sent the ejection letters.

      • Mahmud Saleh

        ኣህለን Ted
        Wedi Kassa? እንታይ ገይረካ ወደይ። ወዲ ካሳ ሎሚ መዓልቲ በቲ ዘይምሕር ቀለም ሳልሕ ዩኑስ ናብ ፍርዲ ቀሪቡ ኣሎ።

        • Ted

          ስላማት
          ከብኩሉ ነገር ከትአምኖ ዝግባእ you have peace and change loving people behind you. Wedi kass won’t be by himself unlike IA. Saay himself said wedi kass need to break a few eggs to make an omelet.

    • karim

      You people are haters Nd racists beyond repair . Whether you are a friend or a foe of IA, you still harbor I’ll will towards Ethiopia and specially Tigray. Haf haf kitiblu weyane gidefu gidefu Ella abikhinaA ken goma atenfisatikum

    • karim

      You should be happy he left your country 🙂

    • Danny Tesema

      Can you also repatriate Dr. Berhanu back to Ethiopia. We have argent issues to discuss with him

  • Ted

    Hi AMAN, Amen brotha.”You have all the ignorant,coward and opportunist plansand you still want someone to die for you for this.” Those people you are talking about have left no stone unturned, no links unearthed to make people feel heartless, unpatriotic and morally corrupt. What they don’t have is the will and sincere love for their people to come up with conciliatory plan all can come together for the poor people of Eritrea who rather became the target of their drama, the arrogants and opportunists on their high horse blaming and accusing the very people that they want them to take them to the helm as cowardice.

  • AMAN

    Awates
    Did you call me Skinny ? Why ?
    And I say to you this….
    ****
    ” Wala Te Qetenku eko MES eye ” !
    means
    ****
    ” Qetin Elka Temen Aytirgets” !

  • Nitricc

    Hi all, let’s assume that Molla was kidnapped and the reason TPLF want play the game is to send a message to other Ethiopians that they have the capability to infiltrate any where, even in Eritrea. In a way, to play the dram the weyane have played makes sense. So, if Molla was kidnapped, what would you do if you are the Government of Eritrea? Would you come out and tell the truth to the world that Molla was kidnapped or just be silent even knowing he was kidnapped.
    what would you do?

    • Mahmud Saleh

      Hello Gen.Nit
      To answer your question: you keep quiet; you just zip it up. Because he is not a political figure the world knows; he is a military commander who wanted to topple a government through the use of violence….talking about him actually makes you liable.
      I know you are mad because some wanted to draw attention to the greatness of Ethiopian intelligence rather than focusing the damage people like Mola and others cause our people. That’s the unfortunate thing. Here you have a traitor who wronged thousands of young people by misleading them to believe there was a cause, and then in the darkness of the night, he abandons them. A typical mercenary who changes sides to the higher bidder.
      On the intelligence side: Nitrickay, even if they want us to believe that their arm is long, that does not discard that there could be a longer hand. This is not a proof of Ethiopian prowess. In the sixties, Hafez Alassad saw his plans go into thin air. Deliberations that were done in the war room were reaching Israel in real time. He got frustrated. He knew one of his cabinet members was responsible. After setting up a smart sting, he found out that the man who was second to the Defense Minister, an Arab Jew who had entered Syria years earlier through a fake identity and made his way up, was responsible of the disasters.
      The point is: Even if Mola was Ethiopia’s mole, that does not negate that Eritrea could also have an Ethiopian General…Minister…or similar to that (or equivalent to Mola, a senior opposition leader(s) could not be in its pay.

      • Asmerom

        Dear Mahmud
        In your book it’s damn if you do it and damn if you don’t
        Meheret Ye weredelka
        Cheers

      • Semere Andom

        Hi Mahmuday:

        “The point is: Even if Mola was Ethiopia’s mole, that does not negate that Eritrea could also have an Ethiopian General…Minister…or similar to that (or equivalent to Mola, a senior opposition leader(s) could not be in its pay.”
        This valid assumption, but the point is we do not hear Ethiopian opposition or critics reporting that some Eritrean mercenaries are rounding up their young in the Ethiopian cities, we do not hear about the people of Ethiopia complaining about certain Tesfay or Indrissai from the north living the lavish life, we do not hear stories of rape by Eritrean mercenaries. But we heard all that from the Ethiopian mercenaries in Eritrea and that is the difference. Oh, also we do not also hear the Eritrean mercenaries implicated in the security of Ethiopia or in guarding their G-15 group as TPDM was in Eritrea.
        What would a leading opposition member in PFDJ’s pay accomplish for Eritrea. NOTHING. He has not access to security briefing as TPDM has if they were acting as trusted army by passing the EDF.
        The espionage that government undertake on each other is different than this

        • Mahmud Saleh

          Ahlan Tegadala Semere
          You are missing everything I have been saying in relation to this news item. OK, Ya Hfoonay.
          I said good riddance, I wish he took all of his organization and fought his way out. In that case I would call him a hero. I don’t support giving armed organizations refuge in any country, including Ethiopia. If organization could not create a base in their respective countries then they remain to be tools of the hosting country. Therefore, your reply does not reflect my view. I was replying to Nitrickay on the general assumption that you agree with. Case closed. I would not want to see any of these organizations roaming my country and abusing my people and their resources. If they want to fight, have them do it in their soil. Political recognition and hosting armed groups are two different matters. I don’t object hosting purely political oppositions and activities.

      • Nitricc

        The Greatness! you are right sir! you know what though. Molla reviled that TPDM received a training of special force level by the Eritrean army and they were highly trusted. this tells me, that PIA might believed this TPDM army as his protecter . now that sense of protection gone, PIA has no choice but get to the business of the nation. it is all good, Mahmuday the great!

    • Tedi

      Hi Nitricc,

      I can’t understand what is your topic and I got it absolutely wrong because it was constructed on the ” If clause only” therefore, It doesn’t give any seance. just try to speak or to say a logical words in order to get a reasonable answer and try to present your idea in a constructive way.

    • betri_weyn

      Dear nitric
      Since 1992(Ethiopian Calender)
      the world witnessed
      1-operation-sunset
      2-operation-barentu
      3-operation-March(2012)
      4-operation-Mi-15
      5-operation-asgedom…
      The camel slap and operation-appropriate going on…the dogs are crying like a old wolf What a shame!!!! Where is your sovereignty?

      • Nitricc

        Hey Betri weyn; i let you have fun the list from 1 to 4 but the 5th? i hate to break to you. Operation Molla sealed it for you. from the point of Eritreans; you are done! no Eritrean will trust you ever again. we paid 25K for his house rent, we gave him 4 cars and he betrayed the hand that fed him. on the same token, the other Ethnic Ethiopians are paying attention and your stack is plummeting. i don’t want give Molla the literate Tigryan did you the greatest damage in your history. i am just telling you straight up. what is even disturbing is your stupidity to hold a press conference.

        • karim

          You know that song that goes like, don’t get mad … Don’t get mean …. Not get mad don’t get mean 🙂 kikikikikikiki

          Woyin always make
          Me proud. Never disappoint. That’s why I love TPLF.

        • betri_weyn

          Dear nitric
          to be honest wedi-afom he don’t know the word “Trust”
          We have trusted you more than any country in our neighbourhood. But you(not-nitric)
          1-betrayed
          2-chopped
          3-slap
          4-stabbed and finally
          5th invade us… The consequences of your/our ex good-to-be neighbour leader action is still bleeding the your/my country…. Have you watched Mr Asgedom press conference? Please go to the ebc.gov.et. how he was generous towards the border warsay gurds… But don’t forget the Eritrean youth they trust us , for evidence please again watch Ethiopiafirst.com

  • haileTG

    Selamat Awatista,

    14 years to the day since Eritrea was officially taken over by a criminal clique and 14 years to the day since Eritreans were shown to be incapable for standing up for themselves. Even supporting (that many did) is being incapable of standing up for one’s self. Although many things and betreyals happend before Sept 18, 2001, on that fateful day, it was the first time in history that the entire people of Eritrea were assaulted. It was then that Eritreans were told to shut up and accept slavery for themselves and their children. At that point and there after, Eritreans reacted cowardly to towards their attacker and turned against each other in a manner that would be unthinkable they would stoop to, if you go by the country’s litrature of political rhetoric. Today, having sustained incredible injuries for their folly, Eritreans are at the cross roads, the very survival of their generation’s long work at stake, to the whims of few individuals.

    May September 18 be no more!

    • karim

      in a way Higdef made it easy for you all to acquire asylum in Europe. Democracy or not Eritreans love Sidet. 90% of your diaspora will never return and the future intelegentia of Eritrea will be the lowlander nation!

      • haileTG

        The lowlander of what? Isn’t that meant to be geographically relative to something else?? Your position precludes the conjecture’s own possibility.

        • T..T.

          Hi haile TG,

          Karim must be one of those Massawis, who are the blindest diehards of Isayas. BTW, haile don’t you know that Massawis of Karim type are the worst enemies of the Eritrean people. Yes, don’t you remember that it was Alamin Mohamed Said and his Massawa group’s insistence that forced Isayas to condemn the G-15 to dungeons of the regime. Always remember, that is why the opposition call this Massawis group the “craftmen of destruction.” I must also point out that the Massawis are not considered part of the lowlanders because the Massawis are historically the worst enemies of the lowlanders – i.e. since 1940s.

          • T..T.

            Dear moderator,

            A post of clarification:
            I never blamed “the entire region of Massawa or the whole Massawis.” What I stated was that karim might be one of those Massawis’ Shabia, who are considered “craftmen of destruction” by the opposition. I also stated that it was Alamin Mohamed Said and his Massawis group’s insistence that forced Isayas to throw the G-15 into the regime’s dungeons. Many evidences are out there about the enmity of those pro-Isayas Massawis against the lowlanders. Prove me wrong

          • T..T.

            Please moderator delete the above accusation.

    • V.F.

      HTG, I always wonder if it is cowardice that is allowing our conscience to let others suffer and rot in containers, Ela-Ero or the other hundreds of prisons in Eritrea. Not to mention the smuggling and organ trade at the spearhead of which are PFDJ leaders. To me it is deeper than cowardice. What does PFDJ has to be feared of that the Eritrean populace doesn’t have? Fear is a part of the equation, a small part in my opinion. Why would anyone fear PFDJ and not the Mediterranean Sea and the gallows of the Sahara desert, the Bedouins, the cruel streets of Italy and Europe, the persecution, the deportations, you name it. Why are we not afraid of these extraordinarily uncommon phenomena?

      Yet, HTG, you think Eritreans are acting in a cowardly manner to PFDJ? No I don’t think that is it Hailat. Globalization and the extremely fast flow of information has much much more to do with this than anything else. Nitricc, don’t quote me wrong. It is not economic exodus. The exodus is primarily political. The economic part is a result of very bad political leadership. Most Eritreans see that being confined in Eritrea is the worst case scenario for them whether we have good leadership or not. They believe opportunities for freedom and prosperity are abound elsewhere and so they ask themselves why should I stay and die here? It is selfishness than cowardice, to a much larger extent. Selfishly to be free politically and economically without thinking the fate of others.

      • haileTG

        VF I get your point. I don’t think as in cowardice in fear of harm but not having a cuarage to believe that you can have what you have and still stand for thruth, you can have your land tiesa or home bond and still speak for truth, you can have lucrative business and still speak the truth. Eritreans were scared that they would lose what little they had and decided to betray each other on that account. Now the problem is out of hand.

        • V.F.

          I got your point Hailat. Moral cowardice, I guess, would be a befitting description.

          • Amde

            V.F.

            There is this concept called “Loss aversion”. I think Eritreans think fighting against PFDj system will inevitably lead to a number of possible losses. Primary is loss of independence and falling into Ethiopia’s orbit. Secondary (in particular Christian/Highlanders/Tigrinya) people, the loss of (perceived or real) hegemonic position within the Eritrean political system.

            Personally, I think HaileTG struck a gold mine with his diaspora belligerence thesis. Solve that problem, and the Primary loss aversion cause gets resolved pretty quickly.

            Amde

          • saay7

            Selamat Amde:

            I was going to ask Haile TG but he was in “rapid-fire-machine-gun-empty-the-whole-nine yards” mood but figured my involvement would result in too much collateral damage from the friendly fire. So I am asking you: what is “diaspora belligerence” and how is it contributing to our political morass?

            saay

          • haileTG

            hey saay,

            I’ll have to comeback to expand on this later today (I have misplaced my machine-gun and the rounds to go in it:)

            But here is “diaspora belligerence in its simplest form: The PFDJ has no any viable politics to sell in the diaspora other than to claim it has successfuly checked Ethiopia. Any product becomes “viable” when it is sought after. The only reason PFDJ stuck to such an argument is because is made viable by the diasporas belligernce towards Ethiopia that drives from many reasons, including to our national sectarian divisions.

            Cheers

          • V.F.

            Saay, until Amde gets back to you, here is a diaspora belligerence:

            “On the intelligence side: Nitrickay, even if they want us to believe that their arm is long, that does not discard that there could be a longer hand.”
            – Mahmoud Saleh

            “MN, considering the size and influence of both nations, and factoring the military equation of both sides, it would be suicidal to slug-it-out alone to the grave. And we’re not suicidal. We never fought them alone, and when push comes to shove, we never will. In fact, that’s one of our best tools in our toolbox. So why not polish it, sharpen it, and clean it.” – Semere Tesfai

            Please stay tuned for Amde and hopefully HTG as well for a discussion on how it is “contributing to our political morass.”

          • Kim Hanna

            Selam V.F,
            .
            This is the main reason I attend the Awate University. When you prominent Awatistas get together and shine the flood light on the dark corners of issues, I can’t wait to read the next post. Other pressing business has to wait.
            .
            Your V.F participation, at times as a catalyst and at other times as the main idea man, is greatly appreciated. I hope you never tire.
            .
            K.H

          • Amde

            Hello Saay

            I would like to respond by asking you this.

            HaileTG stated initially that “Isayyas has no constituency for peace” He further detailed that to mean that there is no Eritrean diaspora whose support Isayyas can get if he were to embark in a peace policy vis-a-vis Ethiopia/Weyane.

            So let me ask you this:
            1) Do YOU think Isayyas has a peace constituency domestically within Eritrea?
            2) Do YOU think Isayyas has a peace constituency within the Eritrean diaspora?

            Personally, I have always thought Eritrea’s current problems were straightforward. PFDJ engaged in hegemonic competition with Ethiopia. Since it is the smaller party, it predictably lost. The solution to this particular issue is then just as straightforward – stop the competition and come up with an acceptable modus vivendi. Problem solved.

            For years I expected to hear an announcement from Asmara saying to the effect, ” We did not get every inch of territory awarded to us but we have made a comprehensive deal with Addis Ababa to close this ugly chapter behind us” Understandably there would be angry people, but in six months and a year as National Service people start getting demobilized, most will get over it and life goes on.

            What is amazing is that PFDJ has continued with the hegemonic competition to this day. I could never understand why, and thus essentially blamed it on Isayyas’ megalomania. But I never questioned that he himself might not have a lot of political space to make the (what to me looks like) rational decision. To me, HaileTG’s brilliant comment is a very important question to ask and get answers for. If Isayyas feels trapped and doomed if he does and doomed if he doesn’t, then he will continue along this path.

            Amde

          • V.F.

            Dear Amde, given what we know now – that IA and PFDJ do not represent the best interests of the Eritrean people, I really hope they turn to ash first before they do the right thing, which you correctly state is to stop the competition. That would be a new lease in life for them. And they will do the same thing again. They need to go once and for all.

            Is the competition leading to belligerence or is it the other way around?

          • Amde

            Selam V.F.

            What you just said is so saddening and frightening at the same time.

            You just opened another angle, namely.. there IS an Eritrean constituency for peace , but NO Isayyas constituency for peace.

            Am I wrong?

            Amde

          • V.F.

            Selam Amde, see SGJ’s number 2 above. IA and peace don’t mix whatever you do. You can mix water and oil using emulsifiers but there is nothing you could do to mix IA and peace.

            I don’t know why there wouldn’t be an Eritrean constituency for peace, with total exclusion of IA and PFDJ. I don’t know all that much about the opposition parties but there are so many who can achieve a peaceful settlement with Ethiopia.

            Please note that, I am not shy to tell you the ultimate solution is complete unification, no question in my mind. Eritreans will have a much better chance of acquiring lots of power, prosperity, and peace within the federal Ethiopian system than being a neighboring country. People who believe like me would be perfect candidates for peace constituency.

          • Abi

            Mizan
            Ene yelehubetim.
            Put your helmet ASAP . I see things flying at you. Unification?
            BesmeAb! YeseyTan joro ayisma.

            Did you watch the Chelsea game?

          • Nitricc

            Hey Abi, Mizan is one of YG foot soldiers and a religious person. If you can put the 2+2 together; then you will have the idea what Mizan stands. He is a follower I.e. He is free to fantasize.

          • Ted

            Hi Nitricc, Mizan changes his view faster than he can to his name.

          • Nitricc

            Hey Ted, you have to forgive Mizan, he can’t even hold on, on a toothless nick name let alone he can solve and propose a society issue. Mizan gets depressed when ever he thinks the challenges of our country and then he proposes easy way out, like unification with Ethiopia. the worst is that that is not even his idea, that is depressing!!! Mizan stick to your church and pray.

          • V.F.

            Ted, Nitricc, you guys are belligerent. Fight the idea not the person? Why is unification bad? Tell me.

          • Nitricc

            Mizan Mr sunshine; what was the reason we want 30 years bloody war? are you that dumb?

          • V.F.

            We were fooled. We know better now. No Eritrean would go to ghedli now if you rewind the clock.

          • Ted

            Hi Abi be fair. How would we know your people take us back if you don’t endorse his opinion at least in a few words that time and time again you confused us ; i love/hate you.

          • Abi

            Ted , Nitricc
            What’s up
            I purposely said ” yeseyTan joro ayisma “.
            Guess what? Not one but two seyTanoch semut.

          • Nitricc

            Hi Abi, did you know that you, Amde, Hayat and most Ethiopians don’t follow the forum rules. how come you don’t use salutation and AT never reminded you? did you see who the SayTan is?

          • V.F.

            Are geday ale amaraw..,I need your help Abi. You know the belligerence around here. Seriously though, I do not believe Eritrea and Ethiopia are capable of living as neighbors. Time will tell. At the very best a total puppet regime in Eritrea. But much better to be together and eradicate poverty and hunger.

          • V.F.

            Dear Moderator, may I use my real name (of course first name) and call it good and never change again?

          • Amde

            Selam V.F., Saleh GJ

            Thank you for your feedbacks. I understand you are both loathe to trust Isayyas for anything.

            In your opinions, will Issayas lose diaspora support from his current supporters if he were to make peace with Ethiopia now?

            Is this something that Awate.com can run an admittedly unscientific poll on? Ask the question on the worst case scenario, i.e. Normalization/Non-belligerence at borders Ethiopia has currently placed its army. Say Ethiopia promises to to review the border, but assume that it is a lost cause.

            At the very least, I feel it is important to gauge Eritrean public’s support for what I would call “Normalization at cost”, vs the continuation of the status quo, i.e. “Hegemonic competition”.

            Amde

          • Fnote Selam

            Amde,

            Hold that thought, I will get back to you later….

            FS.

          • Mahmud Saleh

            salam Aumde

            (your nick spelt incorrectly in order to evade disqus spell checks)
            Let me quote you and here is where things are falling apart.
            You said, “Say Ethiopia promises to to review the border, but assume that it is a lost cause.”
            What else could we then have to assume as lost cause? Denkalia? Assab? Our “independent existence”? Where do we stop the assumption of lost causes?
            1. Negotiation would simply mean recognizing EEBC and talking on applying it. That’s as far as any reasonable Eritrean could go. If belligerent Ethiopian elites think they could impose their designs through squeezing Eritrea, they have not learnt their lessons.
            2. If IA does establish relations with Ethiopia at the expense of Eritrean interests, he will be opposed.
            3. If Ethiopians could really mind their own problems, and if Eritrean oppositions by now could realize that depending on Ethiopia has greatly impacted their influence among Eritreans, things will accelerate in favor of change.
            4. Eritrea should really look for a balanced foreign relation. There is cost associated with depending on one country. Some tell us here that we can not thrive without depending on Ethiopia. And that belligerence of Ethiopia comes from this mistaken exaggerations of the matter. We are where we are not because Ethiopian embargo , but because of our government’s bad choices in a lot of other matters, particularly in its domestic rules and policies. We can do well without Ethiopia, and if the need for our relation with Ethiopian demands this high premium, then it should be something Eritreans will reject.
            5. In a normal situation, mutual respect of both countries would be great for both of them and the region. If not for PFDJ, Eritrea would have had good relations with the whole region and that would have minimized the price it should pay for checking Ethiopia’s advances and pressures. Ethiopian policies have focused on denying the rise of independent Eritrean alternate.

          • Amde

            Selam Mahmud,

            When I say “lost cause” I mean as far as the EEBC borders, adjusted to meet Ethiopian needs. In other words, where the Ethiopian army is now in September of 2015. I do not believe there is any Ethiopian appetite for ending Eritrean independence, nor for taking over any other Eritrea territory. So my definition of “worst case” is the current territorial reality right now. I actually think Eritrea will probably get more than this, but for arguments’ sake, let us define that as the “worst case”.

            From my point of view, EEBC was a legal verdict that turned out to be a
            terrible political document, that both sides found to be unworkable as
            is, but convenient for maintaining belligerence towards each other. EEBC is not another case of belligerent Ethiopian elite designs. It just became a political poison pill for either side, leading to the current standoff.

            If the opportunity came for Isayyas to sign a deal of normalization with Ethiopia under those conditions, would you oppose the deal? Knowing that it means the end of embargoes, the end of unlimited National Service, the start of demobilization? You said, “If IA does establish relations with Ethiopia at the expense of Eritrean interests, he will be opposed.” Does this situation meet your definition of establishing relations at the expense of Eritrean interests?

            You will probably say this is a false choice. To me it is the acid test of where priorities lie today – new peace or continued confrontation?

            We are just testing HaileTG’s hypothesis here.

            Amde

          • Mahmud Saleh

            Salam Anmde
            How you see EEBC may not be the same how I see it; lets skip it. I have made myself amply clear how I would love the border issue solved, no need of repeating myself on this, on peace, on good neighborliness, on regional cooperation and more.
            For Eritreans, the priority is domestic issue. Ethiopia and border issues come in only when some belligerent (I will reuse this term on and on purposely) individuals hijack Eritrean-centered debates and reframe them in a way there is no distinction between the two countries; some go as far as totally blurring the distinction of what is a state domain and what is PFDJ domain. All these are creating a state of confusion and are drowning efforts that are being made for years by true patriots.
            I respect you. You are a proud Ethiopia and are opinionating to influence readers. You just said “would you agree to our terms.” I say “No.” But believe me that’s what the Ethiopian policy has been banking on all these years. That policy held that Eritreans would finally give in. I don’t think we have to do that. In this case, where there is no Ethiopian appetite to give EEBC ruling any consideration, we don’t even have any guarantee that any future agreements will be honored. Eritreans should focus on getting domestic changes move forward. If there is an unwarranted and naked Ethiopian aggression, believe me, Eritreans will rally around their defense forces. Count this as another exhibit of diaspora belligerence.
            Peace is based on mutual respect, not on arms twisting. Eritrea should solve its internal problems and look for a wider engagement, primarily with development and security partners. Sudan, Egypt, SA…Yemen, EU, USA, China, Russia…could all be good start. Solving its domestic problems will allow it to mitigate any pressures that come from Ethiopia. At this time, Eritrea’s diplomatic problem is not Ethiopia. Its problem is it did not follow a prudent foreign policy that could have countered Ethiopia’s aggressive diplomatic encirclements. You don’t expect international community to compel Ethiopia when Ethiopia’s foreign policy is in agreement with the interests of those international bodies while Eritrea was pursuing policies of self-isolation. So, its not Ethiopia’s strength that has kept us isolated but Eritrea’s weakness.

          • Amde

            Selam Mahmud,

            Do you believe that Ethiopia and Eritrea are in the middle of hegemonic competition?

            To me that is the crux of the matter.

            I don’t think it is simply a case of Eritrea looking comparatively inept
            at countering Ethiopian “aggression and diplomatic encirclement” to
            paraphrase your representation. You see, if it was just an issue of Ethiopian “aggression”, Eritrea wouldn’t also be playing so aggressively in Sudanese, South Sudanese and Somali waters either. There are very few places where a border dispute leads to organized campaigns to remove the government of the opposing side by force. There has to be more than that.

            I am actually sad to read you characterize the issue as basically Eritrean ineptitude at playing defense against what you characterize as “Ethiopian aggression”. I am sure I can be forgiven for reading into it implicit approval for a “stay the course” as long as a more competent player comes about – a new and improved Isayyas 2.0. The question is not whether to play the game better, the question should be whether the game should be played at all.

            Amde

          • Dear Mahmud Saleh,
            I think that you should have taken with a pinch of salt, what Eritrea can do to counter Ethiopia after solving its internal problems. The countries you mentioned above are not going to turn
            their backs on Ethiopia the next day Eritrea’s internal political situation is changed. One expects that they would continue to deal with Ethiopia the same way they did up to now. The EU, USA, China and Russia are not going to twist Ethiopia’s arm to make her abide by the agreement. More important border problems, like the Golan Heights are in limbo, since 1967. I believe that they will tell both parties to sit and sort it out themselves, previous agreement or no agreement. I doubt that world powers will stand against their interests in Ethiopia for the sake of 180 sq miles of land, somewhere in a remote corner in Africa. Therefore, do not discount completely the strength/weakness factor. The road will pass through negotiations; even though the agreement was final and binding. Otherwise, it is going to remain on the shelf for a very long time, and unfortunately, it is Eritrea that would be forced to make the move, for reasons that will continue to affect her negatively, and Ethiopia can wait as she has done up to now. Confrontation is not the recipe for Ethio-Eri problems.

          • Mahmud Saleh

            Dear Horizon
            What’s up/endiet naw bakeh?
            I could take one idea from the above and that’s the border needs to be finalized in a way its solution opens a new horizon. Negotiation is absolutely important. Countries go to confrontation when negotiation fail or when one party thinks it could gain more by confrontation. So let’s put the border stuff out of our way. It is not going to be done until both parties agree to do it. But how my friend Amde put it (take it or leave it) is not the way. Negotiation would mean both parties would be ready to make concessions.
            Meanwhile, you are right Ethiopia will mcontinue to enjoy the same diplomatic relations with all those countries, and I hope it continues enjoying that. No pain in that at all. What I am stressing is If Eritrea could lead a prudent foreign policy, the pressure that comes from Ethiopia could be lessened; we would have found mutual friends who could press our leaders to shake hands…etc. What you are missing is this: there is no benefit from confrontation. There is no reason why Eritrea and Ethiopia should go the way Israel and Syria have gone. Why? There is no benefit from thinking in confrontational posturing. It is all about politics. People have short span of memory but here are some of the ideas I have repeated in the past two years.
            – Ethiopia growth would mean growth of the region, it is positive for Eritrea. I specifically said at one time that Ethiopia has the potential of uplifting the region, and I mean it.
            – I consistently said, had the politicians and elites give the people residing along the border, that issue would long have been solved; to make it clear, there are multiple ways of solving the border without going out of the EEBC ruling if both governments want to do it. But the no peace and war state serves both governments and we are where we are.
            – I actually said we missed an opportunity when PMMZ was alive (I took shots on this from the other side, but I mean it. And, hey, ye shaEbia watader qomo naw yemiwagaw…cheers).
            – When my good friend gual Adem is in good mood, we do entertain regional integration and the posibility of abolition borders….that would include all the countries of the region….
            -I repeated objecvted to statements of bad taste that damage the peaceful co-existence I envision. I understand Eritrea particularly and the region at large have suffered from wars and conflicts, all peaceloving groups and individuals should work towards that end responsibly. Does this look belligerence to you?
            What is then my problem? Very easy. From our side, I see aggressive comments and articles that derail the change I want to see in my country (see my exchanges with Hayat). And from the Ethiopian side, the same old paternalistic attitudes keep coming which affects the domestic improvement I want to see done.
            Sorry, I am in a hurry; hope you got the point.

          • ጤናይስጥልኝ ኣቶ ማህሙድ ሳለህ፣
            I really liked your point, “pressure our leaders to shake hands”. I hope this time it will be different from the Algiers handshake; and it will be a true and genuine one, that will be the result of a solution that will satisfy both parties, a win-win solution for both, so that it will survive internal criticism that might arise.

          • Fnote Selam

            Hi Amde,

            Part of what I was going to say, Mahmud has already said it, so I will spare the redundancy. But here the the other part. You know there is actually a practical voting going on among Eris on how they feel about Eth. It is far better than any electronic survey or voting (which actually might favor the PFDJites because they have both in and outside Eri far better access than the average Eri). And what I am referring is the voting that Eris are making by their foot. The number of Eris abandoning their homeland to go to Ethio is, IMO, a good indication of the kind of feeling they have towards Ethio, and that is despite the incessant propaganda again Ethio by Eri gov.

            Best regards

            FS>

          • Sara

            Dear v.f
            I really admire your courage to come this much open that you are for Ethiopias invasion and occupation of eritrea.
            I wish the rest follow you and be honest with their stand, instead of sweating day and night to tell us they care about
            Eritrea.

            Maa’salama

          • Abraham Hanibal

            Dear V.F;

            Here you come again to your usual way of twisting of issues. As long us Eritreans are concerned, the issue of Eritrea as independent nation is a closed and sealed chapter. Eritrean independence is not the reason for the lack of peace between the two countries, unless you want to use it for your cheap political game. Peace is possible between the two, and it is the only choice of any sensible Eritrean, I guess also any Ethiopian; and unification is not prerequiite for this to happen. In fact, entertaining unification would lead to deeper conflict, and we would be back to square one again, the exact opposite of your recommendation.
            Eritreans have yet to experience living in a free country, where they could develop and build their lives. But they are lacking the space for this in their own country; once they secure a space for themselves, then peace and prosperity would follow naturally.

          • Saleh Johar

            Hi Amde,
            I like your last sentence on para 2…”Stop the competition and come up with an acceptable,,,,,”

            However, there are two important points to consider:
            1) Isaias has the biggest ego in the world, He would rather take Eritrea to the abyss than compromise and act as a statesman.

            2) You cannot say Isaias and peace in one breath–the two do not mix, whatever you do.

            Therefore, any party that makes a deal with Isaias, be it Ethiopia or others, is doomed to fail. It will just elongate the suffering of Eritreans. Maybe this time Eritreans are at a disadvantage to get rid of him, regional and internal elements are hampering the struggle, only his removal can bring favorable prospects for peace.

          • Fnote Selam

            Amde,

            Valid point but I am not sure if Haile meant that…he might but I am not sure….

            FS.

          • Amde

            Hi FnoteSelam

            I really welcome him to correct me. It is important to get right.

            I have read a few places where Eritreans were primarily/initially mad at him for losing the war. The other issues, indefinite servitude, imprisonment, human trafficing, charging parents for AWOL children, organ selling etc only gradually became issues on top of the “original sin” of losing the war. They are all more or less direct results of the continuance of the war by other means. If Eritrean hostility to Isayyas is still primarily because he lost the war (as opposed to because he started the war), then I can see where the signal he might get from Eritreans (primarily diaspora) is that he needs to rescue a win by any means (and at any cost). Maintaining belligerence with Ethiopia is a rational political response in that case.

            What do YOU think? In your experience, does Isayyas have a peace constituency within the diaspora?

            Amde

          • Fnote Selam

            Hi Amde,

            Again I understand what you are saying, but I am not sure if Haile, in his recent comments, was referring to the same kind of belligerence (I also hope he will clarify. Frankly, I tried very hard to understand what he has been saying lately, but I honestly didn’t get his point).

            Regarding if IA has a peace constituency, the thing is ‘constituency’ implies a two-way relation as in one influences/convinces his constituency and the constituency in return holds the person accountable and pressure him/her on decision, policies etc. With IA and his supporters in diaspora, there is no such relation. You know IA is erratic and doesn’t worry if he would be held accountable by his supporters, enemies alike. For example, he would say something about investing in ports (nothing specific, just random blabbing)….then his diaspora supporters wouldrepeat that thing like a million times (they even would go as far as photoshopping some port projects in some other country and present it as something happening in Massawa and brag about how Eritrea is utilizing its port to the max etc etc. That is true story, btw). After, 2 years or so, when asked about ports IA would simply declare ‘the government or the country (it is never his fault) has failed to make proper use of ports bla bla’. Now, you would expect his constituency to hold his accountable regarding his proposal about ports. In PFDJ case, however, they shamelessly run to come up with some excuse and explanation (sanctions is their favorite) why things didn’t happen….This is just one example, but it happens all the time…you can always count on IA to crush the bravado his supporters. I hope you haven’t lost me….My point is, IA supports are not responsible citizens….they are simply bootlickers….to describe them as constituency is giving them too much credit. So to give short answer to your question, as long as IA remains hostile to Eth his diaspora supporters will also remain hostile to Eth. If by some miracle (HUGE IF), IA were to leave everything behind and declare peace with Eth, his supporters would follow suit. But, his supporters have ZERO influence on him.

            Among the non-PFDJ Eritreans, however, I can confidently say there is strong good will towards Eth. There are exceptions of course, but I think there is constituency for peace (that needs to be nurtured, if I may add).

            Best,

            FS.

          • haileTG

            Hey Fnote Selam,

            Sorry for coming out of my proscribed rest period:-) As we go along, I will try harder to make the crux of the issue we’re dealing with as clear as possible. I am grateful for Amde for quickly grasping the point however. For now, here is how I see what is making us speak past each other: before the invention of mirrors, I suppose people never knew what they looked like (unless they intently looked into someone else’s eyes and catch their reflection). Other than that it would be hard to know what one’s own image looked like while knowing how everybody looked like. That indeed is the goodness of mirrors. When we look at the mirror, our reflection isn’t relative to someone else’s, it is just ours’ alone. Meaning, the one single rule that a mirror utilizes is that it only reflects our image independent of anything else. Hence, if we look at the way we do what we do, regardless of what others do (here in the diaspora), you’ll find that we’ve inadvertently imprisoned ourselves by the virtue of validating belligerence towards Ethiopia as a compass to guide the direction of our reactions. The regime had quickly picked up on that and has since permanently latched on it to link virtually everything to Ethiopia. When Mahmuday said that if IA has entered into any relationship with Ethiopia at the expense of Eritrea, that he would be opposed, I am thinking that who will be doing the opposing? Has he not already entered into many relationship against the interests of Eritrea with Somali war lords, regional rebels, in Congo, TPDM… or the qualifier is that it has to be with Ethiopia, i.e the emphasis being Ethiopia than the the “interest of Eritrea”?

            Dear FS, trust me, this thing isn’t merely about one person here or another there, it is huge, it is dangerous and it is critical. I think we need a mirror:-)

          • Fnote Selam

            Selam Haile,

            Thanks for getting back to me. I like your mirror analogy, I am very appreciative of your willingness to be a mirror, you are pretty good at that one….And I am going to replay (later today, I have to leave now) with that spirit (the spirit of becoming mirror to each other).

            Best,

            FS.

          • Mahmud Saleh

            Salam HTG
            Correction: I have opposed and continue to oppose all the other dealings. The question was specifically about Ethiopia. So, please let us stay clear off misreadings. I will try to give your toothless concept a nuke shock, I don’t know when. I’m out of town now.
            Dear Gual Adem: Qoy becha, another nuke is being shipped from our cousin North Korea, where else.
            Selam wo senaay.

          • Hayat Adem

            Rebi Yisetirena:) Remember that you are my PM, you can’t go all weapons on me, no nuke please.

          • dawit

            Amed,
            I don’t think is competition for Hegemony between Ethiopia and Eritrea in the region. However I totally disagree with you implication that Isaias or Eritrea, started the war. The war was started by the late Prime Minister Meles (RIP) and his parliament, that declared war on Eritrea and still maintained. The Eritrean Diaspora never was mad with PIA for “loosing the war” i.e Ethiopia occupying some Eritrean territory illegally in defiance of international legal ruling. In reality Ethiopia is the one which loss the war after sacrificing 100 of thousands poor Ethiopian youth, knowing clearly Bademe belonged to Eritrea.

          • Hayat Adem

            Hi dawitom,
            I counted 5-7 elements of falsity in the above brief comment yours. I’ll tell you the first one, and you will figure the rest. It is Amde, not Amed. You are reminding me here to remember this: as there are people who bring solutions to every problem, there are people who bring problems to every solution.
            Hayat

          • Amde

            Dear Hayat,

            He has to exteriorize what he feels. If he feels I give him Amed, then amedu nun indil yifeqedilet.

            Amde

          • dawit

            Hayat,
            The problem is with my spell check software. I like you last sentence “There are people who bring problems to every solution”. Go and look at the mirror and you will discover who they are.

          • Hayat Adem

            Hi dawitom,
            I don’t depend on mirrors when my neck serves me well.

          • Amde

            Ato dawit,

            awqo yetegnan min yilutal?

            If you don’t think there is no hegemonic competition, then logically you would have to state that Eritrea is where it is because it is staking everything on the implementation of EEBC as is. Personally, i do not care where Badme ends up. I care for there to be a deal that can be acceptable to both sides. EEBC is obviously not acceptable to the Ethiopian side, and Isayyas has figured out a way of using it to extend/maximize his rule at the expense of everything else because he has deluded people like you who don’t have to bear the cost of the stance he has taken.

            The law-breaker-in-chief sacrifices his young on the altar of international legality. That is not metaphorical – that is literal. And you? You keep sharpening his blade for him.

            Amde

          • Nitricc

            Hey Amde I know some Eritreans will ador you for your idea Eritrea should kneel to Ethiopia but why do you expect Eritrea to close the ugly chapter by kneeling to the Ethiopian blunt refusal to accept to the of the court of law? I thought we are for justice and we are law abiding civilized citizens. Are we not? If so, why are you expecting Eritrea to give in to Ethiopian’s illegal refusal? What is it? Becouse Eritrea small? Week? I tell you this, PIA have many short comings and many bone head moves but when it comes on this issue; he is on it and bulls eye. You can’t chose and select; either you stand for the rule of law or you don’t. The fact that you expecting Eritrea to Give in in to Ethiopia’s unlawful refusal shows that your stand in justice and rule of law is corrupted.
            That goes to the people who are cheering you. I reject war with every molecules of my body but there are few times war is worth every blood shaded. The court has spoken and the only option is that we follow what the court has decided.

          • Amde

            Nitricc,

            Do you really believe Eritrean youth are wasting their lives to enforce the rule of law?

            Let me ask you the question: Would you support Isayyas if he were tomorrow to announce a policy of normalization with Eritrea without the resolution of the border issue?

            I do believe when HaileTG says “diaspora belligerence” he is talking about people specifically like you. So this is your opportunity to prove him wrong, or alternately to warn Isayyas not to soften his stand. What say you?

            Amde

          • Nitricc

            Hi Amde, are you for justice and rule of law or not? that is my point. if PIA had to do his job in 1992 and follow the work of the referendum; we wouldn’t be on this mess. PIA choose normalization and cooperation between the two countries and look where he got us. Haile and Mizan can kiss up to you say what ever they want but i am telling you, a rule of law will protect you better than tanks and bullets. if PIA to come out and say bend for the weyane, then, he is putting in a real danger the coming generation. irresponsible is the word.

          • saay7

            Selamat Amde and VF:

            Amde:

            Ummm…I think I am going to assume that there is more to this than what you are saying and will have to wait for Haile TG’s questions. I am serious. You know why?

            1. Yes, there IS peace constituency domestically within Eritrea. In fact, there is NO war constituency domestically within Eritrea.
            2. Yes, there IS peace constituency in the Diaspora. In fact, there is NO war constituency in the Diaspora.

            Let me explain. To say that there is “no constituency for peace in the Diaspora” means (to me) that Isaias Afwerki loses a lot of sleep wondering, “If I do x, _______ and ______ and most importantly _______ will not approve.” There is no name of an individual, group, organization, church that you can fill in the blank. It is exactly the same domestically. Even the hardest of the hard-core “Weyane Out Of Every Inch Of Eritrea!” would adjust their attitudes accordingly because, and this is important, when it comes to Eritrean sovereignty, Isaias Afwerki represents, to them, the alpha and omega. So, if he says yes, they will reason, there must be something I don’t know; he knows more; I can rely on his judgement.

            There was a documentary I once saw on Japanese culture and how subordinates subconsciously mimic the body language of their boss. A lot of how the Isaias Clique acts is by first asking itself a question (subconsciously): how would Isaias expect me to act if he was next to me right now.

            Now, let me flip it to you. Isaias is a human being and notwithstanding all his tough talk, he doesn’t like to be ridiculed. And who would ridicule him mercilessly if he did a U-turn and changed his tack? The Eritrean opposition including, of course, Haile TG. So, using that argument–that Isaias Afwerki is actually susceptible to public opinion–the biggest constituency against peace is the Eritrean opposition. (Using the logic Haile TG presented IF your understanding of his position is clear.)

            VF: The two examples you gave are DEFENSIVE postures. Semere’s position is really NOT about how to be a kingmaker in Ethiopia (offensive) but how to foil schemes design to dismember and/or make Eritrea what Lebanon used to be to Syria. I don’t call that belligerence but strategic thinking.

            Waiting for Haile TG…

            saay

          • haileTG

            Dear saay,

            Nowadays I am getting more “goraH”, hence I never named names nor announced a particular school. The menace is widespread. Let me predict something into the near future confidently by reading the present and the past:

            – Just as the Molla saga came and gone, soon something else as terrible will come up. Very soon indeed. IA/PFDJ will as usual hide and be no where to be seen. ERiTV will not announce the incident. The IA/PFDJ 03 will go in full spin connecting the issue to Ethiopia/Woyane. That spin will be limited to widest diaspora outlets. I don’t even know what the event will be. IA/PFDJ must have learned what I stumbled on long ago:)

            Questions will follow.

            cheers

          • Abraham Hanibal

            Hi Amde,

            Let me try to answer your questions:

            Isayas neither has a constituency in Eritrea nor in diaspora. He acts as he pleases; he can declare a constitution “dead” with a single sentence, and no one would challenge him on that. I’ve difficulty to understand those who “support” Isayas, especially those in the diaspora who’ve the freedom to use their God-given brains. It is as if whatever Isayas takes of steps is acceptable for them. If Isayas would tomorrow decide to abandon the Badme-question, and strike a deal, these people would support him without hesitation, and echo his reasons for doing so. This type of attitude has led to Eritrea’s current near death situation.

            God have mercy on the Eritrean people!

          • haileTG

            Selam Amde,

            I would have liked you avoided #1 in order to keep the subtlety of this issue to be grasped easily. Anyway,

            1 – The hundreds of thousands of Eritreans who decided to flee the country, those fleeing and those waiting for a solution are IA’s domestic peace constituency. They are outgunned by a merciless brute at home and hopeless diaspora that is belligerent. and has made Ethio-centric politicking the alpha and Omega of its discourse.

            2 – If IA had a peace advocating constituency in diaspora, he wouldn’t stick to exclusively “Ethiopia-culpable” argument to consistently claim upper hand in derailing any momentum.

            Take National Service for example, it was extended under the Warsay-Yikealo martial plan. The plan had failed. The warsays have been scattered, yet a meaningful diaspora resitance was stifled because he invoked the “defending the country against Ethiopia card”. He could have easily went for its economic benefits and development potentials, but that argument will not have a buyer in the diaspora. The Ethio-centric card came out a winner (as with every other case). The tragedies of recent times were connected to “woyane taking people out to weaken Eritrea” and guess what? It worked in silencing diaspora supporters and dividing and turning against each other diaspora opposition. Belligerence hasn’t produced anything in real terms and significant weakened Eritrea as a whole. Why on earth would the regime would change connecting everything to Ethiopia, if it actually work?

            Hizbawi MeKete are the highest organized form of such belligerence from the regime side. They include monitary contribution to the war efforts. On the opposition camp, the one single issue that turned Eritreans against each other is the “Ethiopia” card. An ex EYSC chairman had once written an article titled “The Elephant in The Room”.

            As you witnessed here recently, if God forbid, there happens a major conflict b/n Ethio opposition wanting out and the Eritrean regime inside Eritrea and a serious disaster unfolds on the civilians, marks have already been drawn to lend support to the regime forces to do anything and shoot anyone to protect “intelligence” leaving to “Ethiopia”.

            This belligerence has complex propelling factors as well. But what matters is that it has rendered the struggle to progress much slower than warranted.

            Regards

          • Amde

            Hi haileTG,

            My apologies for mixing issues. But thank you for the valuable perspective.

            Amde

          • saay7

            Selamat Hailat TG:

            When you and Mahmuday are in the zone, you post at such rapid fire that I actually lose the thread. So, I am going to ask you to indulge me and ask you to clarify some things because I know how much you hate it when I rephrase it based on my own understanding and ask you if this is what you meant. I intended to do that when you first posted but Guest/Gud had resumed his sniper role; Mahmuday and you were in full “Endet Molla Molla, Molla; ere Molla Molla Molla Molla, alfelgm fqr k’anchi lela” mode (apologies to Mahmoud Ahmed) and I figured you had your hands full.

            I need your help with the following:

            1. When people like T Kifle use to say there are no partners for peace in Eritrean elites, I use to disagree because I only use to look at the statement from the point of view of the border conflict. I use to think they meant that unless we took the same position as them in the border that we were not for peace or something like that. It only clearly downed on me what that observation entailed, and sadly the diaspora opposition have plenty of belligerents but i don’t think that is the case in Eritrea.

            Please put your explanation by addressing the following:

            (a) The Eritrean Democratic Alliance–the mainstream opposition– endorsed Meles Zenawi’s 5 Point Peace Plan–a plan that wasn’t even endorsed by the US;

            (b) There has never been, with the exception of the Eritrean People’s Democratic Party (EPDP, which is not part of the Alliance OR the Baito), a single statement issued by any of the Eritrean opposition organizations or any of their consolidations (EDA, Baito) calling for strict compliance with EEBC. They have essentially taking an extremely conciliatory approach or been indifferent to it.

            (c) If you judge the “Eritrean elite” by those who strive to shape opinions–Paltalk hosts, website publishers, columnists, commenters, Facebook groups (EYSC and its splinter groups), civil society (NEW, Solidarity, Arbi Harnet, Stop Slavery, etc, etc) based anywhere in the Diaspora (Australia, Europe, North America)–there is hardly any hardline position on Ethiopia. It is uniformly conciliatory to the point of naievete (in my opinion and I am in the very very tiny minority.)

            2. He [Isaias Afwerki] is in a sense cornered by a war he can’t win and a diaspora opinion that is only Ethio-centric and indifferent to the Eritrean plight. Put yourself in his shoe and what else would you have done other than milking that card?

            Judging by prevailing attitudes, it is hard to say there is a true constituency for peace in our side, giving the subtle signal to IA that confrontation is the only way to stay in power.

            IA doesn’t have a constituency for peace. Another sad twist!

            This is the one I am grappling with because “constituency” implies that its support is conditional. But the “constituency” is the same one that supported him when he signed Mutual Defense pact with Ethiopia; it is the same one that didn’t raise an eyebrow when he said confederation with Ethiopia is the way to go right after independence; it is the same one that supported him when he was the darling of the US and part of the frontier-states against Muslim fundamentalism; it is the same one that was making arguments that Eritrea is a natural base for the US; it is the same one that congratulated him for his keen insight in placing the G-15 in key positions in the government; it is the same one that understood when he disappeared them; the same one that understood when he allied with Al Shabab, the same one that applauded him when he brokered peace deal in Eastern Sudan; it is the same one that applauds him when he isolates himself from the world; and the same one that congratulates him for his diplomatic efforts in re-engaging with the world…

            So, Haile TG, isn’t the larger problem NOT that we have a war constituency but no constituency in the true sense of the word: one that makes its support for a politician conditional on principles he believes in? The reason I call them Isaiasists is not to “absolve PFDJ” but because I believe that if Isaias were to say tomorrow morning that the era of PFDJ is over and he is dissolving it, they would still support him.

            Anyway, please explain.

            saay

          • haileTG

            Dear saay,

            Don’t worry, the weekend is upon us, things will go at slower pace now anyway.

            Saay, I will address a combined response, however if you prefer and insist on bullet, I will do that too.

            – Is there an Eritrean group that can be identified by name which presses for peace with Ethiopia because it is good for Eritrea, Ethiopia, IA, PFDJ, EPRDF, the people of both countries…. and has enlisted support on that?

            The best peace call is one that hopes it topple IA as a result of it. It isn’t a peace founded on the merits of peace itself but something intent on leveling the playing field for further confrontation, i.e to humilate IA or Ethiopia as the case may be.

            You and me recently discussed opposition in Ethiopia and you assessed them irrelevant because they didn’t make a stand. I still haven’t seen any group voicing support to 5-point officially however. At any rate, far from a constituency for peace, their very being in Ethiopia was made to split the opposition. They were condemned to the level of being associated with toxicity, sellouts, mercenaries…. It is understandable that they stay away from the issue given the level of belligerent attitudes that prevail.

            The way you explained how IA’s supporters being “go along” type is interesting. Yes, they supported getting the rights and benefits of peace. However, they allowed that to be taken away from them in exchange to sustaining their belligerent tendencies. It doesn’t show constancy of non-involvement, there is a definite dynamics there.

            All those you deemed lenient towards Ethiopia (saying such betrays the tendency under scrutiny too) are invested on political mileage on the back of it than truly appreciating the meaning and relevance of peace where it is lacking.

            IA will be able to follow with his chosen course because he has done his homework of destroying any viable opposition at home by extreme violence. The diaspora belligerent supporters will not be able to do anything not because they don’t care but because they traded their citizen power to maintaining belligerence, thus the train has left the station.

            Dr Bereket got the worst treatment for saying what is normal and peaceful thing to say, the EEBC is abandoned because any view point has become polarized, Eritrean opposition call eachother sellouts of PFDJ/EPRDF depending which camp they are. Saay, peace has no space in the vocal politics. The opposition in Ethiopia’s main reason of downfall can’t be used to argue a case in positive.

            In the end, why do IA adopt blame Ethiopia policy, if he judged it unworkable?? That supply explains the nature of the demand.

            cheers

          • saay7

            Selamat Hailat:

            Ok. So I read your piece twice.

            Let’s contextualize the word “peace” within Eritrea. Peace, “selam” is always accompanied by “rahwa” (“selamn rahwan” and, interestingly, they are names of females not males) and here it would mean:

            (a) absence of shooting war, violence, dislocation
            (b) normalizing relationship with Ethiopia/Sudan/Djibouti (trade, movement of people, intermarriage)

            Now, let’s talk about the “peace constituency” in Eritrea or its alleged absence.

            A. Absence of Shooting War, Violence, Dislocation

            There is no shooting war in Eritrea right now; there are no factional armed Eritreans controlling large swathes of land shooting at each other; there are no Eritreans who have packed their meager belongings on their pack animals and being dislocated from their home and internally displaced. All this could easily happen (we are in the Third World) and, in many quarters, Isaias Afwerki is credited for the fact that it hasn’t happened, for the fact that this level of peace exists.

            So, to their thinking, the “Nhna Nsu”, the “koboro junkies” are a “peace constituency.” They are not encouraging Isaias Afwerki to go to war; they are praising him for maintaining peace while, according to them, the forces of the world are arrayed against him and trying to instigate violence and civil war in the country.

            Peace: Normalizing Relationship With Sudan, Djibouti, Ethiopia

            I mention those three because they are our neighbors; but I intend to spend time with the two that have the longest common borders: Sudan and Ethiopia.

            The Isaias government spends a lot of its media energy to showcase its exemplary relationship with Al Bashir. Here he is on his landrover driving to Sudan; here are the people of Sudan greeting him like a brother. The fraternal this, the fraternal that, open borders, free trade, booming border town, etc, etc. Omar Al Bashir came to Asmara and it was a Friday and he happened to pray at my Asmara neighborhood mosque and he gave a sermon. A friend who attended the sermon told me that Omar Al Bashir told them that Isaias Afwerki is fit not only to preside over Eritrea but the whole of Africa. There is your “peace constituency.” Everybody is happy about this–everybody except those of us in the opposition because this also means Security Relations between the two States and there is no political space for us. But, since you are talking “peace constituency”, people–elite, non-elite, domestic/diaspora–are very happy about this. Eritreans go to Sudan to, for example, get medical treatment and they are happy that the relationship is restored to normalcy.

            The strained relationship with Djibouti. Again, nobody–elite, non-elite, Diaspora, domestic– is calling on Isaias Afwerki to “go to war; teach them a lesson they will never forget”, etc. A tiny border skirmish got an express service attention–it moved from IGAD to AU to UNSC at warp speed–and everybody understands this has to do with how fast the world works when it loves you (Djibouti-Eritrea boundary) and how slow it works when it despises you (Eritrea-Ethiopia boundary.)

            This takes us to Ethiopia. Within the context of everything you have written, peace to you is “sustainable peace, normalizing of relationship, with Ethiopia.” It is here where you have echoed T.Kifle’s extremely unreasonable assessment. In fact, if you remember, T.Kifle said there is no peace partner among the Eritrean elite because the Eritrean elite is damaged goods due to Italian colonialism. It has identity confusion, projection, psychosis, and fill in any other psychoanalytical terms (including the latest: “the mirror stage”?) For T.Kifle, the answer was simple: you just wait it for this generation to die and hopefully the next generation of the elite is sufficiently cured. (I am paraphrasing: I would have preferred to come up with the precise quote, but can’t find it.) And there is a great deal of Yorgasm within Ethiopian Elite whenever they read Yosief Gebrehiwet because he gives them hope that the diseased Eritrean Elite mindset is on its deathbed and a new generation of Eritrean highlanders who see their natural home as Ethiopia is emerging (I think Eyob has seen the movie you linked and the interview with the artist 7 times.)

            But even here, there is a “Peace Constituency”: it simply says to Ethiopia, “please live up to your own promise and lets demarcate the damn border because sustainable peace requires it.” This can only be defined as belligerence if all meaning of the word belligerence is reversed. Is it belligerence if T.Kifle tells me that Ethiopia is going to have a say in any future post-Isaias government and I say, no, actually, I prefer that it doesn’t have a say and the best way for that to happen is for evolutionary change to come? I mean: isn’t the person whom you have come to “understand”–T.Kifle–denying his country’s obligation (compliance with terms of treaty) and granting his country rights (selection of next Eritrean government) the belligerent party here?

            saay

          • Fnote Selam

            Dear Haile,

            I am still working on the reply, but this comment of you caught my attention. Quick question, are you implying that IA’s supporters support him because he is belligerent toward Ethiopia?

            Thank you again for taking a time off from your break, much appreciated!

            Best,

            FS>

          • haileTG

            Hi Fnote Selam,

            I have saay’s response to write soon and hopefully, I’ll be able to make more headway with addressing your question too. For now, the short answer is that belligerence towards Ethiopia enables IA to keep his supporters in leash and a good portion of opposition checked. Please beware that this is one of awate’s exclusive big shows. In such exclusive events, all concepts are tested at their limits, reason is played with master dexterity and the pace is often at breakneck. It is not without reason that Mahmuday is still scuffling with the doormen trying to get in with hand grenades to bomb some of those inside:-) Please continue raising my vague points as often as you can, I appreciate that because Tinfas zeyhib kunetat eyu zelo 🙂

          • Fnote Selam

            Dear Haile,

            I guess I will wait to see your response to Saay (I will try to find the answer to my question in there), but in the mean time I want you to consider the ff:-

            1. tell us what you mean by belligerence. what things are considered belligerent towards Eth and what things are considered belligerent toward Eri? For example, wanting some kind of assurance from Eth to go ahead implement the border commission rule (not as ruled, but as proposed by them) considered belligerent (it is not like they didnt violate another very recent agreement!). Or, does the biggest (and very active) Ethiopian facbook group, having its profile pic a map of Eth with Eri as part of it considered belligerent?
            2. Related to 1:- do you see any from of belligerence from Eth (gov’t, elites, some section of the people) toward Eri?
            3. Clearly delineate whether you think IA supporters rally behind because he is belligerent to Eth (in other words, do they force him to be belligerent to Eth?) or do you think he simply uses perceived or real threats from Eth to make his supporters rally behind him EVERY SINGLE TIME (even in things not related to Eth).
            4. Re opposition groups, please give us an example where an opposition group rather have IA stay in power to avoid any threat that comes from Eth or simply so that the hostility between the two countries could continue. If you find an example, please try to show us how much of the opposition do these groups/individuals represent?

            Those are thing I hope you will address (for now).

            Thanks again!

            FS.

          • Dear Amde,
            It is always the same. It is the modus operandi of all authoritarian regimes to use the scare-tactic. They brainwash the people and they make them believe that if they go the result will
            be chaos, and the country will be in danger from forces within and outside the country. Remember HS and the Derg used the same tactic. It is not unexpected therefore that PFDJ will resort to a similar method. More so, because PFDJ propaganda machine has been working day and night over so many years to make Eritreans believe that it is the guarantor of the Eritrean independence, and the only force that can protect the country and the people from aggression especially by the enemy to the south. Unfortunately, the opposition has done nothing to debunk this myth, so that people can rid themselves of their fear, and take their fate in to their hands. As long as Eritrean opposition does not come out to the front and tell the people that Ethiopia could be a trustworthy friend and they can be able to live in peace with Ethiopians in the future, Eritrea and Eritreans will continue to live under the grip of the dictatorial system.

            The curse of Ethiopia was one-ethnic-group-dominance. It was partly the reason for Gedli, and if Eritrea cannot correct it as soon as possible, (as Ethiopia should continue on the road of completely abolishing it), it will be the disease that will eat away Eritrea from within, much worse than any external factor.

          • Semere Andom

            Hi Haile and V.F
            As we reflect on Sep 18 it makes it worse to find a fitting description of our ineptness. It is not that we are re-inventing the wheel, it is not that we are new to resistance. We have precedent for everything;
            we have history of fighting , we have the road map
            we have history of releasing prisoners from inside the enemy dungeons
            We have history of endurance.
            PMZ said once when expressing his disgust of how Ethiopia become the emblem of starvation while his ancestors build the Axum monuments. I think he was saying that it was not for luck of ingenuity but for lack good governance, a theme that he emotionally expressed during the 1994 draught.
            We have no excuse but to call ourselves who we really are; we all we have done with our history is elevate the career of one man, like the devil did to Jesus, we took our own devil to pinnacle of the mountain and showed him all the wealth and begged him to take it all. to occurs to me that our failure has not sunk in, we are still in denial, we are still shell shocked and have barely taken responsibility individually we have contributed to our current state of affairs.
            The once visionary did not do his job, the intellectual did not do his job, the citizen did not do his job. the visionary got blind, the intellectual became dull and the citizen became a subject
            PS: V.F: you are driving me crazy, is this MizaanÉ

      • Music Novice

        Greetings V.F.,

        I tend to disagree with your assertion that people would still have emigrated out of Eritrea “whether we have good leadership or not.”

        Peace and law and order are of primary importance to many Eritreans. I know many (this is of course anecdotal) skilled people, who would prefer to stay in Eritrea to earn a relatively decent living had there been a semblance of normalcy.

        Personally, I would choose living in Eritrea, while being paid a peanut salary, even under a dictatorship, provided it is a benevolent type. In my experience, the time of my life I spent in Eritrea between 1991 and the beginning of 1998 were the best and most memorable.

        I hate exile!

  • karim

    Halayat , back to back you losing

  • L.T

    Today I thought enough to adapt and take responsibility velocity with my http://www.awate after Yonus warn me with my poor currently English.Ok I’ll do this first,I will write my opinion in my brain before I write the www,you are partly right Yonus and I’m happier thet we have people like you protected road users here.Now I’ll park myself here and you must know thet I’ll neverback me to write in my awate site.Awate are mine.Weyane Tegaru is here and are fullbacked and runs as they want.Let us go for it.
    I do not believe that Bitsaye Isaias will become the responsibility of Sahara or the Sea.Who is responsible in this?Me and you:We sent them money to go to hell,their parents too.Mom sold or pledged her spare gold to send her daugher and Dad borrow money from neighbors for his son to drean hell.Do not be stupid Isaias can not slaughter a goat for everyone at Easter every year.

    • V.F.

      L.T. your English is perfectly fine. Everybody understands what you are saying. But your ideas and what you say are flat out nuts. You need no English lessons. You need sensitivity for your fellow human beings, Eritreans at that.

  • L.T

    Hirayee Amu Salih Yonous..I will try to better my Engilsh ..:-)

    • saay7

      Hi L.T.

      That was a different Yenus who told you that. I would never tell you to do that. English is not your mother tongue and you don’t owe her any favors. Write exactly the way you have been writing for years. You can’t improve on a classic. Don’t listen to the qena-at.

      saay

  • QoQah

    Watch Ginbot 7 Army
    https://youtu.be/sey0WsRDLVo

    • Nitricc

      Hey QoQah; what is up? long time. i am glad you are around. this Molla thing has to happen to pull in huh? well, well comeback if this the old, the sharp and to the point QoQah. And i do think this MOlla incident will unite the none Tigryan Ethiopians than ever. people say MOLLA defected from Eritrea; that is not so, he defected from idea of one-ethiopia.

  • Mahmud Saleh

    Hello Dear AT and Awatawyan

    Please help out with the following proposal.
    What: To ask AT to dedicate one posting showcasing its artistic/graphic treasure trove.
    Why: To learn, discuss, and celebrate this achievement
    How:
    1/ awate selects the best few graphics that accompanied articles, and say some thing about them
    -how each of them came up and developed as an idea; they may give recognition to certain members of the AT or contributors of those graphics…with more emphasis on the thoughts that went into their production. I suspect the bulk of the job goes to one man for he has already produced art works (sketches…poems…proses… (I may be wrong), what time of the day do most of those ideas come to him; what techniques does/do he/they use to stir up those creative moments…influences he/she/they could mention.
    – The best way would be to interview both Salehs. I thought of sending Nitrickay, but that would ruin the project because he will focus only on wild girls, and he will not find any. I thought of sending out Amanuel Hidrat to Elk Grove, CA, but he will enter a duet contest with Saleh Younis on “system/one man” ; Saleh Gadi will be irritated, and he will show them the door. Semere would probably be better situated for this job, but now that Ted has heard the story of Mola, he will close all Canadian border ports leading out to the USA. He has her Majesty Naval, ArmY and Airforce in his disposal. Hayat will just look for the red/yellow flag which embodies a lot of things: a lone yellow star…AK-47, the obelisk of Axum….she will not find many of those emblematic themes and she will be disappointed and make a hasty return. I will have to answer the question: ወይለኸ ጓል ኣደም፡ ነዚ ዲኻ ደኣ ሰዲድካኒ? …(side note: Gual Adem take it with pride. You are one of those I would love they were on my side of the debates. I may not agree with your every take, but I read you, and I admire you for the fact that you make people better be prepared in their debates/discussions…After all, a debate without opposing and contrasting ideas is not a debate).
    2. Give awatistas a chance to pick out their favorite arts work and AT then selects few of them.
    The Objective of this call is just to remind us how outstanding those editorial graphics are; and, may be, help us to also take time on them next time we read another article. Because of this, I ask the AT to look into it and showcase their art’s products.
    Awate.com accompanying arts (pictures and graphics are unique in their originality. Most Eritrean websites post generic pictures (most of them copied from elsewhere), and they repeat them with every related article that arrives. For instance, they may use (and yes, they do that) the gaunt looking picture of Issayas for every article related to the GOE or PFDJ…same pictures of refugees…migrants…but not in Awate.com. AT comes up with aesthetically captivating, original, proportional (does not overwhelm the written material), and something that could enhance the particular message contained in the article. The visual effects/messages of those graphics could stand in their own right. Bellow is how I interpreted the graphics accompanying this article (it was a reply to Pappi when she welcomed Sale Johar and asked where he was).
    “His honor was busy building up the wardrobe of those two dark and scary creatures. They must look messengers of darkness, they are as big, powerful, menacing, and cunning as you could imagine each of them is. Therefore, you have the chatters on this forum as to which side is more able in effecting maximum damage. But then there is the pencil in between which seems to be saying, ‘Wait a minute! I’m the judge.”
    Regards.

    • Kim Hanna

      Selam Mahmud Saleh,
      .
      I agree with your comment. However, I just wanted to add that there were a couple times they went a little overboard. The test is the graphics must never compete for attention from the article. That is when it becomes unbecoming of Awate Forum. I would say 98% of the time the graphics compliment the article, that is a great batting average.
      .
      K.H

      • Mahmud Saleh

        selam KH
        98% , that makes them pass with flying colors. And then you sing “ዓልል…ዓልል…”, don’t bother to ask abi. He doesn’t know the song. Rahwa T, Gen.Nit, or abrham may help.
        Thanks.
        ps: Frankly, they are good at it. Compare Awate with the editorial cartoons/graphics of any Ethio-Eritrean sites, and you know these guys stand out.

    • Hayat Adem

      Excellency PM Mahmud Saleh,
      Thank you my PM, the feeling is mutual. If it was my wish though, I would like to be recognized as a voice of truth, reason, the future and the bigger good. I would never seek recognition for any of my debating skills, if any. If I’m on the wrong side, good debating skill is a liability than asset as it will mean I’m debating good for a bad reason. But if I’m on the right side, it would be okay even if I don’t have those skills.
      Usually, you and I don’t see eye to eye on few things: ghedli, EPLF, national ego, national pride, sense of sovereignty…But my sense is we agree on more other things, more than you may be willing to acknowledge.
      My sense of duty is more on taking the pain of every single Eritrean than Eritrea. This is not to say Eritrea and Eritreans have competing interests and existence but the “for Eritrea” slogan sometimes turns out be against Eritreans. Yours is more about Eritrea than Eritreans. Of course, I would say you are wrong. Like you, there are many big brains on the erring side regarding this.
      Making Eritreans safe would make Eritrea a safer and happier nation, whereas the other way would never guarantee you more safety and happiness for Eritreans. I’m a bit direct here, and my apologies for being blunt but I would Your thinking is clouded by the ghedli culture of sacrifice and endurance. Those are cost values not harvest values. You embrace them when you have to but as a forward-looking people, those values need to yield and give a chance for a good life and happy living.
      I enjoy the stories you sometimes interject about your family here. I can’t imagine a better and healthier father-son relationship than the one at your home. How beautiful is that for us who know you in this forum let alone to you and your family. Is an Eritrean father entitled to that kind of serene and happy life? Yes, and you paid for that in sweat and blood, and your friends paid their lives. But how can that be made possible?
      As you know, nothing replaces hard work. But every hard work needs to be focused on identifying and sorting problems. One “problem” is we are neighbors to Tigray/Ethiopia. Neighborliness are never competitive and rival inherently. But they can make look like one because some bad smart people can sell them to emotions and false egos. Bad smart people live out renting conflicts. How much of Eritrea’s problem would have been solved if we were at peace and cooperation with Ethiopia? A lot. Economically? No question. Geopolitics/
      security? Significantly. Governance? Some of it.
      The other option to the “problem” is continuous confrontation and conflict. Not only does that hurt both, but it would always put Eritrea at a more disadvantage. That would make the Eritrean father in Eritrea lead a controlled life (NS), an outsourced life (remittance) and a sad life (sea/desert). Germany and Japan and many other countries went wild in adventure and they paid for it. But the other side of their greatness shinned from how they truly rediscovered themselves. They are prouder than when they were in the 1st half of 1940s. They reconciled with the reality as life is not a problem to be fought but a reality to be welcomed and experienced.
      Ghedli might have served a purpose. But it has no purpose now. It is about death, not life. It is about the past not the future. We have no an enemy neighbor. We should not let our people be conquered in eternal fear and mistrust of their shadow. If I can make a dint of the irrational wall running east-west between us, I don’t resent your sarcastic way of associating with the TPLF emblem. You must have seen it flying or folded when they come to Sahle to fight with you. Why do you have to distance them? If you cherish Ghedli, they were there. If you mind the future, they will be your partners for greatness.
      Hayat

      • Mahmud Saleh

        Ahlan Hayat
        Genuine Eritreans know their future properity depends on celebrating their past strengths and correcting mistakes. You tell them “please just zero in on the warts; you have got no healthy skin. You are done.” I say, “Yes we do have some warts but compared to the general look and history of our body, they are correctable. We are not done.”
        Hayat, Eritreans are acutely aware of their past, present and future. I think they do understand the difference and unifying significance of “Eritrea and Eritreans.” There are no Eritreans without Eritrea and there won’t be Eritrea without Eritreans. So let’s throw this gimmicks of blurring borders and sovereignty.
        – I don’t believe you take more pain for Eritreans more than any decent Eritrean.
        – I have respect and love for the people of Tigray and Ethiopia but not for the government. If PFDJ is a rock to Eritreans, then the Ethiopian governments policies towards Eritrea have been the hard place between which Eritreans are pressed.
        – Germany and Japan? Huh! In your view, Ethiopia being the victorious forces of WW II. I could only say ይግበረላ።
        – Listen to radio Forum of yesterday, there is an article that was written by the G15 weeks before their detention. You will understand the vibe that was prevailing in that period of our history; then you will know why this type of generalized mischaracterizations of “ghedli this…EPLF…that” makes me ….
        In that article, you will hear what went wrong and how we ended up where we are. I know exactly what went wrong. It needs to be redressed but not through pamphleteering Ethiopian propaganda. It is just absurd to tell me that you want to see vibrant Eritrea when you go after its pillars, eroding every sustaining pillar.
        – Sensationalizing is not proof of CONVICTION. If you really want to see peace work for it, because neither of the governments’ policies lead to peace.
        -Your views lead Eritreans to be more careful, Hayat. That’s why I repeatedly said that as long as the opposition is seen as if represented by people who see Eritrea as an extension of Ethiopia, who envision an Eritrea that’s dependent on and subordinate to Ethiopia…it will lose credibility.
        -The current problem, I know it. But wrong prescription is not going to cure it. And obviously, you can’t expect correct prescription from the wrong doctor.
        – I still respect you as a person, but I have no illusion that the Eritrea that you have in mind is totally different than the one I have in mind. When we have that big of a difference, it’s laughable to think we can agree on solutions. You are looking for solutions that fit the Eritrea in your mind and I am looking for solutions that fit for the Eritrea in my mind.
        Exhibition:
        Just look the comments I got in my reply to Gen.Nit. This has become clear than ever Hayat. Eritreans will have to look into themselves, find the solutions that fit the problem. You have spent time on how great Ethiopian intelligence is and how great Mola was without saying proportionally significant thing about matters that are important to Eritreans: the presence of armed groups in our land.
        Anyway, the bottom line is: we know what needs to be done. Try Eritreans are trying to find solutions to the problem. You are clearly using every opportunity of Eritrean pain for your myopic view that anchors on the notion that has never been Eritrea and there could not exist one unless it looks exactly like Ethiopia. And this is what causes the opposition be chronically vegetative. Because its voice is overtaken by few determined and vocal elements who want us to believe them that they are working in our interest. Unless the opposition disassociates from these elements, they will keep posing a liability factor. Well, the sheep are aware that there could be wolves among them in sheep’s clothing. Eritreans’ debates aimed at bringing real change are getting drowned by belligerent loud voices that attempt to marshal Ethiopia’s greatness at the expense of hurting the viability of Eritrean efforts to ensure the rebirth of our ideals. This month has shown us the danger posed when narrowly-definable issues and interests (like languages, regions, religions…Ethiopian factor….) take over the broad interest of achieving a state of politics where all citizens feel proud of. Because of these, Eritreans are treading carefully.

  • AMAN

    Thankyou Awates
    for this Documentary and historical narration.
    Democracy is really growing up as manifested
    by your commitment & service to freedom of speech
    to satisfy everyone.
    Thankyou Again,
    AMAN

  • Nitricc

    Hi All, here is more head-ache for you Tplfites. Dr Argegawi is saying it is good for the opposition that Molla left. i think he is speaking from experience.

    http://amharic.voanews.com/content/dr-aregawi-berehe-analyses-the-current-situation-of-tpdm-09-16-15/2967300.html

    • V.F.

      Nitrricc please break this down for us. Daniel Berhane wrote it on FB:

      Jawar Mohammed made an interesting hypothesis that TPDM’s return home might be part of a trend.

      What trend? He claimed:
      “In the last few years, particularly since Meles’ death, we have been witnessing re(unification) of Tigrean forces and Molla Asgedom’s decision to abandon opposition politics and rejoin the mothership is part of this trend”.

      To support his hypothesis he listed 8 points. Awkwardly, most, if not all, were incorrect.

      1) Bitew Belay did not return to TPLF.

      2) There is no reason to say Generals Tsadkan G/Tensai and General Abebe Teklehaymanot have become “active supporters of the regime”.

      In fact, what we know is that:
      * Tigrai region had been unsupportive to Tsadkan’s effort to establish Raya Beer.
      * Abebe was forced to retire from Addis Ababa University (just like Merera and Dagnachew)

      3) Seeye Abreha quit Andinet(UDJ party) probably because the party moved to the right and abandoned Medrek coalition. (Probably for same reason as Dr. Negasso Gidada).

      4) Gebreu Asrat did not reduce his opposition. In fact, he just published a book that some felt negative to the entire armed struglle. As one veteran described him, “after 14 years, Gebru is as angry as he was then”.

      5) I can’t say much about the diaspora Prof Tekola Hagos. Regarding Dawit Kebede, last I checked, Dawit abandoned the diaspora hardliners for the same reason Jawar clashed with them. (Listen here: Jawar Mohammmed explaining https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=StBVQHwyWsc&list=PLw3IP5eXUvgX5moO2Nku-xWWxTGQiDxlU&index=3 )

      7) Dr Aregawi Berhe is neither silent nor soft. Just a few months ago, he wrote this on HornAffairs http://hornaffairs.com/am/2015/03/12/aregawi-berhe-responds-general-tsadkan/ and also listen to his interview on VOA Amharic yesterday.

      8) Jawar Mohammed also claimed:
      “TPLF has adopted quite a clever strategy when it comes to dealing with Tigrean dissidents. Whenever there is fallout they avoid measures that could cause irreparable wound.”

      That is a tempting hypothesis. Nevertheless, what is his basis?

      8.1) Unlike what Jawar claimed, the family and relatives of Seeye were not treated kindly. In fact, it wentr too far that some described it as “targeting a clan”.

      8.2) Again, TPDM was not declared terrorist because TPLF didn’t officially recognize its existence. That’s all. No conspiracy.
      (Here is a news flash: TPLF doesn’t even wish to acknowledge Arena-Tigrai party as a valid regional opposition. You observe that when you ask officials for an official reply to Arena’s statements).
      ———-

      I can’t blame Jawar for speculating on the motives of TPDM and Mola Asgedom. With meager data, he did well. Though, he could have asked around.

      Now, the bases of Jawar’s hypothesis are shown inaccurate. I expect he will promptly revise it.

      • Eyob Medhane

        V F,

        As Daniel says, there is no merit. NONE WHAT SO EVER for what Jawar Mohammed had to say…Because everything he says about this can be demolished in a second with clear facts. But he doesn’t care. Not a bit. This is what he does. He lies, when he takes a break from talking about killing his Christian neighbors with machete….

  • Pass the salt

    It probably is a good idea to wind up Molla’s discussion. After all, it is Eritrea’s 9/11 memorial, in case anybody forgot. Here is a nice summary of the event and the actors
    http://www.freeourparents-eritrea.com/who-are-the-eritrean-g15-and-where-are-they-now/

  • Mahmud Saleh

    Salam Pappi
    His honor was busy building up the wardrobe of those two dark and scary creatures. They must look messengers of darkness, they are as big, powerful, menacing, and cunning as you imagine each of them could be. Therefore, you have the chatters on this forum as to which side is more able in effecting maximum damage. But then there is the pencil in between which seems to be saying, “Wait a minute! I’m the judge.”

  • Saleh Johar

    Hi Pappillon,
    Let me differ with you a bit here 🙂
    Molla and anyone allied to Isaias was doing the dictator’s bidding; therefore, he aided and abetted in the crime against Eritreans. When he decided to stop his role as an ally of Isaias (that is the only role that matters to me), he didn’t do it because he realized he was hurting Eritreans, he did it for his own reason. There is no reason why Eritreans should be be grateful to him–he was a collaborator with Isaias and he stopped being one. I think it ends there. Good riddance and I wish the remaining groups will follow suit, but I am not thanking them for stopping being criminals when they do… Do I make sense or you will severely shred my views? 🙂

    • Papillon

      Dear Sir!

      I sense a bit of cynicism on your part where you would equally extend a gratitude when say a hot shot cabinet minister abandons the regime. I trust your relentless struggle is to chip away the edifice of the regime whether the regime is sustained by foreign forces or homegrown. It doesn’t hurt to give people the benefit of the doubt where I believe your credo is reconcile as opposed to holding grudges.

      • Saleh Johar

        No Papillon,
        There is no grudges, but I would not lionize even if Yemane Monkey abandoned Isaias. Good for Ethiopia, they have one less headache to worry about, but to me, it’s good riddance. Even people who abandon Isaias are welcome, but good riddance from the power circle.

      • V.F.

        Papillon, people are taking this as good news or bad news for a variety of different reasons. To me, aside the fact that they were being fed from the meager resources Eritrea had, they were more or less nonexistent in the eyes of the average Eritrean back home.

        I celebrate this because it chips away from IA and PFDJ and helps even more people realize that the regime is a carcass as HTG describes it.

        The gain for Eritrean people is for when the inevitable all out civil war comes. It’s probably one less armed group to worry about but perhaps hardly depending on how much they left behind.

        Good riddance is indeed a cynical description as I understand that they had minimal everyday interaction with the average Eritrean. But it’s one less tool out of the nearly empty toolbox for IA.

    • Sophia

      The TPDM were killers who served isayas like mercenaries of gadafi. The end is coming for eplf.
      In 1980s, tplf saved isayas from losing to deerg. And in 1993, meles helped us gain independence because isayas was too stupid to manage the UN referendum process. And in 2000, meles saved isayass from being killed by the xxxxxxx like siye abraha. This time TPLF will not save EPLF again because meles is no more. RIP to isayass

    • Kim Hanna

      Selam Saleh Johar,
      .
      The statement you made above is exactly what I expected from the opposition at Awate Forum. In my opinion it is a natural and normal reaction just from the available information. What was an abnormal reaction was what I got for several days from some of the opposition participants, each time I peeked.
      .
      I can perfectly understand it, if that sentiment came from PFDJites and supporters of President I.A .
      .
      In any case welcome back, were you by any chance around The Sudan in your absence?
      .
      K.H

      • Nitricc

        KH i think you are becoming a seasoned politician with out even you know it. can you explain it in a lay man language what you are saying?

        • Kim Hanna

          Selam Nitricc,
          .
          As a lay man, I thought I said it straight. The last sentence, however, is an attempt at a little humor about how I waited for a scoop of Awate’s first field reporting, around Ethiopia, Eritrea and The Sudan border. (I said attempt)
          .
          The main statement is Mr. Johar said good riddance to Molla and co., which is or should be a normal opposition view point.
          .
          IA supporters say TPDM is largely in tact, Ethiopia has failed again in its espionage.
          .
          I hope that clarifies it. If not we will ask Fanti to translate it into Gojjamigna. Fair?
          .
          K.H

      • Saleh Johar

        Dear Kim,

        I just want to be sure: are you favoring my comment or the opposite? Please explain.

        • Kim Hanna

          Saleh Johar,
          .
          Yes, I am in favor of your comment.
          .
          I am in favor of Molla going back home because a potential threat to Ethiopia is neutralized. You are in favor of it as you described it.
          .
          Eritrean Gov. supporters have a different and opposite feeling about it.
          That was what I am trying to say. Sorry about that, Nitricc thought I was talking like a politician.
          .
          K.H

    • Hope

      That is CORRECT Your Excellency!
      DEMHIT was the GUARD of the DEVIL and as such,it was more than a Mercenary and more than a LIABILITY to Eritrea and ERITREANS !
      Pappilion,Hayat and Haile should view the Molla Saga from that aspect !
      Was not he and his Mercenary Clique Rapists and Abusers of ERITREANS?
      But the Halies,the hayats ,the Pappis are telling us otherwise’ albeit knowingly and intentionally !
      Worst,the EDF was labelled as a Mercenary crashed by Molla’s and IA’s Rapist Mercernary Army!
      And U tell me then why I am upset ‘

  • Ahadu
  • Saleh Johar

    Thanks Papillon,

  • Papillon

    Selam Awatewian,

    In the true sense of valor and heroism Dejen takes all the trophies but of course the wider political implication of high caliber gave Molla greater coverage and interest from both countries. Probably a movie is in the offing titled “Molla”. Whether he is a traitor, hero or a pawn is subjective to say the least.

    • Nitricc

      Hey Pappi. Let’s not give something is not there. Molla got the gig not becouse he is qualified or educated but becouse he was uneducated and literate. That is what PIA’s philosophy is. He doesn’t trust Persons with some education. He always picks the literate once becouse he knows they will follow his orders with out buts and ifs. This time back fired. Your boy Molla can not take it To be under a Gurage Doctor In his beloved TPDM.
      The truth!

  • Yonus

    Please LT, go to school first and try to write clear English, before claiming we are more educate than Ethiopians or Tegaru. It shows how little brain you have.

  • Hayat Adem

    Dear Awate,
    Of course, this is great. But this week’s events point more to a one way espionage without resprocity. If one of the armed Eritrean oppositions stationed in Ethiopia returned to Eritrea, I really doubt if it would make such headlines as the case of Molla. The reason is because we visualize such an event as having a huge impact in Eritrea and not as much in Ethiopia.The underassumption for this maybe the asymmetric level of fragility associated with each country.
    Hayat

    • Saleh Johar

      Selam Hayat,
      Don’t you think one-way or two-way, the end result is the same? A volley ball game stays the same regardless of who is doing most of the serving, at least until a winner is declared. If it is a good game, at least the spectators will be entertained. But the espionage driven politics have become boring and costly. They have become longer than a game of cricket that goes for days.

      • Nitricc

        Hey SJ; the drama that was staged; meaning, TPLF spies communicating with Molla over a year; well they were mimicking the CIA
        http://www.globalresearch.ca/the-cia-and-the-media-50-facts-the-world-needs-to-know/5471956#

      • Hayat Adem

        Selamat SGJ,
        I agree with your main idea that the whole thing is sort of MerryGoRound. But it seems you have never played vollyball. Whoever scored a point does the serving. That means, as long as you keep on scoring, you keep on serving. So more serve means more points.

        • Saleh Johar

          Haha, Hayat,
          True, maybe I played once when I was a child, by the order of the teacher, not voluntarily. But I was not talking about winning or loosing, I was talking about the spectators who would find it boring…. at any rate, it is not that important. Cheers.

      • Yoty Topy

        Hi SGJ,

        If a team served the most and the game came to an end , wouldn’t that make it a winner? You don’t score a point on your opponents serve but you can covert your serve to a point. I can see how that might be true in Tennis though.

        • Saleh Johar

          Yoty,
          I must withdraw from this. My attachment to sports is not better than my attachment to the saxophone.

          • Yoty Topy

            Hi SGJ,
            I didn’t see Hayat’s response 🙁 so I was being yejib chikul…

            Sports is for the feeble. The great ones such as yourself build their own greatness. No need to bask on others’ athletic prowess:)

          • Ted

            Hi, SJ, we don’t need more enemy now, Sax militants are handful as it is.

          • Saleh Johar

            Ted,
            I sense you want to scare me from the sport militants? Okay, let me rephrase it. I love sports very much provided I don’t have to play or watch it if not under gunpoint. But will anyone get mad if I said I don’t like volley ball and… Cricket? For God’s sake, cricket! Why do I feel you are leading a militant sport squad Ted? 🙂

          • saay7

            Salutations y’all:

            Did someone mention sports? I would like to congratulate our Ethiopian brothers for coming 10th at the men’s half-marathon race in Copenhagen. Kenyans came 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th, 6th, 7th, 8th, 9th. I don’t think I have ever seen anything like it.

            I would also like to congratulate Ethiopians for coming 5th, 6th and 7th at the men’s half-marathon race in Brazerville today. Eritreans came 1st*, 3rd and 4th.

            Before Eyob comes with his in-your-face posts, Ethiopians dominated in the women’s half-marathon coming 1st, 2nd and 3rd.

            AND Football season is here, giving one more chance for Nitricc to assemble his toothless fantasy team that will come dead last:)

            saay

            * The reason Rodab won’t return back to awate.com is because he was sure Zeresenai Tadesse is aging and his best days are behind him, etc, etc. Well, guess who came first, baby?

          • Ted

            Hi Saay, Hurry up before Eyob jumps on you. Eritrea did 10th not Ethiopia-:)

          • saay7

            Thanks, Ted. You ruined a perfectly rehearsed punchline. Because what Eyob will do is find 3 races I didn’t even know we’re happening THEN I was going to say, my mistake, actually Ethiopia didn’t make it to the Top 10: it turns out it was dominated by Kenya and Eritrea. 🙂

            saay

          • Ted

            Saay, Darn it, now you said it, it would been funny.

          • saay7

            Oh, well, Ted. And my Ms Teen USA is much much much more entertaining that your Ms America

            http://youtu.be/lj3iNxZ8Dww

            Saay

          • Eyob Medhane

            Ok Sal,

            Here is a little advice from a brother south of Mereb to you a brother north Mereb.

            Don’t start a fight that you know you can not finish…

            Yes Ethiopia dominated in women and MEN..

            This is men 5000
            https://mobile.twitter.com/athleticsafrica/media/grid?idx=0&tid=644586047775621121

            Men 10000
            https://mobile.twitter.com/athleticsafrica/media/grid?idx=0&tid=644586047775621121

            Men 1500

            http://mobile.twitter.com/athleticsafrica/media/status/239843105371725825

            And please don’t forget to look, who is tenth on men 5000..

            More to come, if you ask for it…

            Congratulations to the ultimate “Amele Shega” Zeresenai Tadese is of course in order…

          • saay7

            Selamat Eyob:

            So you did really well in the mid-distance runs…I think marathoners run that long for warm-up and cool-down.

            Boom.

            The Eri cyclists are coming to Virginia. Five, countem, 5. How many are coming from South of the Mighty Mereb?:)

            saay

          • Eyob Medhane

            Sal,

            Well,…if you want to challenge our marathon prowess, you got another thing coming…what you guys do with wheels (cycling) we can do it with our feet.. 🙂 And more over, we got 2015 African champion Tsigabu Grmay to contend you with.. 🙂

            And of of course, when it comes to All African Games, I have my potent weapon, which I showed you before…I will do it again… Your pouting athletes at the opening…

            I urge every awatista to watch this starting 38:00 minute to about 42:00 minute of this video… Please, I urge… 🙂

            https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=NpvF9E_afY0

          • saay7

            Eyobai:

            The marathon medals, you have to do it either (a) per capita or (b) number of years the country has been in existence in organic or artificial form:)

            I did watch the video from 38:00 to 42:00. What I learned

            1. Egypt (Arab Republic) is the winningest country
            2. Ethiopia has won “not too many”, according to the announcer
            3. Eritreans strode the way they do in Asmara: relaxed but calm: no reason to say geyetsyets:)

            saay

          • Eyob Medhane

            Sal,

            Wrong again!!!

            *Ethiopia has not won too many medals, as prestigious in athletics as it is…but it did win enough.. Don’t make me pull the fifty year record of All African game..in fact, I will do it…

            https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/All_African_Games

            * That was no strolling…that was pouting..They looked like they were being ushered to court.. 🙂

            * Did you listen to the song Tayitu Emebetitu..ye Adowa Arbegna, a song that the athletes were led to the stadium with? Where was Adeye Adi Jeganu?…No where to be heared 🙂

          • saay7

            Eyob:

            Hoisted by your own petard.. Did you see the medal count in the link u provided? Egypt has ten times (10x) Ethiopia’s medals. And they are Arabs for Gods sake. So are Algerians…Tunisians. All ahead of you. Yasaznal:)

            They didn’t play Adeye Adi Jeganu because we had logistics issues. That CD was in our luggages eith Zimbabwe Airlines and you know that airline.

            You have a really unique definition of pouting. There was an athlete waiving to the crowd; that’s not pouting. They had the Habesha stroll…we are not going to do the jungle dance man. Not before we win:)

            saay

          • Eyob Medhane

            Sal,

            Well that was because camel riding was added in the competition in the early days of the start of the completion that Arabs did well.. 🙂

            Instead of Zimbabwe Airlines, you guys should have used the World class Ethiopian Airlines…all your bikes and CDs would have gotten there on time.. 🙂

          • saay7

            Again, Eyob?

            I had already edumacated Abi on this and now you: after Somalia, no African country has more camels than….Ethiopia. So don’t diss your own countrymen. You know, the ones that aren’t self-identified “Habesha.” Tsk tsk tsk.

            And they have camel races in….San Bernandino, CA. And wild pimp-my-SUV fast and furious car races in….Saudi Arabia.

            saay

          • Eyob Medhane

            Sal,

            Oooooh..which reminds me..Let me edumacate you about Ethiopian camels..

            Do you wanna know what we use our camels for…

            Here…. Read up..

            http://www.2merkato.com/news/alerts/3881-camel-milk-export-rewards-ethiopia-with-300-thousand-usd

            http://www.2merkato.com/news/alerts/3896-ethiopia-hurmud-camel-milk-company-to-be-constructed-in-jigjiga

            Not for sporting event…

            So…it is what it is sir… We win..without camels… 🙂

          • saay7

            Hey Eyob:

            Whoa! I didn’t know that. If it’s that important to your economy, have you considered putting it on your seal, currency, passport? 🙂

            saay

          • Eyob Medhane

            Sal,

            Hell no..that animal is so ugly to be put on seal, currency or passport. We have a lion. A black mane lion that is unique to Ethiopia on our currency, however. ‘Cause that’s how we roll.. 🙂

          • saay7

            Eyobai:

            Yeah, da black maned lion, Haile Selasses gift to the world. A lion THAT every conservationist is telling you will go extinct soon but you are ignoring the Ferenj warning you. THAT lion? And THATs how you roll:)

            Some scientist conducted an experiment to test the hypothesis that the black mane is a sign of health and virility and is it true that once a lioness goes black mane she never goes back?:). And guess what?

            How did we end up here? Oh. Hope the readers enjoyed the joust. Happy Friday!

            saay

          • Eyob Medhane

            Happy Friday to you, too Sal..

            Sorry, I have to leave you with this..

            Only thirty seconds… 🙂

            https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=zoDjnDh_Bkc

          • አዲስ

            Hi Saay,

            They do look like “yakorefu” 🙂

            It’s All Africans Game and we’re not that successful in other sports other than mid and long distance running. That’s why Egypt got more medals. But have you seen our new Athlet(new atleast for me) ? She represent us in high jump. I am wishing for more participants from all corners of Ethiopia to get a chance to show their talents.

            https://twitter.com/total_433/status/643493441004007424

          • Ted

            SJ, I agree there are some not qualified to be named sport. Volley ball ? women beach Valley ball gets a pass. Cricket, i am with you. Some times it helps to watch sport just to be in the loop.

            https://www.youtube.com/watch?t=18&v=4ViA04tw0I0

  • asgedom

    Btw he was one of the trusted men of Alula aba nega. he participated in many of the battles alongside alula..including the battle of dogali, kufite and adwa. what makes his participation during the battle of adwa spectacular was cause he was a double agent sent by Alula to the italian camp to spy and disinform the italians…

  • asgedom

    Bashayi awalom is from Enticho,adwa. there is a statue of him at his gravehard in one of the churches in Enticho…You can go check it and read his biography underneath. he was born was born, raised and buried at his homeland nothing to do with seraya. As to Bilatta Geberezabher Gilay, i dont think any tigrean even know his name let alone to associate him with tigray..

  • Ali

    According to the latest article, it was reportdely that they will aim to overthrow the despotic tyrannical regime (Isayas and his Shabia bandits). This coincide with this news.

    So, if he is really in Sudan and have been backstabbed by Isayas and still active with men and groups then hopefully, he can find ways to unify the Eritreans in Eastern Sudan, in Djibouti, Ethiopia and within the territories without been detected and form a revolutionary Front and begin overthrowing the Shabia bandits starting from the high ranking army position which will easily collapse because they all hate the regime. I and many Eritreans know deserted relatives and have witnessed there was never an ‘army’ to begin with so it shouldn’t be that hard.

  • Delayi Selam

    The only reason Eritrea is right now is because of a clique with bunch of supporters like L.T (Hlna Albo – Hamokishti Tsnku).

  • Delayi Selam

    Awate: Please remove this L.T account. I don’t want to waste a second reading nonsense and narrow-minded ‘aletawi’. The only reason Eritrea is right now is because of a clique with bunch of supporters like L.T.

    • Amde

      Hello Delayi Selam

      One of the good things to come out of the Molla Mystery is that L.T has decided to come out of seclusion and grace us with his inscrutable writings. You wouldn’t deny us this pleasure would you?

      Amde

  • Dear All,
    How would one interpret the behavior of the Sudanese government? It gives the impression that it had known in advance what was going to happen; and the way it handled the whole situation looked organized (accepting, defending and caring for the rebels and quickly transporting them to the Ethio-Sudanese border with no fuss at all). Is this the normal way in such a situation? Does it have anything to do with the latest Ethio-Sudanese military agreement to jointly operate along the border? Is DIA being isolated, and may even be sandwiched between the two governments?

    • haileTG

      Hi Horizon,

      An interesting angle indeed. The only other explanation that I would think would be that in the pecking order of influences, Ethiopia is a notch higher and its orders are implemented first. For example, the PFDJ does coerce the Sudan to kidnap opposition members but when the wife of the Forto coup leader came to Sudan, the Ethiopian Embassy there whisked her off to Addis unopposed, and then to a third country in Europe, in short order. Similar with everything else. When both Ethiopian and Eritrean regime interest is directly at stake Sudan appears to weigh the Ethiopian pressure more than the PFDJ. In such case, any request from PFDJ must have been turned down to accommodate the needs of the more important party. Just my 2-cents.

      • V.F.

        Your two cents are a million dollars worth of information Hailat. The one thing that Saay said that may have proven right is that, the Sudan Tribune reported that the TPDM army were stripped off of their firearms and escorted to Ethiopia. I saw pictures all over FB as well with all the Kalashnikovs laid down on the ground, looked like hundreds if not thousands. That may seem a small thing but the speedy and organized nature leads me to believe that Horizon might be on to something there. Not a single confirmed shot was fired within the boundaries of Sudan.

        • haileTG

          Thanks VF: but every claim and counter claim seem to contradict. i saw the following a couple of days ago:

          https://www.facebook.com/enbinmlkihgdef/videos/1633597160222177/?fref=nf

          which claims as some of the arms were handed over in Metema. Again, yesterday the VOA interviewee from Asmara said Molla was the only leadership rank but the link shows (refers to) two others. So, yes I agree the details are sketchy and might be best to look at the overall picture:)

  • cool

    Hi to all,
    The story of mola Asgedom escape from Eritrea is very complicated . no one knows for sure as to how this incident unfolded
    But the narrative that mola has planned the escape together with Ethiopian security forces for solang is a myth ,because if so, why have mola escaped to sudan first and to ethiopia subsequently ?Even if he knows the danger of being caught and delivered back to eritrea by sudanis/eritrean security forces ,as the case of the daughter of ex -information minister of eritrea .why not directly to ethiopia?where they could come up with very simple reason of attacking the “enemy”ethiopia in humora or some where else in ethiopian border?why were ony few hundreds of soldiers out of at least 20tausand soldiers with mola during the action?if the complete disintegration of TPDM was planned long before?
    My guess is that mola was furious of being a deputy of someone from amhara ethnic group with no field experience and decided promptly to flee,but as he arrived in sudan he might have got some lucratve offers from weyane undercover agents.
    But what kind of personalty?cheap without integrity,he has changed his postion now for a third time .Even weyanes will put him in a garbage pail after having succeded some media circus.
    The person Mola is now already dead while he is alive!Einsteins “NOT TO BE “applies here very well.The question is how this impacts the rest of the ethiopian opposition movements.

  • sara

    Dear all
    this summer while on a visit/tour , if i remember it well i read something like this on a mural wall..
    ” when you are a bear, dog or a donkey of a very little heart or brain , and you think of things , you find sometimes that a thing which seemed very thingish inside you is quite different when it gets out into the open and has other people looking at it”
    isn’t this interesting , in-view of what is coming out into the open as commentaries.
    may god/allah -protect eritrea

  • haileTG

    Dear Awatista,

    I know it isn’t easy to find firm information on activities involving clandestine entities and their fluid situations. So, on the lighter side, the editorial graphic is interesting. IA//PfDJ love to be equated with something that is normal and functioning. The identical photo above gives the subliminal message that both regimes are on the same footing, not that one is alive and the other a carcass. At this time where phones are Answered by TPDM reps in Asmara and PFDJ is lost in action, AT should have put a big flashlight on the PFDJ side of the photo. Besides, Asmara is pitch dark and going in dark glass isn’t practical:-)

    • አዲስ

      Hi hTG,

      What does the pencil symbolizes? 🙂

      Thanks,
      Addis

      • haileTG

        Hi Addis,

        It isn’t easy to decipher what is encapsulated in AT’s editorial graphics. I admit that I like them and that is because they keep me guessing. Some are humorous, like the Camel balancing on a globe 🙂 some are paradoxical, like a white dove holding an AK-47 and and many other interesting once. There sure is a message to the pencil in the above graphic but we can have varying interpretation. In my case, I see it as meaning that everything being the same and identical about both regimes, only their narratives (pencil meaning writing) differ. Do you agree with that or you have a different reading?? Don’t worry, this is from the modern arts branch thus you can’t be wrong, what it means to you is what it means. Modern art has that versatility to it 🙂

        Regards

        • Mahmud Saleh

          Salam HTG
          I once begged Gadi to say something about the art that goes into accompanying these articles. I don’t know, but that part covers half message of the posting; at least, that’s how I enjoy Awate arts work. Why don’t you join me in asking the AT to dedicate one posting for the arts and graphics and the efforts that go behind them. The composing part could be understood, thanks to technology, but the idea part takes some people with deep appreciation of editorial art . Thanks AT.

          • haileTG

            Merhaba Mahmuday,

            I second your call too (remember, I have issued you a blank cheque, just put any demand, my name is signed under:) But I wonder if the AT will give away the power of holding the key to our imagination. Nothing wrong trying though:-)

          • Mahmud Saleh

            Ahlan HTG
            I understand. I’m a bit guarded too. Tigre people say ” jerbie sekey ikele’e” which translates roughly to ” trying something doesn’t forfeit your choice to run away (when danger strikes) .”

          • Saleh Johar

            Ahlan Mahmuday?

            Can you specify what’s that you want to know? I remember we talked about it but I don’t have a clear idea what we could do. Can you please list or write the script (bullet points) of what you would like us to do. If you help with that, we will oblige. You are so dear, even if you want the Northern star, just ask, we will get it for you 🙂

          • Mahmud Saleh

            Ahlan Saleh
            Wow…abusalah…Thanks very much.
            I will do my best when this afternoon.
            HTG: let’s make this possible. I will jot down some, you do so. Let’s swap some ideas.

        • አዲስ

          Hi hTG,

          I sometimes get curious about the graphics here too. AOsman’s take on it makes sense to me this time 🙂

          Thanks,
          Addis

      • AOsman
        • haileTG

          Hi AOsman

          does this mean it is the logo of the pencil editor? Why is it in the middle of the masked men? And what if it is James Bond type dual instrument☺

          • saay7

            Hey Haile TG:

            Obviously, you were not a fan of Mad Magazine:)

            http://img05.deviantart.net/af57/i/2006/054/0/4/spy_vs_spy_by_ragdollnamedgary.png

            saay

          • haileTG

            Hi saay,

            I thought the Camel balancing on the globe was the humorous a creative editorial graphic can get to, and now this one…very funny 🙂 I can’t wait for the next article (the graphic part that is:) Thx

          • AOsman

            Hi Haile TG,

            I was on the move when I posted the link. As far as I remember, all Pencil related articles from AT have that logo put somewhere in the image….so I thought just providing the link will resolve the query. Hey you game me more questions, at least Addis is satisfied 🙂

            Regards
            AOsman

  • Mirab

    It reminds me the tale of the brave Bashay Awalom in the battle of Aduwa when the fascist Italian general was shouting
    “…Awalom!!….Awalom!!”
    He replied “…Niskha twelo nihna anwalo…”

    The same is true with Isaias shouting “…Molla!!…Mola!!….”

    ” ….Isaias jilu mogn neh telala…”

  • T..T.

    Hi all,

    When two smarts play a game in which each tries to outmaneuver the other, the outcome always leads the two “back to square one.” The game is known in Kebessa as “Kilite Gorahat Hamookhshi Sinqom,” which can be translated as, “When two conniving persons compete with each other in strategies that weaken the strength of the other, both feed on ashes.”

    Even though each is ready to even use the devil to connive at weakening the other, the game of outmaneuvering, which both are exerting appears to follow certain rules that minimize any possible major damages lest not ignite a second unintended/unnecessary border war.

    Suppose the Egyptian Central Intelligence (Al-Mukhabarat Al-Amma) brought to the attention of Isayas that it sniffed and sensed unexplained connection between Demhit and the Ethiopian govt. To thwart the posed danger, Isayas decided to immediately push Demhit across the Eritrean/Ethiopian border, kill Molla Asgedom as well as other top leaders while crossing the border and claim were killed after they ignored the warning shots fired by their security forces as they attempted to surrender to the Ethiopian side.

    And suppose, the Ethiopian side intercepted Isayas’s order and re-directed Molla Asgedom and his group to divert to the Sudanese border in an effort to outmaneuver Isayas, the outcome can be said to have certainly contradicted the concept of “Kilite Gorahat” to become yet another blow to the Eritrean despot, who can only excel in deception and betrayals against his own people.

    • Hayat Adem

      Hi TT,
      I think I know the story behind the KilteGiraHat expression.
      Once upon a time, there were KilteGoraHat jointly planning a shared trip. Being both GoraHat, each was atrategizing to exploit the other. GoraH A thought if he filled his bag with Hamukhshti instead of HeriCH, he would be excused for a mistake someone at home committed preparing the logistics, and will then be allowed to share what the other had. GoraH B, calculated exactly the same strategy. Time for lunch, both opened their bags. Both ended up with Hamukshti. Laugh it out, kilete goraHat Hamukhshit sinQom.

      • T..T.

        Thank you Hayat for explaining the rational-knowledge behind the concept of “KilteGoraHat.“ But since we have a winner here, we can say that the loser has unmasked his false-self revealing that he is just a rat, who used to mislead his people into thinking that he is a lion.

        • Goytom

          I thought he mislead us into thinking that he is a tiger, i.e. “nakfa nebri”.

  • sabri

    Dear all,

    The much awaited piece of Awate on Mola Asgedom is arrived lastly. It is more a background information rather than an indeoth analysis. Questions like what is the impact of Mola incidence to the future relationship between the two countries? What does this mean to the newly formed Ethiopian n opposition group in Asmara? What is the scenario of TPDm after this? I was expecting these and similar kind of questions is addressed to some extent. Anyway as a background information it is good.

    • saay7

      Selamat Sabri:

      I have great respect for your sober analytical skills and I was hoping you would take a crack it.

      Before I give my reading, I would like to summarize The Pencil’s view: (a) frequently we hear of sensational events that are supposed to be game-changers; (b) they distract and suspend the activities of the Eritrean opposition (at least in social media) and meanwhile (c) Eritrea and Ethiopia are no closer to sustainable peace.

      My answers to your questions based on what I know with a HUGE CAVEAT that there is much I don’t know:

      1. The “impact of Mola incidence to the future relationship between the two countries.”

      There have been a series of episodes which show Ethiopians going to Eritrea because they didn’t think they had political space in their country to conduct meaningful political opposition and then learning that Eritrea (under the rule of Isaias Afwerki) is the wrong venue for them and leaving. Some of those who left have now embraced EPRDF, some have remained opposed to EPRDF but distanced themselves from Isaias Afwerki, some appear to have dropped off from politics altogether.

      If we assume that the “current relationship between the two countries” is extremely hostile, then I would assume that the “Mola incidence” makes it even more hostile and reconciliation would be even less likely. Nations with espionage and counter-espionage activities escalate them when a “Mola incidence” happens: Isaias will bring out the broom from the closet to see how far the spying extends; and my guess is Ethiopia will be on high alert for counter-espionage activities.

      2. What does this mean to the newly formed Ethiopian opposition group in Asmara?

      If you listened to Molla’s interview, it was hard for him to suppress a smile of “if only you knew?” Some of these groups are one-man and ten-man shows, according to Molla. He even pre-empted what the Isaias Afwerki will do: have Eritreans, prisoners, anybody don Ethopian opposition uniforms, flags, T-shirts. So, there doesn’t appear to be an Ethiopian opposition group in Asmara, if you believe Molla.

      3. What is the fate of TPDM after this?

      This is really THE question and you will arrive at vastly different conclusions depending on what you believe. If you believe, as I believed, that TPDM is a force with 10, 20, 30 thousand force (because SEMG told me so), then Molla and his 800 is an inconsequential number. If what Molla says is correct, that the bulk of TPDM has left with him and what is left is a useless rump, then TPDM is done.

      The thing here is that both governments AND the Somalia Eritrea Monitoring Group (SEMG) are incentivized to say there is still a large Ethiopian opposition presence in Eritrea:

      a. For EPRDF, that is important because it is the driver for its campaign to ensure that the sanctions remain. A lot of its diplomatic campaign is about convincing the world that the sanctions should stay in place.
      b. For PFDJ, that is important because it wants to present itself as a king-maker and relevant for peace/security in the Horn of Africa;
      c. For SEMG, it would be a huge embarrassment and a ding on its credibility to say, well, we got that one wildly wrong: we overestimated a number as little as 1,500 and called it at least 20,000.

      One final note: the PFDJ had always answered the Ethiopian opposition presence in Eritrea as something driven by Ethiopia’s “domestic affairs” and it had nothing to do with its existence. Now it can say, “it was a domestic affair: they came when they felt that they had no political space in Ethiopia; and they returned when they felt they did. Me: Pontius Pilate.” But it won’t: you know the Biblical expression: “pride comes before a fall.”

      saay

  • Abdu

    As described in the article, espionage in the horn of Africa, is the mainstay of government’s to undermine the security and stability of their neighbours, even if their diplomatic relations look cordial at least for observers. In the Mid 1990s, Eritrean dictator merged different factions of armed rebel groups of Sudan to form NDA, which included among others SPLA/M, Beja Congress, Rashida’s Freelions Movement and one of the Major trafitional Northern political party led by M. Osman Almirghany and splinter group of Umma Party called Hozbel umma lelISLAH led by AbdulAziz Khaled lel- Islah.
    Abdulaziz Khaled became field and operational Commander of thsupportede new Alliance supported not only by Eritrea and Eritrea but also funded by the West- which had concerns with the spread of the so called civilization project “Mashrue Alhadari” of the Alturabi and his National Islamic Movement of Sudan which was in power in Sudan.
    The point of my discussion is that major deffection in Etotrea’s dictator was started by General Abdulaziz khaled, who abandoned all the favours of Issaias like Mola Asgedom and returned to his country. Took many loyalists and more importantly the rebel documents, related to personnel, strategies, plans and so forth. He mentioned as his defection motive ” opposition from inside is more effective as the country was heading to the right direction and Eritrea’s unwanted meddling in the opposition’s affairs is clearely intended to disintegrate Sudan”.
    Eritrea’s dictator took big blow and NDA dramatically changed from posing armed threat to Sudan to paper lion for almost a decade. Issaias never forgave abdulazizkhaled for years and continued to abandon dealing with any opposition alliance which included Hizbel Umma lel Islah- led by AbdulAziz khaled. These among other factors paralized NDA and the Sudanese oppositions lost momentum and influence until the year 2002, when the United States decided to empower SPLA and other opposition groups to force the ruling clique in Khartoum to accept the frame work agreement which was signed in Mashakos and became prelude to Naivasha agreement which created the South Sudan as an independent entity.
    In nutshell, I think the Ethiopian armed opposition has declatedly started to loose it’s power and influence just like the NDA did before twenty years ago with the defection of Abdulaziz khaled from it’s ranks. Worth mentioning is that after.Abdulazizkhaled’s defection, dozens if not hundreds of Sudanese rebels had to go to Tehadesso and some perished in PFDJ gulags!

    I would like tohumbly remind Mr. Saleh, spearhead of Eritrea’s free speech, that Rashid’s Movement was called Free lions not black lions and If I am not mistaken governor Tahir Ela is headline National Islamic Front member with only superficial relations with Eritrea’s dictator. Occasional visits he did to Asmara was only as a requirement of his position as governor of Eritrea’s Adjuacscant state to implement Bilateral agreement to strengthen relation of borderline states /regions of both countries signed at the highest levels. He was also involved in factional differences within the ruling Islamic front wing led by Ali Osman and Nafe Ali Nafe and was apparently prompted albashir to move him to more controllable stable region away from heating border pans of Red sea or Kassala.

  • Abe z MineWale

    AZM
    Hi AZM
    Molla needs behaviour consultant
    He. Is a lousy actor
    I see nothing of TeGadalai character on him

    • Rule of Law

      What the heck does that mean? He lived like a king as a personal protector of the Eritrean dictator. Don’t you hear him in the interview in which he said that the dictator paid 26.000 Naqfa as a housing allowance alone but Mola finally succumbed to his conscience as an Ethiopian who must work for his country’s interest instead of serving the tyrant’s interest. He has been a TPLF tedagalay and he proved it quiet strongly by fighting his way out of Eritrea which is something no fighter has ever did, and he made it. does he urinate over Isayas or does he? One thing is certain: that Mola has caused chaos among Shaabia intelligence community. While Dr. Berhanu was lured to the slaughter house at his own free will, the Tigrean tiger has blasted his way in full force. wiping out who ever tried to stop him. That’s what you call a real TEGADALAY.